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Quilters Find a way to care

01017

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 16 Jan 2001 22:55:56 -0500

From: The Dougherty Family <dttesindy.net>

A customer sent me this question, and I thought some of you might be able

to help:

Message:

A friend inherited a lovely old quilt. It has some ink stains on it, and

we wondered if you knew of a safe product that would successfully remove

them without damaging the quilt fabric. I assume it is cotton. Thanks for

any info!

Thanks,

Teri Dougherty

The Back Door

Greenwood, IN

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 16 Jan 2001 23:07:00 EST

From: aol.com

Judy makes an excellent point by mentioning the Fashion Institute of Technology. A small college or specialty school (FIT, the Rhode Island School of Design, Mass College of Art, etc.) might be just the place for a specialized collection, especially if it's endowed. It would also be much easier for students and scholars to study the collection at a smaller school - less red tape, fewer study requests, and so on. It's like the difference between trying to get a look at, say, the print collection at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts and that at Smith College, my alma mater. Smith will actually loan out prints and drawings from its collection to residential students for the semester, and that includes things like second copies of Rembrandt etchings. There isn't a major museum in the world that would do that.

One thing I would NOT do: leave an important collection to a local historical society unless I left enough money for proper storage and conservation. One of the most heartbreaking things I've ever seen is a 1796 embroidered wool coverlet in the Williamsburg Historical Society in Williamsburg, Massachusetts. The coverlet is in very good condition, natural wool worked with indigo and madder dyed crewel in typical Tree of Life motifs. It was given to the society several years ago by a descendant of the maker, who included a complete provenance.

The problem is that the Williamsburg Historical Society doesn't have the money to take care of the coverlet. As of a couple of years ago it was displayed on a bed in a musty room with no air conditioning or humidifier, along with several moldering crazy quilts and a few Victorian costumes. There were no guards, no monitors, and no visible burglar alarms. I could have sat on it, touched it, dropped food or drink from the Fall Festival on it, or brought in any number of small children to bounce up and down on it. The nice ladies of the Historical Society were doing their best, but they barely had the money to keep their Greek Revival building from collapsing around them, let alone purchase a climate control system.

So...if you have an important piece (or two, or three), make sure that wherever you leave it has the money to care for it. Definitely talk to a good lawyer about setting up an unbreakable trust to care for the collection. And if you have a climate control system or display case, include that with the bequest. Future generations may thank you for your foresight....

Karen Evans

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2001 15:26:30 +1100

From: Lorraine Olsson <svenpnc.com.au>

I am also interested in this subject. My client has a deep blue and deep pink

"Amish style" quilt with blue ink stains.

Lorraine in Oz

The Dougherty Family wrote:

> A customer sent me this question, and I thought some of you might be able

> to help:

>

> Message:

> A friend inherited a lovely old quilt. It has some ink stains on it, and

> we wondered if you knew of a safe product that would successfully remove

> them without damaging the quilt fabric. I assume it is cotton. Thanks for

> any info!

>

> Thanks,

> Teri Dougherty

> The Back Door

> Greenwood, IN

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2001 08:20:56 -0500

From: "bonnie wilbur" <bonnie.wilburoracle.com>

 

Some of my old household help books suggest spraying hair spray on ink

before washing to dissolve it, but I don't know whether that works on old

stains, or only new ones.

Bonnie

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2001 09:26:51 -0500

From: Beth Donaldson <quiltsmuseum.msu.edu>

 

Don't forget the Michigan State University Museum. We have over 500 quilts,

are planning two major exhibits from July 29-December 30 (The Mary Schafer

Collection and Michigan Quilt Project: New Discoveries), hosted the

American Quilt Study Group in 1999, are the home of the Quilt Index (an

on-going project to place all state documentation projects on the

internet), have at least 7 quilt themed Traveling Exhibits (including To

Honor & Comfort: Native Quilting Traditions, currently opening in Arizona)

and soon to be the proud inspiration for a line of fabrics based on our

collection for RJR. We could write all day about our quilt activities and

collection but we have to go and sew on the reproduction quilts to be

featured in our fall 2001 book for C&T, Great Lakes, Great Quilts.

Great topic and Jane, give Kate Edgar a call about those feedsacks, she

works here too!

Beth Donaldson

Quilt Collections Assistant

Mary Worrall

Textile Collections

Michigan State University Museum

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2001 07:01:43 -0800

From: "Carol Berry" <cberryelite.net>

 

Two books which have information regarding WTCU quilts:

The American Quilt Story: The How-To and Heritage of a Craft

Tradition by Susan Jenkins and Linda Seward

Hearts and Hands: The Influences of Women & Quilts on American

Society by Pat Ferrero, Elaine Hedges and Julie Silber

Carol Berry

Merced, CA

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2001 08:13:07 -0800

From: "Julia D. Zgliniec" <rzglini1san.rr.com>

 

Dear QHL,

In the last issue of PieceWork, there was an article about Colorado

State University and it's recent acquisition of an important lace

collection. This university has a large collection of many different

kinds of textiles.

Let us remember our colleges and universities when we think of

donations. Many DO have wonderful collections and use them for teaching.

Regards,

Julia Zgliniec

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2001 14:21:36 -0500

From: "John Cawley" <cawleygoeaston.net>

 

I took a quick look at wills in Talbot Co. MD c. 1800. I saw, in this far

from exhaustive survey, fewer references to textiles than I expected, all

in women's wills. Between 1797 and 1814 I found references to 3 counterpanes

and 2 bedquilts. The following is NQR, but I loved it:

John Ruth of Bolingbroke, 1814

"Chas. N. Ruth (son) as he has not conducted himself in a proper manner

towards me nor my business, has cost me a deale of money to make something

of him and could not--to have one shilling. Mary (Daughter) as she has cost

me much money on acct. of her education, etc. (but a dutiful child) and

thinking her well provided for can't leave her more than one shilling."

Those Ruth kids just couldn't win!

Cinda on the Eastern Shore

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2001 16:02:17 -0500

From: Judy White <jawhiteinfi.net>

I have used alcohol to take ink out of a white cotton handkerchief, but

that was a 20th century hankie, not an 18th or 19th century one.

Judy White

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2001 19:40:43 -0600

From: Jocelyn <Jocelynmdelphi.com>

 

Jean,

You're probably right about the namesake for the block. However, as Barbara

said last night, you can't assume a date for the block based on the dates

for Clay's life. It could have originated during one of his presidential

campaigns... which would mean a 20 year span. Or it could have been designed

as a memorial to him, after his death. It makes the most sense to assume

that a historically named block would have been developed at the same time

as the historical event it's named for, but PROOF is often lacking.

Barbara's recent research into the Underground Railroad block (you can see

her pattern for a quilt using this block in the current issue of Keepsaking

Quilting catalog) failed to show any proof that this block was used prior to

1880- decades after the UGRR.

OTOH, we might all be wrong, and Clay might be the son of the Grandma who

had a choice about blocks, too. <G>

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2001 21:20:00 EST

From: Hazelmaccaol.com

 

Those who have UNCOVERINGS, 1985 from American Quilt study Group you will

find two interesting papers that were presented on the Civil War. "South

Carolina Quilts and the Civil War" by Laurel Horton and "Quilts for Union

Soldiers in the Civil War" by Virginia Gunn. This issue of Uncoverings is

out of print but you can no doubt get a copy through inter-library loan.

Hazel Carter

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2001 21:36:19 EST

From: KareQuiltaol.com

 

Just bought a copy of July 1942 Antiques Magazine with two very interesting

articles. One is titled "Four Zachary Taylor Kerchiefs" by Esther Lewittes.

The other is "Age of Heirloom Quilts" by Florence Peto. I would like to

quote some and then ask a couple of questions of this group.

Pg. 33 "As American printers did not use trade-marks, nor did early

manufacturers keep sample books, an earnest endeavor to identify printed

cottons with a specific domestic cotton-printing plant has produced extremely

meager results."

Question: Almost 60 years later with all the research that has been done in

our field in the last 20 years, how true are Peto's statements today about

trade-marks and the dearth of manufacturers sample books available for study?

Who has the greatest resource today of said sample books available for

research and how far back do they go? Which history book(s) in your opinion

contains the best current research on early American fabric

printing/manufacturing, quilt related or otherwise?

Quotation con't: "In Figure 1, picturing a group of swatches of domestic

calicoesâ€|Duplicates are to be found in a sample book (1863) which had been

kept by Borden Mills, Fall River, Rhode Island, and which is now the property

of Fruit of the Loom Company."

Question: Unfortunately, I do not yet have the Rhode Island State Search

book. Do they go into any detail about Borden Mills in Fall River, RI, in the

book? Thanks!

Karen Alexander

Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2001 21:58:43 EST

From: KareQuiltaol.com

To: jeanchambpsinet.com

CC: Hazelmaccaol.com, QHLcuenet.com, rafowleribm.net, bmunncomteck.com

Subject: QHF publicity

Message-ID: <47.63b7b4f.2797b5e3aol.com>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"

Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Dear Jean,

It was good to hear from you and to get some idea of what is being done for

Celebration 2001. Teresa sent me the Press Release list that she had

compiled from what you had given her, apparently, so I am fine in that area.

Thank you.

I am a little confused, however. With so many people apparently still

involved in our Publicity effort (yourself, Madonna, Teresa, and the Quilt

Show committee it looks like), it would sure be helpful if we had a specific

plan of action and a timetable we all followed for the various aspects of

Publicity. I don't want to duplicate whatever you all are doing there. That

is why, as a Board member working with Publicity, it is so important for me

to know what you all are doing, and when it is done. If I understand your

email correctly, you yourself have now contacted the Indiana newspapers about

Celebration 2001, so I don't have to worry about that part. Is that correct?

So I will just do the magazines? Is that correct?

It would be helpful to know exactly who was contacted and what they were

sent. Is the flyer that you included in your recent package (when you sent

me my misdirected Antiques magazine) the same information you sent to the

newspapers?

Has publicity about the Quilt Show gone out as well? If so, could I see a

copy of that as well?

I need to know how I can be most helpful to you all there in Marion without

duplicating what you are already doing. I would appreciate feedback from all

of you whom I have copied this email to about the points I have brought up.

Is my greatest contribution in simply writing Press Releases for you and then

letting Teresa mail them? I am willing to write about whatever you want

whenever you want, if you will just let me know. Is this how you think I can

be most helpful, writing but not actually doing the contacting?.

Jean, thank you again for sending that package on to me and for enclosing the

two items about QHF.

Karen Alexander

 

 

Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2001 22:39:55 EST

From: KareQuiltaol.com

Dear QHL members,

Someone just warned me that I inadvertently sent an email meant for QHF to

QHL instead. My apologies to everyone involved. The two addresses are right

next to each other in my address book!

Karen Alexander

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2001 22:26:44 -0500

From: Nancy Morgen <nancysquiltmindspring.com>

At 07:40 PM 01/17/01 -0600, Jocelyn wrote:

>Jean,

>You're probably right about the namesake for the block. However, as Barbara

>said last night, you can't assume a date for the block based on the dates

>for Clay's life. It could have originated during one of his presidential

>campaigns... which would mean a 20 year span. Or it could have been designed

>as a memorial to him, after his death. It makes the most sense to assume

>that a historically named block would have been developed at the same time

>as the historical event it's named for, but PROOF is often lacking.

>Barbara's recent research into the Underground Railroad block (you can see

>her pattern for a quilt using this block in the current issue of Keepsaking

>Quilting catalog) failed to show any proof that this block was used prior to

>1880- decades after the UGRR.

>

>OTOH, we might all be wrong, and Clay might be the son of the Grandma who

>had a choice about blocks, too. <G>

Another possibility that I understand happened with some degree of

frequency is that a familiar block got a new name in honor of Clay. Block

names often varied regionally and over time.

Nancy Morgen

CEO of the DUH Factory

nancysquiltmindspring.com

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Jan 2001 10:22:57 -0500

From: Vivien Lee Sayre <vsayrenesa.com>

Karen and All,

I believe Shelburne has had some difficulty lately and has been selling off

part of their collection. Just FYI.

Vivien in MA

 

At 08:32 PM 1/16/01 EST, you wrote:

>Another museum with a superb collection of quilts *and* the money to take

care of them is the Shelburne Museum up in Vermont. It was endowed by a

Vanderbilt and has the sense to keep the quilts in a properly lit, climate

controlled building (and rotate the collection on a regular basis). I don't

know if they're still acquiring quilts or accepting legacies, but they sure

do a nice job with what they have.

>

>More museums with quilts and expertise: Old Sturbridge Village in

Massachusetts, Winterthur in Delaware, the Abby Aldrich Folk Art Collection

(either New York or Washington), the Cooper Hewitt Museum in New York City,

and the Wadsworth Atheneum in Connecticut. There's also a Museum of Women

in the Arts in Washington - they're fairly new and would probably love a

well documented collection.

>

>Karen Evans

>

>

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Jan 01 10:49:52 -0600

From: woodford <haqgalenalink.net>

Zout gets it out! Don't know what kind of stains you might have. There

are all sorts of inks---"permanent" and otherwise. But I recently used

Zout on the ink markings (probably an ordinary ballpoint) on three

corners of a 1910-20 cotton quilt, and with 2 applications they came out

almost completely. But then, how do you get the Zout out if you are not

going to wash the whole quilt (which, in my case, I did after

pretreating)?

Barbara Woodford

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Jan 2001 12:31:56 -0500

From: Newbie Richardson <pastcraftserols.com>

 

What to do with your treasured collection...I think that I spend more

time councelling clients on that issue than I do either doing

conservation or appraisals!

If you are fortunate enough to find a museum/university which has a

"hole" in their collection, then by all means donate. However, I have

come to the conclusion that concerned collectors should seriously

consider the idea of selling their collections to other - younger-

affictionados. It is generally true that those who pay for something

tend to care for it and show it off. I have found that my clients who

have "placed" their treasured items with collectors are pleased. They

get some money and the knowledge that the history that the items

represent will be perpetuated by another generation. Isn't that the

ultimate mission of any museum?

Finding a buyer should not be too hard. Ask discretely among your

guilds, your favorite dealer may have a new client. You probably have

run into potential "heirs" at ASQG, or QRS meetings, etc.

Some items are best left with individuals, not institutions.

IMHO

Newbie Richardson

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Jan 2001 12:50:47 -0500

From: Newbie Richardson <pastcraftserols.com>

Cinda,

I spent the past few days going over the results of just a search with

scholars in Williamsburg at the "Textiles in the Home" seminar.

They pointed out several terms to watch for. First of all, there is a

specialized vocabulary - you have to read between the lines, so to

speak. A 'bed', and 'bedding' always refer to the textiles, never the

furniture. Also look for 'testors', 'valences', 'curtains','rugs' (as

in bed rugs not floor coverings), upholstery, ect.Beds were refered to

as 'bed stead'.

Many people had no textiles to leave - they were the single most

expensive item in a household (before 1820) and some families of

middling means simply did'nt have much.

In reviewing the wills at Old Sturbridge Village and other historic

sites in southern New England, Lynne Bassette noted that the value of

quilts declines in direct corrolation to the availability of fabric - c.

1825/30. The textiles were no longer "valuable". The labor to create

these items never was valued. Things haven't changed much, the labor of

needlework is still grossly undervalued today!

A good person for you to talk to is Kim Ivey, asst. curator of

textiles for colonial williamsburg. She is VERY nice and accessible. I

am sure that she could give you some valuable info - besides, I know

that she would love to know about Talbot County! She just finished

researching and putting up: "Curtains, Cases, and Covers: Textiles for

the American Home 1700 - 1845" It will be up until 2002.

Newbie Richardson

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Jan 2001 18:33:36 -0000

From: "Sally Ward" <Sally.D.Wardbtinternet.com>

 

>. A 'bed', and 'bedding' always refer to the textiles, never the

> furniture.

In William Shakespeare's will the only thing he left his wife Ann Hathaway

was his 'second best bed'. This is often misinterpreted firstly as being

the actual bed, not the covers, and secondly as being a rather derogatory

bequest. However, it makes more sense to assume that as he was leaving

her the bedcovers which would have been most used they presumably had happy

memories - rather than the 'best' bedding which was likely to have received

little exercise <G>

Saly Ward, UK

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Jan 2001 14:06:38 -0500

From: "John Cawley" <cawleygoeaston.net>

This probably falls into the category of "Get a life!" but can somebody

explain to me why the 2000 issue of Uncoverings measures 6-1/8"x9-1/4" when

its predecessors all measure 5-1/2"x8-1/2." This means that the most

recent volume doesn't fit on the shelf where its sisters live--a minor

problem, but annoying none the less.

Cinda on the Eastern Shore who really does have more important things to

think about but was reminded when I went to look for 1985 to read the

articles about Civil War quilts that Hazel Carter reccommended

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Jan 2001 18:13:36 -0600

From: Laura Hobby Syler <texas_quilt.coairmail.net>

Many...Many years ago, (circa 1983 or so) when I had 17 women working for my

hand quilting service..... one of my best quilters in Missouri needed to get

one of my personal quilt tops marked, but also had to cook supper at church

that day. Her DIL volunteered, and never actually having seen her MIL mark a

quilt decided that a blue ball point pen would be the best to mark on the

muslin.....that way MIL could see lines with no problem. Mary quilted it

beautifully, but never said a word. When I got the quilt back with all the

little feathered plumes marked in blue ballpoint I nearly died. Thank goodness

it was one of mine and not a clients! I used 3 cans of hairspray and 2 bottles

of alcohol, and lots of white thick cotton towels. Don't know what I would have

done if it had been cotton batting. At least with the Fairfield poly batting

the ink wicked through to the back and the towel.

Spray & blot, spray & blot....and not all of the ink came out...but did

eventually wash out with time.

Please note that black bic ball point is almost always perminant, even though

it doesn't say so. This is what Mary Ellen Hopkins uses to mark anything,

especially if it is to be cut on ie: PPT's, since you cut on the line you draw.

Laura

bonnie wilbur wrote:

> Some of my old household help books suggest spraying hair spray on ink

>

Many...Many years ago, (circa 1983 or so)&nbsp; when I had 17 women working

for my hand quilting service..... one of my best quilters in Missouri needed

to get one of my personal quilt&nbsp; tops marked, but also had to cook

supper at church that day. Her DIL volunteered, and never actually having

<i>seen</i> her MIL mark a quilt decided that a blue ball point pen would

be the best to mark on the muslin.....that way MIL could see lines with

no problem. Mary quilted it beautifully, but never said a word. When I

got the quilt back with all the little feathered plumes marked in blue

ballpoint I nearly died.&nbsp; Thank goodness it was one of mine and not

a clients! I used 3 cans of hairspray and 2 bottles of alcohol, and lots

of white thick cotton towels. Don't know what I would have done if it had

been cotton batting. At least with the Fairfield poly batting the ink wicked

through to the back and the towel.

<br>Spray &amp;&nbsp; blot, spray &amp; blot....and not all of the ink

came out...but did eventually wash out with time.

<br>Please note that black bic ball point is almost always perminant, even

though it doesn't say so. This is what Mary Ellen Hopkins uses to mark

anything, especially if it is to be cut on ie: PPT's, since you cut on