quilthistorylogo.gif (6848 bytes)

 

Home Page

 

Archives  
Appraisers  
Articles  
Bibliography  
Books  
Cleaning  
Conservation  
Dating  
Gallery  
Join QHL  
Member Links  
Frappr  
Museums  
Quilt Restoration  

Study Groups

 
Subscribe  

Teachers

 

Search

 
   

Comments

 

 

Quilters Find a way to care

 

Date: Wed, 28 Feb 2001 21:07:18 -0600

From: Gail Ingram <GIngram@tcainternet.com

 

Re Susan Wildemuth's request for contact information for Helen Ericson of

Mrs. Danner's Quilts:

Mrs. Erickson is holding forth brilliantly in Emporia, KS. Her address is

P.O. Box 650, Emporia, KS 66801. In fact, she is doing workshops on

sunbonnet children, Ks. stars this month in Kentucky, maybe Paducah.

 

When I began to make quilts in the sixties, I discovered Scioto Danner, who

generously helped me locate cotton fabrics (She was a Peter Pan fan) and

encouraged my desire to make quilts, when quilting was not in vogue. Her

little books became Bibles for me in my isolation. Later, Mrs. Ericson

proved similarly generous.

I had not heard from her in over a decade when, my husband and I decided to

make an end-of-summer trip to the Midwest to look at quilts and history. We

had only 8 days and no time to waste. I telephoned Ms. Erickson, who not

only invited me to Emporia to see her collections and the Lyons County

Museum collection, but also located wonderful exhibits then up in Ks and

Nebraska­­from the Carrie Hall blocks to the James Collection, it was a

visual extravaganza, thanks to her.

I've often wondered if Mrs. Danner impacted others outside her region as she

did me. It would be interesting to hear from others and to understand her

influence.

Gail Ingram

P.S. I also found it amusing to learn that like another Emporia quiltmaker,

Rose Kretsinger, Ms. Danner generally had her tops quilted by someone else.

In the late sixties, when I asked her help in seeking a quilter, she had

written me urging me to quilt my own tops so the work would be "all" mine.

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 28 Feb 2001 21:25:42 -0800

From: "Colleen" <silky@psln.com

 

Yesterday I received a catalog that included a listing for a set of blocks

that are supposed to be thee blocks for each state. This, once again,

raised the question in my mind, is there any such thing as an official set

of state blocks?

Colleen

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 28 Feb 2001 23:56:00 -0800

From: "Ellen King" <esking@rcsis.com

 

Friends,

I discovered a wonderful shop in Amador City, California, that has

Depression and pre-1900 quilts, quilt tops, etc. I was in heaven just

looking at the wonderful examples of this wonderful folk art, most of it

hand-stitched. The prices were beyond my budget, but I will probably

re-visit this shop just to admire the dozens of quilts on racks and

shelves. The name of the shop is Victorian Closets. The proprietor is

Sally Knudson. If you are passing through this area (near Sutter Creek

in the Mother Lode), it is worth the time to plan an hour stop to this

little town's shop.

Ellen in Citrus Heights

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 01 Mar 2001 09:34:32 -0500

From: "Judy Kelius (judysue)" <judysue@ptd.net

For all you 19th century fabric lovers out there, you have to look at this

quilt on eBay. The colors and prints are fabulous . . . you rarely see

fabrics this early in this condition.

http://cgi.ebay.com/aw-cgi/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item1412863968

The same seller has another outstanding quilt listed - indigo/white

feathered star with superlative quilting. But personally I'd go for the one

with the bright colors!

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 1 Mar 2001 21:16:04 -0800

From: "Margot Plonk" <foustfab@bellsouth.net

I have a very old quilt with alot of polyester doubleknit patches- any

idea how old this might be?

Gracie's Wholesale Fabrics/Foust Textiles

Foustfab@bellsouth.net

Margot Plonk

(704)739-3168

 

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 02 Mar 2001 22:25:43 -0600

From: Marilyn Woodin <woodin@kctc.net

Jean Throckmorton Martin--beloved neice of the late Dr Jeannette

Throckmorton passed away on Feb 11.

Jean championed her aunts love of quilting and kept the memory of her

aunt alive.

She made it her mission to see her aunts quilts--among them the famous

Sunflower--were appreciated by the homes and museums they went to.

She kept the history of Dr Jeannette in a large memory book and sought

all published and non published things for the book.

She will be missed by her loving husband Robert-daughter Suzanne-son

Jeffry and his wife and 3 grandchildren and those of us who visited with

her and were fortunate enough to--because of her-own one of Dr

Jeannette's quilts.

Thank you for letting me share my sadness with those on this list. She

wasn't a notable in the quilt world-one of her family was--she was just

one of the ones who believed quilts are important statements of life and

beautiful art for everyone to share. Marilyn Woodin

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 03 Mar 2001 10:10:17 -0500

From: "Judy Kelius (judysue)" <judysue@ptd.net

Does anyone know if Clues in the Calico was published in a hard cover

version? My paperback version is falling apart! If there's no hardback

available, I think I'll take it to a print shop and have a ring binding added.

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 03 Mar 2001 10:46:19 -0500

From: "Kris Driessen"

 

 

BLUE RIDGE MTS of VIRGINIA 5TH RETREAT

AT THE LANDMARK

PINE TAVERN LODGE

FLOYD, VIRGINIA

OCTOBER 4, 5, & 6, 2001

Step back into the late 1800's in this rural mountain town located in the

BLUE RIDGE MTS of VIRGINIA, a week-end midst the glorious golds,

oranges, yellow, copper, rust, and reds of fall as a background for the local

quilt and craft show, a Friday nite bluegrass jamboree, antiquing, fabric

shopping at SCHOOL HOUSE FABRICS, sewing 24 hrs a day if you so desire, door

prizes, make and take classes, country cooking, and meeting new friends or

friends you spent the week-end with last year.

The PINE TAVERN is a small privately owned landmark motel, hence we can only

accommodate 18 guests. There are 7 rooms with two double beds in each unit.

All have an area where you can have your coffee/tea and cereal in the

morning. There is also a small cottage that has two separate bedrooms, one

double bed in each room, plus a queen size sofa bed in the living room. The

cottage has a front porch and each of the rooms at the lodge have a small

back porch looking out over a field of pine trees. Or you might also enjoy

sitting in the gazebo in front of the lodge and returning the waves of the

locals heading to or coming from town.

Because of the popularity of this retreat, and the fact that there is a quilt

and craft show on the week-end those who attended last year have opted to

come in on Thursday instead of Friday Why??? .sooo much to doâ€|sooo little

time..soooo much fabric!!

For those who want a week-end of NO PHONES, NO TAXI SERVICE, NO COOKING, NO

DISHES, NO MAKING BEDS, NO HUBBIES, NO KIDS, (no kidding), JUST EXPLORING,

SHOPPING , SEWING, SEWING, SEWING..

THIS IS YOUR WEEKEND..JOIN US IN MY HOME TOWN AND BASK IN THE BLUE RIDGE

MTS of VIRGINIA DOING WHAT YOU LOVE MOST..QUILTING

Contact me at baglady111@aol.com for added information..HURRY..SPACE IS AT

A PREMIUM.. there are only 14 spots left!!

Jane Clark Stapel

FLOYD, VA is located north of HILLSVILLE, VA, and SOUTH of ROANOKE, VA..LOOK

FOR ROUTE 221

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 3 Mar 2001 21:54:00 -0500

From: "John Cawley" <cawley@goeaston.net

On the first Thursday of each month the Daughters of the American

Revolution (DAR) have a quilt study program which lasts about an hour and a

half and costs $20. The program is conducted by Nancy Gibson. the textile

curator of the DAR Museum on D St., NW in Washington, D.C. Last Thursday I

was one of only 5 people who turned up and it was utterly wonderful.

Starting with a mid-18th century blue resist wholecloth quilt from the

Hudson Valley (Nancy explained that the source of the fabric, which has been

found in other quilts from the same area, is a complete mystery even though

it has been studied intensively for more than 20 years) and a Baltimore

Album top dated 1846 which are hanging in the gallery, we went upstairs and

began working our way through the quilts Nancy had chosen for the program.

Nancy Gibson is as excited about quilts as any of us and extremely

knowledgeable; it's a great learning experience to see these quilts

accompanied by her commentary. One of the most interesting topics we

discussed was the question of terminology. What words were used to describe

these quilts by the women who made them? They probably didn't use a lot of

fancy phrases. The first reference to Broderie Perse, for instance, was in

the 1870s; so what did the women of the early 19th century call chintz

applique (maybe they called it chintz applique!). Cording was called

cording and anything stuffed was stuffed work (not trapunto).

I know you want to hear about the quilts. Everything we saw was

pre-1850 and we saw a lot. If you are a compulsive book buyer I can refer

you to pictures of some. On the cover of First Flowerings: Early Virginia

Quilts is an appliqued quilt with a border of pieced triangles (lovely

Prussian blue and white) dated 1810-1820 made by Catherine Parker Custis.

The central medallion is a chintz applique of peonies, pomegranates and

peacocks. On p. 23 of the same book is an appliqued, stuffed and pieced

quilt dated 1823 made by Amelia Lauck. The chintz applique in the center is

incredibly fine and detailed; the stuffed work alternates with pieced

borders to create 9 frames around the center.

A couple of quilts had particularly interesting histories. There was a

Baltimore Album donated by a member of the DAR who had found the quilt in a

D.C. thrift shop in 1916 and cut it up to make a pair of draperies and a

9-block wall hanging for her dining room. In the 1940s she came to her

senses and sewed the quilt back together--the seams are visible on the back.

I think my favorite is the Basket of Flowers Medallion made in Frederick, MD

by Anna Garnhart around 1850. (If you have the catalogue of the DAR exhibit

in Japan see p. 64.) The elaborate floral center is surrounded by cut-out

motifs, a leaf and vine border, a border of large chintz motifs and another

vine and leaf border. Just to make it extra special the whole quilt is

reverse applique! And she made quilts for each of 11 grandchildren all

primarily reverse applique. This quilt is perfect condition; the colors are

as bright as they must have been 150 years ago. How did it survive in such

condition. It was given to a grandson and descended in the male line. When

it was give to the DAR the family explained that the successive

daughters-in-law appreciated it for its beauty, but since it had no family

associations for them kept it stored so it was never used. Lucky for us!

We probably saw 25 quilts, but I'm only going to tell you about one

more. The only completely pieced quilt we saw was every bit the equal of

its appliqued sisters. You can find it on p.p.. 31-32 of the Japanese

catalogue. Around 1840 Mary Lloyd Key (widow of Francis Scott Key) pieced

an unquilted bedcover that the family called Five Blazing Stars. The stars

are Mariner's Compasses outlined in green piping, one in each corner, one in

the center surrounded by a series of pieced borders: first diamonds, then

triangles to form a square on point and then triangles oriented to square

the whole top. It's made of scraps of all the wonderful mid-century

fabrics--great to see such variety. It's tacked to a plain cotton back of

the period; it was not intended to be quilted. Mary was living in either

Georgetown or Baltimore when she made this quilt, but she grew up at Wye

Plantation in Talbot Co. (sometimes called the Land of the LLoyds) here on

the Eastern Shore.

The phone # at the DAR is 202-879-3240. If you can plan a trip to D.C.

around the first Thursday of the month you definitely want to do this. One

of our little group was a woman from Vancouver, B.C. who had a weekend

conference and came early because she figured this was literally the chance

of a lifetime.

Cinda on the Eastern Shore

Date: Sat, 3 Mar 2001 22:25:28 -0600

From: "Hope Seider" <hseider@tacnet.missouri.org

Does anyone know if Clues in the Calico was published in a hard cover

version? My paperback version is falling apart! If there's no hardback

available, I think I'll take it to a print shop and have a ring binding added.

I don't know of a hard cover version. The pages are popping out of my book, too! And at that

price! But I think your idea is a good one -- I'll have to have mine ring-bound, too.

Hope in SW Missouri

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 3 Mar 2001 23:39:05 EST

From: @aol.com

A friend of mine has just informed me that one of the members of her church

needlework group is a quilter named Gail Binney Stiles. Does anyone know if

this is Gail Binney Winslow, co-author of Homage to Amanda? My friend is

going to tea at Mrs. Stiles's house next Saturday and I'm curious to know.

It's not as if Gail Binney is all that common a name...:)

Karen Evans

------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 4 Mar 2001 08:46:35 -0500

From: "Avalon" <malthaus@idcnet.com

 

I had some luck finding a book that I had been lusting for-----"Treasury of

American Quilts by Cyril Nelson and Carter Houck"----by using the personal

shopper tool on ebay. It was is perfect condition upon arrival. It did

take several months before I received a notice that it was listed, however.

Mary in Wisconsin

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 4 Mar 2001 11:53:42 -0600

From: "Susan Wildemuth" <ksandbcw@geneseo.net

 

This is a quilt-related history question. During the 1800's, what did the

young African American women who labored in plantation homes and/or loom

houses use for thimbles? If they were not given a thimble to use, what did

these industrious women use protect their fingers? How did they store them

when they were not in use? I don't believe I have ever read anything that

addresses this issue. Thanks.

Sue

Date: Mon, 5 Mar 2001 09:09:12 EST

From: Hazelmacc@aol.com

 

Last week Bunnie Jordan and l were invited to present our lecture an

"Introduction to Dating Quilts" for an afternoon seminar presented by the

Wiliamsburg Institute. It began with a lecture by their curator of textiles,

Linda Baumgarten. Her slide presentation showed many of their quilts. She

as well told briefly the history of Wmbg. We were then taken to the textile

conservation lab where their conservator of textiles Loreen Finkelstein

explained their workroom activities. We got to see a tent that they are

conserving and an early "strippie" quilt that was a beauty. Then associate

curator of textiles Kimberly S. Ivey took us into the storage area where

drawers were pulled out for our viewing pleasure. All of this was overload,

but l ventured ahead to see drawers of early chintz in small pieces.

For me l had longed to see the blue thread in the selvage of chintz. What

this blue thread indicates is that it was meant for export from England (they

were wanting to protect their woolen industry), secondly that the fabric

would be all cotton, and thirdly the fabric would date from 1774 to 1811.

The last time i was at the Victoria and Albert Museum there was a small room

with pieces of chintz and all had the blue thread in the selvage according to

the labels; however, all pieces of chintz were framed and no selvages shown.

Finally seeing this blue thread was a double treat for me!

Hazel Carter

Northern Virginia were we have a small amount of snow on the ground - not

what was predicted.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 05 Mar 2001 08:13:40 -0800

From: Laura Robins-Morris <lrobins@snap.fhcrc.org

Karen asked how we're doing in Washington state. Well, as for me and

the folks I know, we're doing fine. It was scary (probably nothing to

the California folks) but it could have been a lot worse, so we all feel

very lucky. The shaking and swaying was unnerving but I personally had

no damage at home or at work, and I didn't see any around my

neighborhood either. There was damage to some of the older brick

buildings, and the state capitol building and a few roads and bridges.

And there has been a rash of TV programs and newspaper articles

reminding us how to prepare for "the Big One", yet to come. But for most

people, I don't think it had a long-lasting effect.

But I guess I really should finish putting together my emergency kits

for work and the car. Oh yeah, and bolt the house to the foundation!

Laura in Seattle, furiously finishing a quilt that has to be turned in

tomorrow for a quilt show. It could use more quilting but they want all

entered quilts to have a sleeve. Big decision: quilting or a sleeve,

quilting or a sleeve...

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 05 Mar 2001 10:31:23 -0700

From: Alice Cruz <alice.cruz@home.com

 

I need help removing a large amount of candle wax from a quilt. A hole in

the back side of the candle provided a escape hatch for the hot wax, which

overran the flat plate the candle was sitting on. The was has soaked

entirely through the quilt in a couple of spots about the size of dimes. A

huge chunk of wax has hardened on top of the quilt. The quilt is 100%

cotton fabric & thread, & cotton batting.

alice

Alice Cruz

The Quilted Chile

<mailto:alice.cruz@home.com

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 5 Mar 2001 11:43:24 EST

From: JQuilt@aol.com

either iron the spots with newprint paper...or a newspaper that is over

3-4weeks old or put it in the dryer...

jean

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 5 Mar 2001 12:20:29 EST

From: QuiltEvals@aol.com

Hi,

I hope Kris and everyone in the East is surviving the latest storm, stay safe

and warm!

I just wanted to let everyone know that the Vintage and Antique Textile Shop

in Sturbridge, MA, will be presenting "Quilt Talk," an antique quilt and

textile study day on March 24. For further information, please see the web

page at: http://thequiltauction.com/help/sturbridge.html

We should be seeing some great pieces, and participants are welcome to bring

in things to share from their collections. Mary Koval will be sending along

some surprises for us to see (and buy) as well. I hope to see some QHL'ers

there.

Deb Roberts

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 5 Mar 2001 12:48:14 -0500

From: "bonnie wilbur" <bonnie.wilbur@oracle.com

 

I'd be cautious about putting it in the dryer. Sometimes that spreads the

wax to other areas, and I've had wax from kids' crayons continue to stain

clothes for 3-4 loads.

Bonnie

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 05 Mar 2001 09:50:54 -0800

From: Laura Robins-Morris <lrobins@snap.fhcrc.org

 

QUILTERS ANONYMOUS Annual Quilt Show

March 9 - March 11

10-6 Friday and Saturday, 10-5 Sunday

Commercial Building, Evergreen Fairgrounds, Monroe, WA

Lots of great quilts, including one by yours truly

Large Merchant Mall

Demonstrations

Lots of great quilts

Crazy Quilt Raffle Quilt

Featured Artist

Lots of great quilts

Its going to be a great show! Don't miss it!!

Laura in Seattle (Stitching to the very last minute. Yeah, I know it

needs more quilting, but hey, at least it has binding!)

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 05 Mar 2001 12:18:58 -0600

From: grapes <grapes@flash.net

 

Well, I am not a historian, or appraiser, but I do not use a thimble on

my underneath hand and I use a leather one to push with. I would guess

that would be where we got leather thimbles from. Slaves or poor women

who could not afford thimbles.

Jo in Tx

--

Spindle's Tops Machine Quilting

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 05 Mar 2001 13:20:45 -0600

From: Laura Hobby Syler <texas_quilt.co@airmail.net

Hi Alice,

I would start by putting the quilt in the freezer (or outdoors if you are up

north <G) to really harden the wax. THEN, do the brown paper bag/ iron thing.

I agree with Bonnie, I would not put it in the dryer on the outside chance

that you have not gotten all of the wax out. Another final effort would be to

pour boiling water over the area, after you do the iron and paper bag thing.

This will help flush any wax that might have found it's way into the batting.

Naturally, I'm hoping that the area this candle attacked your poor quilt is

color fast, or better yet, white <G.

Good luck and let us know what you try and what works.

Laura

 

Date: Tue, 06 Mar 2001 13:10:53 -0500

From: Newbie Richardson <pastcrafts@erols.com

 

Hi guys, need some brain power.

I have a freind/client/collector who has a wonderful 1930's applique

quilt that has scenes from what must be a novel. Each block is

appliqued with characters in mid 19th to late 19th c. costume - in the

manner of "old time folks" so popular then. It is clearly an

individual's artistic expression - not a kit. My friend thought that it

was scenes from the maker's life (there is the courtship, wedding,

christening, etc. as well as more mundane scenes.

In late 18th and early 19th c. girlhood embroidered pictures, the

subject was frequently drawn from a popular novel. Did this happen in

early 20th c. quilts as well?

Thanks for any input.

Newbie Richardson

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 06 Mar 2001 14:27:17 -0600

From: Xenia Cord <xecord@netusa1.net

 

Newbie, this sounds like one of the wonderful designs from Marion

Cheever Whiteside. See Naida Treadway Patterson: Marion Cheever

Whiteside Newton: Designer of Story Book Quilts, 1940-1965, in

Uncoverings 1995 (vol. 16 of the Research Papers of the American Quilt

Study Group), ed. Virginia Gunn.

Among the stories she designed for applique are the Bridal Quilt (13

wedding customs from around the world), Little Women (15 story blocks.

also available in 2 other formsts, with 9 or 12 blocks), Cinderella,

Helen of Troy, Historic Lovers, Treasure Island, the Victorian Quilt,

Wizard of Oz, and many, many nursery rhyme/Mother Goose stories.

Xenia

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 06 Mar 2001 15:36:50 -0600

From: Gail Ingram <GIngram@tcainternet.com

I have been a member of this list for only a month, but what an interesting

month it has been! Today's notes on storybook quilts reminded me I much I

have learned and how much I look forward to the daily entries.

Thanks to all who support and make possible this remarkable list!

Gail Ingram,

from the hills of North Louisiana, where the week-long rains have ended, the

sky is blue, and the daffodils are in full glory

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 6 Mar 2001 17:33:45 -0500

From: "bonnie wilbur" <bonnie.wilbur@oracle.com

 

I agree, Gail. Reading this list has been such a boost for me. Every time

I get discouraged because my skill levels will never approach some of the

remarkable quilts winning prizes today, or because of stories like the son

who nailed his new quilt over a window to block out the light for his

darkroom, I am grateful to this list again. It keeps reminding me that

there are plenty of quilts which have been made by unskilled people and have

been through the wars and are still valued.

I know that's just a side benefit of the intelligence and experience brought

to this list, but it is a reason for me to say thanks also.

Bonnie

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 6 Mar 2001 15:38:20 -0800 (PST)

From: "Pat L. Nickols" <patlnickols@yahoo.com

Just a few suggestions to add to the thread going on removing wax from a quilt. The first step would be to have a ready bowl of ice cubes and some old bath towels, plus a plastic spatula. With a towel under wax area rub with ice cubes and you will see the wax clump up, some areas you could use the plastic edge to help lift the wax. If you can get to the back of the quilt repeat above steps. This method has helped me get wax out of tablecloths. Good luck and do keep us informed on (hopefully) your success.

In rainy (we need it and like it) San Diego.

Pat L. Nickols

 

 

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 06 Mar 2001 19:35:48 -0500

From: Paul and Nancy Hahn <phahn@erols.com

I am very interested to learn more about the Williamsburg Institute

Hazel Carter mentioned. Is this an annual event, or a one time seminar

or an ongoing project? Also, is there a contact person for the textile

conservation lab? Is this something one can arrange to tour or are

there regular hours you can visit? Do you need to be a member to visit

or is this part of the Williamsburg historical area tourists can visit?

Nancy Hahn

Date: Tue, 6 Mar 2001 23:24:04 -0600

From: "Karen S Bush" <birdsong@accessmo.com

 

Well, I'm going to ask a stupid question. I KNOW I've heard Mary Story's

name, but, from this list? Does anyone have a URL for her? Inquiring minds

want to know???

Mary, if you're on the list, and my mind has gone to mush, please don't

take it personally, I know so many 'on line' names, but, can't remember if I

'know' her or not...just another dumb question, kinda fits my week...:/ kb

www.karenbushquilts.com

www.QuiltUniversity.com

Member of TAS-The Applique Society

Ebay seller name- karenbush

------------------------------------------

Date: Fri, 02 Mar 2001 22:25:43 -0600
From: Marilyn Woodin <woodin@kctc.net>
Jean Throckmorton Martin--beloved niece of the late Dr Jeannette Throckmorton passed away on Feb 11.
Jean championed her aunts love of quilting and kept the memory of her aunt alive.

She made it her mission to see her aunts quilts--among them the famous Sunflower--were appreciated by the homes and  museums they went to. She kept the history of Dr Jeannette in a large  memory book and sought all published and non published things for the  book.

She will be missed by her loving husband  Robert-daughter Suzanne-son Jeffry and his wife and 3 grandchildren and those  of us who visited with her and were fortunate enough to--because of 
her-own one of Dr Jeannette's quilts.

Thank you for letting me share my sadness with those on this list. She wasn't a notable in the quilt world-one of her family was--she was just one of the ones who believed quilts are important statements of life and beautiful art for everyone to share.

 Marilyn Woodin

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 03 Mar 2001 10:10:17 -0500
From: "Judy Kelius (judysue)" <judysue@ptd.net>

Does anyone know if Clues in the Calico was published in a hard cover version? My paperback version is falling apart! If there's no hardback  available, I think I'll take it to a print shop and have a ring binding added.

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 03 Mar 2001 10:46:19 -0500
Subject: Retreat in Floyd VA from Baglady111@aol.com

>BLUE RIDGE MTS of VIRGINIA 5TH RETREAT
>AT THE LANDMARK
> PINE TAVERN LODGE
>FLOYD, VIRGINIA
>
>OCTOBER 4, 5, & 6, 2001
>
>Step back into the late 1800's in this rural 
mountain town located in the
>BLUE RIDGE MTS of VIRGINIA, a week-end 
midst the glorious golds,
>oranges, yellow, copper, rust, and reds of fall 
as a background for the local
>quilt and craft show, a Friday nite bluegrass 
jamboree, antiquing, fabric
>shopping at SCHOOL HOUSE FABRICS, sewing 24 hrs 
a day if you so desire, door
>prizes, make and take classes, country cooking, 
and meeting new friends or
>friends you spent the week-end with last year.
>
>The PINE TAVERN is a small privately owned 
landmark motel, hence we can only
>accommodate 18 guests. There are 7 rooms with 
two double beds in each unit.
>All have an area where you can have your 
coffee/tea and cereal in the
>morning. There is also a small cottage that has 
two separate bedrooms, one
>double bed in each room, plus a queen size sofa 
bed in the living room. The
>cottage has a front porch and each of the rooms 
at the lodge have a small
>back porch looking out over a field of pine 
trees. Or you might also enjoy
>sitting in the gazebo in front of the lodge and 
returning the waves of the
>locals heading to or coming from town.
>
>Because of the popularity of this retreat, and 
the fact that there is a quilt
>and craft show on the week-end those who 
attended last year have opted to
>come in on Thursday instead of Friday Why??? 
.sooo much to do…sooo little
>time..soooo much fabric!!
>
>For those who want a week-end of NO PHONES, NO 
TAXI SERVICE, NO COOKING, NO
>DISHES, NO MAKING BEDS, NO HUBBIES, NO KIDS, (no 
kidding), JUST EXPLORING,
>SHOPPING , SEWING, SEWING, SEWING..
>
>THIS IS YOUR WEEKEND..JOIN US IN MY HOME TOWN 
AND BASK IN THE BLUE RIDGE 
>MTS of VIRGINIA DOING WHAT YOU LOVE 
MOST..QUILTING
>
>Contact me at baglady111@aol.com for added 
information..HURRY..SPACE IS AT
>A PREMIUM.. there are only 14 spots left!!
>
>Jane Clark Stapel
>
>FLOYD, VA is located north of HILLSVILLE, VA, 
and SOUTH of ROANOKE, VA..LOOK
>FOR ROUTE 221

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 3 Mar 2001 21:54:00 -0500
From: "John Cawley" <cawley@goeaston.net>

On the first Thursday of each month the Daughters of the American
Revolution (DAR) have a quilt study program which lasts about an hour and a
half and costs $20. The program is conducted by Nancy Gibson. the textile
curator of the DAR Museum on D St., NW in Washington, D.C. Last Thursday I
was one of only 5 people who turned up and it was utterly wonderful.
Starting with a mid-18th century blue resist wholecloth quilt from the
Hudson Valley (Nancy explained that the source of the fabric, which has been
found in other quilts from the same area, is a complete mystery even though
it has been studied intensively for more than 20 years) and a Baltimore
Album top dated 1846 which are hanging in the gallery, we went upstairs and
began working our way through the quilts Nancy had chosen for the program.

Nancy Gibson is as excited about quilts as any of us and extremely
knowledgeable; it's a great learning experience to see these quilts
accompanied by her commentary. One of the most interesting topics we
discussed was the question of terminology. What words were used to describe
these quilts by the women who made them? They probably didn't use a lot of
fancy phrases. The first reference to Broderie Perse, for instance, was in
the 1870s; so what did the women of the early 19th century call chintz
applique (maybe they called it chintz applique!). 

Cording was called cording and anything stuffed was stuffed work  (not trapunto).
I know you want to hear about the quilts. Everything we saw was
pre-1850 and we saw a lot. If you are a compulsive book buyer I can refer
you to pictures of some. On the cover of First Flowerings: Early Virginia
Quilts is an appliqued quilt with a border of pieced triangles (lovely
Prussian blue and white) dated 1810-1820 made by Catherine Parker Custis.
The central medallion is a chintz applique of peonies, pomegranates and
peacocks. On p. 23 of the same book is an appliqued, stuffed and pieced
quilt dated 1823 made by Amelia Lauck. The chintz applique in the center is
incredibly fine and detailed; the stuffed work alternates with pieced
borders to create 9 frames around the center.

A couple of quilts had particularly interesting histories. There was a Baltimore Album donated by a member of the DAR who had found the quilt in a D.C. thrift shop in 1916 and cut it up to make a 
pair of draperies and a 9-block wall hanging for her dining room. In the 
1940s she came to her senses and sewed the quilt back together--the 
seams are visible on the back. I think my favorite is the Basket of Flowers 
Medallion made in Frederick, MD by Anna Garnhart around 1850. (If you have the 
catalogue of the DAR exhibit in Japan see p. 64.) The elaborate floral center 
is surrounded by cut-out motifs, a leaf and vine border, a border of large 
chintz motifs and another vine and leaf border. Just to make it extra 
special the whole quilt is reverse applique! And she made quilts for each 
of 11 grandchildren all primarily reverse applique. This quilt is 
perfect condition; the colors are as bright as they must have been 150 years ago. 
How did it survive in such condition. It was given to a grandson and 
descended in the male line. When it was give to the DAR the family explained that 
the successive daughters-in-law appreciated it for its beauty,  but since it had no family
associations for them kept it stored so it was  never used. Lucky for us!

We probably saw 25 quilts, but I'm only going  to tell you about one
more. The only completely pieced quilt we saw was every bit the equal of
its appliqued sisters. You can find it on p.p.. 31-32 of the Japanese
catalogue. Around 1840 Mary Lloyd Key (widow of Francis Scott Key) pieced
an unquilted bedcover that the family called Five Blazing Stars. The stars
are Mariner's Compasses outlined in green piping,  one in each corner, one in
the center surrounded by a series of pieced borders: first diamonds, then
triangles to form a square on point and then triangles oriented to square
the whole top. It's made of scraps of all the wonderful mid-century
fabrics--great to see such variety. It's tacked 
to a plain cotton back of
the period; it was not intended to be quilted. 
Mary was living in either
Georgetown or Baltimore when she made this quilt, 
but she grew up at Wye
Plantation in Talbot Co. (sometimes called the 
Land of the LLoyds) here on
the Eastern Shore.
The phone # at the DAR is 202-879-3240. If 
you can plan a trip to D.C.
around the first Thursday of the month you 
definitely want to do this. One
of our little group was a woman from Vancouver, 
B.C. who had a weekend
conference and came early because she figured 
this was literally the chance
of a lifetime.
Cinda on the Eastern Shore

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 3 Mar 2001 23:39:05 EST
From: @aol.com
A friend of mine has just informed me that one of 
the members of her church 
needlework group is a quilter named Gail Binney 
Stiles. Does anyone know if 
this is Gail Binney Winslow, co-author of =Homage 
to Amanda=? My friend is 
going to tea at Mrs. Stiles's house next Saturday 
and I'm curious to know. 
It's not as if Gail Binney is all that common a 
name...:)

Karen Evans

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 04 Mar 2001 06:53:17 -0600
From: Laura Hobby Syler 
<texas_quilt.co@airmail.net>

Several years ago I purchased another copy at 
Half Price Books (couldn't believe I found a copy
there!). Anyway, I keep that one in my library. 
The one that has the coffee cup stains,
highlighted, underlined, reference notes and 
swatches stuck in (and that I had Barbara autograph
in Omaha -with stains and all-) is in page 
protectors in a three ring binder. I find that this is
useful when ever we do a fabric dating class (I 
can just pull those pages) and I can add my extra
pieces from my fabric dating book swatches to 
"the book". I have had lots of fun just compiling
that!
Barbara lurks on this list occasionally, she may 
see this thread and reply. If not, I think it is
safe to say that the book has not been published 
in hardback. There has been some talk in
reprinting the book with several "updates and 
corrections", but Barbara hasn't spoken of that in
several years.
Laura
In finally sunny N. Texas
where the lakes that were 17 feet low are now 2 
feet high!!!
Typical Texas weather!

Hope Seider wrote:

> >Does anyone know if Clues in the Calico was 
published in a hard cover
> >version? My paperback version is falling 
apart! If there's no hardback
> >available, I think I'll take it to a print 
shop and have a ring binding added.
>
> I don't know of a hard cover version. The 
pages are popping out of my book, too! And at that
> price! But I think your idea is a good one -- 
I'll have to have mine ring-bound, too.
>
> Hope in SW Missouri
>
> ---------------»§«»§«----------------------
> hseider@tacnet.missouri.org
> ---------------»§«»§«----------------------
> "We made quilts as warm as we could
> so our families would not freeze,
> and as beautiful as we could
> so our hearts would not break."
> -- pioneer mother
> ---------------»§«»§«----------------------

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 4 Mar 2001 08:46:35 -0500
From: "Avalon" <malthaus@idcnet.com>
To: <QHL@cuenet.com>

I had some luck finding a book that I had been 
lusting for-----"Treasury of
American Quilts by Cyril Nelson and Carter 
Houck"----by using the personal
shopper tool on ebay. It was is perfect 
condition upon arrival. It did
take several months before I received a notice 
that it was listed, however.

Mary in Wisconsin

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 4 Mar 2001 11:53:42 -0600
From: "Susan Wildemuth" <ksandbcw@geneseo.net>

This is a quilt-related history question. During 
the 1800's, what did the
young African American women who labored in 
plantation homes and/or loom
houses use for thimbles? If they were not given 
a thimble to use, what did
these industrious women use protect their 
fingers? How did they store them
when they were not in use? I don't believe I 
have ever read anything that
addresses this issue. Thanks.

Sue