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Quilters Find a way to care

01150 - 01160

Date: Tue, 12 Jun 2001 21:38:29 EDT

From: MLEDevine@aol.com

Dear QHL:

Does anyone know of sources for information on needlework schools in the

1850s? I am doing research to back up a statement that I made in a

course. I

made a rash statement in regard to the use of symbolism and women's

needlearts. I stated that certainly women knew and understood what they were=

doing when they used symbols to create mourning prints, quilts, and other

types of needlework. I am now working to prove this statement.

I am aware that women made quilts for specific circumstances, such as Album

Quilts, political statements, fund raising, and in at least one instance

satirical, as in the spinster quilt. These quilts have been discussed by man=

y

quilters as evident in the hundreds if not thousands of quilt books on the

market.

I also know that men like Thomas Jefferson utilized specific symbols from

Greek and Roman history in the design of American structures which could

compete with the great works found in Europe. It seems that the men had

definite design inspirations which they used to express a specific idea. I

find it difficult to believe that women did not draw inspiration from simila=

r

sources, and perhaps even elaborate in a new format.

What did these women use as textbooks? Were they readily available through

the needle art schools? Was the language of symbolism known and purposefully=

utilized by women? I suggest they did. After all look at the wonderful

Baltimore Album Quilts. But there must be more to all of this.

Date: Tue, 12 Jun 2001 18:59:07 -0700

From: "Julia D. Zgliniec" <rzglini1@san.rr.com>

To: MLEDevine@aol.com

Dear MLEDevine and QHL,

Two books which I refer to many times when looking for information on

historic needlework are:

Beck, Thomasina, (1995). The Embroiderer's Story Needlework form the

Renaissance to the Present Day. A David and Charles Book. Brunel House.

Newton Abbott. Devon ISBN 0-7153-0238-8

Ring, Betty,. c.1984. Needlework An Historical Survey A new and expanded

edition. Main Street Press. Pittstown, NJ ISBN 0-915590-56-5

Regards,

Julia Zgliniec

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 13 Jun 2001 14:18:40 -0500

From: "Karen S Bush" <birdsong@accessmo.com>

Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I've been working like crazy, so, that's why I've been a little quiet.

Enjoy...doesn't happen TOO often! haha..

I just put my new website up with the new gallery...go check it out if

you've got the time and if there's any problems with it, just let me know!

:)

http://www.karenbushquilts.com/gallery.htm 

www.karenbushquilts.com - Online hand quilting classes

Member of TAS-The Applique Society

Richmond/Ray County History Site- member of AHGP & ALHN

http://www.geocities.com/richmond64085/Myhistory.htm

Think Big thoughts, but cherish small pleasuresDate: Thu, 14 Jun 2001 09:14:53 -0400

 

From: Newbie Richardson <pastcrafts@erols.com>

To: QHL@cuenet.com

 

The symbolism used in the decorative arts of the mid and late 19th c.

did not come out of any needlework school per se. It was "in the air'

through the other arts.

Elly Sienkiewicz's book: Spoken Without a Word has a selected

bibliography that includes:

- Burke, ML Ed.: the Language of the Flowers, Price, Stern, Sloan, Los

Angeles 1965

- Dreyfus, Henry: The Symbol Source Book, McGraw Hill, NY 1972

- Lehner, Ernest: Folklore and symbolism of Flowers, Plants, and

Trees, Tudor Pub.Ny. 1960

Any research needs to look into the histroy of Victorian decorative

Arts - not needlework. this is part of the greater picture of Art

history.

Also, there was a post asking about the social history of political

quilts. Probably the best, most concise study can be found in the book

Hearts and Hands: Women, Quilts and American Society, Hedges, Ferrero,

Silber. Ruthledge Hill Press, Nashville, Tenn. They chronicle how by

rejecting the 19th c. passion for needlework, the Sufferage movement

"lost"(ie. took forever to gain momentum) while the Temperance movement,

by embracing it, won.

Newbie Richardson

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 14 Jun 2001 12:28:48 -0500 (EST)

From: Teri Klassen <teresak@bloomington.in.us>

I know there was extensive symbolism related to flowers. There were books

written in the first half of the 1800s about The Language of Flowers,

i.e. if you gave someone a certain flower it conveyed a certain

message. it lasted on into the early 1900s, and turns up on postcards

ca. 1910. Teri in Indiana

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 14 Jun 2001 19:24:45 EDT

From: DDBSTUFF@aol.com

To: QHL@cuenet.com

Hi All;

Does anyone know when the quilting hoop came into use?

Thanks,

Darwin

ate: Sat, 16 Jun 2001 10:03:05 -0700

From: Denise Clausen <nadyne@oregoncoast.com>

I don't know about needlework schools, but Sandi Fox's book, Wrapped in

Glory- Figurative Quilts and Bedcovers 1700-1900, talks a lot about the

sources of the images appliques on the quilts in that book. Also check

out the bibliography in her book Small Endearments.

Denise Clausen

Sandlake, Oregon

 

Date: Mon, 18 Jun 2001 16:48:55 -0700

From: Julie Silber <quiltcomplex@earthlink.net>

Hi,

Julie Silber here. I'm back on after a few months' hiatus to finish some

work.

Please pass the word to anyone who wants to see a great collection of

Lancaster Co., PA Amish quilts from the "Esprit Collection." Twenty

four museum quality examples (1890-1940) will be on display at the

Vermont Quilt Festival in Northfield, VT from June 29 to July 1, 2001.

This is very likely THE LAST time these quilts will be displayed.

For more information on the Vermont Quilt Festival, check their web site

is www.vqf.org E-mails regarding the Festival can be sent to Richard

Cleveland

at vqf@drbs.com.

For more information on the exhibit of Esprit Amish quilts, you can

contact me, Julie Silber, at quiltcomplex@earthlink.net

Thanks,

Julie Silber

Date: Tue, 19 Jun 2001 22:29:26 -0400

From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessen@yahoo.com>

This came to me, but she addressed it to the list. Please answer both her

and the list, I am sure we would all be interested.

Kris

 

>From: "J. Glen" <jglen@pacifier.com>

>

>I purchased a kit at an estate sale that was missing the directions, bias

>for stems and embroidery floss. I have been appliquing it bet would like to

>know it's name and perhaps a little about it.

>Yvonne Jones did a presentation on red and green quilts at our quilt guild

>and suggested I write you about my question.

>The applique pieces identify the quilt as no 7228. It has a center section

>and two side panels. The poppies are each three shades, red,orange and

>burgundy with a yellow center and black embroidered stamins.There are also

>embroidery lines on each petal. Some have a two-toned bud as well as the

>open flower. They do not form a wreath per se. The side panels have two

>poppies each. The leaves are two shades of green on each leaf. The quilt is

>supposed to have a scalloped edge. Short of a picture of what I have done so

>far, that is the best description I can give.

>I hope you can help identify it. Also, do you know where I might find bias

>of the quilt's vintage? Otherwise I will have to use a darker green cotton

>and make some as it was missing from the package as was the original

>packaging.

>Sue Glen jglen@pacifier.com

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 20 Jun 2001 15:52:20 -0500

From: Bettina Havig <bettinaqc@socket.net>

To

In addition to the Amish quilts from the Esprit collection there will also

be 25 Amish crib quilts from Sara Miller's private collection and also a

gallery talk at the Vermont Quilt Festival. Sara is a Mennonite woman from

Iowa. She grew up Amish and reamined so until about ten years ago. She has

collected these quilts over the past 15 or so years. The bulk of her

collection was acquired last fall for the International Quilt Study Center

in Lincoln, NE.

Bettina Havig

Date: Fri, 22 Jun 2001 01:07:50 +1000

From: "Ruth in the Blue Mountains" <rathgarr@ozemail.com.au>

I'm aware of various terms for fabrics that are used in different ways -

calico, for example, is used here in Oz for the plain cream fabric that's

about the cheapest plainest cream you can buy, not for patterned fabrics.

In looking around eBay, I've seen the term 'domestic' used in descriptions

of quilts, eg. "These blocks are pieced alternately with squares of

domestic". I can make an assumption from the quilt and the context, but

would anyone care to share a definition of this noun/type of fabric? (The

only use I've heard before of 'domestic' as a noun is 'someone who cleans

your house', and I doubt it would be wise to cut them into squares, however

important the quilt!!!!!!!).

The Quilters' Guild show in Sydney (Australia) is on at the end of next week

for four days. The guild website is at

http://members.ozemail.com.au/~quiltgld/ and I'm told results in the various

categories will be up on the site at the end of next week. 2001 marks the

centenary of federation in Australia, so there are several categories

celebrating Australia. (If you want a quick historic moment, before 1901

Australia was not an independent nation, and each of what are now the states

functioned independently as a British colony.) http://www.centenary.gov.au/

is the official govt website on the various celebrations - there have been

several quilt-related ones.

 

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 22 Jun 2001 01:10:05 +1000

From: "Ruth in the Blue Mountains" <rathgarr@ozemail.com.au>

They will be up on Thursday afternoon, Sydney time (which is ahead of US

time) and the direct link to the page is

http://members.ozemail.com.au/~quiltgld/winners.html

There's nothing there yet, of course.

 

Cheers

Ruth

Ruth in the Blue Mountains (World Heritage Area) west of Sydney, NSW,

Australia

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 21 Jun 2001 10:43:19 -0500

From: Laura Hobby Syler <texas_quilt.co@airmail.net>

Hi Ruth,

My grandmother always refers to what we (in the US) now call "unbleached

muslin" as "domestic"...bleached or unbleached. It was the utility

fabric around the house. Pillowcases, aprons, what ever else she needed

to whip up in a hurry, and was cheap and not a fancy fabric. Whether the

cheese-clothy loose weave, or almost a twill. Pillow ticking was the

stuff with the pretty blue or pink stripes or floral stripes, even

though the weight and hand were similar to the cotton twill.

Hope this helps a little.

Laura Hobby Syler

In Steamy N. Texas

Ruth in the Blue Mountains wrote:

>

> I'm aware of various terms for fabrics that are used in different ways -

> calico, for example, is used here in Oz for the plain cream fabric that's

> about the cheapest plainest cream you can buy, not for patterned fabrics.

>

>------------------------------

Date: Thu, 21 Jun 2001 11:44:38 -0500

From: Gail Ingram <GIngram@tcainternet.com>

Ruth,

"Domestic" is muslin, a lightweight square-weave fabric . I grew up hearing

and using the term in the late 40's and 50's, and since then have heard it

in common use across the South. When I made curtains for my first home in

1970, I purchased probably hundreds of yards of this fabric from our local

Penny's store. I still hear the term used locally.

There are/were variations in quality and price based mainly on two

things--the number of threads/inch and whether the fabric had been bleached.

The highest quality was a closely woven fabric that had been bleached,

resulting in a supple, creamy colored material, "Yellow domestic" was the

term often applied to the unbleached fabric, though its color was more in

the line of a light tan color with just a touch of yellow.

Its popularity was, I imagine, based both on its usefulness for a variety of

household needs (aprons, kitchen curtains, tea towels, various linings,

quilt backing, quilt piecing) and even more on its inexpensiveness. Even in

1970, some stores sold it at $1.00/3-4 yards.

I used bleached domestic for backings/linings of quilts and as bases for

appliques in the first three quilts I made, and I believe that prior to the

quilt revival of the mid-70's, most people in our part of the country used

domestic to back quilts. Even the lowest quality domestic could be "squared"

or pulled "straight" when washed, another advantage for quilting and sewing

projects. One quality the seamstress had to take into account with all

varieties of this fabric was shrinkage, which was fairly considerable. As a

young housekeeper, I would purchase good quality unbleached domestic, then

wash it with bleach, thereby shrinking and bleaching it at the same time.

My mother routinely bought yardage of this fabric to keep on hand for

general household use. I have continued to do the same thing. One can find

it in any general purpose fabric shop, including those like Wal-Mart.

In our part of the country, the term "domestic" was never applied to

cheesecloth or to twill or heavy weaves.

I've always assumed the term was originally an adjective, not a noun,

referring to goods produced in America---i.e., domestic goods. The root of

"domestic" is the Latin word for "home," and we still hear the term used

this way--e.g., "domestic production of oil and gas" as opposed to foreign

production. Probably at some point, the term also implied lesser quality

than finer, imported cottons.

From North Louisiana, where sweltering summer has set in,

Gail Ingram

> From: "Ruth in the Blue Mountains" <rathgarr@ozemail.com.au>

> Date: Fri, 22 Jun 2001 01:07:50 +1000

> To: "qhl" <QHL@cuenet.com>

> Subject: QHL: 'domestic' + Sydney Show

>

> I'm aware of various terms for fabrics that are used in different ways -

> calico, for example, is used here in Oz for the plain cream fabric that's

> about the cheapest plainest cream you can buy, not for patterned fabrics.

>

> In looking around eBay, I've seen the term 'domestic' used in descriptions

> of quilts, eg. "These blocks are pieced alternately with squares of

> domestic". I can make an assumption from the quilt and the context, but

> would anyone care to share a definition of this noun/type of fabric? (The

> only use I've heard before of 'domestic' as a noun is 'someone who cleans

> your house', and I doubt it would be wise to cut them into squares, however

> important the quilt!!!!!!!).

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 21 Jun 2001 14:00:02 -0700 (PDT)

From: Cindy Brick <brickworksinc@yahoo.com>

Hi all,

I am still heavily researching the history of

hankerchiefs...for instance, did you know that

gentleman in the 17th century often carried

hankerchiefs with maps printed on them? That way, they

could know exactly where they were going while riding

the coaches...I believe this was primarily an English

sort of thing.

Do you have any unusual hankies or hankie-related

history you can share? I would really appreciate it.

Gratefully,

Cindy

__________________________________________________

Date: Thu, 21 Jun 2001 16:55:09 -0400

From: Newbie Richardson <pastcrafts@erols.com>

Run, do not walk to the Maryland Historic Society's Baltimore Album

Show. It is wonderfully displayed and exhibited. A true study in

:Good, Better, Best. Also, Nancy Davis, the curator has posited the

connection between the invention (and subsequent rage for) the

kaledoscope in 1819 and some of the early patchwork star designs.

Sumpter Priddy, an acknowledged authority on early southern Dec. Arts,

has written a book on the same subject which will be published by Abrams

next Spring ('O2). Additionally, Dr. Davis has done a wonderful job of

incorporating interactive children's activities: make a block out of

colored foam cut outs, a treasure hunt for 19thc. iconography, ect. I

am told that the show is on line at the maryland Historic Society web

site.

Kudos.

Newbie Richardson

Newbie