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Quilters Find a way to care

01184

 

Date: Wed, 25 Jul 2001 16:37:39 -0600
From: Xenia Cord <
Bucilla has at least 3 poppy design applique quilts during its kit
history, and the one Cinda asks about 1117, is surely one of the earlier
ones if the Bucilla kit numbering system is any indication. The others
are #2003, Poppy Applique ( Jan.1930), and #8971 Garden Poppies (ca.
1960). Progress and HomeNeedlecraft Creations also had poppy designs,
as did other kit manufacturers.
Marie Webster made her famous Poppies quilt in 1909, and it was her most
popular and influential pattern, according to her biographer, Rosalind
Webster Perry. She sold it in pattern and kit form well into the 1930s.
Everything I have read suggests that poppies became a popular quilt
motif during WW I, when the poem "In Flanders Fields" was written by
Dr. John McCrae, a surgeon who spent seventeen days treating injured men
-- Canadians, British, Indians, French, and Germans -- at Ypres. After
he wrote the poem in May of 1915 he was not satisfied with it and threw
it away, but it was retrieved by a fellow officer and sent to London.
The Spectator, in London, rejected it, but Punch published it on 8
December 1915:
In Flanders Fields
In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.
We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved, and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.
Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.
-Xenia
------------------------------
Date: Wed, 25 Jul 2001 20:12:37 -0400
Last week I was approached by our local hospital to talk about healing =
quilts. I'm wondering if any members of this list would care to share =
their stories with me and what the making, giving or receiving of a =
healing quilt meant to them. I would use the stories during my lecture =
but names would not be used. A healing quilt is a quilt made to help a =
person through a difficult time in life (such as divorce, death, empty =
nest, illness, etc.).
Please respond privately. Thanks so much.
rballard@tir.com
-<
------------------------------
Date: Wed, 25 Jul 2001 21:00:14 -0400
From: "Cinda Cawley" <lrcawley@dmv.com>
Bucilla has at least 3 poppy design applique quilts during its kit
history, and the one Cinda asks about 1117, is surely one of the earlier
ones if the Bucilla kit numbering system is any indication. The others
are #2003, Poppy Applique ( Jan.1930), and #8971 Garden Poppies (ca.
1960). Progress and HomeNeedlecraft Creations also had poppy designs,
as did other kit manufacturers.
Xenia,
Where does Bucilla's numbering system start? At 1000? At 1? How many
different patterns are there? How long did a particular pattern remain
available? Every answer evokes more questions. Thanks.
Cinda on the Eastern Shore
------------------------------
Date: Thu, 26 Jul 2001 07:22:38 +0100
From: "Sally Ward" <Sally.D.Ward@btinternet.com>
<Did the rage for kit quilts cross the Atlantic?
Not so far as I can see, Cinda. At one time I thought there might have been
a 'version' of kit quilts going around in Northumberland because there is a
small number of quilts with similar bold designs in the same fabrics,
(nothing like the elegant US kits) but
that seems to have been just a small cluster and not a commercial
enterprise. All I know of kit quilts is what I've read on QHL or in
American books. I certainly haven't heard of a manufacturer over here, and I
don't think your manufacturers exported.
But I could be wrong <G>
Sally W
------------------------------
Date: Thu, 26 Jul 2001 07:43:00 +0100
From: "Sally Ward" <
>. If the Amish adapted the
> Welsh Diamond to their own purposes, this takes nothing away from the
beauty
> of either form.
I've had a pupil who demonstrated this type of adaptation perfectly. A
German born lady who married an Englishman and has lived here for more than
30 years learnt to quilt at my classes. Although surrounded by English
decor and sensibilites she looked at my class sample and then instinctively
created a quilt with a strong sense of colour which some might call Amish,
while all about her were either copying mine, or choosing traditionally
English colours, or swallowing whole the dictates of particular fabric
ranges. If a group of early settlers like her saw Welsh quilts, there is no
doubt in my mind how they would have interpreted them - always assuming the
appropriate fabrics were available.......
Sally Ward
 


------------------------------
Date: Thu, 26 Jul 2001 13:35:13 +0100
From: "Sally Ward" <Sally.D.Ward@btinternet.com>
To: "QHL" <QHL@cuenet.com>
I asked the question about 'open' feathers in quilting patterns of my
British quilt history list, and got the following from a lady who collects
and teaches on wholecloth quilts in the north of England (copied here with
her permission)
So the question is, when is a feather an oak leaf?
Sally W
 


------------------------------
Date: Thu, 26 Jul 2001 10:35:49 -0500
From: "schwenkfelder library & heritage center" <schwenkfeld@netcarrier.com>
 


Dear Listers:
Today I received an email from our associate director who was "born =
Amish" as he says...we were discussing a photograph of him and he quoted =
one of the basic tenets of the Amish faith --
Make no graven image of ANYTHING that is the earth below or the heavens
above ...
Perhaps that is a motivation behind their quilt designs. Just a =
thought.
Candace Perry
Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center
 


 


 


 


 


Date: Thu, 26 Jul 2001 09:15:15 -0700
From: "Maureen Flanagan" <flanagan@booksandoldlace.com>
 


Hi all:
Checking the Advanced Book Exchange at www.abe.com, I find 108 copies of
Call the Darkness Light, beginning at $1.10 and one copy of Kobayashi's book
at 14.21 from a UK dealer.
Maureen Battistella
Ashland, Oregon
------------------------------
Date: Thu, 26 Jul 2001 09:45:20 -0700
From: "Maureen Flanagan" <flanagan@booksandoldlace.com>
 


Hi all,
To add to the QHL discussion of published works on regional quilt history, a
bibliography evolved from postings on the H-Quilts list last fall that was
posted to http://www.usd.edu/sdquilts/ at that time. In addition to the
formally published state documentation project books, additional materials
on State Projects, Regional and Topical Quilt History, Exhibit Catalogs,
International Quilt History are also included as long as they have a
specific geographic focus. There are also links to web sites maintained by
state projects. The scope note, reviewed and discussed on the H-Quilts list
describes the nature of the bibliography.
Thanks to Cheryl Wolf, J. G. Row, Mary Persyn, Marsha MacDowell, Colleen
Hall-Patton, Laurie Woodard, David Crosby, Maureen Battistella, Shirley
McElderry, Cuesta Benberry, Mary Worrall for their contributions to the
bibliography. Additional items were gathered through a search of the
University of Nebraska at Lincoln, which houses the AQSG collection and the
Library of Congress. Soon to be added are titles from the UMI Dissertation
Abstracts database and WorldCat.
Maureen Battistella
Ashland, Oregon
------------------------------
Date: Thu, 26 Jul 2001 17:56:12 -0400
From: "Fran" <
 


QHL friends..next week there is the second annual Quilt Odyssey in
Gettysburg PA. It is at the Eisenhower Inn and Allstar Sport Center. Aug
2-5..Times are Thur , Fri and Sat 10-6 and Sunday 10-4.There will be over
200 quilts entered in the various contests and members of the AQSG are
having their second show of 19th Century Quilts. This year we are
spotlighting the counties of Adams,Franklin and York, PA.I have seen some of
the quilts and they are outstanding, you will find some of them in the Adams
and York County documentation books. There is also an.elaborate Crazy quilt
with the most intricate embroidery that I have ever seen, and a reversible
quilt from MissLiberty Fabric[Centennial perhaps??] to a postage stamp
back.If you are interested in more info check their website..www.quilt
odyssey.com...and if you find yourself at the show please look me up, I'll
be at the AQSG booth..it's always nice to put a face with a name...Fran Fitz
------------------------------
Date: Thu, 26 Jul 2001 17:02:30 -0500
From: "Karen S Bush" <Birdsong@worldnet.att.net>
I've been meaning to re-join for some time, but, got my new magazines for
the month and just HAD to get busy and resub so I could give KUDOS!!!! to
all the publications out there (and I think I have EVERY one of them!)
haha....
And,..the NEW ANTIQUE QUILTS!!!! HUUUUURAY!!!!! :) kb
www.karenbushquilts.com - Online hand quilting classes
 


----------------------------
Date: Thu, 26 Jul 2001 23:01:07 -0400
From: "Alan Kelchner" <
 


I purchased a top off the eBay. It came, and sure enough, it wasn't =
from the 30's as advertised. That more than alright, since I didn't =
think it was.
It's a courthouse steps variation on the log cabin. Two sides of each =
block are in a solid lime green (one of my personal fav's), the others =
in a print. The block centers are a red white-dotted swiss. The way =
the blocks are set, the lime green visually becomes the background, and =
the patterned fabric becomes a lantern shape. Rather dull red/black =
circle print borders it.
I saved the pics if you're interested.
I've pretty much set it at late 1950's. But I am curious about the =
patterned fabric. It's red/yellow/grey on white. There are musical =
notes on a staff, the words "The Oriole", "Old", and "Ring" are =
readable. Also a bird, presumably the oriole.
Anyone recognize the song? Must have been popular, but I'm much, much =
too young to remember it ...... <vbg>
And yes, I'm going to finish it into a quilt. It's not very remarkable, =
and it matches my lime green bedroom walls nearly exactly.
Alan
------------------------------
Date: Fri, 27 Jul 2001 01:08:19 -0400
From: "J. G. Row" <Judygrow@rcn.com>
Laura and all,
This is not a "they." This is the site for Bette Feinstein, who is also a
quilter. She also puts out printed catalogs devoted to certain needle-art
topics. I've enjoyed dealing with Bette. Can't recommend her highly
enough.
Judy in Ringoes, NJ
judygrow@rcn.com
------------------------------
Date: Fri, 27 Jul 2001 01:16:01 -0400
From: "J. G. Row" <Judygrow@rcn.com>
To: "Quilt History List" <QHL@cuenet.com>
I can't wait to see the AQSG show at Gettysburg!
My DH hardly ever lets me go to quilt shows without him and this one is no
exception. We'll be there on Sunday, and will look for you, Fran. Who else
will be going on Sunday? Is there a time or place we can all meet, perhaps
for lunch? Perhpas put faces to names?
Judy in Ringoes, NJ
judygrow@rcn.com
------------------------------
Date: Fri, 27 Jul 2001 07:23:55 -0500
From: Laura Hobby Syler <texas_quilt.co@airmail.net>
Yes, Judy you are correct. I couldn't recall Bette's name when I was
sending that message. She is a lovely person and has even called me a
couple of times to let me know of special thing.
Laura
------------------------------
 


 


CONTACT:
Shelly Zegart or Professor Mark Kornbluh
The Alliance For American Quilts MATRIX: The Center for
(502) 897-7566 (tel) Humane Arts and Letters Online
(502) 897-3819 (fax) Michigan State University
Zegrtquilt@aol.com (517) 355-9300 (tel)
http://www.quiltcenter.org (517) 355-8363 (fax)
mark@mail.matrix.msu.edu
http://www.matrix.msu.edu
The Alliance For American Quilts and Michigan State University Secure
Grant from NEH to Launch The Quilt Index
East Lansing, Michigan and Louisville, Kentucky, June 4, 2001 - The
National Endowment for the Humanities has granted $200,000 to
Michigan State University to launch The Quilt Index. The Quilt Index
is a project conceived and developed by The Alliance for American
Quilts in partnership with Michigan State's MATRIX: The Center for
Humane Arts and Letters Online and the Michigan State University
Museum.
The Quilt Index will be a comprehensive on-line research tool
providing wide public access to information about quilts, both
publicly and privately held. Working in XML using the Metadata
Encoding Transmission Standards (METS) that have been developed by
members of the international digital library community, MATRIX is
constructing the Quilt Index and designing the World Wide Web
interfaces. The Index will draw together previously scattered and
difficult to access documentation and images of quilts and quilt
makers from state and regional quilt projects and public collections,
as well as bibliographies of secondary materials and finding aids-all
will be searchable through the Index's site on the World Wide Web
(http://www.quiltindex.org).
The NEH funding will make possible the design of the Quilt Index in
collaboration with four pilot digitization partners. These pilot
sites are The Illinois State Museum, The Kentucky Quilt
Project/University of Louisville Archives and Records Center, the
Michigan Quilt Project/Michigan State University Museum, and The
Quilts of Tennessee/Tennessee State Library. Each of these partners
will digitize a portion of their extensive records as part of the
Index's development and initial deployment. Once The Quilt Index is
launched, The Alliance and MATRIX will begin working with state quilt
projects and collecting institutions around the country to add
records about the tens of thousands of quilts that have been
documented. The American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress
is also a partner in this project, and will link their on-line quilt
records with the Index.
Alliance co-president Shelly Zegart commented, "The Quilt Index has
long been a dream of many who study quilts and work to preserve their
history. For the first time, anyone with access to the Internet will
be able to search a vast database of quilt images and information."
Professor Mark Kornbluh, Director of MATRIX said, "We are so pleased
to be working with The Alliance and its partners to develop and host
The Quilt Index; it will provide unprecedented access to previously
unpublished documentation on American quilts and quilt making; and
will be a rich resource for students, teachers, scholars, quilt
makers, and the general public."
The Alliance for American Quilts is a national non-profit
organization that has developed a series of projects to document,
preserve, and share the history and stories of quilts and quilt
makers. It plays a unique role as a catalyst, bringing together
institutions and individuals from the creative, scholarly, and
business aspects of quilts to advance the recognition of quilts in
American culture. A board of more than 20 scholars, teachers, and
quiltmakers has worked since 1993 with The Alliance's four founders
to advance the work of documenting this nation's quilt heritage. The
Alliance implements its projects in partnership with institutions and
organizations nationally, including those noted above and the
American Folklife Center of the Library of Congress, the University
of Texas Center for American History, The University of Nebraska
International Quilt Study Center, and the University of Delaware
Center for American Material Culture Studies. Projects include The
Quilters' S.O.S. Project- Save Our Stories, a grassroots oral history
project; Boxes Under the Bed=81, an effort to identify and preserve
quilt documentation, and Quilt Treasures, a project that documents
the lives and work of the leaders of the American quilt revival.
Based at Michigan State University, MATRIX is devoted to the
application of new technologies in humanities and social science
teaching and research. The center creates and maintains online
resources, provides training in computing and new teaching
technologies, and creates forums for the exchange of ideas and
expertise in new teaching technologies. MATRIX, a national leader in
developing online resources, hosts Digital Library Initiative II
projects National Gallery of the Spoken Word and African Digital
Library. As the host of H-Net: Humanities and Social Sciences
OnLine, MATRIX supports more than 100 free electronic, interactive
newsletters, including H-Quilts, a listserv devoted to discussion of
quilts and quilt scholarship.
Michigan State University Museum, the state's natural and cultural
history museum, is home of the Great Lakes Quilt Center. The MSU
Museum has a long history of engagement in research, education, and
service projects related to quilts and holds a collection of over 500
quilts, quilt-related ephemera, and quilt-related documentation.
=46or more information, contact:
Shelly Zegart or Professor Mark Kornbluh
The Alliance For American Quilts MATRIX: The Center for
(502) 897-7566 (tel) Humane Arts and Letters Online
(502) 897-3819 (fax) Michigan State University
Zegrtquilt@aol.com (517) 355-9300 (tel)
http://www.quiltcenter.org (517) 355-8363 (fax)
mark@mail.matrix.msu.edu
http://www.matrix.msu.edu
Marsha MacDowell
Michigan State University Museum
------------------------------
Date: Tue, 31 Jul 2001 12:18:25 EDT
From: KareQuilt@aol.com
From QU of Northern VA's on-line newsletter: Here's a webpage that takes a
look at major threads on the market. You'll actually see the most popular
sewing threads that quilters use under the microscope. (You'll be amazed at
the loose fibers on some of the threads which can clog up your machine and
possibly do damage.) Check it out at:
http://sewing.about.com/library/weekly/aa102100a.htm
Karen Alexander
------------------------------
Date: Tue, 31 Jul 2001 16:48:51 EDT
From: Chyral@aol.com
 


There is a short article about the Baltimore Album Quilt exhibit at the
Maryland Historical Society on-line at:
http://www.antiquesandthearts.com/default.asp?type=CoverStory&d=Archive2000&s=
CoverStory07-31-2001-13-20-20.htm&nl=1
 


------------------------------
------------------------------
Date: Wed, 01 Aug 2001 11:44:25 EDT
From: QuiltEvals@aol.com
Dear fellow quilt and vintage textile lovers,
I am currently completing plans to take a group of like minded fabric/quilt lovers to France and England to see the sights, study at several museum and textile archives, shop at several "hot" vintage textile spots, and hear from quilt experts in each country, during the summer of 2002. This is not an effort to make any money on my part, but basically to have a great time and see some wonderful things with like minded friends.
This trip has been close to 2 years in planning, and I am leaving shortly for these areas to finalize details. We have been working on access to museum archives for the 2002 tour and it looks like we will see some great things.
Right now, I do not know a final price, but we are looking at 6 or 7 days in France, with an optional 5 day extension to England, as far as accommodations go, we are working on "nice, yet affordable".
If you would like to be added to the interest list, email me privately at QuiltStudy@aol.com and I will keep you informed as further information becomes available.
Spouses welcome......
Deb Roberts

 


paintcrib.jpg (53722 bytes)Date: Wed, 01 Aug 2001 10:48:16 -0700
From: Julie Silber 
Hi,
I am hoping that someone knows if a great crib quilt I have is a kit. It is currently on eBay, item #1451400084, 
I have asked Merikay Waldvogel and here is her response: Julie: It doesn't look familiar, but it sure looks like a kit. I'll keep my eyes open for a source. 1931 is early for a quilt kit. The maker might have taken some embroidery transfer patterns (Butterick or McCalls) and put them together in her own clever way to make the crib quilt and pillow. --Merikay
Does anyone out there know this one? Thanks,
Julie Silber
paintcribdet.jpg (40909 bytes) (click on the thumbnails...)
 


------------------------------
Date: Wed, 01 Aug 2001 16:04:38 -0500
From: Gail Ingram <GIngram@tcainternet.com>
The presence of the matching pillow, the set of the blocks, the border, and
the quilting design all make this quilt look like one made from a kit. Yet,
I have a baby quilt from my family, made "from scratch" sometime in the
1930's, with what appears to be the same squirrel and elephant designs.
Moreover, in 1974 my daughter was given a similar quilt with what are
clearly the same two figures. The maker of the latter was an older woman,
and she showed the friend who commissioned it a variety of similar animal
designs, all aged transfers. I have seen old (Vogart?) as well as McCall's
embroidery transfer patterns similar to this one. That duck ought to be the
"giveaway," for it seems fairly distinctive compared with some of the
others.
Sad that Billy Benz did not have kin to whom he could have passed this quilt
or who would have appreciated his grandmother's effort with it.
Items like this, from which much can be learned, is why I just love being a
member of QHL.
Gail Ingram
 


 


 


------------------------------
Date: Wed, 1 Aug 2001 16:40:49 -0500
From: "Carol Butzke" <butzke@nconnect.net>
Thought this might be of interest to the group. At a quilt documentation
day recently in Wisconsin, a quilt top was brought in that contained an
intense
lavender cotton fabric. The owner, a gentleman, who was knowledgeable about
his quilts and quilt tops called the color of the fabric "Rose de Chine".
This was unfamiliar to me. Looking through my library, I couldn't find a
reference to it.
A futher conversation with the gentleman produced the following information:
In the late 19th century the color palette from "jewel tones" to "brights".
Rose de chine is the color name given by an East Coast mill to an intense
lavender/pink synthetic dye. Used for clothing, it found its way into
quilts. His source was a book he purchased from an antique dealer which was
from a cloth related conference, editor, Jeanette Lasansky.
In an e-mail conversation with Xenia Cord, she added that the source was an
article by Virginia Gunn, "Dress Fabrics of the Late 19th Century, Their
Relationship to Period Quilts" as a part of Jeanette Lasansky, ed., "Bits
and Pieces, Textile Traditions" (1991). Xenia adds, "On page 11, Gunn
quotes Emma Hooper of Ladies Home Journal (1893) as saying that rose de
chine (lavender pink) would be most fashionable for 1893 (along with several
other colors.)"
If you have any further information, please add.
Carol Butzke
On a very hot and humid day in WI, 94 degrees predicted. Unusual for
Wisconsinites.
------------------------------
------------------------------
Date: Thu, 2 Aug 2001 08:58:32 -0400
From: "Zendelle Bouchard" <zendelle@indri.mv.com>
Hi everyone,
I have a collection of fabrics of the 1920s - 50s, both vintage and
reproduction, that is growing by dismaying proportions. I came up with the
idea of storing small swatches of each of the fabrics in the plastic pages
that are used for baseball cards. Or, for larger prints, I could use the
postcard size pages. This way, I could feel free to use the remainder of the
fabric while knowing that a piece of it is still preserved in my collection
in an attractive display. Is this a good idea? Is there anything about the
plastic pages that would negatively impact 20th century fabrics? What about
older fabrics?
thanks for any help,
Zendelle in NH
------------------------------
Date: Thu, 2 Aug 2001 10:12:26 -0500
From: "schwenkfelder library & heritage center" <schwenkfeld@netcarrier.com>
As long as the sleeves are polypropolene, the fabrics should be okay --
polypropolene is used in archival sleeves.
 


 


------------------------------
Date: Thu, 2 Aug 2001 10:12:01 -0400
From: "Zendelle Bouchard" <zendelle@indri.mv.com>
To: <QHL@cuenet.com>
I love hearing about kit quilts. Does anyone know if there is a website or
book that documents them?
Z
>>Bucilla has at least 3 poppy design applique quilts during its kit
history, and the one Cinda asks about 1117, is surely one of the earlier
ones if the Bucilla kit numbering system is any indication. The others
are #2003, Poppy Applique ( Jan.1930), and #8971 Garden Poppies (ca.
1960). Progress and HomeNeedlecraft Creations also had poppy designs,
as did other kit manufacturers.
------------------------------
Date: Thu, 2 Aug 2001 10:10:32 -0700
From: "Laurette Carroll" <rj.carroll@verizon.net>
To: "QHL" <QHL@cuenet.com>
Subject: Re: Storing fabric swatches
Message-ID: <006401c11b76$0ff6adc0$da860304@carroll.vz.dsl.genuity.net>
Hello,
I store my swatches on acid free paper in archival sheet protectors. I
can write on the paper a description or note about the fabric using an
archival pen or pencil. These sheets go into large three ring binders.
Swatches as small as 1"or as large as 8"x11" can be kept on these
sheets.
Stores that sell scrapbook supplies like Memories, will carry archival
supplies good for storing swatches. You should be able to get a lot of
ideas there. Not all products are the same quality so read product
descriptions carefully.
If you already know what you want, you can go to the Gaylords site, they
sell all kinds of archival supplies.
To order call toll free 800 448-6160 or http://www.gaylord.com
Laurette Carroll
Southern California
Look to the Future with Hope
------------------------------
Date: Thu, 02 Aug 2001 16:28:22 EDT
From: jocelynm@delphi.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
> > A ninety-year-old friend tells me she still feels dread early on July
> afternoons because of her memories of childhood summers.
>
Gail,
I can relate to that- I remember being given the job of peeling the
tomatos after they'd been heated to make the skins loose, and the
peculiar slimy-soft feeling of a hot tomato with the skin slipping off.
Or going out and picking cherries, and bringing them home to put them
up...
My mother remembers that in her childhood, the first task of the canning
season was for her father and brothers to dismantle the cookstove and
carry it out into the yard and set it up again under the trees. <G> They
did their cooking and canning outside, so the house wasn't all heated up.
 


------------------------------
Date: Thu, 2 Aug 2001 16:49:09 EDT
From: KareQuilt@aol.com
There are several small quilt publications from the 1970s like "Aunt Kate's
Quilting Bee" that may have gone unnoticed by some quilt historians simply
because they were rather short lived and not widely circulated compared to
Quilters Newsletter Magazine and other quilt publications still around today.
One of those 1970s publications that comes to mind is "Tumbling Alley" out of
Gainesville, FL, edited and published by Evelyn Brown. It must have been
launched about 1972. I have never seen research on Evelyn Brown/"Tumbling
Alley." Does anyone know if Evelyn is still quilting or writing? Another
small "grassroots" quilt publication from the 1970s that is not widely known
is "Nimble Needle Treasures" (NNT - 1969-1975) out of Sapulpa, OK, edited and
published by Patricia Almy (now Randolph). Cuesta Benberry, Dolores Hinson,
and Maxine Teele were all early contributors to NNT. I stumbled across a
number of back copies of both of these publications in a small town in
central Indiana in 1995. I had never heard of either before and was
absolutely delighted! Hazel Carter subsequently wrote a good article about
Patricia Almy Randolph's quilt publishing efforts in the Spring 2000 (issue #
17) of The Quilters Hall of Fame newsletter which is the only thing I have
personally seen in print about Patricia Almy and NNT. A regular series in
NNT was titled "Quilting from California" (or Canada, Hawaii, Iowa, Kansas
etc) showing the breadth of coverage in NNT. Patricia is quoted in the
article, saying, "my association with Cuesta Benberry was the backbone of NNT
historically and it would not have been the same without her." The article
goes on to say that in the pages of NNT Cuesta exposed quilters to
"first-ever-in-print news about Ladies Art Co.," as well as a chronological
study of quilt kits, the Smithsonian quilt collection, and the Index of
American Design at the National Gallery of American Art. Because circulation
was small these 1970s publications are quite hard to come by today. Is it too
soon for the secondary market of 1970s quilt history to hit the antique shops?
I personally have not seen a copy of "Aunt Kay's Quilting Bee." Are there
history articles in "Aunt Kate's Quilting Bee" like the ones that Cuesta
Benberry used to write for NNT? Who wrote for "Aunt Kate's?" Who was its
editor? Where was it published? How many issues were published?
Karen Alexander
--------------------------------
Date: Fri, 3 Aug 2001 09:31:11 -0400
From: "Clare Smith Long" <clong@ix.netcom.com>
Does anyone know of a speaker or teacher in Ohio/Michigan/Eastern
Pennsylvania who could give a presentation to a guild on Civil War quilts?
Our guild meets in Elyria, Ohio (40 minutes or so west of Cleveland). Our
committee is trying to put together the next two years worth of programs and
meetings. A survey was given to all the members and Civil War quilting was
tops on the interest list. Any leads towards speakers would be appreciated.
Thanks.
Clare Long
clong@ix.netcom.com
------------------------------
Date: Fri, 03 Aug 2001 08:57:25 -0500
From: Gail Ingram <
 


I would appreciate any information, either anecdotal or bibliographic, about
quiltmaking that is directly related to WW II. My husband, an historian, has
an ongoing project in which he is documenting the voices and experiences of
WW II veterans and discovering the way those experiences affected their
later lives. As the project has progressed, he has become interested in the
ways the women on the homefront handled their sons', sweethearts',
husbands', and fathers' being gone from the home and constantly in harm's
way. I called to his attention the article on the way British women in
detention camps used quilts to sustain hope as well as to communicate with
the men from whom they had been separated by the Japanese army.
Any information will be appreciated.
Thanks in advance,
Gail Ingram
------------------------------
Date: Fri, 03 Aug 2001 10:30:13 -0400
From: Beth Donaldson <quilts@museum.msu.edu>
Karen,
The Great Lakes Quilt Center at the MSU Museum has copies of many of the
items you described. We just received issues of the Aunt Kate's Quilting
Bees from the 1970s as a donation from Eleanor Ebanks. We already have some
from the 1960s in our Mary Schafer collection. I haven't had time to read
them thoroughly, but most include patterns, swaps, recipes and poems. We
would love to have more of them. If anyone finds them at yardsales or flea
markets and would like to donate them to us, drop me a line.
Beth
Beth Donaldson
Quilt Collections Assistant
201 Central Services, MSU Museum
East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1045
quilt line: 517-432-3800
quilts@museum.msu.edu
http://museum.msu.edu/s-program/MQulit/index.html
------------------------------
Date: Fri, 3 Aug 2001 10:59:50 EDT
From:
 


if you go to
http://museum.msu.edu/exhibitions/Virtual/quilts/preview.html
you will see the quilt exhibit at MSU
jean
------------------------------
Date: Fri, 03 Aug 2001 13:24:10 EDT
From: jocelynm@delphi.com
To:
 


On Thu, 02 Aug 2001 15:57:26 -0500 Gail Ingram wrote:
> Jocelyn, This is just one more proof that folks elsewhere had better sense
> than those who settled in the Deep South!
Gail,
Actually, it WAS the Deep South. Wesson, Mississippi, to be exact. <G>
------------------------------
Date: Fri, 3 Aug 2001 18:34:04 +0100
From: "Sally Ward" <Sally.D.Ward@btinternet.com>
To: "QHL" <QHL@cuenet.com>
 


> I would appreciate any information, either anecdotal or bibliographic,
about
> quiltmaking that is directly related to WW II.
While you are thinking about this, I am also looking into the quilts which
were made in the US and Canada and sent to the UK during this period - I'm
particularly keen to find some oral history on the groups that made them.
Sally Ward in UK
------------------------------
Date: Fri, 03 Aug 2001 14:05:06 -0400
From: Judy White <
KareQuilt@aol.com wrote:
>
> I personally have not seen a copy of "Aunt Kay's Quilting Bee." Are there
> history articles in "Aunt Kate's Quilting Bee" like the ones that Cuesta
> Benberry used to write for NNT? Who wrote for "Aunt Kate's?" Who was its
> editor? Where was it published? How many issues were published?
 


I have three issues of Aunt Kate's Quilting Bee, one dated 1973 and two
from 1971. Apparently, according to the title on the front of the
magazine,it began in 1962 as a publication "for the fun and enjoyment of
quilt lovers and hobbyists everywhere." By 1973, this had changed to
say, "magazine for quilt lovers."
These are typical, as you say, "grassroots publications" in black and
white with much hand typing and liberal printing of KC Star patterns as
well as many McKim patterns along with some original applique and
quilting patterns. It also includes some history of old blocks, quilt
layouts, poems, etc. Evidently, between '71 and '73, there was a change
at the publishing level because the 1971 issues state that the Editor
and Publisher was Glenna Boyd; however, in the 1973 issue, the Editor,
Owner-Publisher was Carolyn Scroggs and the Management Consultant was
Glenna Boyd. In the '73 issue, there are also 10 names of designers
listed and a photgrapher's credit. There also seems to be a running
column by Delores Hinson.
I don't know how long Aunt Kate's was published but would like to find
somemore issues. Another self-published magazine was "Kansas City Star
Quilts Shine Again" by James and Betty McAdams in Hot Springs,
Arkansas. I have the 8 issues beginning with the first one in January,
1983. Betty McAdams was the editor, and her husband is listed as
publisher. The patterns were usually printed in three or four sizes;
for instance, the pattern "The Album" is printed in the original 10 1/2"
block and then redrafted in 12", 14" and 16". The magazine contains
letters from readers, a letter from the editor and a pattern search
column. It is basically the same hand-typed format as Aunt Kate's with
the exception of a color cover. Betty states in the November, 1984
issue that she originally planned to put out the magazine on a quarterly
basis but changed to the WIFLI-LY schedule (when I feel like it.)
As I said, I have eight issues, but one day I received a letter in the
mail from Betty McAdams saying that her husband was very ill and she
would try to continue the magazine on her own. However, shortly after
that letter, I received another one saying that she was discontinuing
publication, so I'm not really sure how many issues were actually
published. Does anyone know anything about this little magazine?
Judy White
 


------------------------------
Date: Sat, 4 Aug 2001 07:51:50 -0500
From: "Susan Wildemuth" <
 


The Royal School of Needlework
Principal: Lady Smith-Dorrien, D.B.E.
Exhibition Road, London S.W. 7
Printed by Palatine Press, Manchester,3.
No copyright date
The Royal School of Needlework put out a series of several booklets called
Needlework in War-Time. I am assuming WWII from the looks of the booklet in
my collection, but there is no copyright date, maybe others on the list can
confirm this.
The Series:
1 Lingerie Making
2. Cutting and Making of Children's Clothing
3. Canvas Work
4 Quilting and Patchwork Quilts
5. Church Work
6. White Work
7. Embroideries in silks, cottons, or wools on material other than canvas
8. Suggestion for teaching Beginners or Convalescents
9. Renovating (mending, darning, and patching
10. Remodelling
11. Dressmaking
As you can see Book 4 is on Quilting and Patchwork Quilts. It is an eleven
page, twelve if you count the last page booklet. More of an instruction or
how-to, but there is a little history on pages 2, 3, and 4, but just a
little.
How did I get my copy? Through Hard to Find Needlework books, Betty
Feinstein.
www.needleworkbooks.com
Hope this helps members of the list who are interested in WWII quilting
information. I am interested in this area too, do any of you have any other
quilt paper or book items that relate specifically to this time period?
Many thanks!
Sue in Illinois
------------------------------
Date: Sat, 04 Aug 2001 19:57:26 +0100
From: MARK POWER <
 


Greetings!
Vietnam Veterans Memorial founder Jan C. Scruggs
will be the keynote speaker at the opening of a
new exhibit featuring artwork created by veterans
who served in Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia.  The
opening will be held on Friday, August 3, 2001 at
6 p.m. at the National Vietnam Veterans Art Museum
in Chicago.
The Healing Art exhibit features 30 pieces of fine
art that were chosen from the Department of
Veterans Affairs National Veterans Creative Arts
Competition.  Veterans nationwide were given the
opportunity to enter the competition through the
VA medical center where they receive their care.
The National Vietnam Veterans Art Museum in
Chicago is hosting the exhibit during the month of
August.
For more information, please see the attached
press release or feel free to contact me.
--
Alan Greilsamer
Director of Communications
Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund
1023 15th Street, Second Floor
Washington, DC 20005
(202) 393-0090 ext. 19 telephone
(202) 393-0029 fax
agreilsamer@vvmf.org
------------------------------
Date: Sat, 04 Aug 2001 22:33:14
From: "Ann-Louise Beaumont" <albeaumont@hotmail.com>
ToContent-Type: text/plain; format=flowed
Sherrie F. Davidson conducted the Prince Edward Island Heirloom Quilt Survey
between 1991 and 1994 and published a preliminary analysis of her findings
in "Patchwords 1992 and Patchwords 1994: Volumes 1 and 2 of the Research
Papers of the Canadian Quilt Study Group" edited by Nancy Cameron Armstrong.
She wrote that "During World War II, the PEI Women's Institutes gathered or
made 9,260 for delivery overseas. Sometimes names and addresses were
embroidered on the quilts and correspondences were begun in this way. A copy
of one such letter from England was found in the locally published history
of Cascumpec-Fortune Cove, PEI" which she included in her paper and is full
of human interest. The reference for the 9,260 quilts was a telephone
conversation with a person in the Red Cross Office, Charlottetown, PEI.
Although I no longer live in PEI, I could make a few phone calls to try to
get a contact person for the Red Cross or the Women's Institute if this
would help. Please email me if this is what you are looking for.
Edie Zakem and I included Sherrie's information in the quilting module of
First Hands, a twentieth century history of women's contributions to art and
culture on PEI. This can be found at www.gov.pe.ca/go/firsthand.
Best Wishes,
Ann-Louise Beaumont in Greeley, Colorado.
-----------------------------
Date: Sat, 4 Aug 2001 21:04:44 -0500
From: "Junior/Peggy McBride" <jlmpam@netins.net>
 


I was interested in the thread about some early patchwork. I have forgotten
what was mentioned, but there was Tumbling Alley by someone in Florida who
summered in Maine I think it was, and in going through some things today,
and moving things around, I found my notebooks with Patchwork Patter and I
don't remember who put them out.
Peggy Mc
------------------------------
Date: Sun, 5 Aug 2001 13:16:11 EDT
From: Hazelmacc@aol.com
To: QHL@cuenet.com
 


l researched a paper for The Quilters Hall of Fame back in 1998 on "Quilters
Contributions in the 20th Century. I will quote a couple of items:
In 1916 when the WWI came along the American Red Cross asked women to help
their cause...To illustrate the magnitude of this organization - in three NW
states alone (Washington, Oregon and Idaho), there were 113 chapters with an
average membership of 7,396.
"I recently examined a Red Cross quilt donated to the American Red Cross in
Washington, DC. The quilt is accompanied by a real treasure: a scrapbook
relating its history. Boys in Eva Jones's 7th and 8th grade class
(California) insisted they wanted to make money for soldiers in France. With
help from the PTA, plans were put in place for a Red Cross quilt of white
squares with red cross appliqued in each center. One lad explained to the
teacher he could go to the cemetery on Memorial Day and get a lot of
signatures from people who visit there "for they are very sad". He was
correct. By noon he had secured 77 names. This class project went well
beyond the local community. Four squares were distributed among governors of
the states. Even the President of France and Madam Poincare signed a square
as did the U.S. President Woodrow Wilson and Mrs. Wilson...Other signatures:
Orville Wright, Mary Pickford, Charlie Chaplin and John Philip Sousa.
Quilters Hall of Fame Honorees Bertha Stenge and Marie Webster were Red Cross
volunteers and two of our honorees made quilts for the Red. Cross. Grace
Snyder called her red, white and blue quilt "The Rocky Road to Tokyo". Made
of 12,000 pieces, it was auctioned for over $100 with all going to the Red
Cross. Honoree Carrie Hall wrote a friend saying "l pieced 5 quilts in the
last two weeks - three l gave to the Red Cross and two to my niece."
While at an exhibit in England l saw two quilts from WWII that had been made
in USA: one a Dresden Plate and the other 6"squares. The quilts were well
worn and were for sale. Quilters in the United Kingdom found 54 quilts in
their search that bore the Canadian Red Cross Society's labels. In archival
records 25,000 Canadian quilts were assigned to England alone, while others
went the the continent and even to Greece. In 1945 the Relief Society of the
Church of Jesus Christ of the Latter-Day Saints made and donated nearly
40,000 quilts to war-stricken contries following WWII."
Hazel Carter, Pres of The Quilters Hall of Fame

01185 - 01189

Date: Thu, 2 Aug 2001 08:58:32 -0400
From: "Zendelle Bouchard" <zendelle@indri.mv.com>

Hi everyone,
I have a collection of fabrics of the 1920s - 50s, both vintage and
reproduction, that is growing by dismaying proportions. I came up 
with the
idea of storing small swatches of each of the fabrics in the plastic 
pages
that are used for baseball cards. Or, for larger prints, I could use 
the
postcard size pages. This way, I could feel free to use the remainder 
of the
fabric while knowing that a piece of it is still preserved in my 
collection
in an attractive display. Is this a good idea? Is there anything 
about the
plastic pages that would negatively impact 20th century fabrics? What 
about
older fabrics?
thanks for any help,
Zendelle in NH

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 2 Aug 2001 10:12:26 -0500
From: "schwenkfelder library & heritage center" 

As long as the sleeves are polypropolene, the fabrics should be okay 
--
polypropolene is used in archival sleeves.

Candace Perry
Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center
www.schwenkfelder.com

----- Original Message -----

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 2 Aug 2001 10:12:01 -0400
From: "Zendelle Bouchard" <zendelle@indri.mv.com>

I love hearing about kit quilts. Does anyone know if there is a 
website or
book that documents them?
Z

>>Bucilla has at least 3 poppy design applique quilts during its kit
history, and the one Cinda asks about 1117, is surely one of the 
earlier
ones if the Bucilla kit numbering system is any indication. The 
others
are #2003, Poppy Applique ( Jan.1930), and #8971 Garden Poppies (ca.
1960). Progress and HomeNeedlecraft Creations also had poppy 
designs,
as did other kit manufacturers.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 2 Aug 2001 10:10:32 -0700
From: "Laurette Carroll" <rj.carroll@verizon.net>

Hello,

I store my swatches on acid free paper in archival sheet protectors. 
I
can write on the paper a description or note about the fabric using 
an
archival pen or pencil. These sheets go into large three ring 
binders.
Swatches as small as 1"or as large as 8"x11" can be kept on these
sheets.

Stores that sell scrapbook supplies like Memories, will carry 
archival
supplies good for storing swatches. You should be able to get a lot 
of
ideas there. Not all products are the same quality so read product
descriptions carefully.

If you already know what you want, you can go to the Gaylords site, 
they
sell all kinds of archival supplies.

To order call toll free 800 448-6160 or http://www.gaylord.com

Laurette Carroll
Southern California

Look to the Future with Hope


------------------------------

Date: Thu, 02 Aug 2001 16:28:22 EDT
From: jocelynm@delphi.com


> > A ninety-year-old friend tells me she still feels dread early on 
July
> afternoons because of her memories of childhood summers. 

Gail,
I can relate to that- I remember being given the job of peeling the
tomatos after they'd been heated to make the skins loose, and the
peculiar slimy-soft feeling of a hot tomato with the skin slipping 
off.
Or going out and picking cherries, and bringing them home to put 
them 
up...
My mother remembers that in her childhood, the first task of the 
canning
season was for her father and brothers to dismantle the cookstove 
and
carry it out into the yard and set it up again under the trees. <G> 
They
did their cooking and canning outside, so the house wasn't all 
heated up.


------------------------------

Date: Thu, 2 Aug 2001 16:49:09 EDT
From: KareQuilt@aol.com-
There are several small quilt publications from the 1970s like "Aunt 
Kate's 
Quilting Bee" that may have gone unnoticed by some quilt historians 
simply 
because they were rather short lived and not widely circulated 
compared to 
Quilters Newsletter Magazine and other quilt publications still 
around today. 
One of those 1970s publications that comes to mind is "Tumbling 
Alley" out of 
Gainesville, FL, edited and published by Evelyn Brown. It must have 
been 
launched about 1972. I have never seen research on Evelyn 
Brown/"Tumbling 
Alley." Does anyone know if Evelyn is still quilting or writing? 
Another 
small "grassroots" quilt publication from the 1970s that is not 
widely known 
is "Nimble Needle Treasures" (NNT - 1969-1975) out of Sapulpa, OK, 
edited and 
published by Patricia Almy (now Randolph). Cuesta Benberry, Dolores 
Hinson, 
and Maxine Teele were all early contributors to NNT. I stumbled 
across a 
number of back copies of both of these publications in a small town 
in 
central Indiana in 1995. I had never heard of either before and was 
absolutely delighted! Hazel Carter subsequently wrote a good article 
about 
Patricia Almy Randolph's quilt publishing efforts in the Spring 2000 
(issue # 
17) of The Quilters Hall of Fame newsletter which is the only thing I 
have 
personally seen in print about Patricia Almy and NNT. A regular 
series in 
NNT was titled "Quilting from California" (or Canada, Hawaii, Iowa, 
Kansas 
etc) showing the breadth of coverage in NNT. Patricia is quoted in 
the 
article, saying, "my association with Cuesta Benberry was the 
backbone of NNT 
historically and it would not have been the same without her." The 
article 
goes on to say that in the pages of NNT Cuesta exposed quilters to 
"first-ever-in-print news about Ladies Art Co.," as well as a 
chronological 
study of quilt kits, the Smithsonian quilt collection, and the Index 
of 
American Design at the National Gallery of American Art. Because 
circulation 
was small these 1970s publications are quite hard to come by today. 
Is it too 
soon for the secondary market of 1970s quilt history to hit the 
antique shops?

I personally have not seen a copy of "Aunt Kay's Quilting Bee." Are 
there 
history articles in "Aunt Kate's Quilting Bee" like the ones that 
Cuesta 
Benberry used to write for NNT? Who wrote for "Aunt Kate's?" Who 
was its 
editor? Where was it published? How many issues were published?

Date: Fri, 3 Aug 2001 09:31:11 -0400
From: "Clare Smith Long" <clong@ix.netcom.com>


Does anyone know of a speaker or teacher in Ohio/Michigan/Eastern
Pennsylvania who could give a presentation to a guild on Civil War 
quilts?

Our guild meets in Elyria, Ohio (40 minutes or so west of 
Cleveland). Our
committee is trying to put together the next two years worth of 
programs and
meetings. A survey was given to all the members and Civil War 
quilting was
tops on the interest list. Any leads towards speakers would be 
appreciated.
Thanks.

Clare Long
clong@ix.netcom.com

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 03 Aug 2001 08:57:25 -0500
From: Gail Ingram <GIngram@tcainternet.com>
To:



I would appreciate any information, either anecdotal or 
bibliographic, about
quiltmaking that is directly related to WW II. My husband, an 
historian, has
an ongoing project in which he is documenting the voices and 
experiences of
WW II veterans and discovering the way those experiences affected 
their
later lives. As the project has progressed, he has become interested 
in the
ways the women on the homefront handled their sons', sweethearts',
husbands', and fathers' being gone from the home and constantly in 
harm's
way. I called to his attention the article on the way British women 
in
detention camps used quilts to sustain hope as well as to communicate 
with
the men from whom they had been separated by the Japanese army.

Any information will be appreciated.

Thanks in advance,
Gail Ingram

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 03 Aug 2001 10:30:13 -0400
From: Beth Donaldson <quilts@museum.msu.edu>
To:


Karen,
The Great Lakes Quilt Center at the MSU Museum has copies of many of 
the 
items you described. We just received issues of the Aunt Kate's 
Quilting 
Bees from the 1970s as a donation from Eleanor Ebanks. We already 
have some 
from the 1960s in our Mary Schafer collection. I haven't had time to 
read 
them thoroughly, but most include patterns, swaps, recipes and poems. 
We 
would love to have more of them. If anyone finds them at yardsales or 
flea 
markets and would like to donate them to us, drop me a line.

Beth

Beth Donaldson
Quilt Collections Assistant
201 Central Services, MSU Museum
East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1045
quilt line: 517-432-3800
quilts@museum.msu.edu
http://museum.msu.edu/s-program/MQulit/index.html

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 3 Aug 2001 10:59:50 EDT
From: JQuilt@aol.com
To: quilts


if you go to 
http://museum.msu.edu/exhibitions/Virtual/quilts/preview.html
you will see the quilt exhibit at MSU
jean

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 03 Aug 2001 13:24:10 EDT
From: jocelynm@delphi.com
To: GIngram@tcainternet.com
Cc: 


On Thu, 02 Aug 2001 15:57:26 -0500 Gail Ingram wrote:

> Jocelyn, This is just one more proof that folks elsewhere had 
better sense
> than those who settled in the Deep South! 

Gail,
Actually, it WAS the Deep South. Wesson, Mississippi, to be exact. 
<G>

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 3 Aug 2001 18:34:04 +0100
From: "Sally Ward" <Sally.D.Ward@btinternet.com>
To: 



> I would appreciate any information, either anecdotal or 
bibliographic,
about
> quiltmaking that is directly related to WW II.

While you are thinking about this, I am also looking into the quilts 
which
were made in the US and Canada and sent to the UK during this period 
- I'm
particularly keen to find some oral history on the groups that made 
them.

Sally Ward in UK

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 03 Aug 2001 14:05:06 -0400
From: Judy White <jawhite@infi.net>
To: 


KareQuilt@aol.com wrote:


> I personally have not seen a copy of "Aunt Kay's Quilting Bee." Are 
there
> history articles in "Aunt Kate's Quilting Bee" like the ones that 
Cuesta
> Benberry used to write for NNT? Who wrote for "Aunt Kate's?" Who 
was its
> editor? Where was it published? How many issues were published?


I have three issues of Aunt Kate's Quilting Bee, one dated 1973 and 
two
from 1971. Apparently, according to the title on the front of the
magazine,it began in 1962 as a publication "for the fun and enjoyment 
of
quilt lovers and hobbyists everywhere." By 1973, this had changed to
say, "magazine for quilt lovers."

These are typical, as you say, "grassroots publications" in black and
white with much hand typing and liberal printing of KC Star patterns 
as
well as many McKim patterns along with some original applique and
quilting patterns. It also includes some history of old blocks, 
quilt
layouts, poems, etc. Evidently, between '71 and '73, there was a 
change
at the publishing level because the 1971 issues state that the Editor
and Publisher was Glenna Boyd; however, in the 1973 issue, the 
Editor,
Owner-Publisher was Carolyn Scroggs and the Management Consultant was
Glenna Boyd. In the '73 issue, there are also 10 names of designers
listed and a photgrapher's credit. There also seems to be a running
column by Delores Hinson.

I don't know how long Aunt Kate's was published but would like to 
find
somemore issues. Another self-published magazine was "Kansas City 
Star
Quilts Shine Again" by James and Betty McAdams in Hot Springs,
Arkansas. I have the 8 issues beginning with the first one in 
January,
1983. Betty McAdams was the editor, and her husband is listed as
publisher. The patterns were usually printed in three or four sizes;
for instance, the pattern "The Album" is printed in the original 10 
1/2"
block and then redrafted in 12", 14" and 16". The magazine contains
letters from readers, a letter from the editor and a pattern search
column. It is basically the same hand-typed format as Aunt Kate's 
with
the exception of a color cover. Betty states in the November, 1984
issue that she originally planned to put out the magazine on a 
quarterly
basis but changed to the WIFLI-LY schedule (when I feel like it.)

As I said, I have eight issues, but one day I received a letter in 
the
mail from Betty McAdams saying that her husband was very ill and she
would try to continue the magazine on her own. However, shortly 
after
that letter, I received another one saying that she was discontinuing
publication, so I'm not really sure how many issues were actually
published. Does anyone know anything about this little magazine?

Judy White

Date: Sun, 5 Aug 2001 23:05:28 EDT
From: Edwaquilt@aol.com
To: 



Patchwork Patter was the early publication of the National Quilting 
Association.
Tumbling Alley was edited by Evelyn Brown who lived in Gainsville 
Florida.
I'm now sorting through various things and find that I have several 
of these 
early publications.

Holice