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Quilters Find a way to care

01190 - 01193

 


Date: Mon, 6 Aug 2001 22:36:29 -0400
From: "J. G. Row" <Judygrowrcn.com>
To: 

DH and I returned tonight from the Quilt Odyssey in Gettysburg. It 
was a wonderful show in a VERY comfortable venue! If only the Lancaster 
show
could find a venue like the Eisenhower Center in Gettysburg! Or even 
like
the Expo center where the Mancuso's have their Fort Washington show. 
I
always dread the inconveneince of all the rooms and stairs, and 
especially
the dread trip to and from the tennis courts of Lancaster.

But, back to Quilt Odyssey. The special show of the quilts of York 
and
Adams counties was terrific! Especially since the books just 
recently were
published. It was so nice to see the quilts in the flesh. Many 
thanks to
the owners and collectors who loaned their quilts for the exhibit.

I didn't run into any list members, but since we stayed an extra 
night
after
the show closed (to do some sightseeing and antiqueing) I did see and 
was
tempted to swipe a sign still up at the Inn announcing that Phyllis 
Twigg
would be doing quilt appraisals (follow the arrow). Sunday night I 
counted
5 people besides DH and me who were having dinner at the Inn and I am 
sure
no one would have caught me, or minded. But I chickened out.

We did do our antiqueing today and I came home with a collection of 
106
quilt blocks, all different patterns, fabrics and sizes, Probably all 
made
before 1910. Some were hand pieced, some machine pieced. These were
obviously not done for a sampler quilt but as a record of block 
designs.
They had been stored in a cardboard box for some longish time, and 
the
bottom couple of blocks, the largest, are stained. I think I can 
freshen
them up a bit without further damage.

My question is, how should I store them for display and handling? The
smallest square is about 6", the largest block, a feathered star in 
red
solid and white is about 16" square. My thought was to cut a rag 
matboard
to a standard size, probably 16 x 20, and put a couple of basting 
stitches
through the the top of the blocks to the board to hold them down, but
enable
them to be lifted up to see the reverse side. That will be 
expensive, even
for me and I get the boards wholesale, and will take up a great deal 
of
room.

Or, I could baste them to muslin, but that would continue to make 
handling
them awkward.

Does anyone else have any suggestions? I know many of you either 
have or
have seen large blocks collections. Like the Carrie Hall blocks.
I'd appreciate your help.

Judy in Ringoes, NJ
judygrowrcn.com

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 6 Aug 2001 23:16:20 -0400
From: "J. G. Row" <Judygrowrcn.com>
To: 


At an antique shop on our way home from Gettysburg I found a 
wonderful 
new book by the quilt dealer Stella Rubin.

How to Compare and Value American Quilts 
(Hardcover)
by Stella Rubin
Retail Price: $24.95 Hardcover - 176 
pages 
(August 2001)20
Mitchell Beazley;
ISBN: 184000381220

Both Booksamillion.com and Amazon.com have listed it for $17.95. 
Unfortunately, I paid full price. Well, that doesn't matter because 

think it is a must-have for everyone even remotely interested in 
collecting antique quilts. If you look through your old Dutton Quilt 

Engagement Calendars you will find that Stella's quilts have been 
regular and spectacular items in virtually every year.

In this book over 60 styles or types of quilts are displayed 2 each 
on 
facing pages. One is a "best", the other only a "good" or a "better" 
in 
the style. All of the text tells you why one is better (or more 
collectible ergo more valuable) than the other. Some might argue 
with 
some of her reasoning, but there isn't much I would wag my head to. 

found that most of the time I was nodding in agreement. The photos 
are 
clear but there are very few close-ups. 20

Her valuations obviously reflect what HER market is willing to pay, 
and 
I suppose is self serving, and will tend to drive her own prices 
higher. 
Personally I think her valuations are high. The one quilt from 
her 
own collection that I hoped she would one day be willing to sell to 
me 
has just been priced incredibly out of my reach! -- It is pictured 
and 
valued in the book as a "best." Now the whole world will want it. 
20

Not all the quilts pictured are from her own inventory. Her "best" 

Baltimore Album she values at over $150,000, her "good" at $15,000 - 

$25,000. The worst photo in the book is of the only quilt she values 
as 
"Incalculable." This is the "Russellville Fair"quilt from Kentucky 
circa 1856 in the Smithsonian collection for 50 years. Of course 
this 
is a whitework quilt and they often don't photograph well. But I 
know 
I've seen photos of this quilt where you can actually see all the 
intricate detail. In her photo you can just make out general 
circular 
shapes and some trees around the border.

There is much good history, and information on caring for and 
displaying 
your quilts, and a list of where to see and/or buy quilts.

One of the wonderful things about this book is that most of the 
quilts 
pictured have never been published before. They are fresh images, 
important to those of us who devour every new book of antique quilt 
history and often see the same quilts time after time.

Judy in Ringoes, NJ
judygrowrcn.com


------------------------------

Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2001 10:58:01 -0500
From: lessmannearthlink.net (Ellen Lessmann)
To: 


QHL-
I recently found an old print at an estate sale. The subject 
is
quilting, so I could not pass it. The picture shows two women in 
colonial
type dress. An older is seated in a wingback chair on the left side 
of the
picture, by a fireplace, which is the center of the picture. She and 
a
younger woman, who is on the right side of the picture, are holding 
up a
large sampler type quilt to admire, across the center of the picture, 
in
front of the fireplace. At the older woman's side is a wonderful 
sewing
table, with what appears to be a screw on type of pincushion and 
spool
holder.
I cannot read the signature for sure, best quess would be 
"William
Fezller" or something like that. The size is about 15 inches x 20 
inches,
and the condition is not too great. It shows fading and water 
damage, but
still has a lot of charm, at least to me.
Does anyone recognize the description? I would love to know 
more
about it.
Thank you all -- Ellen in Omaha

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 07 Aug 2001 09:13:05 -0400
From: John W Kaufman <incentiveearthlink.net>
To: 


Thank you to the QHL members who came to visit and shop at my booth 
at
Quilt Odyssey. Some of you were my best customers.

The show was a great success for both the promoters and vendors. J. G. Row's comments on QHL were typical of remarks I heard from other 
visitors.

Thank you again for your support. Hope I will see you again soon.

In the "doing it the way they used to" department I still have a set 
of
vintage curtain stretchers for sale. Please contact me privately if 
you
are interested.

Nancy Kaufman
Just as I Am / Incentives
Arlington, Virginia
Vintage Fabrics, Sewing Notions, and Linens.

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 07 Aug 2001 20:41:02 -0400
From: Barb Garrett <bgarrettfast.net>
To: 

I was at the post office today and there was a poster about an 
activity
that may be of interest to some people -- I jotted the information 
down
quickly but there is a phone number to call if you have questions --

Amish Quilt Stamp 2nd Day Event
August 10, 2001 10-4
Ceremony at 11:30
PA Dutch Convention and Visitor Center
Greenfield Road Exit of Route 30 east
Lancaster PA

Stamp Sales, Special Event Cancellation
Souvenir Cards, Pins, Bookmarks, Posters

Information - Bev at 717-390-7416

I asked my post lady and she said the stamps will be available for 
sale
at your local post office on the morning of August 10, and they may 
not
sell them on August 9, which is the first day of issue. The 
Convention
Center is about 10 minutes from the site of the Lancaster Heritage 
Quilt
Show held each April at the Host.

Barb in southeastern PA

Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2001 19:06:30 -0700 (PDT)
From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com>
To: QHLcuenet.com

I received this note from a Japanese quilter to pass on to my E-mail
club, but I am sending it to QHL too in case y'all are interested.

Kris

From: louisejburfordhotmail.com

Hi - I have just joined the quilting bus !
I am located in Tokyo, Japan.
If anyone has an interest in acquiring japanese textiles -
particularly antique textiles, or quilting accessories, traditional
dyed fabrics - particularly aizome (natural indigo dyed textiles),
thread etc, - I would be more than happy to arrange it for you.
I have studies Sashiko - traditional Japanese quilting for 8 years
here in Japan and would love to meet up with others over the internet
who are interested in this craft.
Looking forward to hearing from you,
Louise

_________________

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2001 22:45:00 EDT
From: KareQuiltaol.com
To: 

Did you see the blurb on page 12 of QNM July/August 2001 about the 
international panel & forum (sponsored by QNM) that will take place 
in 
Greensboro, NC, as well as Lansing, MI, at the World Quilt & Textile 
gathering? The blurb reads in part: <<This year's topic will focus 
on the 
development of quilting communities, including discussion of the 
structure 
and originals of small quilt groups to the evolution of quilt guilds 
and 
organizations as they exist today. The international panelists will 
include 
Cynthia Morgan from Australia, Annie Viche of France, Kazuki Yoshiura 
from 
Japan, Grete Moe of Norway, and Christine Porter from the UK. U.S. 
quilter 
Sue Nickels will serve as moderator in Michigan, and Melody Johnson 
will 
direct the discussion in North Carolina.>>

I am very interested in this topic, but cannot go, unfortunately. I 
would 
love to hear a report on it. Anyone on QHL planning to attend the 
panel at 
either Greensboro or Lansing that would be willing to take notes and 
give 
me/us a report? Please email me privately if you are planning to 
attend the 
panel at one of these sites. Thanks.

Karen Alexander

------------------------------


ate: Wed, 8 Aug 2001 22:47:45 -0400
From: "Cinda Cawley" <lrcawleydmv.com>
To: 



I spoke with the people at the Maryland Historical Society this 
afternoon. They are thrilled with the response to the Baltimore 
Album 
exhibit. My guild, the Bayside Quilters, are doing a program on the 

12th as part of the "Summer Quilt Sundays" the Museum has offered. 
We'll have story telling (quilt themes), applique demos, quilting 
demos 
and guided tours of the exhibit. I know some of you have been there. 

How about some feedback. Kim? Denise?
If you can get to Baltimore before Sept. 9 you are in for a real 

treat. They are not going to show these quilts again for years and 
years. .20
Maryland Historical Society, 201 W. Monument St., Baltimore, MD 
410-685-3750
Cinda on the Eastern Shore


------------------------------

Date: Thu, 9 Aug 2001 07:31:17 EDT
From: JQuiltaol.com
To: 



the baltimore album exhibit at the maryland historical society 
museum...has
been extended until sept 16th...
you can see a mini slide show of the quilts at
http://www.mdhs.org/online/quilt_exhibit.html
jean

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 9 Aug 2001 12:00:10 EDT
From: Hazelmaccaol.com
To: 



Someone may have mentioned this but Nancy Rowley gave a paper for 
AQSG with
the title "Red Cross Quilts for the Great War". It can be found in
Uncoverings, Vol. 3, 1982.

Hazel Carter in hot No. Va. Relief for us tomorrow so they say.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 09 Aug 2001 18:55:52
From: "Kim Heger" <khegerhotmail.com>
To: 



I just finished watching "America Quilts" on PBS; what a wonderful 
program!
They are having a telethon, and mentioned that if you call in and 
make a
donation of $75, you will receive a copy of the "America Quilts" 
video. A
donation at the $120 level will get you the video and a copy of a 
magazine
with the century's best quilts. The number is 1-800-337-4788. Just
thought
some of you out there might want to know!
Kim