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Quilters Find a way to care

01194 - 01198

Date: Thu, 09 Aug 2001 22:47:18 -0400
From: denise nordberg <quiltdiva@usnetway.com>
To: 

My guild ran a trip to the Maryland Historical Society last Saturday 
to
see the Baltimore Album exhibit and some of us are still drooling. 
I've
been an afficionado .for years so I knew there would be goodies but 
the
exhibit is outstanding. In addition to the Baltimore Album quilts of
1847-1857 era, they have on exhibit "before and after" quilts ie. 
quilts
that led up to the short burst of energy that we know as Baltimore 
album
quilts and those that followed and were from outside the small 
Baltimore
quilt area. It was a treat to the eyes and also a learning 
experience
for those who can't get enough of these outstanding examples of
quilting. The space itself and the way the quilts were hung was also
inviting with a different wall color for each of the three periods. 
I
especially liked the exhibit of cartes de visite, kaleidescopes and
friendship albums (not unlike our autograph albums) which showed some 
of
the influences on the quilts. The book of the exhibit, available at 
the
gift shop is also stunning. The color is quite good and it will 
serve
to remind me and continue to educate me about these beautiful quilts.
Denise in NE PA

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 09 Aug 2001 21:18:25 -0700
From: quilter@flash.net
To: 


Hi,
The following message was passed through QHL to me from the Rocky 
Mountain
Quilt Museum. My software detected the "Code Red" worm in the 
attachment.
Thought you might like to know.

Quilter



Date: Fri, 10 Aug 2001 20:01:27 -0700
From: Amy Wilson <awilson@utech.net>
To:



I am new to the list and am interested in fabrics and patterns from 
the
Rev. War period. Does anyone know of any resources? Thanks!

--
Amy

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 11 Aug 2001 20:12:13 -0500
From: The Dougherty Family <dttes@indy.net>
To:


One of my friends bought a quilt at a garage sale, and wondered how 
old it
might be. It's a Log Cabin design with 1/2" finished strips, set
diagonally, in different colors and types of satin. Where it's a 
little
frayed, you can see that it was sewn to a base that looks like 
cheesecloth,
but a little more tightly woven than what's available now. The darks
include purple, green, black, brown, red, tan, grey, and orange. The
lights include pastel shades of pink, blue, mint, yellow, rose, 
green, and
orchid. The centers are about 1-1/2" and are dark yellow satin. 
There is
a pleated ruffle sewn on the sides (but not the bottom) from the same
yellow. This yellow has an allover moire type weave, with scattered
circles of different sizes in a tighter satin weave. There are no 
prints,
but all of the satins have different types of weaves, and neither of 
us
have ever seen anything woven like the yellow ruffles and centers. 
Any clues?

Thanks, 
Teri Dougherty
Indianapolis, IN

te: Sun, 12 Aug 2001 13:31:29 +0200
From: Ady Hirsch <adamroni@netvision.net.il>
To: 


Hi All,
I really enjoyed reading Judie's reports on her progress with the 
Mariner's
Compass quilt, and that got me curious. I know this is a high-brow
intellectual sort of list, where lofty historical matters are 
discussed
<g>, but I'm really curious to know what quilts you're working on. 
Any
reproduction quilts being made? What are your favorite patterns? 
Favorite
period? Call it late summer boredom, an excess of quality time with 
my kids...
Hope I'm not breaching any netiquette rules here, but I'd really like 
to
hear..
Happy quilting
Ady in Israel, hand quilting a repro log-cabin in mid-19th cent. 
repro
fabrics, literally glued to the air-conditioner.

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 12 Aug 2001 10:06:46 -0300
From: Terry and Sara Chisholm <family.chisholm@ns.sympatico.ca>
To: 


I'm currently finishing up some projects that my mother, who passed 
away
earlier this year, had started. One is a reproduction of a Florence
Peto quilt - I think entitled "Playtime" - full of wonderful
conversational prints. Just a bit more quilting and a binding and 
that
will be done.

Mom had also collected fabric to reproduce Ruth Baston Hull's c.1830
"Pieced Quilt (Four Patch on Point)" - pg 92 & 93 in Calico and Chinz 
-
which I've started. Not quite all the fabrics are there - so I'll
continue the search, but I couldn't paw through the ones she had 
without
itching to start. I've got a nice pile of four patches in the box.

It's been too hot to do any quilting for the last week or so, but the
weather has finally broken, and my machine is running again!

Sara Hart Chisholm, Middleton, Nova Scotia

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 12 Aug 2001 14:14:10 +0100
From: "Audrey Cameron" <audreycameron@onetel.net.uk>
To: 



Here is an exhibition in Bristol, England that may interest anyone 
lucky
enough to be there or near:
A Patchwork of Internment; the British Empire & Commonwealth Museum, 
Clock
Tower Road, Temple Meads, Bristol, BS1 6QH, 18 September- 21 December 
2001;
open 1-5, admission 3 pounds, concessions 1.50
The exhibition covers the experiences of British civilian men, 
women &
children internees in Japanese prisoner of war camps in the Far East 
during
WWII illustrated through sketches, hand made toys & games, camp 
newspapers &
embroideries.
The centrepiece will be quilts made by the women of Changi which 
were
sent to POW camp as a message to their husbands that these women were 
still
alive.
This will be the 1st time the three quilts (albeit 2 as 
reproductions) have
been brought together since the war.
More information can be obtained by e-mail: 
collections@empiremuseum.co.uk

Audrey Cameron in Lincolnshire, England
audreycameron@onetel.net.uk
audrey.cameron@virgin.net

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 12 Aug 2001 10:04:58 -0700
From: "Laurette Carroll" <rj.carroll@verizon.net>
To: 


Hello,
I have been purchasing yards and yards of *reproduction* fabrics 
since
the F&Z fabric line came out several years ago. (Hi Julia). So lately 
I
have been making pieced quilts using fabrics from different eras, and
trying to make them look as authentic as possible for that specific 
era.
I love the little antique doll and crib quilts, so I have made 
several
of those. I have also done a few strippy quilts using nice border
fabrics for the strips.

I take my ideas from quilts in my collection or antique quilts in the
literature, but I don't try to reproduce the quilt in detail. I 
prefer
to work at getting the same look or feel of the quilt.

Laurette Carroll
Southern California

Look to the Future with Hope


Date: Mon, 13 Aug 2001 00:25:08 EDT
From: KATNUE@aol.com
To: 



If anyone read an e-mail last week about someone writing a new book 
about the 
value of antique quilts please let me know. I lost the e-mail with 
the 
information. Thanks Kathy

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 13 Aug 2001 08:51:18 -0400
From: "Kris Driessen, QuiltBus.com" <krisdriessen@yahoo.com>
To: 



I added it to our "favorite books" page at 
http://www.quilthistory.com/top_twenty.htm 

It's "How to Compare and Value American Quilts", 
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1840003812/quiltweb/ 

Kris

At 12:25 AM 8/13/2001 -0400, you wrote:
>If anyone read an e-mail last week about someone writing a new book 
about the
>value of antique quilts please let me know. I lost the e-mail with 
the
>information. Thanks Kathy

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 13 Aug 2001 08:58:33 EDT
From: Tubeywooby@aol.com
To: 



Ady and all-
I just got back from Sydney in the great land way down there, 
visiting none 
other than our illustrious member Hiranya.
We had a lovely 2 weeks browsing quilt and antique stores, and I 
spent my 
spare time piecing a quilt top for her out of her voluminous 
reproduction 
fabric collection. (Read: mountains of fabric, some excavation 
required) It 
was a strippy style, with the strips of blocks being a square in a 
square. 
The border fabric was a wide column fabric... not sure of the 
manufacturer. I 
finished it the day before I left, and took pictures of her standing 
with her 
top.
Now making sofa slip-covers in hot Houston, Texas- Melissa Young

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 13 Aug 2001 13:56:49 +0100
From: "Audrey Cameron" <audreycameron@onetel.net.uk>
To: 


Hi
I would like to make a query about 2 books I would like to obtain:

Is there a Quilt Engagement Calendar (by Cyril Nelson) this coming 
year? I
have a 2001 one. Where can I get one - Amazon & Barnes & Noble know 
nothing.

The other is Ellen Kort's Wisconsin Quilts,A Voice of Their Own 
published
by Rutledge who I know are no longer publishing. I also realize that 
Ellen
Kort's Wisconsin Quilts, Stories in Stitches is coming in September. 
Is this
a new one or the other with a new title?

TIA

Audrey Cameron in Lincolnshire, England
audreycameron@onetel.net.uk
audrey.cameron@virgin.net

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 13 Aug 2001 15:50:50 -0500
From: "Steve and Jean Loken" <sandjloken@worldnet.att.net>
To: 



Ady and group,
My favorite period is late 19th century. I've been collecting many of 
the
repro fabrics and hope to make a Lady of the Lake quilt much like 
that in a
book in our library. It will be in many double pinks, madders, 
shirtings,
and some blue and green repros. I made a careful diagram of color 
placement,
but alas, forgot to write what book it was.
I did finally learn how to send plain text, so this is my first post 
in a
while, but I've been enjoying the digest very much lately.
Jean in Minnesota, fair and sunny and just like anyone would want the
weather.


Date: Mon, 13 Aug 2001 22:57:25 -0400
From: "J. G. Row" <Judygrow@rcn.com>
To: 



This weekend, while on vacation on the North Fork of Long Island, 
there
being no quilt or fabric stores handy, I stopped in my third favorite 
type
of store, a used book store. (Second favorites are antique shops and 
there
were plenty of them.) In the bookstore in Greenport I found a large 
format
paperback book, 489 pages, published in 1980 and written and 
illustrated by
Yvonne M. Khin, called "The Collector's Dictionary of Quilt Names and
Patterns." Both she and her husband were natives of Burma and began
quilting after coming to the United States. Mrs. Khin's first quilt, 
a
tumbler pattern was made in the late 1960's.

This book contains 2400 patterns, each one with a hand drawn very 
clear
design, alternate names and earliest references, much like Barbara
Brackman's Encyclopedias of pieced and applique designs, which came 
much
later.

I've not heard of this book before, nor have I ever heard Mrs. Khin's 
name
mentioned. Can anyone tell me about this lady? And why her book was 
so
quickly eclipsed by Brackman's?

Judy in Ringoes, NJ
judygrow@rcn.com

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 13 Aug 2001 23:26:33 -0500
From: Gail Ingram <GIngram@tcainternet.com>
To: 


re: Addy in Israel: "I know this is a high-brow
intellectual sort of list, where lofty historical matters are 
discussed, but
I'm really curious to know what quilts you're working on. Any
reproduction quilts being made? What are your favorite patterns? 
Favorite
period? "

Well, this hot summer of quiet thinking time, this list's exchanges 
about
the dangers of romanticizing our foremothers' circumstances coupled 
with the
purchase of a gorgeous red-and-white Pineapple pattern quilt top on 
Ebay
have given me an epiphany-----I am a Depression Quilt gal. For years, 
I've
fought off admitting that.

I love using and owning all those lovely geometric designs in the 
colors of
the 19th century, but I don't love making them. I've bought enough 
green and
white and red fabrics to make all sorts of old standards from an 
earlier
era, but when I sit down to sew block after block of an identical 
pattern
with identical fabrics, I grow wan and feel the need of freshly 
dripped
coffee and fresh air.

I never leave a quilt store without a bag of 20's and 30's repro 
fabrics,
which I love washing and pressing and putting in their correct places 
in my
plastic boxes. I yearn for old sateen the way some folks yearn for a 
good
meal. Sometimes I literally cannot pass by the closet where my 
fabrics live
without pulling back one of the pocket doors and admiring the little 
prints
and pastels and art deco designs. I collected feedsacks long before 
such
collections were in vogue. I have bits and pieces from my 
grandmother's and
mother's scrapbags. My first quilt was a Double Wedding Ring. My 
second was
a Dresden Plate---both made from scraps of small print fabrics passed 
to me
from the 30's and 40's and 50"s.

The recent purchase of a beautifully done Red and White Pineapple 
quilt top
finally freed me. Looking at that quilt on our high 1840's tester 
bed, I
rejoiced in its beauty. The red-blue-and-yellow Pine Tree quilt over 
which I
laid it, the gift of another student's granny, gives my life daily 
grace.
The classic Peony on which I've been working for too long is almost 
done and
will be pretty on a similar poster bed at Christmastime. Two 1850's 
quilts
from the family of an early teaching mentor look terrific on the 
Renaissance
bed in a guest bedroom

It occurred to me: I've done my duty to my beds and my earlier 
ambitions.
Now I can do what I've wanted to do from the first----use all those
Depression and Depression repro fabrics. So today, I pulled out a 
piece of
1930's blue yardage and looked up a basket pattern Scioto Danner sent 
me
from Emporia, KS, when I was 23 years old and desperate for guidance. 
I
might even drive over to Arcadia, LA, 20 miles west on I-20 and see 
where
Bonnie and Clyde met their end, check out some of those movies like 
"Places
in the Heart" and oggle the cotton print dresses their heroines 
wear---just
to get the feel of the era. A last fling before school starts. And a
headstart on a winter's happy piecing and thinking.

Now, how's that for "highbrow" and "intellectual," Addy? Maybe it 
helps
that I've pulled Alice Walker's wonderful story "Everyday Use" from 
my shelf
for bedtime reading--just to keep the mood going.

Gail Ingram

------------------------------


Date: Tue, 14 Aug 2001 08:25:08 -0400
From: Judy White <jawhite@infi.net>
To: 


Hi Judy. You bring up a very interesting question. I have the Khin
book as well as the original Brackman Encyclopedia of Pieced 
patterns.
Personally, I think this is a case of two people doing the same thing
only in a different way. In the Khin book, she classifies the 
patterns
by the basic geometric design - square, recetangle, diamond, circle,
hexagon, applique, misc. She states in her introduction that she
rejected the patch identification method in favor of the geometric
design method. 

On the other hand, Brackman identifies the patterns in her 
encyclopedia
by "the basic unit of the design and its repeat. To use the key to 
find
a pattern, the reader must decide what the repeat is." Also, in the
Brackman encyclopedia, she uses a hard-to-use (in my opinion) decimal
system of numbering the patterns. 

Volume 1 of the Brackman book was published in 1979 and Khin's book 
came
out in 1980. They both used some of the same sources for their 
patterns
but apparently unaware of each other, or maybe not. Barbara Brackman
had access to the Spencer Museum of Art at the University of Kansas 
and
its vast collection of quilt books, pamphlets and the Carrie Hall 
Block
Collection there. 

In Quilter's Newsletter Magazine, issue 151 on page 28, there is an
article about Yvonne Khin and her quilt collection and how she began
quilting. She said it took her ten years to write the Dictionary of
Quilt names and Patterns.

I think the reason we are more familiar with Barbara Brackman is that
she kept writing articles and doing research about old quilt patterns
and women who quilted in the midwest and she published her findings. 
To
my knowledge, the Dictionary of Quilt Names and Patterns is the only
thing Khin published. But I could be wrong about that. 

Another interesting thing is that a review was published in Quilter's
Newsletter about the Khin book when it first came out, and they sort 
of
chastised her because the drawings could not be drafted as quilt
patterns ready to use. Apparently, they missed the whole concept of
"dictionary."

Judy White - Ct

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 14 Aug 2001 07:25:14 -0500
From: Laura Hobby Syler <texas_quilt.co@airmail.net>
To: 


Hi Judy,
I met Ms. Kin when she lived in DC back in the '80's and have both 
the
hardback and soft cover - autographed. My father got them for me when 
he
lived in DC.
While the book is loaded with designs, it is very difficult to find a
pattern unless you know the name. I think the huge size, weight and 
hand
drawn look of the blocks turned people off...at least some of my
customers thought it unprofessional for the price @ $12 if memory 
serves
me correctly (way back when I had my quilt shop)
At the time I was selling it, I was also selling Jinny Beyer's "The
Quilter's Album of Blocks & Borders" (hardback only and sold for 
$16.95)
and very professionally done graphics with fabric textures added, and
Judy Remhel's "Key to 1000 Quilt Patterns" 3 additions. These are 
small
3 ring binders, about the size of a paperback book. I know Jinny did 
not
reprint her book, and I lost contact with Judy...though I believe 
I've
seen one of the editions from time to time advertised in QNM....
They have all come in handy for me though the years...and I continue 
to
use them all for pattern identification when I'm stumped!
Laura



------------------------------

Date: Tue, 14 Aug 2001 09:02:16 EDT
From: JQuilt@aol.com
To: 



a lot of tradtion is "unprofessional" ..
and while that may be the case with ruby's quilt block 
dictionary...there is 
a large place in the quilting world for tradition...so let's not 
write off 
ruby's book so fast...instead let's treasure and honor the lady and 
the book 
that was in the beginning of cataloging all the quilt block 
patterns...
jean

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 14 Aug 2001 09:04:28 -0500
From: "Carla Toczek" <CToczek@hot.rr.com>
To: 


I've found that the hot Texas summer is just as confining as the 
previous New York winter and consider that fact a great excuse for 
sewing. <G> 20

I'm finishing a block of the month program from a Croton-on-Hudson, 
NY 
shop that uses Nancy Kirk's Civil War line in a block within a star 
design, each being different from the last. It's an original design 

from the shop, but has a great period feel to it.20

On my list of to-do's, I plan to delve into my own stash of repro 
fabric 
and make the double pink and poison green streak of lightning quilt 
from 
the New Jersey Quilts book. The same quilt was patterned recently in 

Traditional Quiltworks Magazine; although, I promise I already had 
the 
idea to do it myself!

And on a related note, have you all seen Pepper Cory's new line of 
cinnamon pinks and reds? They're really nice. 20

Howdy from Central Texas,
Carla Toczek

-


------------------------------

Date: Tue, 14 Aug 2001 10:36:15 -0400
From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett@fast.net>
To: 


I remember seeing Yvonne and her husband in old, early issues of 
quilt
magazines -- like Quilt World of the late 70s early 80s. They did
articles, patterns -- can't remember exactly what, but I was familiar
with her name as a magazine contributor before I heard of Barbara
Brackman. My aging brain remembers them appearing "older" in 
pictures
-- perhaps her encyclopedia was the culmination of her work in quilts
rather than the beginning that it was for Barbara. Is Yvonne still
around?

Since Quilter's Newsletter did not understand the intent of the book 
and
didn't give it a positive review, it just may be a case of not 
having
the right item at the right time -- Yvonne was ahead of her time and 
the
quilt world wasn't ready for a book of pictures -- people needed
patterns so they could re-learn how to make quilts. By the time AQS
published Barbara's book, the market was a little more ready for that
type of book, plus the interest in quilt documentation started about 
the
same time and her book was the readily, easily available book to
consistently use for reference, giving it a boost in popularity and
recognition. State (and county here in PA) projects weren't as 
likely
to use the Rehmel or Khin books as they weren't easily found, so
volunteers became familiar with Brackman, not realizing there were 
other
encyclopedias available.

Barb in southeastern PA

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 14 Aug 2001 12:23:34 EDT
From: QultFrFn@aol.com
To: 


Lucky you! I haven't found Khin's books yet. Used bookstores are 
usually 
first on my list. ( I found a mint condition QUILTS IN AMERICA, 
Orlofsky, 
1974 edition, for twenty dollars last year.) 

I've collected quilt 'encyclopedias' for some years and have found 
the Hall 
and Kretsinger book wonderful as a view into available patterns of 
the first 
third of the 20c. Rehmel and Beyer were the first, that I know of, 
to 
organize the block and patterns into consistent, mathematically 
reasonable, 
'systems'. This is a great benefit for teachers, designers, and 
students -- 
because the math isn't arbitrary.

Although I do enjoy Brackman's encyclopedia I find the lack of 
reasonable 
math systems an annoyance. I have only her self-published 
encyclopedia -- 
maybe in the AQS version things are organized better.

I've enjoyed following the comments on this topic! Nancy in Tempe, 
AZ

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 14 Aug 2001 18:01:21 -0400
From: "J. G. Row" <Judygrow@rcn.com>
To: 



Vivien,

My Khin is marked $16.95 original price, and I paid $20.00, so I got 
a good
deal! Hooray!

Judy in Ringoes, NJ
judygrow@rcn.com

From: "Vivien Lee Sayre" <vsayre@nesa.com>
To: 



> Judy,
>
> You found one of my favorite reference books. I bought mine for $10 
from
someone
> down sizing, about eight years ago and use it constantly for 
appraising
and
> ideas. It is wonderful! Recently, I saw this book sell on-line for 
over
> $150, so someone else has learned how good it is too.
>
> Vivien

> > In the bookstore in Greenport I found a large format
> >paperback book, 489 pages, published in 1980 and written and 
illustrated
by
> >Yvonne M. Khin, called "The Collector's Dictionary of Quilt Names 
and
> >Patterns."
> >This book contains 2400 patterns, each one with a hand drawn very 
clear
> >design, alternate names and earliest references, much like Barbara
> >Brackman's Encyclopedias of pieced and applique designs, which 
came
much
> >later.

------------------------------


Date: Tue, 14 Aug 2001 20:23:41 -0500
From: "caveman" <caveman@cowtown.net>
To: 


Hi all,
Someone asked what we are all doing. I already deleted that e-mail 
but 
wanted to answer the question. I just finished two miniature quilts 
that 
are going to be auctioned at my quilt guild show (Arlington, Tx) in 
September. One is a little Grandmother's Fan quilt made of the 1930's 

repro fabrics and muslin. The other one is a strippy style quilt of 
little 3 inch pink and brown scrappy cactus baskets, set on point. 
The 
border and sashing fabric is a pink and brown Harriet Hargrave 
printed 
stripe. I'm really pleased with this one and hope it brings a good 
price. My guild has a miniature quilt auction every year with the 
money 
going to the Susan G. Komen Foundation for breast cancer research. I 
try 
to donate a quilt every year and this year the machine quilting is 
done 
by Karen Roxburgh who does wonderful work.20

If anyone has the booklet "The Quilts of Western New York" then you 
can 
see exactly the quilt I just finished, also to be hung at the 
Arlington 
show. This quilt is an extremely scrappy Blind Man's Fancy pattern, 
with 
many pinks, browns, reds, blues, yellows, and absolutely no greens. 
The 
original quilt is an 1880's quilt and mine looks just like it! I 
spent 2 
years making this quilt, carefully scrutinizing each fabric in the 
original photo and matching it as exactly as possible. The result is 

every bit as I had hoped it would be. The quilt is so exuberant and I 

would love to know what the original maker was thinking as she made 
it. 
She definately had no inhibitions in her piecing or color 
combinations. 
She often turned her points the wrong way, demonstrating a carefree 
attitude. At least, this is how I envision her. I did mine just like 

hers.

I hope some of you will be able to make it to the Arlington quilt 
show, 
this Sept 21 to 23. Maybe you will even want to bid on some of our 
mini 
quilts. It is for a great cause. I'll see you there!

Arlene Heintz in Arlington, Tx