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Quilters Find a way to care

01220 - 01221

 

Date: Sun, 9 Sep 2001 22:22:30 -0400
From: Brea_Barthel@mapinfo.com
To: 
Kate Knight's recent posting about ramie included the following:
DISADVANTAGES OF RAMIE AS A FABRIC
Low in elasticity
Lacks resiliency
Low abrasion resistance
Wrinkles easily
Stiff and brittle

Those all fit with my experience, but I'm curious whether another 
problem
I've had is generic to the fabric, or specific to the dying 
techniques used
for the four different pieces, by different makers, that I've noticed 
in my
ramie or ramie-blend clothing. The fabric seems to be particularly
sensitive to sweat... or rather, since I'm a lady, perspiration 
(glow?).
Collars on two different jackets have severely faded at the fold 
where
they're exposed to my glow. Since this has never happened with my 
cotton
clothing, I suspect that it has to do with how well ramie holds its 
dye.
I've also run into occasional problems with the ramie clothing 
reacting
badly to spot treatment for stains. Has anyone else noticed these
problems? Any suggestions? (besides not sweating or staining 
clothing, of
course).

Brea Barthel

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 10 Sep 2001 09:06:15 -0400
From: "Teddy Pruett" <Aprayzer@hotmail.com>
To: 


Dear Karan and Listmembers,
I have just spent nine months researching and preparing for a new 
lecture I am now giving on the effects of the "war for secession "on 

Southern quilts. Lest someone think I am advertising the lecture, I 

wont even mention the name or specifics. 20

I was astounded at the things I learned, things I had never even 
considered. I am known for humor in my lectures, and most of my 
audiences think they are coming for a great time, so they are going 
to 
be stunned if they come to see this one - it is anything but 
humorous. 
I spent months researching, just to distill the info down to lecture 

size, but there is very little humor. The war was NOT funny - it 
was, 
in reality, a brutal time in American history. I can't change the 
truth, even by the cleverest of writing, so I have attempted to make 
the 
program informative by telling the stories and facts that most 
touched 
my heart, hoping that the same things will touch the hearts of my 
audience.

I had no idea of the starvation, devastation, and hardships the women 
of 
the south actually experienced. I am afraid my audience will either 

walk out or leave so depressed that they will have to head for the 
nearest hot fudge sundae to recupe!

Just be prepared for the sadness you uncover.

Teddy Pruett, born&bred Southern gal, descendant of Southern 
families, 
Certified Appraiser, historian and lecturer. (There! That's my 
advertising!)

-

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 10 Sep 2001 09:09:34 -0400
Fro


?<<< Anyone know when commercial machine
quilting began? Alhambra and elmora could just be the
pattern names<<<

Barbara Brackman writes in her Clues in the Calico, pg.140, that
prequilted silk was available in the 1889-90 Montgomery Ward 
catalog,
for $1 a yard, and states that it dates back to about 1870>>>

I have appraised a good number of Victorian Cray Quilts, 1880's and 

90's, with pre-quilted backs, so that info appears to be correct. 
Teddy Pruett



------------------------------

Date: Mon, 10 Sep 2001 09:25:18 -0500
From: Bettina Havig <bettinaqc@socket.net>
To: 
I worked with this company a few years ago when they almost decided 
to
revise these booklets. Unfortunately they got side tracked by 
chem-tex tube
paints and have not done any revisions. The company still exists.
Apparently they saw no need for copyright dates. None of the 
booklets have
copyright dates but all are still in available. The first nine of 
the
twelve that they published all have fabric requirements for 36 inch 
wide
fabric even thought none has been available for years. The last 
three
booklets, done after 45 inch wide fabric came about, also have no 
copyright
date, but the fact that they give yardage for 45 inch fabric at least 
puts
them in the 70's. Aunt Martha/Colonial Patterns still operates from 
the
same location in Kansas City MO that they have for the past at least 
50
years. You can reach them 340 West 5th St.,Kansas City MO 64105, 
phone
816-842-1969.
Bettina Havig

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 10 Sep 2001 11:00:23 EDT
From: Hazelmacc@aol.com
To: 
I have collected almost everyone but the publisher announced last 
year that 
that calendar was to be the last one. 

Hazel in No. Va. 

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 10 Sep 2001 11:04:10 -0400
From: Vivien Lee Sayre <vsayre@nesa.com>
To: 
Laurette,


Two years ago I appraised a Civil War quilt that contained 'quilt as 
you
go' blocks. One block was completely machine made. Date of quilt, 
1863.


Vivien Sayre


>>>>


From: "Teddy Pruett" 

To: "Laurette Carroll" , "QHL" 

Date: 


<excerpt> ?<<<<<< Anyone know when commercial machine

quilting began? Alhambra and elmora could just be the

pattern names<<<<<<


Barbara Brackman writes in her Clues in the Calico, pg.140, that

prequilted silk was available in the 1889-90 Montgomery Ward catalog,

for $1 a yard, and states that it dates back to about 1870>>>



<fontfamily><param>Arial</param><smaller>I have appraised a good 
number
of Victorian Cray Quilts, 1880's and 90's, with pre-quilted backs, so
that info appears to be correct. Teddy Pruett

</smaller></fontfamily></excerpt>

</excerpt><<<<<<<<

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 10 Sep 2001 08:26:10 -0700
From: "Laurette Carroll" <rj.carroll@verizon.net>
To: 
Hello,

Vivian, Yes, I have seen early machine quilting, also. The quilt as 
you
go method, too. If you are referring to Brackman's 1870 date, she was
referring to *commercially* quilted fabric made for resale (as was 
the
original list question), as lining for clothing and often used for 
backs
of quilts. But this should not surprise us because the very first 
sewing
machines were used commercially by tailors for clothing manufacture.

Laurette Carroll
Southern California

Look to the Future with Hope

----- Original Message -----
From: "Vivien Lee Sayre" <vsayre@nesa.com>


------------------------------

Date: Mon, 10 Sep 2001 14:04:29 -0400
From: Judy White <jawhite@infi.net>
To: "

Laurette, I agree with you that the names Alhambra and Elmora were 
names
of pre-quilted patterns.

Judy White - Ct where I had to turn the AC on again today.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 10 Sep 2001 14:18:14 -0400
From: "pepper cory" <pepcory@mail.clis.com>
To: 

Somewhere I read, or heard, that machine quilting as a cottage 
industry was
common in Missouri in the 1920's. I have a wool Amish quilt (very 
heavy)
from Iowa that the owner told me was sent to Missouri to be quilted 
by
machine. I know rug weaving was an industry there and at least one 
loom
maker came out of Missouri. Once upon a time I was going to be a 
weaver and
had a rug loom. So I wouldn't disturb a sleeping spouse (small 
apartment) I
hung the treadles with leather laces that I''d wet and stretched. My 
piece
de resistence was a rag runner 13 1/2 ft. long. Then I met my first 
quilt,
the loom gathered dust, and I sold it in an auction.
Havin a spectacular day in coastal North Carolina-
Pepper Cory

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 10 Sep 2001 12:40:00 -0700 (PDT)
From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessen@yahoo.com>
To: 

Teddy,

What a tease you are! Can you hit some highlights? Are you
lecturing anywhere north of the Mason Dixon line in the future? I
promise not to wear blue....

Kris, born in NY 100 years after the Second Civil War. 

> I had no idea of the starvation, devastation, and hardships the
> women of the south actually experienced. I am afraid my audience
> will either walk out or leave so depressed that they will have to
> head for the nearest hot fudge sundae to recupe!

> Just be prepared for the sadness you uncover.

> Teddy Pruett, born&bred Southern gal, descendant of Southern
> families, Certified Appraiser, historian and lecturer. (There!
> That's my advertising!)



__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 10 Sep 2001 17:21:19 -0400
From: Pat & Jim <jimpat@mediaone.net>
To:

Dear Becky:

In doing some research recently, I came across information related to
the Index of American Design. The most recent published index, a 
heavy
two volume set, is called The Treasury of American Design by 
Clarence
P. Hornung, New York, 1970. If they are not available through your
local library, try Interlibrary Loan.

The National Gallery of Art, which is a part of the Smithsonian
Institution, commissioned out-of-work artists to do watercolor
renderings of great American folk art treasures in the 1930s, under 
the
auspices of the WPA program. The goal was to preserve the images for
posterity. Color photography was not advanced at the time, and the
issue of longevity and storage of photos was an issue also. It was 
felt
that watercolors, which require less maintenance to preserve over 
time,
would be the perfect medium.

Quite a few artists participated over a period of three years or so, 
if
memory serves me, and their work has served as a catalog of early
graphic design and artifacts.

Pat Cummings
Concord, NH where we are awaiting cooler temps.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 10 Sep 2001 18:46:19 -0400
From: "J. G. Row" <Judygrow@rcn.com>
To: 

http://web.mit.edu/2.972/www/reports/sewing_machine/sewing_machine.htm

Someone on the QuiltArt List posted this address. If you have ever 
wondered
what goes on when the needle disappears underneath the throat plate, 
this
web site will leave you with absolutely no more questions. This was 
put
together by Jonah Elgart, a second year student at MIT. Pay special
attention to the animated operation of the stitching mechanism. Even 
he got
so carried away because of how ingenious it is that he mis-spelled
"stitching".

Now if he could only show me exactly why and how that airplane gets 
off the
ground~!

Judy in Ringoes, NJ
judygrow@rcn.com

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 10 Sep 2001 19:02:47 -0400
From: "J. G. Row" <Judygrow@rcn.com>
To: 

Friends,

The following (made anonymous by me) came on the QuiltArt List. I'd 
like to
get your feeling about this post. My answer to her follows. Was I 
right?
I'll forward all answers I get.

>Several folks have been discussing how poly thread could affect the 
cotton
in a
>quilt top and expressing doubt about this really happening. I've 
had sad,
>personal experience with this. Over a quarter century ago I sold a
beautiful Log Cabin >quilt to my cousin -- top was about 1890's, had 
been
newly, and nicely, hand-quilted in
>1974. Everything was in superb condition.

>Once she got it home, the quilt was hung on a wall, not exposed to 
light,
cared for >lovingly. However, the poly thread is definitely now 
cutting the
fabric in many places, to >the point that she is not sure she can 
actually
justify continuing to hang the quilt even
>though the whole room was planned around it. I have no idea HOW this 
is
>happening, or WHY, but I can definitely tell you that it IS 
happening.

If that quilt has been hung continuously for 25 years I think the 
threads
would be cutting the fabrics no matter what kind of quilting thread 
was
used. Just think of the weight those little threads have to bear. 
My
thought was that the sleeve (I hope there was a sleeve) should be 
moved
around from side to side every couple of years if the quilt was going 
to be
hung continuously. Or, the whole thing stitched throughout to a 
backing and
then hung from the backing. Of course I haven't seen it, but I am 
not
convinced that it is the poly-cotton thread which has done the 
damage.

Judy in Ringoes, NJ
judygrow@rcn.com

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 10 Sep 2001 19:47:30 EDT
From: ARabara15@aol.com
To: 

I would agree that I would not have hung any vintage textile for an 
extended, 
continuous period of time. And even though the quilt may not have 
been in 
direct sunlight, filtered sun, dust, and dust mites may have taken a 
toll.I'm 
not certain that the thread is actually cutting the older fabric as 
much as 
the fabric is falling away from the thread which has not 
disintegrated as the 
fabric fibers have. Some means of support, say a backing or frame to 
support 
the quilt and take the weight off of the fabric might have saved the 
quilt. 
Just my thoughts...

Donald from Trenton NJ

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 10 Sep 2001 16:51:12 -0700
From: "Laurette Carroll" <rj.carroll@verizon.net>
To: 

Hello,
Judy, actually it was Judy Schwender who sent the following message. 
I
just put in my 2 cents about the Brackman information.
The only thing I know about *Alhambra* is that my Mom and Dad lived 
for
30 years in a city by that name here in So. California!
Laurette

>>>I wonder if this is an invoice for fabric that is
already quilted? Anyone know when commercial machine
quilting began? Alhambra and elmora could just be the
pattern names (like VIP's Simple Treasures or
Concord's Country Florals.)<<<


------------------------------

Date: Mon, 10 Sep 2001 20:01:37 EDT
From: ARabara15@aol.com
To: 

Now you all are going to think that I'm nuts but this has happened 
far to 
often for it to be a coincidence. Many times I will get a vinatge 
quilt 
(Vintage varies -some have been 19th cent and some 20th cent) and 
they have a 
distinct sour smell to them similar to pickles. I am so accustomed to 
the 
various smells of vintage fabrics but this one is very new to me. 
It's not 
stale tobacco smoke or camphor, or cedar. I grew up with all of those 
smells. 
This sour smell has been in quilts that have come to me from many 
different 
states so it's not a regional thing and the quilts are not the same 
color so 
I've ruled out fabric dye. Could it be in the cotton batting? Has 
anyone had 
this experience before and might anyone know what it might be? It 
does wash 
out but the odor intensifies when the quilt hits the water-as most 
smells in 
textiles do. Is there a quilt pickling process out there that I'm not 
aware 
of?

Donald with a clothespin on his nose in Trenton NJ

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 10 Sep 2001 20:56:05 EDT
From: ARabara15@aol.com
To: 

I'm full of questions tonight. I had the incredible good fortune this 
weekend 
of being able to purchase a large duvet cover (probably used to cover 

feather bed)made from 19th cent lightweight cretonne. The dealer told 
me that 
she purchased it from an estate in Lancaster Co Pa. The background is 
a rich 
pomegranate red with a vining paisley print. The cover is hand 
pieced, there 
are salvage edges but I haven't checked for any mill names yet. The 
cover has 
been used and smells musty. Can I safely wash this treasure in cold 
water 
without destroying it? Please advise.

Elated and nervous - Donald in Trenton NJ

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 10 Sep 2001 21:18:25 EDT
From: ARabara15@aol.com
To: 
Brea, 

from my past product development days in retail these problems 
are 
inherant with ramie and ramie/ct. It does not hold dye as well as 
cotton- 
that's why they added cotton as a blend and tends to fade easily and 
abrades 
on the surface. It is a very "disposable" fabric.

Donald - tucked safely away from my past life in provincial Trenton 
NJ


Date: Mon, 10 Sep 2001 22:13:36 -0400
From: "Cinda Cawley" <lrcawley@dmv.com>
To: 
Holice,
Does the bolt end say Ely Walker or Ely&Walker?
Cinda on the Eastern Shore


------------------------------

Date: Mon, 10 Sep 2001 22:47:41 -0400
From: "Cinda Cawley" <lrcawley@dmv.com>
To: 


Yesterday was the annual quilt show and sale at Sully Plantation, 

mid-18th century house in Northern Virginia near Washington, D.C. 
This 
is a one day event held on the Sunday after Labor Day. As expected 
in 
Virginia in late summer it was hot, hot, hot and humid. Fortunately 

there are lots of big trees and sometimes a breeze. There are 
antique 
quilts everywhere: on display in the house and for sale all over the 

grounds. Quilts hung on clotheslines, draped over wooden fences, 
piled 
on the grass, under tents--heaven!
I bought a copy of Dr. Dunton's book and a wonderful, very early 
top 
(1st quarter 19th century). It's a four patch with alternate blocks 
of 
indigo printed with large bright blue leaves. It had once been 
quilted 
in a one inch grid. The four patches are a variety of (I think 
French) 
prints, checks and stripes with white. The whites are the 
interesting 
part of the top; they are all different kinds of cottons: dimity, 
pieces 
of Marseilles weave, plain muslin, woven patterns. I will bring this 

piece to AQSG in the hopes that those more knowledgeable than I will 

enlighten me.20
If I were rich and could have taken home anything I wanted my 
choice, without hesitation, would have been a Log Cabin quilt in 
Stella 
Rubin's booth in madder browns with a bandana from the Centennial 
Exhibition as a central medallion. Talk about quilt history!
The most interesting quilt in the small exhibit in the mansion 
house 
was called the McHaney Rose Quilt, dated 1889. Anticipating Anne Orr 
by 
30 years, Louise McHaney of Henderson Co., Tennessee designed a rose 

bouquet inspired by a needlepoint design and executed in 12,772 5/8 
inch 
mosaic pieces. The roses, in shades of red and pink, are on a 
chocolate 
brown background. 20
The word is that there will be no more Quilt Engagement 
Calendars. 
The publisher isn't doing any more.
SOB!
Cinda on the Eastern Shore


------------------------------

Date: Mon, 10 Sep 2001 22:44:00 -0700
From: Gail Ingram <GIngram@tcainternet.com>
To: 


Re > I had no idea of the starvation, devastation, and hardships the
> women of the south actually experienced. I am afraid my audience
> will either walk out or leave so depressed that they will have to
> head for the nearest hot fudge sundae to recupe!


> Teddy Pruett, born&bred Southern gal, descendant of Southern
> families, Certified Appraiser, historian and lecturer. (There!
> That's my advertising!)



May I suggest a work of fiction that is good reading and that also 
gives a
good sense of the post-Civil War South---"The Last Living Confederate 
Widow
Tells All" by Allen Gurganus. Set in South Carolina in the scorched 
earth of
Sherman's march from Atlanta to Charleston, this novel gives a good 
sense of
what it was like to have one's entire world destroyed and to have to 
start
life again using negative numbers. Also of what it took to survive.

Many families went from wealth to abject poverty with the strike of a 
match.
As a graduate student I was astonished to find boxes of materials 
containing
letters of people like the South Carolina poet Paul Hamilton Hayne 
that were
written in the margins of old newpapers, on endpapers of books, on 
fragments
of wallpaper and used butcher paper. Hayne had been a wealthy man 
before the
war. After the war he fed his family by trapping rabbits and birds 
(he was
low on amunition for his gun) to supplement what little he could grow 
in a
vegetable garden (seeds were scarce, too). He and his entire family 
lived in
a one-room outbuilding, and he wrote on whatever paper he could find. 
At a
later point, suddenly the letters were written on real stationery, as 
were
his poems. An Ohio stationer whom Nathaniel Hawthorne had told about 
Hayne
in 1863-4 had sent him boxes of stationery!

When the Board of little Washington College (now Washington & Lee) in
Lexington, VA, wanted to invite Robert Edward Lee to assume the 
presidency
of that school, no one in the group had a suit that was significantly
unpatched. Board members and community members chipped in to purchase 
a suit
for the member chosen to call on Lee. They had hoped to send two 
people, but
they could afford only one suit. These too had been people of 
financial
substance and social status.

The bulk of the southern population supported itself through 
subsistance
farming and lived a hard scrabble existance well into the 20th 
century and,
some will argue, up until World War II. To these families, the loss 
of men
in war, the destruction of homes and farms, and the scattering or
confiscation of farm animals made even providing milk for children
problematic. A twenty-year-old great-grandmother of mine in Central
Louisiana held a Union soldier at bay with her husband's hunting gun 
when
the soldier tried to take the last milk cow from the farm. A huge
diamondback rattlesnake coiled up on the path between her and the 
soldier,
within striking distance. She said she could smell it, but she kept 
her gun
trained on the soldier. She thought she had only one good shot in the 
gun,
and she said she was prepared to take her chances with the snake. She 
had
responsibility for four small children, two of them orphans, along 
with her
aged fathere, and that cow stood between them and starvation.

Anyone who thinks the South is ante-bellum Gone With the Wind needs 
to
remember the picture of Scarlett O'Hara in that turnip patch. The
moonlight-and-magnolias myth was wishful thinking by old women whose 
worlds
and futures had been wiped out by war. Too bad they failed to 
understand
that their real heritage---a people who could survive war and 
deprivation
and still smile and worship God--was far more admirable than their 
myth.

Kris is right, Teddy: don't tease us. The story you've discovered 
needs to
be told. And if your listeners go out for sundaes afterwards, they 
will
appreciate the taste a lot more, knowing that generations of their 
forebears
could not have dreamed of such luxuries.

Still hanging tough in North Louisiana, where fall seems on its way,
Gail Ingram

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Sep 2001 16:38:29 +1200
From: "Anne Scott" <nzquilter@xtra.co.nz>
To: 


Hi from New Zealand

There has been discussion on commercial quilting. of late.

I have been looking through 19th century NZ newspapers which have 
recently
become available online through our National Library website. It is 
an
arduous process but I recently happened upon an advertisement in an 
1865
newspaper selling sewing machines and among their attributes was they 
were
recommended for quilting.

We don't have a quilt tradition as such in NZ so I was fascinated 
that it
would have been mentioned and so early in our history.

Cheers

Anne Scott
Editor & Publisher
New Zealand Quilter magazine
www.nzquilter.com




?<<< Anyone know when commercial machine
quilting began? Alhambra and elmora could just be the
pattern names<<<

Barbara Brackman writes in her Clues in the Calico, pg.140, that
prequilted silk was available in the 1889-90 Montgomery Ward 
catalog,
for $1 a yard, and states that it dates back to about 1870>>>

I have appraised a good number of Victorian Cray Quilts, 1880's and 

90's, with pre-quilted backs, so that info appears to be correct. 
Teddy Pruett

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Sep 2001 07:32:13 EDT
From: CBENBERRY@aol.com
To: 



The Index of American Design was organized under the auspices of the 
Federal 
Art Project of the W.P.A. It was a program designed to give work to 
unemployed artists during the Great Depression. There were over 30 
IAD 
Projects organized nationwide. While most of the projects were 
state-wide 
projects, yet in a few instances, such as in New York, there were two 
IAD 
Projects within the state- a New York City Project (NYC) and a New 
York 
State project (NYS). Or California, when rendering took place in San 
Francisco, label was Ca; when located in Los Angeles, the label was 
So. Ca. 

The purpose of the Index of American Design was to record in 
renderings or 
water color paintings exact replications of American artifacts made 
prior to 
1890. The IAD was the most massive government sponsored arts program 
ever to 
have existed in the USA.

Early on in the program some of the renderings were forwarded to 
Washington, 
DC but not all were. As the program was ending close to the advent 
of World 
War 11, U.S. government officials claiming the renderings were 
government 
property demanded that institutions such as the Metropolitan Museum 
of Art, 
which planned to circulate IAD renderings in traveling exhibitions 
and also 
to publish a book of some plates to be made available to independent 
graphic 
and decorative artists, schools of art, etc. forward the renderings 
it had 
acquired to Washington, D.C. Today, the majority of the IAD 
renderings are 
housed at the National Gallery of Art, Smithsonian Institution. 

While a number of texts have been written about the IAD over the 
years, the 
most authoritative as to its history is still the book written by one 
its 
founders. It is "The Index of American Design" by Erwin O. 
Christensen, NY: 
Macmillan. 1950. A catalog of the entire Index of American Design 
was 
published in 1980. The Index was so huge that the catalogue was 
divided into 
10 separate publications and each section sold separately. If one 
wanted 
information about quilts in the Index, then that information, which 
told w
hen and where the item was made, by whom, a brief description of the 
item, 
the artist who painted the plate, its "present owner" (circa 
1936-39), and 
its assigned call numbers, would be listed under the state where the 
IAD 
project was held. 

For example, listed under Pennsylvania is one of the famous Hewson 
quilts in 
the collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, rendered by Frances 
Lichten, State Supervisor of the Penna. IAD on a plate that has the 
call 
numbers "Pa-Te-208a." 

Quilt information is largely recorded in the first book of the 
catalog 
entitled "Catalogue of Textiles, Costume, and Jewelry in the Index of 
American Design." Part 1. The catalog contains information exactly 
as 
recorded in each project and was not always uniformly well done. A 
bit 
sketchy here and there because some state programs apparently were 
not always 
as thorough as they should have been. But this is not a criticism, 
because 
I am a true admirer of this tremendous effort- the massive government 
sponsored arts program, the art work of the IAD artists, and the 
visual 
record of historical American artifacts.
Cuesta Benberry
CBENBERRY@aol.com 


------------------------------
Date: Tue, 11 Sep 2001 12:58:18 -0400
From: Newbie Richardson <pastcrafts@erols.com>
To: 

One interesting chapter on the effects of the "late unpleasantness" 
on
the daily lives of women is in Joan Severa's book "Dressed for the
Photographer: Ordinary Americans and Fashion 1840 - 1900." Kent State
Univ. Press 1997(?)
Joan was the director of the Wisconsin State Historically Society 
for
many many years and is one of the country's leading authorities on 
lower
and middle class clothing and related material culture expressions.
For anyone serious about the history of "women's work" in the 19th 
c. 
this book is a "must have". But you must actually READ it! Her 
research
was exhaustive - and was further enriched by her extensive knowledge 
of
the history of fabric and costume. The Wisconsin State collection has
the most extensive collection of middle class and working class 
clothing
in the country.
The chapter on the 1860's is extremely revealing of the effects of 
the
CW on daily life - and where it did not have an effect!
It is still in print and very much available - but expensive - 
about
$75.00 new, unremaindered.
Newbie Richardson

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Sep 2001 13:10:59 -0400
From: Newbie Richardson <pastcrafts@erols.com>
To: 



Nothing is perfect. Poly thread is extremely strong and impervious to
the effects of humidity/dryness. That is a good thing as it is 
therefore
very "stable". However, when used to sew fabrics that do absorb
moisture (and "grow" and then "shrink"), it will eventually cause 
stress
to those fibers.
The c 1890 quilt top that was quilted was probably already in a 
state
of desication and fragility - albeit not to the naked eye. What the
maker/owner are seeing is the natural aging of the textile (the quilt
top)with the lack of aging of the thread. In much of the same way, I
have seen shattered silk garments that were held together by the 
thread
that stitched the parts together.
As a professional textile conservator and historian, I beg you all 
NOT
to quilt an old (before1950) quilt top!
I also am willing to bet that those sewing impliments made from
vintage fabrics, will desintegrate before too long as most of them 
are
probably made with poly thread!
Use 100% cotton on 100% cotton!
Newbie Richardson

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