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Quilters Find a way to care

Sept 11

Date: Tue, 11 Sep 2001 21:17:45 +0200
From: Ady Hirsch <adamroni@netvision.net.il>
To: 


Dear QHLers
My deepest sympathy on this terrible day. We're praying for all the
victims of this tragedy
Ady in Israel

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 12 Sep 2001 08:41:48 +1000
From: Lorraine Olsson <sven@pnc.com.au>
To:


Please know that we in Australia are shocked and horrified at the 
ordeal
that you are facing.

Please accept my deepest sympathy for your loss, and know that my
thoughts are with you all.

Lorraine in Oz

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Sep 2001 18:32:40 -0500
From: "Avalon" <malthaus@idcnet.com>
To: 



Let us all pray that diplomats around the world will be able to solve 
the
current evolving unbelievable events and we will not spiral into 
world
chaos. . We all know the sorrows of war as viewed through the ages. 
Let us
all pray that all of our diplomats of all countries can prevail with 
words
and not bombs. Let us remember our leaders and pray for their wisdom 
as they
make their decisions that will affect ALL of us in the weeks to come.

How ironic that the discussion on this list has been focusing on the
hardships after the Civil War.

Mary in Wisconsin

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Sep 2001 20:23:35 -0400
From: "Phyllis Twigg" <ptwigg@radix.net>
To: 



Just to let everyone know...the Pennsylvania National Quilt 
Extravaganza in
Fort Washington, Pennsylvania will be open Thursday through Sunday as
scheduled.

I'm curating an exhibit there called "When More Was Better: Early 
Quilting
and Dimension"
Included are 20 examples of the fine work of quiltmakers long ago who
stitched in abundance, often including stuffed work and cording. 
Quilt
owners who are loaning their quilts in the exhibit include Polly 
Mello,
Debby Cooney, Judy Roche, Cinda Cawley, Ann Stagnaro, Judi Gunter, 
Carol and
John McCulloch, and myself. I'm sure you will enjoy the display.

Phyllis Twigg

 

Date: Wed, 12 Sep 2001 13:14:40 +1000
From: nomad1@attglobal.net
To:



Dear QHL'ers
We woke up this morning in Oz to this unimaginable horror
that has struck you all. Our thoughts and prayers are with
you all, especially for those waiting and suffering in
hospital and those still trapped and for the huge task
ahead.
Words cannot express our feelings of empathy and horror
adequately. As my pal Melissa says, terrorism has surely
sunk to new lows! :(
Hiranya from Sydney, Australia

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Sep 2001 23:41:35 -0400
From: "J. G. Row" <Judygrow@rcn.com>
To: 



Thanks to our world-wide friends for their outpourings of grief and 
support
for us here in the USA. We are grateful that you are thinking about 
us.

I am about 60 miles from NYC in the country, halfway between NYC and
Philadelphia. We are under the air corridor between those cities, 
and in
our daily lives there is
usually the gentle thrum of high flying airplanes. We either ignore 
those
sounds or are annoyed by them. The skies were eerily still today. I 
miss
the noise.

I hope for the safety of everyone in this great country, but 
especially for
all the loved ones and acquaintances of everyone on this list.

Tomorrow would be a good day to start flying your American flags, at 
half
staff if you can.

Judy in Ringoes, NJ

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 12 Sep 2001 09:45:36 EDT
From: Xroadclown@aol.com
To: 


thanks for your thoughts and prayers, and i agree! let us fly our 
flags 
proudly. We are americans, i am proud, and we will be ok.

melanie
ithaca, NY

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 12 Sep 2001 14:04:34 -0400
From: "pepper cory" <pepcory@mail.clis.com>
To: 


Hello friends. Along with everyone else, I've been glued to the TV,
alternately dreading any more horrific news, The overwhelming 
feeling is an
emptiness and faint nausea.. Is it any surprise that I picked up a 
needle
and started doing redwork? OK, not rocket science but it's all I'm 
capable
of at this minute.
I also have what I call "count the noses" anxiety and have telephoned 
all my
relatives. My brother Chris (an oil engineer)who was supposed to go 
to Saudi
Arabia is stuck in the Hague (rather a nice place if you ask me-) and 
my
sister-in law (also an oil engineer) isn't flying to Venezuela this 
week.
That's OK as the sentiment is "circle the wagons" and stay put. For 
you
QHL'ers from other countries, "circling the wagons" is the defensive 
move of
wagon trains when threatened by Indian attack.
In a phone call this morning, my 80 year old sharp-as-a-tack mama 
said,
"This is what war feels like, Pepper." Last night I attended a 
service
called The Great Litany (service in the Episcopal prayer book for 
times of
disaster-) and found it quite comforting to be surrounded by friends 
and
neighbors of my small village. The minister asked if anyone would 
like to
say something and from the 70 or so gathered people, four had
friends/relatives in NYC.One lady's son had escaped from the south 
tower of
the Trade Center and then helped other survivors make it to the 
ferries that
came from Staten Island. My friend Joan's eight year old 
granddaughter
watched the whole tragedy unfold from her seat in her schoolroom! An
eloquent older gentleman, Dr. John Costlow, asked us to remember the 
heroism
and the good deeds of the rescuers. We all were subdued but feeling 
less
alone when we left that service.
Tonight Rod and I put up our big (5x7 ft.) American flag. Usually we 
run it
up between two trees for July 4 but this time it stays up 
indefinitely, not
as a war-like gesture but rather as a hopeful symbol. Thanks for 
letting me
share my thoughts.
Pepper Cory

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 12 Sep 2001 15:09:31 EDT
From: Palampore@aol.com
To: 


In my effort to sort out the events of yesterday I am trying to 
organize my 
nest --my home. ( I guess that is the only spot I truly feel in 
control of 
today. )
While sorting out I found 3 things that you need to know about. My 
dear 
sweat niece whom I taught to sew sent me a brochure of a wonderful 
show she 
recently went to: The Magic of Lace, The Art Institute of Chicago 
(June 27 - 
Jan. 6) The Elizabeth F. Cheney and Agnes Allerton Textile Galleries 
The 
brochure is wonderful!
When at the Costume Society of America SE Conference recently I 
bought 2 
books. They are: TEXTILES FOR COLONIAL CLOTHING:a Workbook of 
Swatches & 
Information by Sally A. Queen, and TEXTILES FOR CLOTHING OF THE 
EARLY 
REPUBLIC, 1800-1850 by Lynne Zacek Bassett 
Each book has swatches of different types of fabrics which were used 
during 
those time periods. 
Contact Sally Queen if you want to order these: 
www.sallyqueenassociates.com 
My brother and sister-in-law were in the air coming back to NC from 
London 
yesterday as all of this happened. The plane turned and took them 
back to 
London. Not sure when they will get home. Just glad they are safe. 
My 
brother's old office in the Pentagon is no longer there.
How can we help other than to give blood and to pray???? 
Should we be making comfort quilts for the children who lost parents? 
I know 
I keep hugging and touching my 3 children and my husband.
Thanks for the kind words from our world-wide quilting family.
Lynn in New Bern, NC

Date: Wed, 12 Sep 2001 15:16:13 -0400
From: "J. G. Row" <Judygrow@rcn.com>
Cc: "



As a point of reference -- It is possible that 50,000 people worked 
and died
in the WTC.

In the entire Korean War, the United States lost 33,629 people.

In the entire Viet Nam War the United States lost close to 58,000 
people.

(I had a typo in the line above. I had typed Untied -- and was 
tempted to
leave it. But thinking about it, I think we are perhaps knotted more
strongly together.)

Keep your flags flying.

Judy in Ringoes, NJ
judygrow@rcn.com

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 12 Sep 2001 15:32:25 EDT
From: ARabara15@aol.com
To: 
I affixed American Flags to the fronts of our buildings in Trenton 
today. I 
was disappointed to see so few displayed.

Deeply distressed and waiting to hear if friends are safe. Grateful 
for the 
few that I know had escaped in time. Praying for those who may not 
have.

"As they fell and perished, God caught their souls and carried them 
to 
Paradise"

Donald Brokate

------------------------------


Date: Wed, 12 Sep 2001 14:45:02 -0500
From: "Steve and Jean Loken" <sandjloken@worldnet.att.net>
To: "

Ady, Lorraine, and Mary,
Thanks for your thoughtful expressions of sympathy. Though I'm not in 
New
York any more it is my family home. My relatives are all accounted 
for,
thankfully. I can't help but stare in horror at the images on TV. I 
was
hardly able to stick to my piecing yesterday. I baked a loaf of 
bread, as an
expression of hope, I guess.
May we all be able to get past this without world upheaval. We're 
changed
forever here, I think. Daily life is something to cling to as well as
family. Be safe, all of you dear e-mail friends.
Jean Loken in Minnesota

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 12 Sep 2001 16:06:00 EDT
From: Xroadclown@aol.com
To: 

I hung my flag today, with pride and honor! as the day has 
progressed, and 
i've traveled a bit, i see more and more flags, and with each one i 
feel 
renewed!

melanie
ithaca, ny



 
------------------------------

Date: Wed, 12 Sep 2001 17:15:41 EDT
From: KareQuilt@aol.com
To:

I was 19 and living in East Africa when Kennedy was shot. Our first 
news of the assignation came via a bang on our door at midnight. We were told  that the Pres., Vice Pres., Gov of TX, and the Speaker of the House were all dead and possibly others as well. It was another 24 hours before we got the real news. Two months later I lived through a coup-de-ta there. I was living in the section of the city where the Arab, African and European sectors came together taking care of two small children under age two whose parents were out of the country for two weeks. I won't go into details (this is going to be long enough) except to say the world as I knew it (a place of trust and peace) came to an end and was never the same again. Ever since I have had a great awareness of the trauma that the women and children (and yes men too) 
go through who have to endure terrorism on a regular basis. 

My point? America's capacity and compassion and helping hand is world famous. One of the things that I hope will come out of all of this horror that has now touched our people on our very own soil is that we Americans will have our compassion to help those who live with terrorism on a daily basis GROW even MORE resolute. Here is a wonderful tribute from one of our neighbors to the north that my husband brought to my attention. Widespread but only partial news coverage was given recently to this man's remarkable editorial broadcast from Toronto in 1973. His name is Gordon Sinclair and he is a Canadian television commentator. What follows is the full text of his trenchant remarks as printed in the Congressional Record. Thanks for letting me share. 
Karen A.

TRIBUTE TO THE UNITED STATES
America: The Good Neighbor.

"This Canadian thinks it is time to speak up for the Americans as the 
most generous and possibly the least appreciated people on all the earth. 
Germany, Japan and, to a lesser extent, Britain and Italy were lifted out of the debris of war by the Americans who poured in billions of dollars and 
forgave other billions in debts. None of these countries is today paying even the interest on its remaining debts to the United States. When France was in danger of collapsing in 1956, it was the Americans who propped it up, and their reward was to be insulted and swindled on the streets of Paris. I was there. I saw it. 

When earthquakes hit distant cities, it is the United States that 
hurries in to help. This spring, 59 American communities were flattened by tornadoes. Nobody helped. The Marshall Plan and the Truman Policy pumped billions of dollars into discouraged countries. Now newspapers in those countries are writing about the decadent, warmongering Americans. I'd like to see just one of those countries that is gloating over the erosion of the United States dollar build its own airplane. Does any other country in the world have a plane to equal the Boeing Jumbo Jet, the Lockheed Tri-Star, or the Douglas DC10? If so, why don't they fly them? Why do all the International lines except Russia fly American Planes? 

Why does no other land on earth even consider putting a man or woman 
on the moon? You talk about Japanese technocracy, and you get radios. You talk about German technocracy, and you get automobiles. You talk about American technocracy, and you find men on the moon- not once, but Several times-and safely home again. You talk about scandals, and the Americans put theirs right in the store window for everybody to look at. Even their draft-dodgers are not pursued and hounded. They are here on our streets, and most of them, unless they are breaking Canadian laws, are getting American dollars from ma and pa at home to spend here. 

When the railways of France, Germany and India were breaking down 
through age, it was the Americans who rebuilt them. When the Pennsylvania Railroad and the New York Central went broke, nobody loaned them an old caboose. Both are still broke. I can name you 5,000 times when the Americans raced to the help of other people in trouble. Can you name me even one time when someone else raced to the Americans in trouble? I don't think there was outside help even during the San Francisco earthquake. Our neighbors have faced it alone, and I'm one Canadian who is damned tired of hearing them get kicked around. 
They will come out of this thing with their flag high. And when they 
do, they are entitled to thumb their nose at the lands that are gloating over their present troubles. I hope Canada is not one of those." Stand proud, America! 

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 12 Sep 2001 18:56:13 EDT
From: JQuilt@aol.com
To: 
let's all light a candle... and pray for peace and justice, for all 
of the 
people, on this wonderful planet...
jean 


Date: Wed, 12 Sep 2001 19:38:22 -0700
From: "Penni Ryan" <penniquilts@home.com>
To: "


> Dear Quilting Friends:
>
> I just returned on Monday night from the Restoration Conference in 
Omaha.
> It was the best Conference I have attended in the Quilting World. 
But
after
> yesterday's tragedy even a quilt can't comfort the sorrow and grief 
that I
> feel for our Nation and citizens. I want to help so much but I 
cannot
> donate blood. However I can pray continually and display the 
American
> flag. Even though I am crazed by quilts as others are, I hope that
everyone
> will focus their main thoughts in pray. I realize that the people 
during
> and after the Civil War had an extremely difficult time. The 
people in
New
> York, Washington D.C., Pennsylvania and across the nation are also 
in a
> similar difficultly experienced long ago.
>
> Penni Ryan-Pitre
> Cave Creek, Arizona


------------------------------

Date: Wed, 12 Sep 2001 22:45:09 -0500
From: "quilt97" <quilt97@prodigy.net>
To: <


It is so heartening to read of several 
fellow-quilter-countrymen/women 
who are proudly flying our American flag. I have been so glued to 
the 
television I am ashamed to say that I had not even thought of flying 
our 
flag. But it will begin flying in the morning.

Thanks to Addy, Hiranya, and Lorraine for their thoughts and prayers. 

The wonders of e-mail.

This past January I began teaching 6 friends to quilt. When we meet 

this Monday we will make some some small quilts for the children 
affected by the tragedy in NYC. If anyone can give me an idea of the 

person(s) to contact to get these quilts into the proper hands, it 
would 
be greatly appreciated.

Thanks to all who contribute to this list. It continues to be an 
interesting learning experience for me, as well as occasionally 
entertaining.

EKarenbeth, proud to be an American


------------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Sep 2001 08:26:44 -0300
From: Terry and Sara Chisholm <family.chisholm@ns.sympatico.ca>
To: 


I took a look at the site Ann passed on for making a perfect 
5-pointed
star, and had to try it - how neat! I think I will put stars in all 
the
windows of my house - in support of Americans everywhere. Thank you,
Ann for sharing.

Sara Chisholm,
An American in Nova Scotia, whose stomach is still in knots



------------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Sep 2001 07:35:46 EDT
From: JQuilt@aol.com
To: 



please be sure that when you wrap yourself in your country's 
flag...you don't 
wrap it around you so tightly.. that you can't take a deep breath and 
extend 
your hand in peace....
jean

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Sep 2001 07:36:44 -0700
From: Gail Ingram <GIngram@tcainternet.com>
To: 

I hope this does not sound unkind or political, for neither is 
intended. The
Psalmist eloquently reminded his people that there was an appropriate 
time
for everything---a time to sow and a time to reap, a time to rejoice 
and a
time to weep.

This, I submit, is a time in which Americans should, in fact, wrap
themselves in their flag for a while.

That flag symbolizes who we are as a people. It is our homes and 
backyard
gardens, our schoolrooms and our Little League playing fields. In its 
stars
and stripes is what we mean by freedom. It bodies forth our shining 
moments
and shames us in our darker ones.

And, if terrorism is to be defeated or even contained in the 21st 
century,
it will, necessarily, be defeated by a people who live and work under 
the
shadow of that flag.

Being too sophisticated to submit openly and perhaps wholly to the 
idealism
and goodness represented by that flag in this hour---to forget that 
in
another era it kept the lights on in Europe and rebuilt the land and 
economy
of a nation that had created Pearl Harbor---is not merely to dishonor 
our
heritage but to encourage a mindset that helped make possible the 
horror
that all of us have seen replayed on our television screens the past 
two
days.

For it is American idealism that has kept our borders open, our 
wealth
flowing outward, our streets free of militia.

Tuesday, a group of men whose hearts had become so hardened that they 
could
not feel the common pulse of humanity watched unmoved by compassion 
as
fathers kissed their children and wives goodbye at airports, 
three-year-olds
took their seats in airplanes, mothers took their leaves of 
children. With
cold calculation and utter selfishness, they sent those and perhaps 
20,000
other innocent people in New York City to their deaths.

If we fail to recognize their barbarity or the inescapable fact that 
only
our nation, under our flag, stands between a world in which innocent 
people
everywhere must quail before selfish, mean-spirited bullies, those 
deaths
will have been in vain.

We in the United States have been blessed with a freedom that has 
given us
the economic means for world leadership. Our flag reminds us of our
responsibilities to that gift.

With KareQuilt, one must hope that from this horror will come not a 
fear of
patriotism but a heightened sensitivity to the plights of people 
everywhere
in our world whose lives are daily menaced by terrorism.

If that sensitivity is to be mobilized, however, it will have to be 
matched
by the resolve to defend freedom. Like the quilts all of us on this 
list
love, The U.S. flag can remind us of the light we hold and often 
ignore. Far
from precluding compassion, the flag demands it.

Gail Ingram

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Sep 2001 07:28:06 -0700
From: "Penni Ryan" <penniquilts@home.com>
To: 

Dear QHL Friends,

Do any of you that live in New York, Washington D.C. or surrounding 
states
have any plans on making quilts for the families of victims, service 
workers
etc? If so I would like to know. Living in Arizona I feel so far 
away yet
I would be thrilled if I could help and send quilts to these people. 
Thanks
for any information.

Quilting and Praying
Penni Ryan-Pitre

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Sep 2001 08:05:08 -0700
From: "Rachel Greco" <grandmasattic@compuserve.com>
To: 


As one of many quilt historians on this list, I would like to remind 

everyone that the key way women throughout the ages have responded to 

catastrophy and times of high stress is to take to the needle. 
Whether 
engaged in the simple rocking motion of hand quilting, or caught up 
in 
the calming whirr of the sewing machine, our ancestors understood 
that 
sewing activities calmed their nerves and soothed the soul. Women in 

America, when confronted with severe tragedy, have consistently taken 
up 
sewing and quilting projects as a way to cope and create 
sigifnicance.

We have the unique opportunity to put those around us in touch with 
their American quilting and sewing roots. We can carry forward our 
nation's unrivaled quilting heritage by helping others discover 
sewing 
and quilting as a means to cope; and we can also inspire them to 
create 
that significance for themselves, their family and loved ones. 

As has been so aptly said before, "When life falls to pieces, make a 

quilt!"

Rachel Greco
Grandma's Attic Sewing Emporium, Inc.
Dallas, Oregon

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Sep 2001 11:06:43 -0400
From: Newbie Richardson <pastcrafts@erols.com>
To:

Dear all,
I seem to be reverting to the "method" trained actress once aspired 
to
be, and using those techniques to analyse the behavior of women of 
the
past in times of crisis. Isn't that what we, as historians try to do?
Think about what all our reactions are to the horror of the past 
few
days. We "nest", doing "rote" activities that somehow give us a 
sense
of order to our inner disorder. I did laundry (the heavy spring 
cleaning
type) and filed. My neighbor cleaned out her kid's Toy box, putting
away the puzzle pieces and legos in their rightful boxes. Then
yesterday, Wednesday, I took apart the slipcover on the couch to 
reuse
the zippers and cording, rather than drive to the store to get new 
ones
for the remake. Think about how that would be translated into the 
daily
activities of war stressed women of the past....but factor in that 
they
did not have the immediacy of today's media - (who incidently get it
wrong like when CNN reported our bombing of Kabul on Tuesday 
evening).
The common thread is that we all try and impose some order to our
immediate space. Yet we also go stand in line for 5 hours to give
blood...
I have read of women in the 1860's who unraveled worn clothing to
reweave the threads into "new cloth", of the quilting and knitting
during the "Great War", and of course all the activities during WWII.
Observe the activities of those around you. It will aid your
insight into the lives of the women we strive to study.

Newbie Richardson in Alexandria, Va.: where I could smell the smoke
coming from the Pentagon...

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Sep 2001 09:38:07 -0500
From: "Avalon" <malthaus@idcnet.com>
To: 

Project Linus is coordinating a quilt making effort for the children 
who
lost family in the terrorist attack. You can check their website and 
find
the nearest chapter to you for information.

Mary in Wisconsin

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Sep 2001 15:47:26 -0400
From: "Cinda Cawley" <lrcawley@dmv.com>
To: 


I am deeply grateful for the messages of support from our friends 
in 
other countries. We Americans have had many deaths in our family. 
Gail, I share your sentiments about the flag. The United States is 
not 
perfect, but I firmly believe that our greatest strength is that we 
very 
consciously, as a society, try to be good. Because of this we are 
often 
criticized as being naive. 
As one who lived in New York City as a young woman and love it 
for 
the exciting, wonderous place that it is, I want to say that New 
Yorkers 
are a special breed of people: tough, generous, brave, funny, 
creative, 
tolerant. God bless them all.
Cinda on the Eastern Shore

Date: Thu, 13 Sep 2001 23:01:06 EDT
From: Bunjorda@aol.com
To: 

A0I am usually a lurker & am just catching up on the digests of the 
last f
ew
days. You all have made some very thoughtful & helpful comments about 
the
attacks in NYC & DC. I live in No Va. My husband works very close to 
the
Pentagon & felt the impact before seeing the smoke & flying debris. 
My
brother works in NY but, fortunately, all family are safe & sound. 
A0I work
at
a Government Hospital & reported for duty Tues. afternoon where 
heightened
security measures were in place (& everyone was patient & 
uncomplaining). It

was inspiring to have to fight my way through the blood bank where so 
many
were waiting to donate blood. When there was a call for medical 
personnel to

volunteer to the disaster sites, the first half hour produced many 
more than

could be used.
To me, these last few days have shown that when we see the worst of 
humanity
,
we also see the best. A0I am struck by the untiring efforts and the 
importa
nt
role of those workers who, under normal conditions, are not highly 
valued in

financial terms, but today, provide a service that could never be 
measured i
n
dollars. This tragedy unifies us in many ways. A0Most of us will 
have some
connection to someone lost: we just don't know yet who that someone 
is. A0B
ut
we're also united in dealing with it & supporting each other. The 
last 2 day
s
have left me appalled, but also very touched and proud. Certainly 
there will

be quilts that come out of this. A0That's how we cope.
Bunnie Jordan

-----------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Sep 2001 22:09:04 -0500
From: "quilt97" <quilt97@prodigy.net>
To: 

So this is why I found myself cleaning hurricane shutters 20 minutes 
before
six ladies were due to arrive at my home for quilt class.

EKarenbeth

Date: Thu, 13 Sep 2001 08:05:08 -0700
From: "Rachel Greco" <grandmasattic@compuserve.com>
To: <QHL@cuenet.com>
Subject: Coping with Tragedy

As one of many quilt historians on this list, I would like to remind
everyone that the key way women throughout the ages have responded to
catastrophy and times of high stress is to take to the needle. 
Whether
engaged in the simple rocking motion of hand quilting, or caught up 
in
the calming whirr of the sewing machine, our ancestors understood 
that
sewing activities calmed their nerves and soothed the soul. Women in
America, when confronted with severe tragedy, have consistently taken 
up
sewing and quilting projects as a way to cope and create 
sigifnicance.

We have the unique opportunity to put those around us in touch with
their American quilting and sewing roots. We can carry forward our
nation's unrivaled quilting heritage by helping others discover 
sewing
and quilting as a means to cope; and we can also inspire them to 
create
that significance for themselves, their family and loved ones.

As has been so aptly said before, "When life falls to pieces, make a
quilt!"

Rachel Greco
Grandma's Attic Sewing Emporium, Inc.
Dallas, Oregon

Date: Thu, 13 Sep 2001 11:06:43 -0400
From: Newbie Richardson <pastcrafts@erols.com>
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: what we do in times of crisis

Dear all,
I seem to be reverting to the "method" trained actress once aspired 
to
be, and using those techniques to analyse the behavior of women of 
the
past in times of crisis. Isn't that what we, as historians try to do?
Think about what all our reactions are to the horror of the past 
few
days. We "nest", doing "rote" activities that somehow give us a 
sense
of order to our inner disorder. I did laundry (the heavy spring 
cleaning
type) and filed. My neighbor cleaned out her kid's Toy box, putting
away the puzzle pieces and legos in their rightful boxes. Then
yesterday, Wednesday, I took apart the slipcover on the couch to 
reuse
the zippers and cording, rather than drive to the store to get new 
ones
for the remake. Think about how that would be translated into the 
daily
activities of war stressed women of the past....but factor in that 
they
did not have the immediacy of today's media - (who incidently get it
wrong like when CNN reported our bombing of Kabul on Tuesday 
evening).
The common thread is that we all try and impose some order to our
immediate space. Yet we also go stand in line for 5 hours to give
blood...
I have read of women in the 1860's who unraveled worn clothing to
reweave the threads into "new cloth", of the quilting and knitting
during the "Great War", and of course all the activities during WWII.
Observe the activities of those around you. It will aid your
insight into the lives of the women we strive to study.

Newbie Richardson in Alexandria, Va.: where I could smell the smoke
coming from the Pentagon...

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Sep 2001 20:05:58 -0700
From: Tamara Bostwick <quilting@bellaonline.com>
To: 



One of the posters in my quilting forum is organizing a quilt drive 
with 
some others. You can read her post here: 
http://forums.bellaonline.com/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubbget_topic&f99&t000183 
- she has a webpage with a bit more information as well.

Tammy


At 07:28 AM 9/13/01 -0700, Penni Ryan wrote:
>Dear QHL Friends,
>
>Do any of you that live in New York, Washington D.C. or surrounding 
states
>have any plans on making quilts for the families of victims, service 
workers
>etc? If so I would like to know. Living in Arizona I feel so far 
away yet
>I would be thrilled if I could help and send quilts to these people. 
Thanks
>for any information.
>
>Quilting and Praying
>Penni Ryan-Pitre

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Sep 2001 23:52:08 EDT
From: ARabara15@aol.com
To: 


A woman in my congregation at St Andrew's in Yardley Pa. teaches the 
daughter 
of one of the pilots of one of the planes that struck the Trade 
Center. Even 
though I do not quilt I would be more than happy to help deliver 
quilts to 
the families of victims and the injured in the NY, NJ, and Pa area. 
Please 
let me know. 

Donald Brokate
Trenton, NJ

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Sep 2001 00:00:31 -0600
From: "Fenstermachers" <fenstermonster@rectec.net>
To: 

I've been reading some of your thoughts about the tragedy that has 
happened in New York, I have been greatly touched. All of your 
messages 
were caring and emphasized prayers going up to Heaven for lost loved 

ones and those injured in the terrorists attack. I would like to add 

one thing:

Each day is a precious gift from God, treasure it, hug your kids, 
tell 
them you love them, do something nice for your husband, do something 

nice for those around you to make their lives more meaningful.

My middle son turned 18 years old today, I pray he does not have to 
go 
fight a war brought on by such a foolish act of uncaring men, I mean 

monsters. But if he did, and he didn't come home I know in my heart 

that he is going to Heaven. You see, my son accepted Jesus Christ at 

the age of 9. He has not been a perfect child, but he believes that 

Jesus died on the Cross to save him from his sins. I pray that those 

people in the tragedy in New York, had that chance also. But I fear 

there were many that did not.
Ladies when you go to Church this weekend, ask yourself, Am I 
saved. 
If I died today would I go to Heaven. If you can't answer yes. 
Then 
confess to God that you are a sinner and ask Jesus Christ to save you 

from your sins. The plan of salvation is so simple that even a small 

child could understand it.

I didn't mean to sound like a preacher, but my heart has been greatly 

saddened this week to think there are such people out there that can 
do 
such great acts of terror towards other human beings. Remember 
that's 
the devil at work. 

If this has touched your heart, please pass it on.

I must quit now I have to go frost my son's birthday cake.


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Sep 2001 16:33:24 +1000
From: nomad1@attglobal.net
To: 

Dear Newbie and All,
What you say is so true about our reaction to horror. Even
though I am here in Sydney, Australia I have been going
around like a blob, acting really odd. I am not a TV watcher
as such but I have been glued to the ABC and CNN comparing
various shows trying to read between lines etc. I have been
doing stuff that I have meant to do for ages - boring stuff
like dejunking.
What has been on my mind is to do a quilt block of that
horrible scene of the aeroplane approaching the Twin Towers.
Now I cannot understand why I would want such a sad block in
a quilt, however I cannot seem to get it out of my mind and
feel I must do it. However, will this offend my dear
American friends I wonder? I care for all living creatures,
however, this horror in the US is closer to me because of my
dear American friends and family too. I have a cousin who
works in New York as a surgeon and we have not been able to
contact him or his wife. They lived right in the heart of
Manhattan. Another ex- QHL'er - Tiffany's husband usually
flies one of those United planes but was home, as his little
boy was in hospital being operated on. So it is all very
close.
Lots to think about methinks.
Hiranya from Sydney, Australia : >

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Sep 2001 05:20:00 -0500
From: grapes <grapes@flash.net>
To:

I live in Texas, and I also have been thinking of making a small wall
hanging to memorize the the terrorist attack, so I do not feel your
thoughts are out of order or even unusual, quilting is how we express
ourselves and it is natural for us to turn to our median to do so.
Jo Spindle
FW Tx
-- 
Spindle's Tops Machine Quilting
Visit our personal Photopoint album at
http://albums.photopoint.com/j/AlbumList?u352870&Authfalse

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Sep 2001 07:43:41 -0300
From: Terry and Sara Chisholm <family.chisholm@ns.sympatico.ca>
To: 



I've been thinking of a seven sisters quilt for some time - jotting 
down
other sevens - seven days of the week, seven wonders of the world, 
even
the seven dwarfs trying to come up with an idea. Watching the rescue
workers in NYC and Washington and the people all over the United 
States
come together has brought me to the Seven corporal works of mercy: 
Feed
the hungry, give drink to the thirsty, give shelter to strangers, 
clothe
the naked, visit the sick, minister to prisoners and bury the dead.
Isn't that what we're all doing? I imagine these seven sisters 
circling
around the crumbling towers. Can't stop sketching.

Those of you thinking of quilting this tragedy are absolutely not 
alone.

Sara

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Sep 2001 07:08:18 -0400
From: "Dee Stark" <dee@nf2g.com>
To: 


Hi everyone. Just a quick note.

I am a disaster services volunteer with the Red Cross in Albany, NY. 
On
Tuesday when the disaster struck I was mobilized to help coordinate
communications in and out of our chapter in Albany - our number was 
the one
given to families for contact and to all the health services workers 
to call
until 800 numbers were set up. I am currently on standby as a 
national Red
Cross Disaster SErvices volunteer to help coordinate the wonderful 
efforts
of the churches, other charities, and business that want to help the 
victims
of this horrific tragedy and their families. My current 
understanding as
that I am the only person in New York State trained for that 
function.

I have good mental health support available to me, but would like 
those
people who I have known and care about me to do whatever you do - 
pray,
light a candle, think happy thoughts! - and I will provide updates as 
I am
able.

Hug your kids. Tell your family that you love them. I will be 
posting
another message soon with information about how everyone can help.

Dee Stark

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Sep 2001 08:14:24 EDT
From: ARabara15@aol.com
To: 

Yesterday, I received word from the last of my friends that they were 
allright. I was greatly relieved and thankful. I envy all of you who 
are busy 
planning and executing quilting projects to commemorate this Human 
Tragedy. 
My hope is that many of you will capture the beauty of the human 
spirit that 
has rallied when tragedy strikes.
For me, yesterday was a turning point. I began to surface from the 
depths of 
a soulfull suffering. Although I am certainly not done crying, I am 
now ready 
to resume living. I need to show these monsters that the American 
spirit is 
Indomitable. I am scheduled to do an antique show this weekend and 
had 
decided to cancel. Yesterday I decided that I would instead do it. 
Not with 
the intent of selling anything but as a show that I as an American 
will not 
be thwarted in my lifes activities. My American Flag will be tacked 
to the 
end of my quilt rack and Kate Smith will be singing God Bless America 
from my 
CD player.

Last night when everyone in my house was asleep I went outside and 
had a good 
long talk with God. It hadn't gotten cloudy yet and it may have been 
my 
imagination but it certainly looked like there were many more stars 
in the 
sky than usual.

Donald Brokate
Trenton, NJ

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Sep 2001 05:28:46 -0700 (PDT)
From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessen@yahoo.com>
To: 


Like Dee, I am in the Albany NY area. My daughter, Erin, is in the
National Guard and (being a medic) she was called up immediately. 
She has been deployed to the city and told to prepare for a long
siege. 

I am hoping she will be able to help me with a the yellow ribbon
project I have started at http://www.quiltbus.com/yellow.htm.  If you
have an extra hour and a few yellow scraps, please consider making a
block for this project. Send it to me and I will do the work from
that point. 

Today is Fly Your Flag day - wear red, white and blue and fly your
flag proudly! It DOES make a difference. Erin tells me that as
their convoy lumbered along on the trip to New York City, people
honked their horns, waved, construction workers flew flags and
saluted, etc., all the way down. NOT the usual reaction of people to
huge trucks doing 45 miles an hour on the Thruway! The outpouring of
support and patriotism brought tears to their eyes, literally. 

These National Guard troops were just you and me September 10th. Now
they are being asked to leave their jobs and family indefinitely. 
The support we are showing them by showing our colors is keeping them
going as they tug through the sludge, finding only the remnants of
life. 

I am putting together a web page at http://www.yellow-ribbons.com  for
the purpose of listing other ways quilters can help. If you know of
anything I don't have listed, please let me know. 

And if you make a yellow ribbon block, this Mommy thanks you. 

Kris 


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Sep 2001 09:09:13 EDT
From: JQuilt@aol.com
To:



maybe it would be a good idea...for us,quilter folk, who need to find 

positive path through this tragedy...to make a quilt and give it to a 
local 
organization that helps to take care of homeless men, women and 
children in 
america...
not to prove anything to the world....but to take a personal step 
towards 
peace and tranquility..
jean

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Sep 2001 07:20:19 -0700
From: "Julia D. Zgliniec" <rzglini1@san.rr.com>
To: 


Dear Hiranya and QHL,
I just wanted to tell you that I have been especially touched by your
posts and those of Adi and others that are not from the US. 

This event touches all of us in some way. It has shown me again that 
we
are one world.

Today, on this national day of prayer, I will pray for the world.

Julia Zgliniec, Poway, CA.



------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Sep 2001 11:44:22 -0400
From: "bonnie wilbur" <bonnie.wilbur@oracle.com>
To: 



Hiranya,
You do whatever quilt block/quilt you need to. You aren't being 
tactless or
exploiting this event; we all have to work through the horror in the 
most
effective way we can. Take note that this may not be the last quilt 
block
you feel compelled to make. Just as this event has touched so many 
of us,
so may future events.

For those who wish to donate a quilt to some of the orphaned 
children, you
may wish to read the following:

WRAP THEM IN LOVE - As most of you know already, Wrap Them in Love 
gives
quilts to children in need all over the world. Right now there are a 
lot of
children in the USA who have just lost their parents and are in need 
of a
lot of love and comfort. We will be donating quilts to this cause. 
Please
help us to spread the word. As always with Wrap Them in Love, we 
accept all
sizes of quilts----children come in all shapes and sizes. And 
sometimes a
small quilt to snuggle with is just what is needed. The quilts
that you make for Wrap Them in Love are always filled with love and 
prayers.
We
have sent many quilts to children all over the world---spreading that 
love
and kindness. Now it is time to wrap these children in the USA in 
our love.
The Wrap Them in Love address is: Wrap Them in Love, 401 N Olympic 
Ave,
Arlington, Wa 98223. If you can't make a quilt, then just send 
blocks.
Someone will put them together into a quilt.

Bonnie
in Northern Virginia, near the Pentagon.

From: "Fenstermachers" <fenstermonster@rectec.net>
To: <ARabara15@aol.com>

I'm sorry if I offended you, accept my apologies. I only was stating 
how I
felt about what I was reading. That appeared to me what others were 
typing.
Next time I will keep my feelings to myself. As for my email being a
religous chain mail letter, you were wrong. I was only passing along 
a bit
of information that might be useful to an unsaved person, that came 
from my
heart. I will pray that maybe one of the "other religous faiths 
members of
the group" may come to recognize Jesus Christ as their Savior, I 
would think
that any Christian would want to pray the same.

Again accept my apologies, I was not meaning to offend anyone.

-
------------------------------

Date: Sat, 15 Sep 2001 01:05:57 EDT
From: PatKoerner@aol.com
To: 

Thanks to Bonnie for the posting about Wrap Them in Love. That's 
just what I 
need and want to do in response to the events we are all trying to 
deal with. 
I will send the address to all the Colorado quilters in my address 
book as I 
am sure others will find solace in making a quilt for someone in 
need. 

Pat

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 15 Sep 2001 01:20:10 -0400
From: "J. G. Row" <Judygrow@rcn.com>
To: 


On the NBC news tonight, there was a report on a program that the 
Knights of
Columbus, a Roman Catholic men's organization, from Ridgewood, NJ, 
have
started. They are asking that people write letters to the rescuers 
who have
been working so hard under the excruciating circumstances in New York 
City.

The Knights will distribute these "Love Letters from America," as 
they are
calling this program, to those rescuers. I think this is a wonderful 
way
for
us to thank these courageous men and women.

We talk about making quilts for families of the lost, but here is 
something
to
do for those searching for the lost.

We can't make quilts for everyone but our warm words can be equally 
welcome.

We can show the rescuers our appreciation in this easy way.

Write a letter, and send it to a rescue worker in care of
The Knights of Columbus,
Ridgewood, NJ, 07457.

I am sure our letters will be welcome.

Judy in Ringoes, NJ
judygrow@rcn.com

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 15 Sep 2001 00:52:49 -0700
From: Gail Ingram <GIngram@tcainternet.com>
To: 

Thanks to Judy for sending information on "Love Letters From 
America." This
is just what many people in our area have needed!

Thanks too to all those members of this list beyond U.S. borders who 
have so
simply and eloquently reminded us that we are all unified by 
love---as well
as by the love of quilting.

Finally, thanks to Kris Driessen, our list mother, for overseeing 
this list,
for giving us a way to reciprocate her generosity through those 
yellow and
white blocks----and for looking past our occasional blunders.

This has been a long, long week, hasn't it? Anybody for a deep 
breath?


Gail Ingram

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 15 Sep 2001 01:34:56 -0700
From: "Christine Thresh" <christine@winnowing.com>
To: 

I put up a paper pieced American flag block that is quick and easy to 
make.
It can be incorporated in a larger comfort quilt, or you can make 
hundreds
of them and give them out to friends.

The URL for the free pattern(s) is: 
http://www.winnowing.com/flag.html


I wanted to do something! I can't give blood because I'm on blood 
thinners,
but perhaps this will help somehow.

Christine Thresh
a quilter on a California Delta island
http://www.winnowing.com

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 15 Sep 2001 18:13:48 -0500
From: "quilt97" <quilt97@prodigy.net>
To: 

I was not offended by the letter from the mother whose son had turned 
18
(draft or enlistment age) whose emotions have been stirred by the
viciousness of the attack on our nation, nor was I offended by the 
letter
from the man who chose to tell us of his decision to have a long talk 
with
God under a star-studded sky.

As we as a nation watch the suffering and trauma and heroism during 
this
tragedy, perhaps we can afford to be a bit more patient and 
understanding
and tolerant and kind to our fellow Americans.

Yes, this is a quilt list. Subscribed to by imperfect human beings.

EKarenbeth, proud to be an American

I am in California .  There is no doubt in my mind that we as a nation need
to take more than just a minute of silence through our country in the very
near future to show our respect and appreciation for the firemen, policemen
and emergency response personnel who serve us in America.  I wonder why this
has not been done yet.  We need to do this.

The terrorist attacks last week showed mankind 's most evil side; the
firemen, policemen and emergency personnel showed mankind's most pristine
side.  (Oh by the way, your can add the iron workers, heavy equipment
workers, the doctors and nurse, etc. who responded and so on. )

A political thought.  I am cognizant of the pain we go through when we lose
an American soldier in battle.  However, can we all think for a moment how
our life would be today if America did not respond to the Terrorist in Iraq
in 1991 as we did--- i.e. with a strong military strike.  Think of how
different our world would be today without the free flow of oil from the
Middle East .  One thing is for certain--- the wonderful prosperity and
personnel freedom that so much of the world experienced in the last 10 years
never would have taken place.  The heads of state around the world have a
unprecedented opportunity to serve mankind by joining in the effort to
capture and irradiate these terrorist----it can be done without war if they
cooperate.    However, if they do not help us we must do the difficult job
ourselves.  My heart  is with the brave Americans whose efforts allow me and
my loved ones to live in a country with the greatest human freedom in the
history of mankind.

ps. By the way:  Is it correct that France, whom we have saved twice in the
last century, is not going to support our efforts?  Perhaps, France would
like to have these terrorist living on their soil.