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Quilters Find a way to care

01242

Date: Mon, 01 Oct 2001 22:48:25 -0400
From: "Jan Drechsler" <quiltdoc@sover.net
To:

Hi Pepper,
If you are coming to Williamsburg, I will look for my copy of the 
Brandywine
museum exhibit catalog for 'Quaker Quilts' to loan to you. If not, 
I would
be happy to mail it to you. No color pictures in the catalog as I 
recall,
but great info.
Just thinking about that small but intense exhibit is enough to make 
me
swoon! One of the silk quilts was a wholecloth gray silk, with 
exquisite
quilting and quilted scenes.
 Might you just bring your quilt to show us?
Regards, Jan
--
Jan Drechsler in Vermont
Quilt Restoration; Quilting teacher
www.sover.net/~bobmills

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 1 Oct 2001 23:45:04 EDT
From: JQuilt@aol.com
To:

i think you're walking on the same path that lead to the "hidden in 
plain
view" book...
i read the article and it seems to me...that a silk quilt owned by 
some
wealthy quaker family... made by some professional quilter in
Philadelphia...doesn't make it a quaker quilt...just a quilt owned 
by a
quaker..

 i quote the article here

"Both physical and documentary evidence suggest that at least some 
of the
earliest quilts belonging to the Quakers residing in the area under 
the
jurisdiction of the Philadelphia Yearly Meeting were made by 
professional
upholsterers and quiltmakers in Philadelphia or England. Accounts 
drawn
against the estate of Thomas Coates show that in May 1721 his 
daughter
Elizabeth Coates Paschall (1702-1767), a first-generation American 
Quaker,
spent the considerable sum of two pounds for "a Quilt," which would 
have been
payment for quilting services or for an imported quilt.(4) Later the 
same
year payments were made in the name of Elizabeth's sister Sarah for
"Quilting." These expenditures suggest that despite Quaker emphasis 
on a
useful education for girls and the association of Quaker women with 
fine
needlework, such work might be commissioned from specialism by
eighteenth-century Philadelphia families - Quaker or otherwise. 
Certainly by
1739, eighteen years after the Coates accounts were filed, the 
services of
professional quilters were available in Philadelphia. An 
advertisement in the
Philadelphia Pennsylvania Gazette of August 2, 1739, offered "All 
Sorts of
Upholsterer's Work, as Beds and Sacking Bottoms, easy Chairs, 
Couches, and
Seats, as also Quilting, done by Joseph Stockdale."
end of magazine quote...

i can't imagine any group of Friends(quakers) getting together to 
make silk
quilts...it would be so totally in disagreement with the philosophy 
of the
society of friends.....

because some family owned a fancy silk quilt and they belonged to 
the Society
of Friends...doesn't necessarily mean the quilt was a "quaker 
quilt"...seems
like some antique dealers promotion to me..
jean

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 1 Oct 2001 21:37:45 -0700
From: chrisa@jetlink.net
To:

jean,
 Your quote refers to quilts made before 1760, as the title states, 
Keller
is describing Quaker Quilts from the Delaware River Valley between 
1760 and
1890. If you read several paragraphs further into the article, 
Keller
describes the quilts Quaker women made there, especially in the 
nineteenth
century.This is also when she says they often used silk, while the 
rest of
New England most often used cotton. Finally, she goes on to talk 
about
favoring stirppey style quilts in the 3rd and 4th quarters of the 19 
c., as
it was in England.

I found all this a bit of a surprise at first too. Perhaps the book 
Keller
wrote would be more informative, or some of the other books on 
quilts from
that region.

Kimberly Wulfert
Ojai, CA


------------------------------

Date: Tue, 2 Oct 2001 13:23:17 -0400
From: "pepper cory" <pepcory@mail.clis.com
To:

Thank you to all QHL members who wrote about Quaker quilts. The 
reason my
gut tells me this is a Quaker quilt is that 1) the one piece of info 
I can
get from the sellers indicates the former owner lived in 
Pennsylvania after
emigrating from Canada. #2) I have strong visual memories of a 
documented
silk Quaker quilt seen at a quilt show in Florida more than 15 years 
ago.
That quilt was a Center Diamond variation with surrounding sawteeth 
and was
executed in dove gray, deep purple, ivory, and a purple plaid silk. 
The
whole thing was exquisite.My quilt, while only two-color, has that
"feeling." 3) This quilt has very small stitches and is quilted in a 
close
(1/2") hanging diamond style as I've seen on many fine old PA 
pieces.
The next thing to do is conduct a batting test to determine if it's 
wool or
cotton. By the way, the deep teal is a subtle brocade. I'll continue 
to do
research and take some good pictures. Many thanks all.

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 2 Oct 2001 11:47:33 -0700 (PDT)
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603@yahoo.com
To:



A friend of a friend asked me if I was familiar with
these blocks on her website. The best I can do is
30's era fabrics. Does anyone have ideas about the
patterns used?

     http://www.santalady.com/ladies/
   
 
          

         

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 02 Oct 2001 15:52:24 -0400
From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett@fast.net
To:

Hi Jean -

I found your research that you shared with QHL very interesting -- 
thank 
you for
sharing. I am curious about your one comment, however, and would 
be 
grateful if
you could explain what you meant by it. You wrote --

  i can't imagine any group of Friends(quakers) getting together to 
make silk
  quilts...it would be so totally in disagreement with the 
philosophy of the
  society of friends.....

I'm not that familiar with their philosophy and would like to 
understand 
why you
feel so strongly about this. I don't doubt you, I (and possibly 
others) 
would
like more clarification. Is there somewhere on the internet that 
we can 
learn
of their philosophy? And is it getting together to make quilts, or 
using 
silk,
that doesn't fit?

Thank you for your help and information.

Sincerely,
Barb in southeastern PA

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 2 Oct 2001 18:21:16 -0000
From: "laurafisher" <laurafisher@netlink1.net>
To:



Hi - I have occasionally bought Marseilles bedspreads with their 
paper 
label intact that referred to them as AMERICAN QUILT. These were the 

white bedspreads manufactured in the late 19th and early 20th 
century to 
emulate earlier French hand quilting. I think that probably some 
woven 
and printed bedspreads were termed quilts just as a selling tool, 
though 
not made like one, in order to appeal to the late 19th century 
consumer. 
Laura Fisher




----- Original Message -----20
 From: Anne Papworth20
 To: QHL@cuenet.com20
 Sent: Saturday, September 29, 2001 3:55 AM
 Subject: QHL: Earliest Mass-Produced Quilts


 Hello All,

  Kit houses were the intermediary stage between individual 
builders 
and
  developers. Can we then say that quilt kits were the 
intermediate 
step
  between "home made" and industry made? I do not remember that 
there
  many factory made quilts much before WWII - other than the 
machine
  quilted satin spreads of the 1930's and 40's. Just thinking out 

loud!
  Newbie

 Newbie Richardson's posting got me thinking about when quilts 
were
 first mass-manufactured. The earliest reference I can come up 
with is
 an advertisement in the August 24, 1871 issue of "Sheldon's 
Weekly
 Dry Goods Price List". The ad lists "Honey Comb, Fancy Jacquard
 and Imperial Bleached Comfortables and Quilts". Has anyone ever
 seen what one of these "quilts" looks like? I can find no 
reference 
to
 mass-produced quilts prior to 1871, nor from 1872 to the 1930's.
 Anyone else??

 Anne Papworth