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Quilters Find a way to care

01249

Date: Mon, 08 Oct 2001 22:55:46 -0700
From: Gail Ingram <GIngramtcainternet.com>
To: 

Cinda,

Thanks for once again regaling us in the hinterlands with the 
treasures and
pleasures of Fran's Vintage Friends. How I would love to see photos 
of your
prizes­­especially the toile depicting Lord Nelson's funeral! What an
inspiration these reports are.

My husband, an historian, is currently putting together a lecture 
that
illustrates the feistiness of women in community-building on the 
American
western frontier in the late 19th century. I knew he was drawing 
analogies
from contemporary life, and so I offered him the "neither sleet, nor 
snow,
nor spilled missles" story. He snapped it up, noting that he reckoned 
that a
pile of Tomahawk missles would rank right up there with flooding 
creeks,
hostile Indians, and typhoid epidemics as obstacles overcome.

I am so proud of y'all.

Still hanging tight with Melville in a North-Louisiana autumn,
Gail Ingram

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 09 Oct 2001 16:06:07 -0700
From: quilterflash.net
To: 


today there is a new recipe for treating fabric so that our colored
computer ink sets. i don't have it (would love it if someone else 
does as
i need it!), but do remember that it involves soaking the fabric in 
downey
fabric softener, drying it, sending it on freezer paper thru the 
printer,
and then heat setting. i'm not sure if it leaves any residue that 
would be
visible to the naked eye once the label is done. could there be an
ingredient common to downey that earlier quilters used in their 
attempt to
fix a signature onto silk?
dutchrose ---{-

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 9 Oct 2001 20:15:14 EDT
From: SSQuiltaol.com
To: 

Hello,

A heartfelt thank you to everyone who shared their opinion on what 
should be 
done with the original kit quilt packages that I came across while 
sorting 
through the Wurzburg boxes. The general feeling was to leave them 
alone for 
future study and that's just what I'll do. I've got plenty of other 
ways to 
recreate those beautiful quilts. If I haven't answered your email 
personally 
yet, I will. I'm a little behind in my mail. 
I am going to sort out and label all of the fabric swatches that I've 
come 
across and hopefully make a last minute trip to Houston to talk to 
the fabric 
companies about what might be possible for the future of these 
fabrics. I've 
long felt that kit quilts (and their fabrics) have been neglected and 
are 
just now beginning to receive some of the credit they deserve. I know 
there 
are lots of you on the list who have worked very hard in this area 
and I for 
one sure to appreciate it.

Gay Bomers

Date: Fri, 12 Oct 2001 12:51:37 -0400
From: Nancy Manning <nemanninghome.com>
To: 

Hi Everyone--

I just purchased some lovely 36" charcoal gray, medium weight, softer
cotton fabric with a soft sheen from a local antique store for a
reasonable price. It was sold in three 2-yd. lengths. I think the
fabric is all cotton. I debated about buying it because the seller 
had
wrapped each cut in masking tape with the price written on the 
masking
tape. It must have set on the shelf for awhile, because there is 
quite
a residue. I have not had good luck removing tape residue in the 
past.
Any helpful tips? If not, I'll cut around it :-) Thanks, Nancy.

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 13 Oct 2001 13:36:23 EDT
From: Kathlashaol.com
To: QHLcuenet.com


Greetings!

My name is Kathleen Lashley and I am a recent new subscriber. I have 
been a 
quilter for about 25 years, always in love with old quilts after a 
DAR quilt 
showing. Also, I am now the Domestic Crafts Program Coordinator at 
Old World 
Wisconsin, so as part of my job, I research and implement the 
reproducing of 
quilts from OWW's collection, as well as some from the Wisconsin 
Historical 
Society in Madison, of which we are a part.

I have been trying to locate a copy of a book entitled "A Voice of 
Their Own: 
Wisconsin Women and their Quilts". This book has been listed by 
several 
on-line booksellers, including Barnes and Noble, but when I try to 
purchase 
it I am told it is out of print. I have tried to find it in several 
"out of 
print" sections, but to no avail. If anyone can give me any 
information 
regarding if this book is available used, I would appreciate it 
greatly. 

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 13 Oct 2001 11:05:35 -0700 (PDT)
From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com>
To:

If I could blow my own horn for a moment - I maintain a "books
wanted" and "used books for sale" page at Hickory Hill Quilts. 
Judging by how often I am updating those pages, this free service is
pretty popular. It can't hurt to post your "want" at
http://www.hickoryhillquilts.com/wtb.htm.  

Unrelated comment - for anyone is waiting for their "United We Stand"
Pin ( http://www.quiltbus.com/fund.htm  ), they came in today and I will
be mailing them out on Monday.

Thanks,

Kris


------------------------------

Date: Sat, 13 Oct 2001 19:35:57 -0700
From: donbeldpostoffice.pacbell.net
To

Hi, I have a question. I have a friend who has what I am sure is a 
U.S.
Sanitary Commission Quilt with a name on the back. Although it is 
not
stamped, the quilt meets all the criteria: The top is a tied rail 
fence
quilt with Civl War and before era fabric. The real back is an
1840/50's paisley on the short run that was common then. It has been
repaired somewhat and a new back sewn over the old back--around 1900 
is
my guess. The batting is a very rough cotton. It was retied when
repaired with what appears to be feed sack string.

The name written on the back is Scott Chamberklain (?) Does anyone 
know
how to see if this person was a Civil War veteran? Please let me 
know.
There is no indication where it was made. My friend bought it for
$20.00 at an auction in Southern California. Thanks. DonBeld