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Quilters Find a way to care

 

Date: Thu, 6 Dec 2001 21:06:35 -0800
From: "Christine Thresh" <christinewinnowing.com>

Fabric is woven from spun threads so it's been around a long time. I 
am not
a bible scholar, but I have been a spinner. In Proverbs 31: 19 it 
says "She
layeth her hands to the spindle and her hands hold the distaff." 
Spindles
(pointed sticks) are used for spinning thread (wool, cotton, and 
flax). They
were and are mounted on spinning wheels so both hands are free to 
pull on
the fiber. A distaff is a holder for hackled flax and sometimes 
mounted on a
flax wheel (the sit-down type with a treadle). I don't think a 
distaff was
used with a wool wheel (the stand-up type large wheel). I don't know 
when
the translation was done for the King James Bible so dating this 
activity is
beyond me. Perhaps it read differently in the original language. I 
can't
picture the "virtuous woman" holding both a drop spindle and a 
distaff to
spin her thread, she would need a third hand.

Christine on an island in the California Delta
http://www.winnowing.com

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 7 Dec 2001 08:17:05 -0600
From: "quilt97" <quilt97prodigy.net>
To: <QHLcuenet.com>


Thanks to Judy and Newbie who wrote about Elizabeth Wayland Barber's
"Women's Work: The First 20,000 Years/Women, Cloth, and Society in 
Early Times,
"  
Another good read on this topic is: "A Midwife's Tale" by Laura
Thatcher Uhler.
She narrates the late 18th century diary of Martha
Ballard from Maine. You get a very true sense of how women had a
parallel economy that relied on bartering of skills and tools. For
instance one gal would trade warping a loom ( a really ornerous task)
for use of the neighbor's brick oven.
Drop spinning did not stop with the invention of the spinning 
wheel,
as it was so very portable!

ate: Sat, 8 Dec 2001 10:57:03 EST
From: SadieRoseaol.com



Brenda posted this note on the Info-EQ list today. I wrote & 
suggested she 
join us
(she is going to), and offered to post her question here, as I think 
we might 
have someone who can help her out....she really doesn't need 
BlockBase (which 
is a 
wonderful program) for this quilt. 

Subject: Question Regarding BlockBase
From: "Brenda Josselet" <bjosseletaustin.rr.com>
Date: Fri, 7 Dec 2001 09:15:45 -0600

Hi everyone, 

My name is Brenda, and I am new to this group as well as to quilting. 
I
have done many, many other crafts in my lifetime (including sewing), 
but
never quilting until now. I am hoping I can get some input from all 
of
you on Block Base.

What I want to know from those of you who have this cd is -- does it
contain ONLY blocks or does it also have borders. Here's the reason I 
am
asking:

The reason I decided to give quilting a try is because I inherited an
unfinished quilt from my aunt. My mother embroidered quilt blocks 
when
she was 17 years old while recuperating from a broken leg (my mother 
is
about to turn 78 so you can quickly figure out how old these 
embroidered
blocks are). Anyway, the pieces to this quilt have a long family
history. My aunt started working on a quilt that these blocks were to 
be
set into but never finished it. It was to be a present to me when I
graduated from high school (which was in 1971). Since I didn't get it
then, I was then supposed to get the finished quilt when I got 
married
-- never did receive that finished quilt and I've now been married 
for
28 years.

To make a long story short -- I got the unfinished quilt when my aunt
died. It would mean a great, great deal to me to finish this quilt 
and
give it to my mother to keep until it comes back to me at her death. 
It
would also mean a great deal to my mother who has been wanting that
quilt finished since I was in high school.

Anyway, here's my problem -- I know how the embroidered flower blocks
are supposed to be put together, but I don't know how the border is
supposed to look. I know it's a long shot, but I am really hoping 
that
someone on this list will recognize the description of the border and 
be
able to either point me in the right direction for finding a picture 
of
it or might, by some miracle, know something more about this quilt. 
So,
here goes:

The name of the quilt is "Mother's Old Fashioned Flower Garden 
Quilt."
The copyright on the color chart for the embroidered flower blocks is
1931 and was published by Home Art Studio, 531 Waterbury Circle, Des
Moines, Iowa.

The "directions" for completing the quilt are from Household's Quilt
Block Service in Topeka, Kansas. Here's an excerpt from the 
directions:

"To make you flower quilt even more realistic, we suggest you use our
picket fence border pattern. An old-fashioned picket fence surrounds 
the
four sides of the embroidered posy garden. A little gate at the 
center
of one side stands ajar so one may enter and enjoy the beauty and
fragrance of the hand-stitched blossoms."

My aunt did finish quite a bit of the picket fence. She even cut out 
and
put together the gate and stepping stones. The problem I have run 
into
is that there is a corner post and two side corner posts for the 
picket
fence and I cannot, for the life of me, figure out how they are 
supposed
to go together. Since I don't have any kind of picture of what the
finished quilt is supposed to look like, I also don't know if the 
gate
is supposed to go in the center or one of the long sides or one of 
the
short sides.

Like I said earlier, I know it is a long-shot that someone will be 
able
to help me out, but you can't even imagine how much it would mean to 
me
and my mother to see this quilt finished.

Thank you all in advance for any help you might me able to give me.

Brenda J.

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 8 Dec 2001 10:46:54 -0600
From: "Junior/Peggy McBride" <jlmpamnetins.net>


Am I remembering correctly, The calendar by AQS is Quilt Art 2002. 
The
Quilt Engagement Calendar was published for years by someone else, 
whose
name escapes me, and I thought the discussion was a while back that 
it was
not to be published any more. They published mostly antique quilts 
and you
got to see quilts that were in museums and private collections. I 
hope I
am wrong, but don't think I am.

Peggy Mc

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 8 Dec 2001 10:51:41 -0600
From: "Brenda Josselet" <bjosseletaustin.rr.com>


Hi everyone, 

My name is Brenda, and I am new to this group as well as to quilting. 
I
have done many, many other crafts in my lifetime (including sewing), 
but
never quilting until now. I am hoping I can get some help from 
someone
on this list.

The reason I decided to give quilting a try is because I inherited an
unfinished quilt from my aunt. My mother embroidered quilt blocks 
when
she was 17 years old while recuperating from a broken leg (my mother 
is
about to turn 78 so you can quickly figure out how old these 
embroidered
blocks are). Anyway, the pieces to this quilt have a long family
history. My aunt started working on a quilt that these blocks were to 
be
set into but never finished it. It was to be a present to me when I
graduated from high school (which was in 1971). Since I didn't get it
then, I was then supposed to get the finished quilt when I got 
married
-- never did receive that finished quilt and I've now been married 
for
28 years.

To make a long story short -- I got the unfinished quilt when my 
aunt
died. It would mean a great, great deal to me to finish this quilt 
and
give it to my mother to keep until it comes back to me at her death. 
It
would also mean a great deal to my mother who has been wanting that
quilt finished since I was in high school.

Anyway, here's my problem -- I know how the embroidered flower blocks
are supposed to be put together, but I don't know how the border is
supposed to look. I know it's a long shot, but I am really hoping 
that
someone on this list will recognize the description of the border and 
be
able to either point me in the right direction for finding a picture 
of
it or might, by some miracle, know something more about this quilt. 
So,
here goes:

The name of the quilt is "Mother's Old Fashioned Flower Garden 
Quilt."
The copyright on the color chart for the embroidered flower blocks is
1931 and was published by Home Art Studio, 531 Waterbury Circle, Des
Moines, Iowa.

The "directions" for completing the quilt are from Household's Quilt
Block Service in Topeka, Kansas. Here's an excerpt from the 
directions:

"To make your flower quilt even more realistic, we suggest you use 
our
picket fence border pattern. An old-fashioned picket fence surrounds 
the
four sides of the embroidered posy garden. A little gate at the 
center
of one side stands ajar so one may enter and enjoy the beauty and
fragrance of the hand-stitched blossoms."

My aunt did finish quite a bit of the picket fence. She even cut out 
and
put together the gate and stepping stones. The problem I have run 
into
is that there is a corner post and two side corner posts for the 
picket
fence and I cannot, for the life of me, figure out how they are 
supposed
to go together. Since I don't have any kind of picture of what the
finished quilt is supposed to look like, I also don't know if the 
gate
is supposed to go in the center or one of the long sides or one of 
the
short sides.

Like I said earlier, I know it is a long-shot that someone will be 
able
to help me out, but you can't even imagine how much it would mean to 
me
and my mother to see this quilt finished.

Thank you all in advance for any help you might me able to give me.

Brenda Josselet

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 08 Dec 2001 12:20:49 -0600
From: Xenia Cord <xecordnetusa1.net>


There will probably be several replies to Sadie's post, and the
forwarded one from Brenda, but here is some preliminary information:

The pattern ("Embroidered Flower Garden") was created by Ruby Short
McKim of Independence, Missouri, and was used as a contest series in
syndicated newspapers in 1929-32, and perhaps later (The Indianapolis
Star used it over the winter of 1929-30). There were 25 nine inch
blocks to be embroidered, plus a quilting pattern that resembles 4
dandelion puffs, and the picket fence border. In McKim's "Designs 
Worth
Doing," Fall-Winter 1931-32, the design is on page 15. McKim was
selling the stamped blocks and completion fabrics as a kit at that 
time.

The picket fence was a problem, because if the quiltmaker decided to 
put
it on all 4 sides of her quilt as called for in the description (the
illustration shows it just at top and bottom), no information was
provided on how to turn the corner. Some quiltmakers put a gate on 
the
diagonal in the corner block, others repeated the quilting motif, and
some left the corners empty. I have seen a lot of variation in the
fence border treatment, since lots of these quilts were made in 
Indiana
in response to the Star contest.

The description that accompanies the little illustration suggests 
that
Ruby McKim was dealing with competitors who had copied her designs - 
but
poorly, according to her. ("They in no way compare with cheap,
amateurial drawings where some [designs] are scant and spindly and 
other
blocks are crowded and ugly.")

Hope this helps!
Xenia

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 8 Dec 2001 17:33:18 -0600
From: "Leigh Fellner" <hcquiltspeoplepc.com>


The auction just closed at $6,128! :)

http://cgi.ebay.com/aw-cgi/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1491175479 

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 8 Dec 2001 20:38:32 -0500
From: "deb" <debquiltingposs.com>


I just bought some stamped applique quilt blocks - just like the 
stamped
kits but in block form from the Marvil Art Needlwork Co. St. Louis 
MO. Can
anyone provide any information on this company?

Thanks,
Debbie
Bayville, NJ