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Quilters Find a way to care

Date: Sun, 23 Dec 2001 08:18:19 
From: "Anne Copeland" <anneappraiser@hotmail.com>
To: qhl@cuenet.com
Subj

Dear Friends on QHL,

I have been off for awhile. Got hit with that Bad Trans virus, and 
it took 
FOREVER to rescue and try to save what I could of my computer 
software! I 
have McAffee AND Norton, and IMHO, you can't have too much anti-virus 
software.

I had another bad fall on Thanksgiving day, my Big 60 Birthday. I 
ended up 
with my arm in a cast for a pulled ligament which was quite painful, 
and 
just got it off yesterday.

The day after Thanksgiving, my mom died, so that has been difficult.

And today I opened mail from Pacific Bell, and they told me someone 
somewhere (not in my home; I live alone) is making 900 calls and has 
made 
more than 75 since my last phone bill. They will take care of it of 
course, 
but it is just another unpleasant wrinkle to work through.

But out of all this, I am extremely thankful that I have friends 
among all 
of you. Let the world do what it wants to; with you as friends, I 
feel 
absolutely wealthy. I wish for each and every one of you the best 
life has 
to offer for the New Year and always. I wish also that you will have 

gentle and peaceful holiday season. Peace and blessings, Annie

_________________________________________________________________
Chat with friends online, try MSN Messenger: http://messenger.msn.com

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 23 Dec 2001 12:40:00 +0000
From: MARK POWER <mpower@coventry.ac.uk>
To: Quilt Heritage List <QHL@cuenet.com>
Subject: Merry Christmas
Message-ID: <3C25D0A0.2F3F85E6@coventry.ac.uk>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Sherry Christmas everybody and a hippy new year.

Best wishes,
Mark

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 23 Dec 2001 12:53:32 +0000
From: "Karen Bush" <karenbush11@hotmail.com>
To: QHL@cuenet.com
Subject: Mark
Message-ID: <F196vseS0azaX2M2N2s0000d951@hotmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed

Thanks Mark! I don't know about the Sherry, but...it IS getting to be 
rather 
a 'hippy' new year...seems like the 'hips' are growning as fast as 
the years 
go by! hahaha or........I can say 'hippy/hippie' new Year as in...
It's a 'groove, man'....haha..kb


Sherry Christmas everybody and a hippy new year.
>
>Best wishes,
>Mark


http://www.karenbushquilts.com
Karen Bush
It only takes me One day to get a month behind :/



------------------------------

Date: Sun, 23 Dec 2001 14:43:09 -0600
From: "Carla Toczek" <CToczek@hot.rr.com>

Hello Everyone,
A response, both humorous and serious came to mind after I read 
the
following passage. Please keep in mind I speak for myself, only 
myself and
no one else but myself. <G>

"no contemporary quilter making a reproduction would mix red, pink 
(even
double), that green (that photographs so badly as black) and cheddar 
unless
she was out to seriously scam, because the combination isn't 
generally
thought of as a "nice" one."

I would, actually, use red, pink, green (maybe not that 
black-green) and
cheddar to make a reproduction quilt, especially if there was one 
quilt in
particular I had my eye on. And yes, reproduction lines do 
coordinate
nicely these days, but it has been my experience that the more 
interesting
vintage quilts are those that do not coordinate nicely, for intance, 
the PA
red and yellow quilts with a kick of double blue, or even those 
marvelous,
eye candy, 30's quilts.
As an aside, does the definition of "coordinate" differ between 
the
antique quilt world and our current living rooms? To be honest, I 
would
not throw a cheddar pillow on my maroon, plaid sofa, but I WOULD 
display an
1860's red, cheddar and pink quilt if I were fortunate enough to own 
the
real thing. Hmmmm.

Best wishes,
Carla Toczek, Texas

Date: Mon, 24 Dec 2001 09:20:24 +0200
From: Ady Hirsch <adamroni@netvision.net.il>


Hi all,
Merry Christmas and a happy New Year to all. And may the new year 
bring
peace and joy to all.
Ady in Israel

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 24 Dec 2001 07:11:29 -0600
From: "Leigh Fellner" <hcquilts@peoplepc.com>


> I would, actually, use red, pink, green (maybe not that 
black-green)
and
> cheddar to make a reproduction quilt, especially if there was one 
quilt in
> particular I had my eye on. And yes, reproduction lines do 
coordinate
> nicely these days, but it has been my experience that the more 
interesting
> vintage quilts are those that do not coordinate nicely, for 
intance, the
PA
> red and yellow quilts with a kick of double blue, or even those 
marvelous,
> eye candy, 30's quilts.
> As an aside, does the definition of "coordinate" differ 
between the
> antique quilt world and our current living rooms? To be honest, I 
would
> not throw a cheddar pillow on my maroon, plaid sofa, but I WOULD 
display
an
> 1860's red, cheddar and pink quilt if I were fortunate enough to 
own the
> real thing. Hmmmm.

Carla, I guess I wasn't clear. Far too often the "average" quilter, 
at
least IME watching them select fabric in quilt shops and seeing the 
"nice"
quilts at our local quilt shows, seems to want desperately to have
everything "match" Every green, it seems, must be identical to every 
green
(and even "better," as you pointed out, if they're part of the same
manufacturer's line of "nice" coordinates). The prevailing wisdom 
seems to
be that using intense or "non-matching" colors is safe to do only if 
you've
taken a Jinny Beyer class, and then only with her color wheel handy. 
To me
at least, in a world where you can buy paper towels to match your 
kitchen
wallpaper which coordinates with your cannisters, that comes as no
surprise.

The 19th century color aesthetic was indeed different from ours 
(although we
can certainly acquire it and find it more pleasing than the 21st 
century
aesthetic), just as that century's middle-class aesthetics of music 
(no
dissonance), decor (nice and full of "stuff") and beauty (petite, 
fleshy,
and pale-skinned) was different. Remember too that technology has 
changed
dramatically: the range of colors from which an 1880 quilter could 
choose
was significantly limited in comparison to ours, which changes one's
perspective, as does never having viewed things under incandescent or
fluorescent light. IOW, we can work *as if* we had a 19th century
aesthetic, but it is still a conscious choice, not second-nature. To 
carry
the idea to a greater extreme, I did an intense color study of Amish 
quilts
awhile back to try to "get" that value system. If I concentrate, I 
can do
it; but it's like learning an Asian color aesthetic; I may become 
fluent,
but it will always be a foreign language no matter how much I 
appreciate it,
simply because my life experience brings in so many other variables I 
must
learn to ignore in order to make it "authentic".

In any case, my original message's point was that because of the 21st
century obsession with "coordination" (IMHO read: insipidity), a 
quilt
manufactured in the colors of the one in question is simply not 
marketable
to a mass audience because it doesn't "go with" most people's living 
rooms;
better to go with cheery, easy-to-understand Pierre Deux
red/yellow/indigo/green prints, or the ubiquitous and unthreatening
hunter/burgundy. This is why you'll find a thousand pastel Wedding 
Ring
repros but only a very few (if any) Joseph's Coats in sky blue, 
alizarin and
black: the latter are harder for most "moderns" to understand and
appreciate. Hence my opinion that a modern quilt in the fabrics 
shown and
with the irregularities that appear would need to be a conscious 
choice on
the part of the maker to *reproduce* rather than simply to make an 
appealing
quilt - as you said, if there was a "particular" antique quilt you 
had your
eye on. (There's a very entertaining article in, I think, the Quilt 
World
Annual magazine which gives detailed instructions on how to make an
"antique-looking" quilt.)

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 24 Dec 2001 10:02:23 EST
From: @aol.com


Whatever holiday you celebrate, whatever name you know God by, 
wherever you 
are and wherever you walk, may this season bring you peace and joy. 
God 
bless you all.

Pax - 

Karen Evans
Easthampton, MA 

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 24 Dec 2001 10:08:06 EST
From: @aol.com


I've always gone for the colors that please me, and if they don't fit 
the 
prevailing Martha Stewart fashion, too bad. Right now I'm doing my 
house in 
early Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom - lots of Indian fabrics, 
old 
saris, antique brocade I found at Brimfield, etc. - and it pleases me 
just 
fine. It drives my best friend nuts, but she doesn't live here. I 
do.

If your taste runs to coordinate, then coordinate. If it runs to 
eclectic, 
then be eclectic. We don't all have to go by the decorating 
magazines and 
the Home & Garden Network and "what the judges will like." If your 
taste 
runs to chrome yellow and indigo, go for it! And if other people 
don't like 
your house, meet them at a restaurant! :)

Peace, joy, and good quilting to all. May your needles never break, 
may your 
thread never knot, and may your fabric never fade. God bless - 

Karen Evans

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2002 11:15:25 -0500
From: "pepper cory" <pepcory@mail.clis.com>

It has always been my philosophy to make the quilt and THEN paint 
the room!
I used to work with decorators and making those super-coordinated 
quilts was
a real drag. For everybody on QHL this Christmas, I wish for you 
creativity,
courage, and the sense not to listen to anybody else's color opnion 
when it
comes to YOUR quilts. Merry Christmas from the windy Carolina coast-
Pepper Cory

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 24 Dec 2001 11:47:49 -0800 (PST)
From: Ark Quilts <quiltarkmv@yahoo.com>


For many years I've taught beginning hand quilting to
adults who kept asking me what the "right way" was to
do everything especially about using the "right
colors". I always tell them to choose colors that
they like and not to let other people talk them into
doing something else. I also tell them this story.

Several years ago a friend retired. When I went to
visit her there was this lovely 6 ft. tall watercolor
painting of a vase of flowers hanging in her front
hall. I walked in, dropped my mouth open in full
astonishment, and great appreciation for the lovely
painting. She had done it herself and I never knew
she painted. She told me that when she was a child in
grade school, she was told by her art teacher that she
had no talent because she could not draw her pictures
to look exactly like the samples the teacher did and
she did work that did not look like the pictures that
the other students did. One day the teacher became so
angry because the student used the "wrong colors" that
she grabbed a ruler, stood the child in front of the
class, and smacked her fingers with the ruler until
the student cried. The young lady waited until she
retired & was in her late 50's before she ever picked
up another paint brush to practice her talents. 
And....she had talent.....such a waste for all those
years.

In one of my quilt classes, a student selected a
border fabric that she dearly loved. It had large
leaves and flowers on it and she selected some other
prints and solids to mix into the pieced block that
would be an 18 inch wall hanger when she was finished.
The fabric she selected was beautiful & she thought
it would look great hanging on the wall of her office.
Even though she did not know it, she had come up with
a very stunning combination. It was very different
from the other student fabric selections--it stood out
because it was an eye-catching combination. 

As a beginning quilter she was very unsure of herself
and asked my opinion & I quickly asked : Do YOU like
it? She said yes, but did not know if it was "right"
or not. This student came into my next class with a
completely different set of fabrics for her project. 
She was talked out of her original selection of
fabrics by a clerk in the store where my classes were
hosted who (with meaningful intentions, I am sure)
lectured the student on how small scale projects
should always use only small scale prints and that
only coordinated color schemes were attractive.

At the end of the class my student made the project
out of the fabrics the clerk selected for her as the
"right colors & prints". The student was not as
excited about the finished project as she was when
trying to work with her own selection of eye-catching
fabrics she especially selected for the wall of her
office. After a little coaxing, I persuaded her to
use the first set of fabrics and make another class
project on her own. She did, she loved it, and that's
the one she hangs on her office wall for everyone to
see.

Granted not all sewers have an "eye" or "sense" for
color, but part of the fun is learning self expression
in our creativity.....at least for me.......as a
quilting teacher I don't want to do anything to
discourage someone's natural creativity--it's too much
fun watching them experiment, grow, and learn about
what works for you as the creator, not what "the right
colors" are in someone else's opinion.

Holidays' best to all...............C. Ark


------------------------------

Date: Mon, 24 Dec 2001 14:54:18 EST
From: Midnitelaptop@aol.com


johnny mathis singing "i'll be home for Christmas"....one more last 
minute 
stocking to sew...
Merry Christmas!!! , Happy New Year and Peace on Earth to all
jean

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 24 Dec 2001 20:04:15 +0000
From: "Karen Bush" <karenbush11@hotmail.com>


LOL...WELL put Pepper. It's YOUR quilt, YOUR way! :)) kb

courage, and the sense not to listen to anybody else's color opnion 
when it
comes to YOUR quilts. Merry Christmas from the windy Carolina coast-
Pepper Cory



http://www.karenbushquilts.com
Karen Bush