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Quilters Find a way to care

Date: Fri, 10 Jan 2003 08:29:40 -0300 From: "Pilar Donoso " <quiltpd@mi.cl> To: 

If I am not wrong, about a year ago the University of Nebraska was  going to give some courses over the Internet,

I am a History and Geography teacher, but I dedicate my life to  Quiltmaking. I donB4t have a primary source here in Chile to learn  more about Quilt History, so I appreciate this group and all the  information that I receive.

If any courses are given over the Internet, please let me know. Any  other Web site that you think I shouldn't miss, please send me the  address.

Thank you very much

Pilar Donoso I. The Quilt Shop Santiago, Chile quiltpd@mi.cl

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 10 Jan 2003 07:45:35 -0800 From: Laura Robins-Morris <lrobins@fhcrc.org> To: 

Ami Simms has several specialities and many acitivites. Lately she's been doing memory quilts and photo transfer. She's very nice and has a wonderful sense of humor. Her web is www.amisimms.net

DON'T try www.amisims.com which she used to have. It now belongs to someone who uses it to redirect to other "for profit" sites. I'll include an excerpt from her last newsletter. She also asks any concerned quilters to go to her site and click away like crazy. She needs lots of action on the site to try to regain her old name or at least get the new one listed in the better searches.

Excerpt from Ami's newsletter. Long, but interesting about the ways of internet commerce.

... If that wasn't enough, on December 13th the nice folks that registered my domain name (www.AmiSims.com) pulled the plug. No warning; they just deleted it. Then they sent me an invoice on the 18th to renew it. Then they MAILED me an invoice on the 21st to renew by January or they'd delete it by October 2000. So because they're in a time warp, I'm up a creek. Needless-to-say, once they delete it, they can't get it back. It goes into limbo for several days and then onto the open market. No problem. Who would want MY name on THEIR page?

Apparently someone in Hong Kong. Go figure. www.AmiSims.com now takes you (and everybody else) to a site linked to gambling, debt consolidation, and Viagra, among other things. (If you want to see for yourself please do NOT use MY domain name to get there, use <http://www.ultimatesearch.com>.

Misery loves company. I guess I'm not the only one. The Poetry Society went overnight from verse to Viagra when Ultimate Search bought THEIR website. It's happened to several others as well. Some ended happily, others did not.

On the bright side, people looking for me could have been sent to a porn site.

Here's what YOU can do: 1. Tell everybody you can think of that www.AmiSims.com is now www.AmiSimms.net. This would include your entire address book, your buddy lists, newsgroups, guild newsletter, the people at the grocery store, your accountant, and your mother-in-law. Want to go the extra mile? Give me the name of the person that writes about computers at your local newspaper.

2. Tell everybody you know NOT to use www.AmiSims.com until further notice. (If Ultimate Search sees a lot of hits from MY domain name it will become more and more valuable in their eyes and they will NEVER give it back.) They did purchase it legitimately. If you really want to see what their site is all about, enter it through <www.UltimateSearch.com>

3. VISIT www.AmiSimms.net  or www.MalleryPress.com . Get to my site through either of these domain names and CLICK LIKE CRAZY. Doesn't matter where; just GO. The more traffic (hits) the site gets, the more likely the search engines are to list me with a domain name that actually goes to my site. It will probably take years to get where I was before this happened....so CLICK! Please. ...

Me again, signing off. Laura in Seattle

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 10 Jan 2003 12:04:58 -0500 From: "Candace Perry" 

I was looking at an eighteenth century pocketbook in our collection just now and realized that the clasp on it is made in the shape of the Prince of Wales emblem. It's late 18th century, and the clasp is silver (actually unusual that it has such a clasp). The pocket book is done in what is known as "queen's stitch." Just a little FYI for any one who is interested! Candace Perry Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 10 Jan 2003 18:13:40 EST From: KareQuilt@aol.com To: QHL@cuenet.com 

I can't seem to keep this info straight in my head and get several of you and your websites mixed up all the time. Who founded & runs Quilt History.com? What other quilt history websites do you all check regularly, besides QHL and QuiltHistory.com? Just curious. Thanks.

Karen A.

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 10 Jan 2003 21:07:19 -0300 From: "Pilar Donoso " <quiltpd@mi.cl> To: 

Dear all of You:

First, I want to thank you for your great support and information  about places where I could learn more about the History of Quiltmaking.  I have a lot of work to do now. Thanks God it is summer, and things  slow down a lot at the store, and I will have some time to check on  these interesting places.

For a long time a had a "discussion" with a lady that teaches trapunto  at my store. She lived in France for a while and we cannot agreed if  Trapunto and Boutis is the same thing. Also, she keeps saying that the  Boutis is originated in Provence, and according to my records, it is  from Sicily. I checked in many places and they refer to Stuffed work to  Boutis as a French word and Trapunto as an American word . Any of you  Historian Gurus can help me? Pilar Donoso I. The Quilt Shop Santiago, Chile quiltpd@mi.cl

-------------------------------

Date: Fri, 10 Jan 2003 16:55:17 -0800 (PST) From: Kris Driessen 

Karen,

QuiltHistory.com and the QHL list is "mine", so to speak. I pay for the website and privately maintained list with generous donations from the members and everyone who purchases a book through the QuiltHistory website. However, in reality, it belongs to everyone who has contributed to the discussions, offered an article for the website, or said nice things about us in other forums:-))

I strongly believe that we can all learn from each other. There are a lot of people on the list who lurk for years, then suddenly learn something and can't wait to tell everyone on the list. Or simply tell their neighbor! Who knows how many textiles have been saved from the dump because of an alert member. I am especially pleased with the increase in Quilt History study groups. Not everyone can afford to go to the AQSG meetings, but that doesn't mean their interest is less valid. We should all be exceedingly proud of ourselves.

OK, I will get off my soapbox now.

Kris

-----------------------------------

Date: Fri, 10 Jan 2003 23:31:42 -0500
From: "Annette A." <nettie@mindspring.com>

Not only am I a lurker, I am also one who cannot afford to
go to AQSG meetings, quilt shows, museums, etc. Through
your sharing your experience and knowledge, asking questions
and responding to the list, I have gained a wealth of
information and it stretches my desire to learn more.

Maybe one of these days, I will have the answer one of
you are looking for. :-) So thanks everyone.

Now, I have a question. A few months ago, there was a
website about dating wood thread spools that came across
this list. It was very detailed with photographs and organized
very well. I am looking for it and can't find it. Seems
like it was a website done by one of the QHL members. ???

Thanks

Annette

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 10 Jan 2003 20:53:26 -0800
From: "Laurette Carroll" <rl.carroll@verizon.net>

Hello,
Annette, that sounds like Joan's chart for threads at
http://www.fabrics.net/

Laurette Carroll
Southern California

Look to the Future With Hope

> Now, I have a question. A few months ago, there was a
> website about dating wood thread spools that came across
> this list. It was very detailed with photographs and organized
> very well. I am looking for it and can't find it. Seems
> like it was a website done by one of the QHL members. ???
> ThanksAnnette
>

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 11 Jan 2003 00:20:24 EST
From: OzarkQuiltmaker@aol.com

Hi:

This is in reference to the post about trapunto (listed below). 

Anita Shackelford's book called Surface Textures has a section on the
histor
y
of raised work. According to the book, "Early references to raised
work
generally used the term stuffed work or trapunto. ... The earliest
known
quilts in this style are attributed to Sicily c. 1395. ... One of
these
quilts in in the collection of the Victoria and Albert Museum in
London, one

is in the Bargello in Florence and a third is in a private
collection." 

She goes on to say that "many of the early corded and stuffed quilts
which
made their way into trade with Europe and the American colonies came
from th
e
seaport town of Marseilles in the Provence region of France. By the
17th
century, the popular style of work was being produced in great
numbers by
quiltmakers in Marseilles, both for domestic use and for export.
These whol
e
cloth, corded, and stuffed quilts were commonly referred to by their
place o
f
origin as broderie de Marseille." I have always enjoyed Anita's
book. It
has great photos of antique quilts with raised work. It also has
good
directions and photos that teach how to do padding, cording and
stuffing as
wells as textured applique.

According to Brackman's Clues in the Calico, there are a number of
names for

"raised quilting." It has also been called "Italian quilting." She
goes on

to say that "trapunto" is an Italian word that means "quilt." In
addition t
o
Italy and France, early examples were also found in Portugal, Germany
and
England.

The book, Quilt Treasures of Great Britain refers to an early 17th
century
example of "stuffed quilting." This early quilt was from Cornwall,
England.

It had a central rectangle with "a ship at sea bordered by a rim
containing
pictures of hounds and four male heads set north, south, east and
west of th
e
ship." The remainder of the quilting displayed military and hunting
scenes.

It was stuffed with cotton. The book said the oldest item of
quilted
clothing they found in their project was a petticoat dated 1720. 

I have also heard raised work called Boutis. If I remember
correctly, Bouti
s
is a French term and it only refers to corded work and does not
include
padding and stuffing. Stuffed work was not only done on quilts but
also on
clothing, particularly on petticoats. An early example of Boutis
that I
heard about had been done on a baby bonnet.

Whatever the work is called, it is always elegant ...

Sew Piecefully,
Kathy Kansier
AQS Appraiser
Ozark, Missouri 


------------------------------------

Date: Fri, 10 Jan 2003 21:07:19 -0300
From: "Pilar Donoso " <quiltpd@mi.cl>
To: <QHL@cuenet.com>
Subject: Trapunto

Dear all of You:

First, I want to thank you for your great support and
information

about places where I could learn more about the History of
Quiltmaking.

I have a lot of work to do now. Thanks God it is summer, and
things 
slow down a lot at the store, and I will have some time to check on

these interesting places.

For a long time a had a "discussion" with a lady that teaches
trapunto 
at my store. She lived in France for a while and we cannot agreed
if 
Trapunto and Boutis is the same thing. Also, she keeps saying that
the

Boutis is originated in Provence, and according to my records, it is

from Sicily. I checked in many places and they refer to Stuffed
work to

Boutis as a French word and Trapunto as an American word . Any of
you

Historian Gurus can help me?
Pilar Donoso I.
The Quilt Shop
Santiago, Chile
quiltpd@mi.cl

 

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 11 Jan 2003 00:50:25 EST
From: Kittencat3@aol.com

The only thing I'd add to this excellent summary is that quilted
clothing
goes back at least as far as the 14th century (there's an ivory
carving in
England that shows St. Joseph in a quilted tunic). Henry VIII's
household
inventory of 1547 mentions at least forty or fifty bed quilts, plus
several
quilted petticoats.

The single best book for information on early quilting is still
Averil
Colby's Quilting (although I hope to finishing a pamphlet on
medieval
quilting sometime this spring). There's lots of stuff about
trapunto,
wholecloth, and quilted armor. I think the book was just
republished.

Hope this helps -

Lisa Evans

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 11 Jan 2003 10:05:27 -0600
From: "Ronda McAllen" <QuiltDesign@msn.com>

Hello Friends,

I am searching for three antique Baltimore Album Quilts. As far as I
know
they are not in any museum but privately held. I was hoping that
some of
you may have run across them some point.

The first was published in "A Maryland Album" on page 124. The book
was
published in 1995 and the quilt was owned by Dr. and Mrs. Richard
Palmer. I
have contacted the Maryland Association for Family and Community
Education
but they are not able to help me. I have even called ALL the Richard
Palmer
listed in the state of Maryland but to no avail.

The other two were first published in William Rush Dutton's book "Old
Quilts" on pages 171 & 172. They are a pair of album quilts owned by
Mrs.
Frederick Leiter. One of the quilts was published again in 1987 in
"Labors
of Love" on page 71. It was owned at that time by Sam Herrup
Antiques by
has since been sold with no information available.

If any of you are familiar with these three quilts, please contact
me.
Thank you for your help.

Ronda McAllen

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 11 Jan 2003 20:15:00 -0500
From: "Cathy Hooley" <cathy@goosetracks.com>

That's terrible about Ami Simms' site being pirated. I've always
waited to
receive a renewal notice and never gave it much though. The website
"Whois"
at http://www.networksolutions.com/cgi-bin/whois/whois has domain
registration information including expiration dates.

Someone can back-order your domain name, and it can be stolen out
from under
you if you don't renew on time. I don't know a lot about this, I
came
across the site after reading about Ami's experience & thought I
would pass
it on.
Cathy
*********************************
Cathy Hooley
Goose Tracks Quilts
www.goosetracks.com

------------------------------

: Jane Hall <jqhall@earthlink.net>
To: <QHL@cuenet.com>

Great discussion about stuffed work...it is too often all lumped as
"trapunto", which is incorrect. I do have some experience with
"boutis": it
was and still is, found in Provence. It has no batting at all, and
the
cording not only outlines the motifs but fills the background as
well. The
French draw a design, cord it (bouti originally referred to a large
needle-type tool which carried the cording) and then cord the entire
background, one row at a time. The fabric is generally the same,
front and
back, a thin muslin or even lawn-type white cotton. The weight of the
finished piece is unbelievable...all rigid lines of cording. It is
truly
beautiful and about the most tedious task you can think of in
quilting! Jane
Hall

---------------------

Date: Sun, 12 Jan 2003 10:47:35 EST
From: CarylSchuetz@cs.com

Here's what Cathy is talking about:
"What is a domain name back-order? For one full year we watch the
name every
second of the day so you don't have to.
The instant your name becomes available, we race to register it
for you.

Limited risk: if the current registrant renews, transfer your
subscription to a new name, free.
First-come, first-served: only one subscription is available per
domain
name.
Sounds great! Sign me up. Please fill out all fields below, so we can
process
your order and register your domain name. NOTE: Your credit card will
be
charged $69.00 immediately upon submitting your order. Transfers are
free,
but refunds are not offered. Only one back-order is available per
domain
name."

In my continuing ed for real estate broker, our instructor told us
about this
situation, which, as he discribed it, is rampant. There are
businesses out
there just like the one Cathy described, who use software programs to
monitor
active websites. If the owner does not renew by the expiration date,
the
business immediately steps in and buys "pirates" the domain name. The
specific one the instructor discussed, then contacts the site owner
and
offers to "lease" her the name back, on the condition that the
business also
is her webmaster as well as owner of the site. This business is
making
mega-bucks doing this! They are getting the $69 for the monitoring
as well
as web site maintenance $ and $ for the name leasing. If a site name
is
important to the original owner, many online companies and
individuals will
go this route, so a s to keep their well-known site name. It's
really
awful...what a ripoff, but it is legal. Our insructor advised
everyone to
renew their site for 5 years at a time and to be very careful to not
allow
the time to lapse.
Caryl

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 12 Jan 2003 13:39:50 EST
From: Midnitelaptop@aol.com

Who ever thought that creating a website with a brown/black (or any
dark color) was the way to be creatively cool...should be made to read War
and Peace printed on brown paper with black text...
and when he/she got to page 3.. i'll bet second thoughts would start
to occur...

there's a valid reason why magazines, newspapers and books are
printed with
black text on white/off white paper...it's eeeeezzzzzz to read...

as for me, a quilter...whose eyes have already been strained picking
out and unsewing all of those tiny stitch mistakes i've made...whenever i
open a site with dark backgrounds...i just quietly leave the site, and save my
eyesight for birds, squirrels, snowpeople and quilts...
jeanL

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 12 Jan 2003 09:20:17 -0800
From: Anne Copeland <anneappraiser1@juno.com>

Hi folks, Please help this lady out. I have thought of several, but
would appreciate if some of you would point her to the correct museum
home for these quilts. Thanks a lot. Peace and blessings, Annie

Greetings;
I was supplied your name by the staff at QUILTING TODAY. They
stated
that you had written an article about donating quilts. I am
interested
in donating a portion of my collection now (with the remainder after
my
death). I live in Cleveland Ohio and have about 30-40 Victorian
Crazy
Quilts and am looking for someplace which would put them to good use
(and
also qualify as a tax deduction).
Any help you may give me would certainly be appreciated.
Thank you so very much,
Ms. Shawn Knieriem
3432 West 136th Street
Cleveland OH 44111-2424
K9Shiloh@msn.com

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 12 Jan 2003 15:32:06 -0800 (PST)
From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessen@yahoo.com>
Subject: Even new quilts have some value!

Did that subject like get your attention? <G>

Here's part of an article from the Houston Chronicle about the
vandalism at last years International Quilt Festival:

A Harris County grand jury indicted quilting machine manufacturer
Daniel G. Puckett on a felony charge of criminal mischief, accusing
him of damaging two quilts valued at more than $15,000 on Nov. 3,
authorities said this week.

The rest is at
http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/ssistory.mpl/metropolitan/1724288

I would be interested in seeing how this turns out.

Kris

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 12 Jan 2003 18:28:11 -0600
From: Peggy Keirstead <pkeirstead@attbi.com>

In the way of coincidences, there is an article on boutis in the
current
(March 2003) issue of "Threads" magazine. The article is entitled
"Boutis Provencal," and gives a little history of the subject, saying
it
is an "art perfected in southern France in the 17th and 18th
centuries,"
and is sometimes called "boutis de Marseille."

The author, Marie Yolande, says "boutis is neither trapunto nor
quilting" because, unlike trapunto, the backing is not split to allow
for stuffing, and no additional backing fabric is added. A boutis
piece, apparently, looks very much the same on back or front. And,
unlike a quilt, a boutis piece does not have backing throughout;
stuffing and cording appear in isolated areas.

It is an excellent article, with detailed instructions accompanied by
color photographs. A modern vest and a top made with the boutis
technique are really pretty, and very wearable. Also shown are a
(modern, I think) pair of booties, which, since the word "boutis" is
pronounced "bootee," should appeal to the language aficionados among
you
(like me!)

Peggy Keirstead, in *snowy* north Texas

 

 

 

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