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Quilters Find a way to care

Date: Sun, 19 Jan 2003 08:23:59 -0800 (PST)
From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessen@yahoo.com>

Would anyone like to respond directly to this lady? Be sure to copy
the list, too! As far as I know, the Amish didn't make doll quilts
but I wouldn't mind if someone wanted to tell me I was wrong:-))

Kris

--- Alison Burke <alison.burke@verizon.net> wrote:
>
> Hello,
>
> I am a freelance writer working on an article for a magazine
> about doll and dollhouse quilts made by the Amish. Do you have any
> information or suggestions? Thank you for your time.
>
> Sincerely,
> Alison Burke
<alison.burke@verizon.net>
> www.authorsden.com/alisonburke
> www.prairieden.com/burke/
> www.aspire2write.com
>
---------------------

Date: Sun, 19 Jan 2003 21:32:33 -0500
From: "Judy Kelius (judysue)" <judysue@ptd.net>

I apologize if this is a duplicate message - I thought I sent it but
my
computer crashed and I can't find it.

The Amish did make doll quilts. Rachel and Kenneth Pellman wrote a
book on
Amish Dolls and Doll Quilts in 1986 - it is out of print but I still
have
several copies I found in a local Dry Goods store here in Lancaster
County.
I will write the woman and let her know!

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 20 Jan 2003 21:23:52 +0800
From: "Roberta Geanangel" <ragcat@email.com>

Re: The Amish did make doll quilts. Rachel and Kenneth Pellman wrote
a book on
Amish Dolls and Doll Quilts in 1986 - it is out of print but I still
have
several copies I found in a local Dry Goods store here in Lancaster
County.

Thought you might like to know that book is available on half.com

Ragamuffins are for loving!
>^..^<
Blessed Be!
Roberta in Florida

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 08:03:38 -0500
From: "Pat Sloan" <pat@patsloan.com>

Frances on my yahoo list has the following question...she is not on this
list. If you can give her some guidance would you email her at
franchaddc@aol.com

......... My cousin gave to me today a
quilt made by our grandmother at least 75-80 years ago. It has been in
storage for at least the last 30 years. It has some whites that are
discolored and a few places where the material is torn. Especially one block
all of one of the fabrics is torn. It was not a cotton fabric, it was silky
and ravelled. I would like to replace the torn fabric and somehow get it
washed or cleaned. Oh, forgot to mention, it is completely hand sewn and
quilted. Does anyone have any ideas on what to do to fix this and get it
cleaner? I sure would appreciate any help you can give me. I feel so lucky to
have this quilt, as she left us 15 years ago. We thought all of her quilts
were gone, and to find this one was a blessing.

Frances in VA

Pat Sloan
http://www.QuiltersHome.com
sign-up for my yahoo group- Pat-Sloan-Quilts

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 10:48:31 -0500
From: "Sondra Biacchi" <quilt@epix.net>

Good Morning All...
I am enjoying QHL and learning so much from all of you and I feel the
=
need to share ...I haven't seen any posting of the major new quilt =
exhibit at the Shelburne Museum ART OF THE NEEDLE: 100 MASTERPIECE =
QUILTS which runs from May 17, 2003 until October 26, 2003. This is 
its largest-ever survey of 18th, 19th, and early 20th-century quilts 
from their permanent collection which will include over 40 works never =
before on view and several recent acquisitions. An accompanying
book, =
100 MASTERPIECE QUILTS FROM SHELBURNE MUSEUM is scheduled for =
publication in spring 2003. Art of the Needle is curated by Henry =
Joyce, Chief Curator of Shelburne Museum in consultation with Amelia
=
Peck, Associate Curator at The American Wing, Metropolitan Museum of
=
Art, New York City. This will be going on at the same time of the =
Vermont Quilt Festival. I know where I will be headed in June. I am
so =
looking forward to this little excursion!
Sondie in NE Pennsylvania

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 17:36:07 EST
From: Kittencat3@aol.com

A friend of mine has asked for any information or Web sites on male
quilters.
Beyond Joe Hedley in the 19th century and Michael James in the 20th,
I can't
think of any specific names. If anyone knows of links or books,
please let
me know.

Thanks in advance.

Lisa Evans
Easthampton, Massachusetts

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 18:01:43 -0600
From: Xenia Cord <xenia@legacyquilts.net>

At least 5 men were among the quilters whose works were featured in The
Twentieth Century's Best American Quilts: Jonathan Shannon, Michael
James, Edward Larson, Albert Small, and Carl Klenicke.

Xenia

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 18:15:54 -0500
From: Lynn and Debbie Cupp <Cupp5@Cox.net>

Ernest Haight, now deceased, of Nebraska wrote Practical Machine
Quilting in 1974.

Debbie

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 18:41:51 -0500
From: "judygrow" <judygrow@rcn.com>

http://starbulletin.com/97/06/02/features/story1.html 

http://www.tomphillips.co.uk/sculptur/quilts/quilt3.html 

See some male quilters sat both these sites.

Judy in Ringoes, NJ
judygrow@rcn.com

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 18:49:01 -0500

I reeeally like Tristan's quilts -- and his photo isn't bad either!
Uh oh!
That's not PC. A million pardons.

Judy in Ringoes, NJ
judygrow@rcn.com

Newly Updated Site! http://www.manmadequilts.com 
New Work Just Posted - Click on "Recent Work" link!

"19 New Works by Tristan Robin Blakeman" at Yale Art Space, New
Haven, CT
October 2002 through March 2003

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 23:48:23 -0000

A well known male quilter and teacher in the UK is Colin Brandi. His
style
is art quilt, and a couple of years ago I took an excellent workshop
with
him on 'liberated piecing'. 

Sally W in UK

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 22:04:12 -0500
From: "Cinda Cawley" <lrcawley@dmv.com>

Not only do we see great quilts at Fran's we get great food too! Life
is good! It seems we are in no danger of running out of good things. The
biggest puzzle of the day was a 3rd quarter nineteenth century
Chimney Sweep
quilt with alternate blocks and borders of a floral stripe on a brown
ground, the flowers in colors that could have come from the 1950s
(orange,
turquoise, pale green). The fabrics in the pieced blocks were just what I
would have expected, but that stripe was wild. We decided that when we run
across a really disconcerting fabric it is often one of those floral stripes. Anybody else care to comment?

Xenia was quoted several times: "If you want to wash an antique quilt,
lie down in a darkened room until the urge passes." We all confessed that
we had on occasion ignored that sage advice. The context of this was a
charming circa 1860 Whig Rose that the owner acquired in such a sad state
(and for such a low price) that she had to wash it even if it might
self-destruct in the process. It didn't. The 4-block design is quirky and
kind of clumsy. The maker probably was trying to duplicate something she's
seen, but lacked drafting skills. I loved it!

We saw a smashing wool Log Cabin variation. The logs are arranged in
octagons! Modern art! Then came a circa 1860 red and green Irish Chain
with a quilting sampler in the plain blocks. Another take on the Log Cabin was an adorable c. 1870 doll quilt--rare and exciting and in perfect condition. The colors were arranged to form rectangular effects. 

Nancy Hahn brought a mystery object (she often does this). I don't know
what it is, but it's metal and has spindles and wheels and winds things.
Technology is not my thing. Nancy also had many pieces of an Iris quilt: a
large center and lots of smaller blocks for the borders: yellow and green.
There was a fairly small quilt in a block I can only describe as a Feathered Square: various squares and rectangles put together and then
outlined by half-square triangles. None of us had ever seen one
before. Fabrics looked 1890.

I've become intrigued by commemorative fabrics. I'm planning to collect
contemporary commemoratives since the old ones are so expensive. I was
thrilled to get a repeat of the Eisenhower toile. There was a fabulous Delectable Mountains made of various blue resist fabrics (really looks 1830ish) with exquisite quilting. Brace
yourself Xenia; it was bought filthy dirty and washed. The quilt was found in
the Shenandoah Valley.

One of the Vintage Friends loves the bird fabric and she had a bunch of
examples with her. If you look on p. 45 of the York Co. book Quilts the
Fabric of Friendship you'll see one of them: tiny Ohio Stars with a lavish
border of "the birds." A second chintz masterpiece was composed of Pinwheels (lots of red, yellow and bright colors) with a block-printed border of "the birds." She also had a whole cloth unquilted piece from Rhode Island printed with birds in a butterscotch color. It looked
like the piece that was on Ebay last week.

Also in the chintz category was a Carpenter's Wheel (the blocks were
much smaller-about 12"-than usual) with a blue floral border. Southeastern
PA was represented by a Rolling Stone (pink, orange and green) with
embroidered signatures, not fraktur. There was a 4-block Cox Comb
variation and a silk quilt with a scarf from the 1904 St. Louis World's Fair in
the center. 

A special treat was the top Fran put together from the blocks that Sally
Ward and company made for her when she visited BQHL in England. It
was fun to check out the names: Helen from Hobart, etc. Very appropriately
Fran has framed the 25-patch blocks with pieced borders using Liberty of
London fabrics. It's a real treasure.

Do you think we had enough fun yesterday? All this an a fine dinner in
Annapolis on the way home! We've decided to add a dinner stop to the
fabric study curriculum.


Cinda on the Eastern Shore

------------------------------
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 2003 10:28:25 -0500
From: "Quilters Studio" <quilterstudio@earthlink.net>

I would have to say the most famous male quilter I know is Jeffrey
Gutcheon.
He helped popularize quilting even before the rebirth in 1976. He has
made
many quilts and written several books on quilting techniques and
design. He
wrote a regular column each month for many years called "Not For Shop
Keepers Only" in Quilters Newsletter Magazine. I think I read on this
list
that he writes articles for Fabshop Net now. I believe he has his own
line
of fabrics and is a consultant to the industry.

Some other current names come to mind: Kaffee Fassett, John Flynn,
Paul
Pilgrim, Gerry Roy, Ike Winner (the quilting cowboy who endorses the
long
arm machines) and I have seen a few on Simply Quilts like the guy who
was an
illustrator who designs whimsical baby and toddler quilts.

You might also check the books on quilting history. I think John
Irvin has a
few gentlemen quilters in his book. Many of their names are lost to
history.
Many helped their wives quilt. They would draft the templates and cut
out
the fabric. The wife would hand piece it and baste it and the man
would
quilt it on the sewing machine.

Robin
www.quilterstudio.com

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 22 Jan 2003 17:19:42 -0000
From: "Sally Ward" <sallytatters@ntlworld.com>

>. Many of their names are lost to history.

A good point. Joe Hedley of Northumberland is well known, but there
were
also the itinerant tailors who travelled village to village in the
north-east, many of whom did quilt marking as a sideline....

Sally W in UK

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 22 Jan 2003 15:03:08 -0500
From: "Cinda Cawley" <lrcawley@dmv.com>

How about Ricky Timms.
Cinda on the Eastern Shore

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 22 Jan 2003 23:42:28 -0500
From: "judygrow" <judygrow@rcn.com>

I doubt if my words can equal Cinda's in making you feel the exhilaration
that we all felt on Tuesday at Studio Quilt Study Group. So I will let
pictures do my talking.

If you will go to http://www.quilthistory.com/study/jan21.htm  
you will see images from Kris Driessen's digital camera of some of
the quilts we saw and discussed.

Our focus was on log cabin quilts, but we were to bring anything
wonderful that we wanted to share. Altogether, counting groups of blocks as
single items, our attendees shared 47 quilts! What a day!!!

Looking forward to March 18th, our next get-together. Our focus will
be on things green (as in Shamrocks) and things small (as in the Wee Folk).
Green in quilts, and small quilts.

I urge you all in the various parts of the country to try and get
together with other antique quilt and textile lovers on a regular basis. It
doesn't matter if you don't have huge collections to share. There are study
goals you can set for the group, field trips to go on, stories to tell,
books to share. Those who participate in Study Groups will agree with me that
getting together is so exciting and so much fun that it should be
illegal!

If you do get a group going, it only takes one person with a digital
camera and you can share the excitement with the entire world-wide quilt
community, as we have done. Kris will gladly add your group photos to the quilt
history page.

And as an aside, if you enjoy looking at the photos and reading about
all the study groups, you should know that Kris pays for the web pages
out of her own pocket. A little help towards defraying those costs would
always be welcome!

Judy in Ringoes, NJ

-------------------------

Date: Thu, 23 Jan 2003 02:52:27 -0800 From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplex@starband.net> 

Hi All, Joe Cunningham is alive and well in San Francisco and making wonderful = quilts. He does a lecture on being a male quilter -- very interesting -- = Quilter in A Strange Land." And he does a fabulous musical show with = original songs and story based on the life of Joe Hedley. I think he = calls it "Joe the Quilter" -- it is not to be missed. You can contact = him at joethequilter.com Julie Silber 

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 23 Jan 2003 08:04:57 -0500 From: "khicks1" <khicks1@prodigy.net> To: <QHL@cuenet.com> Subject: Male Quilters - African American Message-ID: 

Lisa Evans,

Good Morning! Here are a few African American male quilters to add to = the list for your friend: Michael Cummings of NY, Jim Smoote of Chicago, IL., Gerald Duane Coleman = of Milwaukee, WI and Raymond K. Houston of St. Louis are contemporary = quilters today. Artists who also make quilts include: Wendell Brown, = who's teaching here in the Northern Virginia area, academic Michael = Harris, retired art professor (Univ. of Maryland) David Driskell, = artists Napoleon Henderson Jones, and David Hammons (who has = incorporated hair in his quilts). Let's also add quilt designer (and = most important documenter) Roland Freeman in Washington, DC. =20

Dr. Gladys Marie Fry curated the exhibit "Man Made: African American Men = and Quilting Traditions" in 1998. A 34 page catalog with quilter bios = and quilt photos was published. You might also consider Dr. Fry's = research on slave made quilts, including quilts by men.

Historically, George Washington Carver also quilted. The museum that = bears his name has samples of his various needlework in its permanent = collection.

Finally, I can of one Black man who teaches quilting - Anthony Jones of = St. Petersburg, FL.

Hope this is helpful -=20 Kyra Hicks www.BlackThreads.com=20

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 23 Jan 2003 08:39:16 EST From: Edwaquilt@aol.com To: QHL@cuenet.com 

Where there were few (not too many years ago), there are now many.

Holice

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 23 Jan 2003 07:11:46 -0700 From: "BOBBIE A AUG" <qwltpro@msn.com> To: 

There is an exhibit representing about 30 male quilters at the Museum of = the American Quilter's Society, Paducah, KY which opens in Feb or Mar (ol= d age - can't remember) and will be there for several months including th= e annual Show the end of April. Among those represented: Michael James,= the late Paul Pilgrim, Gerald E. Roy, Scott Murkin, Roger Sandy, Don Blo= om, Miles Fairchild and more (again, can't remember). It will travel for= up to two years if there is demand. I had lots of suggestions for names= - like Y chromosome - and some that might be considered not PC, but I th= ink Manmade was a good choice.

Bobbie

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 23 Jan 2003 15:41:05 -0000 From: "Sally Ward" <sallytatters@ntlworld.com> To: <QHL@cuenet.com> Subject: Re: Manmade Message-ID: 

< I had lots of suggestions for names - like Y chromosome - and some = that might be considered not PC,=20

A few years ago one of the UK shows had a special section for male = quilters, titled HOM - Hand Of Man. I quite liked the pun on the French = 'Homme'.

Sally W in UK

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 23 Jan 2003 10:57:55 EST From: Kittencat3@aol.com To: qhl@cuenet.com 

I want to thank everyone who responded to my request for information on male quilters. My friend Mary is grateful to one and all. The generosity of quilters never ceases to amaze me - God bless you one and all!

Lisa Evans Easthampton, MA [where it's something like -5 right now on a bright sunny morning]

----------------------------

Date: Fri, 24 Jan 2003 06:40:42 -0600 From: Xenia Cord <xenia@legacyquilts.net> To: 

Did anyone mention John Flynn? Xenia

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 23 Jan 2003 13:48:50 -0500 From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett@fast.net> To: 

In the August 1988 issue (#63) of Patchwork Patter there is an article called The Men of Missouri and Their Quilts, page 15. It says it is reprinted with permission from Ladies Circle Patchwork Quilt, May 1988. There is a picture of 4 gentlemen and their quilts -- a Hawaiian style quilt, a sampler and a large parrot. At the end of the article, the author, Frank Foley, says he is interested in hearing from other male quilters. He is from St. Louis, MO

Barb in southeastern PA

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 24 Jan 2003 15:43:51 -0500 From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett@fast.net> To: 

In the Dec/Jan/1989-1990 issue of Quilting Today (Issue 16) is an article about Paul McDade. It says he's a Senior Systems Analyst in Hamilton, Ohio, and made his first quilt in 1964. His prize winning quilts include Daddy Hex - first in 1973 NQA show in Georgetown, MD and Mountain Mist Award. Bicentennial Star - won Bicentennial Emblem Competition at 1976 Ohio State Fair. 1977 - Wild Duck won First at NQA show. 1980 - Pony Joe took third at NQA show for professional applique.

Barb in cold southeastern PA

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 24 Jan 2003 16:00:04 -0500 From: "Nancy Roberts" <aquilter@alltel.net> To: 

I sent the following post yesterday, but did not see it in the digest so perhaps it got lost. Since sending it, the name of Arnold Savage came to me (the man from Cleveland, OH, who quilts). I told you it would surface! A copy of the original message follows. Nancy Roberts

copy: In listing men quilters, I'm not sure if Art Salemme, John Flynn, Holice Turnbow, or David Walker were mentioned. I can't remember the first name, but is it Joe (?) Cunningham? Also, there is a man from Cleveland, OH, who has some beautiful vintage quilts and has made quilts as well. Maybe the locale will trigger a name for someone as it escapes me at the moment. I think his name might also be Art. It'll come to me, I'm sure. Nancy Roberts

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 24 Jan 2003 16:45:55 -0600 From: Xenia Cord <xenia@legacyquilts.net> To: 

Back when I was producing Quilt America in Indianapolis, in 1994 or 1995, we did a segment on men who quilt and called it "Men Working." All of the signage was done like those hot orange road signs with the words 'men working" on them. We had about 30 quilts in that part of the exhibit.

Xenia

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 24 Jan 2003 16:52:34 -0500 From: "Sondra Biacchi" <quilt@epix.net> To: 

Kris...The pics of the quilts you posted were fantastic! I've been to the site several times just to gaze at the fabrics. Your right...the quilts are to drool over. I love the log cabin with the madder prints....a great close up of the fabic too. You gals must have had a super time. I wish we could get=20 something like this going in our area.... Thanks for giving us all the opportunity to savor these quilts. Sondie in NE Pennsylvania where temps are in the single digits- bbrrrrrrrrrr!

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 23 Jan 2003 13:20:50 -0500 From: "judygrow" <judygrow@rcn.com> To: "Quilt 

The following to me from Charlotte Bull for forwarding to QHL..........

Judy in Ringoes, NJ judygrow@rcn.com

----- Original Message ----- From: "Charlotte Bull" <charlou@mo-net.com> To: <judygrow@rcn.com> Sent: Thursday, January 23, 2003 10:39 AM Subject: the view

Thanks for sharing the address! Viewing what you all shared on 21st was worth being on the List - even if nothing else was...but of course it is. Wow. Confusing statement! Sorry. Anyway I loved it all.

Could you please let list know that these male quilters should be added: Ricky Tims and John Flynn

I know several very local guys that no one but folks in this area will hear of. They got involved with their wife in her guild. Both couples now run quilt shops and are active in guilds! They do not actually quilt, but one could be excellent appraiser. The other is great with software quilt programs. I guess there are varying aspects of quilting! Another is a single guy who quilts - but he "stays in the closet" as he fears someone will think he's looking for a lady friend. (funny!) But I also know of 2 who run machine quilting businesses. The unknown male quilters are out there. Several of my friends have husbands who rotary cut pieces and who sit at the frame with them. Mine just played with the software as he could not resist anything on a computer.

I'm headed out the door for a doctor appointment or I'd try to figure out how to send to QHL. Sorry for bugging you. Charlie from VFF aka. Charlotte Not a male quilter! : )

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 23 Jan 2003 23:41:32 -0500 From: "judygrow" <judygrow@rcn.com> To: "Quilt 

Don't go rushing out to buy bubble wrap. I received the following note from Kory Berrett, an art conservator and teacher, with the bad news that it can be deadly to art. I knew deep down that it was too good to be true.

But I am not giving up on this. I wrote to the Sealed Air company, the ones who invented bubble wrap asking if they manufactured a more stable product. I have yet to get a response. If I do, I'll be sure to share it. I don't think there will be good news though.

Judy in Ringoes, NJ judygrow@rcn.com

From: "Kory Berrett" Subject: bubble wrap

I was forwarded your inquiry regarding the possibility of using bubble wrap to pad textiles in storage. I work as a conservator of art and was an instructor at the graduate level for eight years. I would advise against this use of bubble wrap or indeed, any other plastic film. While these products are useful for short term applications like shipping and do no significant harm to objects padded in this way, most commercially available packaging plastics have poor long term stability. Over a period of years the film will emit plasticisers, stabilizers, and a variety of other short chain polymers that offer useful characteristics to the wrapping in the first months/years but will leave the matrix over time. I have seen many of these products become brittle, fragmented, sticky, and/or yellowed over periods as short as five years, and I have seen objects made of ceramic, glass, and metal with patterns of corrosion or plastic deposits on them from bubble wrap especially. Better stick with lignin-free, acid-free, tissue.

Kory Berrett Berrett Conservation Studio Oxford, PA

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 24 Jan 2003 13:47:17 -0500 From: "judygrow" <judygrow@rcn.com> To: "Quilt 

Don't go rushing out to buy bubble wrap. I received the following note from Kory Berrett, an art conservator and teacher, with the bad news that it can be deadly to art. I knew deep down that it was too good to be true.

But I am not giving up on this. I wrote to the Sealed Air company, the ones who invented bubble wrap asking if they manufactured a more stable product. I have yet to get a response. If I do, I'll be sure to share it. I don't think there will be good news though.

Judy in Ringoes, NJ judygrow@rcn.com

From: "Kory Berrett" Subject: bubble wrap

I was forwarded your inquiry regarding the possibility of using bubble wrap to pad textiles in storage. I work as a conservator of art and was an instructor at the graduate level for eight years. I would advise against this use of bubble wrap or indeed, any other plastic film. While these products are useful for short term applications like shipping and do no significant harm to objects padded in this way, most commercially available packaging plastics have poor long term stability. Over a period of years the film will emit plasticisers, stabilizers, and a variety of other short chain polymers that offer useful characteristics to the wrapping in the first months/years but will leave the matrix over time. I have seen many of these products become brittle, fragmented, sticky, and/or yellowed over periods as short as five years, and I have seen objects made of ceramic, glass, and metal with patterns of corrosion or plastic deposits on them from bubble wrap especially. Better stick with lignin-free, acid-free, tissue.

Kory Berrett Berrett Conservation Studio Oxford, PA

Judy in Ringoes, NJ judygrow@rcn.com

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 24 Jan 2003 21:27:07 EST From: SEHinzman@aol.com To: QHL@cuenet.com 

How about Jonathan Shannon? He does marvelous work. And Fred Calland, who died in recent times.....and Ricky Tims...

Susan

 

 

 

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