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Quilters Find a way to care

Date: Sat, 8 Mar 2003 21:37:48 -0600 From: "Kelly Robinson" <ksrobinson@texoma.net> 

Carolyn,

If your pattern does turn out to be associated with Marion Whiteside = Newton, one of her descendants is now re-printing some of her story book = patterns. They were applique and ranged from "Little Women", "Pinocchio" = to "Hansel and Gretel" and many more. The patterns are not cheap = ($20-$35) but she says that they have been pricy to reproduce. If your = are interested e-mail me and I will send you her address.

Kelly in North Texas

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Date: Thu, 6 Feb 2003 06:57:10 -0600 From: "Ray and Sharon Wells" 

Yesterday I was asked if I knew about the expression "widow's quilt"? A friend had a quilt made of men's suiting etc and had been told by someone that it was a widow's quilt--pieced and tied by the widow from her deceased husband's clothing. Is there anything to support this theory? Thanks for your help. Sharon Wells North Texas

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Date: Thu, 6 Feb 2003 05:43:00 -0800 (PST) From: Ark Quilts <quiltarkmv@yahoo.com> To: Quilt Heritage List <qhl@cuenet.com> Subject: Questions About 2 Patterns 

Hello there! Another "snow on the way day" here in Ohio. I have been cataloging my quilt pattern books (we've had LOTS of snow & ice this winter) and looking for documentation on 2 patterns that I cannot find sources for. Thought maybe someone on QHL might have some information.

Pattern #1-- Since this one is not in any of Barbara Brackman's references, I suspect it is from more recent magazine sources. It is called "Lovebirds"; it is an applique on large 20-18 " squares. A quilt made from the pattern appeared on Ebay in the last few months. The only description I can give without a picture is: there are 2 opposing birds with long, large tail feathers imposed on a wreath that has a rose at the top center of the wreath circle and at the bottom. There are leaves arranged around the wreath. I have a digital picture I can send, but it cannot be posted publicly in any way. Since it isn't in the Brackman references which cover the earliest quilting books & sources, I suspect it appeared in a magazine from the 1950's on. I checked Quilter's Newsletter index & there is 1 listing under the name "Lovebirds" but it is a quilting design, not an applique.

Pattern #2-- The other pattern I am trying to document is an embroidery quilt block of morning glories. I suspect it isn't included in any of the Brackman references because it is an embroidery block from the early part of the 1900's. I suspect it is a Rainbow block marketed through Needlecraft in Augusta, Maine. I found a Morning Glory quilt pattern in a 1930's Needlecraft Magazine that has a similar design, but that pattern was an overall design and not limited to a single block like these are. The blocks I have had no pattern info with them. They are approximately 16 1/2" x 17 1/2" (although I think they were really supposed to be a square)/ have 4 twig branches crossed at the tips to form a square; there is 1 large morning glory in the center and several arranged around the square. I know I have seen this block pattern in a magazine ad or somewhere.....I can also send a digital photo of the blocks I have.

If you have any information or would like me to send a digital photo via email, please contact me via email at: <quiltarkmv@yahoo.com> THANKS!

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Date: Thu, 6 Feb 2003 09:38:41 -0600 From: "Lisa Erlandson" <quilter@cooke.net> To: 

I have never heard that expression, but I have seen several quilts made with men's suiting fabrics that were made from fabric samples or fabric from nearby mills. Without provenance, I would be afraid to make an assumption that just because it was made from suiting fabrics, that it was made by a widow using her deceased husband's suits. I'm sure it happened, but we don't want to run the risk of unsubstantiated "rumors"! (there's so many out there now . . . .)

----- Original Message ----- From: "Ray and Sharon Wells" <rwells@compuwise.net> To: <QHL@cuenet.com> Sent: Thursday, February 06, 2003 6:57 AM Subject: QHL: Widow's quilt

> Yesterday I was asked if I knew about the expression "widow's quilt"? A > friend had a quilt made of men's suiting etc and had been told by someone > that it was a widow's quilt--pieced and tied by the widow from her deceased > husband's clothing. Is there anything to support this theory? Thanks for > your help. > Sharon Wells > North Texas > > > >

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Date: Thu, 6 Feb 2003 11:37:37 -0800 (PST) From: Joe Cunningham 

I have used the Cotton Classic batting in dozens of quilts, starting with the first year it was introduced in the mid 1980's, and I never have had any discoloration like the one you describe. Of course it is possible that there was some kind of excess adhesive or some other flaw with that batting, but I have never seen anything like that or heard of it from another quilter.

Joe Cunningham Joe@joethequilter.com

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Date: Fri, 7 Feb 2003 07:11:31 -0600 From: "Barbara Vlack" <cptvdeo@inil.com> To: "QHL" 

I have heard of quilts such as you describe, made from men's suiting fabrics, but I haven't heard of them being called "Widow's" quilts. Instead, they've been "Hired Hands" quilts, made quickly and easily as utility quilts from pieces of men's clothes, tied, and used to keep the hired hand warm when he sleeps in the shed. I've also seen quilts made from men's suiting fabrics in the book Old Swedish Quilts. These were also utilitarian quilts. My family has a top much like one of those illustrated in this book, that was made by my great-grandmother, a Swedish immigrant.

Barb Vlack cptvdeo@inil.com

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Date: Fri, 7 Feb 2003 08:53:58 EST From: DDBSTUFF@aol.com To: QHL@cuenet.com 

Speaking of Story Book Quilts, back in the early 89s, I owned for a short time, a quilt with the Story of Baseball. I never could find out anything about it but now I'm wondering if this Marion Cheever Whiteside Newton might not have designed it. Has anyone else ever seen this quilt or a similar theme on a quilt? I did a Google on Marion Cheever Whiteside Newton and found that there had been an article on Story Book Quilts in the Sept/Oct '97 "Piecework" written by Naida T. Patterson. Anyone have it?

Also, on Tuesday - April 24th, 2001, the Quilt Channel (?) had a program on "Storybook-theme quilts made in conjunction with a cottage industry operated by quilt designer Marion Cheever Whiteside Newton in the mid-1940s through the mid-1960s."

Any help on the Baseball Quilt would be helpful.

Thanks,

Darwin

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Date: Fri, 7 Feb 2003 07:51:50 -0800 From: "Laurette Carroll" <rl.carroll@verizon.net> To: 

Hello, Naida Patterson has an article on Marion Newton and her Story Book quilts in Uncoverings 1995. Newton designed more than 50 applique patterns/quilts during the 1940 - 1965 period, including a Baseball quilt. Unfortunately, the article does not include a photo of this quilt. She designed patterns and sold them through several periodicals and also ran a cottage industry selling quilt kits and finished quilts.

Laurette Carroll Southern California

Look to the Future With Hope

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Date: Fri, 7 Feb 2003 07:58:28 -0800 (PST) From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessen@yahoo.com> To: QHL@cuenet.com Subject: Quilt restoration workshop 

Another exciting event: I happened to call Nancy Kirk the other day and she told me about a quilt restoration workshop she is holding in March. I very much hope to go and should know in a week or so. Is anyone from this list attending?

I asked her to send me a blurb, and here it is:

Nancy Kirk of the Kirk Collection and The Quilt Heritage Foundation is offering two Quilt Restoration Workshops in March. There is a Beginning Restoration Workshop March 19 & 20, 2003; then an optional Field Trip on Friday, Mar. 21, to the International Quilt Study Center in Lincoln and a visit to the "Amish Crib Quilts" and "Wild by Design" exhibits. On Saturday and Sunday, March 22 and 23 there will be an Advanced Restoration Workshop focusing on Crazy Quilts and Victorian silk quilts. The advanced workshop will also include a discussion of ethics and professional practices.

At each workshop you bring a quilt you are planning to restore for the triage session and go home with a restoration plan.

The workshops are being held in Omaha. Tuition is $175 for each two-day session, $50 for the Field Trip to Lincoln.

Registration is available on-line at www.quiltrestoration.com.  If you have any questions give Nancy a call at 800-599-0094.

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Date: Fri, 7 Feb 2003 09:07:50 -0700 From: "Karen Housner" <texasthunder@cox.net> To: 

Hello everyone,

I need to find a list of quilts entered in the quilt contest for the = world's fair in Chicago in 1933. Can anyone send me in the right = direction? The quilt in question was made in Springfield Ill. so I know = if would have been in the Chicago region. Thanks for any and all = suggestions!

Sunny and warm in AZ Karen Housner Quilt appraiser Phoenix, AZ

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Date: Sat, 8 Feb 2003 09:31:28 +1100 From: "Lorraine Olsson" <sven@pnc.com.au> To: 

This is also what we in Australia call a Wagga.

Lorraine in Oz

: "Dale Carlton" <djcarlton@worldnet.att.net> To: "QHL" <QHL@cuenet.com> Subject: 

Another possibility for this type of quilt is the use of salesman's samples of wool suiting. I bought a partially completed 'brick' wool quilt top at a garage sale along with a box of extra pieces - they were pinked on the edge and some still had the paper on the back. I hope I'm not saying something already discussed. I've been out of touch and just reading here and there...... Jean C

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Date: Sat, 8 Feb 2003 10:09:33 -0500 From: "Sondra Biacchi" <quilt@epix.net> To: 

From the Orlofsky's book QUILTS IN AMERICA, a Widow Quilt or Mourning Quilt used by the bereaved during a period of mourning was rare. What remains an open question is whether the quilts were made in anticipation of a death, and if so, how long in advance. This type of quilt was said to have been made during the Civil War in colors of black and white and sometimes gray, usually with a black border. The patterns being simple, either a dart motif symbolizing the black darts of death or a cross-and-star design. Quilting patterns, usually stitched in alternating white blocks, may be a weeping willow, harp or lyre. The book also refers to Memory Quilts which are made of pieces of material taken from the clothing of a deceased member of a family or friend, The pattern used here was generally the Memory Wreath or Chimney Sweep, the white center of the block inscribed in ink or embroidered with the name of the deceased, the date of death, and sometimes a sorrowful verse. On page 226 of this book is a pic of a Memory Quilt with the bizarre name of Kentucky Coffin Quilt. In the center of the quilt is a fenced-in cemetery containing caskets. Around the border of the quilt are coffins, each having the name of a member of the family inscribed on the coffin top. As each person died, his or her casket was moved to the burial ground in the center of the quilt. The colors used are tans, browns, and white. Sondra - from frigid northeast Pennsylvania

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Date: Sat, 08 Feb 2003 10:38:01 -0500 From: Palampore@aol.com To: QHL@cuenet.com 

If you are interested in wool quilted petticoats I suggest that you get PIECEWORKS MAGAZINE Jan./Feb. 2003. There is a wonderful article in there entitled, "Sarah Halsey's Mermaid Petticoat". This is a quilted wool petticoat with a mermaid quilted into the design. This item is owned by the Connecticut Hist. Soc. in Hartford. It was made approximately 1758. There is also another wonderful article, "Reflections of Little Girl s and Their Sewing for Dolls". Three doll quilts are photographed. You will also find a great article about the Victoria and Albert's clothing collection. I love PIECEWORKS every month, but this one is exceptional. I am off to assemble a very small exhibit at our church. I attend a Presbyterian Church which was built in 1821. It served in the Civil War as a hospital. Today Dr. Robertson of VA, who is an expert on Stonewall Jackson and CW medicine, will be giving a lecture at the church. To go along with that I am going to display some quilts, clothing, photos, sewing kits, etc. from that time period to make it all seem a bit more tangible. Now that I have begun this project, each Sunday as I sit in the balcony I find myself envisioning the various styles of clothing that have walked down those aisles for the same reasons I am there. To me they are costuming, to them they were what they had in their drawers and closets. It should be a memorable day. I am glad I am able to use my things in this way. Pepper Cory came yesterday and was a big help helping me decide what to take. She and I are trading off days as helpers in cleaning studios. We both need mothers to direct us, and since we don't have that, we are turning to each other. It really has been fun, and very helpful to our studios. We hate throwing away our own stuff, but we are getting really good at saying to the other one, "Do you r....eally need this?" And, we are looking through boxes we haven't seen the contents of in years! I recommend this highly. Well, off to display.... Lynn Lancaster Gorges, New Bern,NC

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Date: Sat, 08 Feb 2003 10:38:03 -0500 From: Palampore@aol.com To: QHL@cuenet.com 

If you are interested in wool quilted petticoats I suggest that you get PIECEWORKS MAGAZINE Jan./Feb. 2003. There is a wonderful article in there entitled, "Sarah Halsey's Mermaid Petticoat". This is a quilted wool petticoat with a mermaid quilted into the design. This item is owned by the Connecticut Hist. Soc. in Hartford. It was made approximately 1758. There is also another wonderful article, "Reflections of Little Girl s and Their Sewing for Dolls". Three doll quilts are photographed. You will also find a great article about the Victoria and Albert's clothing collection. I love PIECEWORKS every month, but this one is exceptional. I am off to assemble a very small exhibit at our church. I attend a Presbyterian Church which was built in 1821. It served in the Civil War as a hospital. Today Dr. Robertson of VA, who is an expert on Stonewall Jackson and CW medicine, will be giving a lecture at the church. To go along with that I am going to display some quilts, clothing, photos, sewing kits, etc. from that time period to make it all seem a bit more tangible. Now that I have begun this project, each Sunday as I sit in the balcony I find myself envisioning the various styles of clothing that have walked down those aisles for the same reasons I am there. To me they are costuming, to them they were what they had in their drawers and closets. It should be a memorable day. I am glad I am able to use my things in this way. Pepper Cory came yesterday and was a big help helping me decide what to take. She and I are trading off days as helpers in cleaning studios. We both need mothers to direct us, and since we don't have that, we are turning to each other. It really has been fun, and very helpful to our studios. We hate throwing away our own stuff, but we are getting really good at saying to the other one, "Do you r....eally need this?" And, we are looking through boxes we haven't seen the contents of in years! I recommend this highly. Well, off to display.... Lynn Lancaster Gorges, New Bern,NC

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Date: Sat, 08 Feb 2003 07:52:46 -0800 From: Judi Fibush <judi@fibush.net> To: QHL 

Does anyone know of the Paragon company's Tree of Life Quilt that came as a kit in the 50's? If so where there might be an actual quilt made up in a museum or somewhere? I just acquired this kit (in a jillion pieces) and desperately need a color photo of one completed. Paragon's instructions and photo to go with the fabric is totally minimal. Besides which the previous owner had cut out all the tiny pieces and this is real puzzle and basically a nightmare. A pic would help me assemble this if I am up to the challenge and believe me it is.

I would gladly pay to get a completed pic.

Judi

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Date: Sat, 8 Feb 2003 10:12:16 -0700 From: "Hartley Bennett" <Hartley@w3az.net> To: 

Carol Bikofsky's note in today's QHL Digest reminded me to write and ask for the archive access password. I sent my money in a few months ago and am desperately seeking the password. Could you please send it to me? QHL is great - I am learning so much and hope, eventually to make a contribution. Since weather seems to be a major topic thought I would give you a perspective from the Arizona desert near Wickenburg- Our weather has been embarassingly beautiful - days in the 70s and clear blue skys. A bit of clouds today and temps at about 60 but still nice. But, we need rain - the drought is in full swing here and all is dry and brown. I feel guilty whining though . Hartley Bennett hartley@w23az.net

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Date: Sat, 08 Feb 2003 09:09:08 -0800 From: Judi Fibush <judi@fibush.net> To: 

Thanks to Shirley, below, my problem is solved. I appreciate the other emails of offers too.

Judi

Shirley McElderry wrote:

>Judi: I think you meant to say Progress Tree of Life instead of Paragon? >The Paragon Company had a Tree of Life, also, but it is cross-stitch. >Anyhow, I have color picture of the appliqué kit that was advertised in >Herrschner's and LeeWards. The number is 1492. Oh and by the way, to >keep things confusing, the Paragon Company had the same kit numbered >1369. >Want me to color copy the pics and send them on? I can enlarge the >photos, too, so you probably can get a good idea of the placement. >Shirley Mc

 

 

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