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Quilters Find a way to care

Date: Wed, 30 Apr 2003 20:45:13 -0700 (PDT) From: Kris Driessen 

> > The American Antiquarian Society Seminar in > > American Visual and Material > > Culture will be held Tuesday, May 13, 2003, at > > 4:30 p.m. at AAS. Lynne > > Bassett (Connecticut Historical Society) will > > present a talk entitled > > "Documenting Regional Innovation in New England > > Whole-Cloth Quilts, > > 1750-1850." Please consult our website for > > more information about the > > seminar: > > > http://www.americanantiquarian.org/Seminars0203/bassett.htm

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Date: Wed, 30 Apr 2003 22:25:25 -0700 From: ikwlt@cox.net To: QHL@cuenet.com 

since i am on digest, this might already have been answered. the link (i had to cut and paste three lines) did work for me, but it is not the quilt that i saw at the show. you really would be first impressed by the resemblance to a double wedding ring quilt. i do believe the quilt was shown in the book "a communion of spirits" for which the show was named. i can borrow the book and scan it (or perhaps find my own .jpg) if someone is interested. you can contact me off list if you are interested. patti in short-shorts

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Date: Thu, 1 May 2003 11:45:29 +0100 From: "Audrey Cameron" <audreycameron@onetel.net.uk> To: "Quilt History" <QHL@cuenet.com> Subject: 

Does anyone know about the new book from Sherburne Museum: Art of the Needle:100 Years of Quilt Masterpieces? It is supposed to be published this Spring in conjunction with an exhibition of the same name. I always have trouble getting copies of these books being in England. Audrey Cameron in Lincolnshire, England audreycameron@onetel.net.uk

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Date: Fri, 02 May 2003 20:05:18 -0700 From: Gaye Ingram 

Noted interesting set of postcards on Ebay, all bearing the Running Foot or Swastika symbol, a subject that has arisen on this list in past: Ebay #2172316829.

Gaye  (click on the thumbnails)

swas.jpg (9120 bytes) swas4.jpg (9812 bytes) swas2.jpg (11735 bytes)

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Date: Fri, 2 May 2003 11:41:14 -0700 From: "Marilyn Maddalena" 

I have been asked by a local hospital what effect fireproofing would have on quilts being hung in offices. It seems they asked their engineering department about how to hang quilts and were told they could not hang them without first having them fireproofed. I asked what product or chemical they planned to use as fireproofing spray, but they didn't know -- they were told to "just go buy the fireproofing spray and spray the quilt with it." I'm trying to suppress my silent screams and do some internet research so I can logically answer them -- I know you experts out there will be able to tell me whether this is an acceptable idea, what chemicals could be used, and what to tell the engineers, etc. I suggested they contact the local fire department for advice, and I told them I'd do some research also. Some of these quilts are new, with poly-cotton and poly bats, and some are vintage quilts. Thanks for any assistance you can give me.

Marilyn Maddalena Professional Quilt Appraiser, Quilt Judge, Historian and Speaker website: www.marilynquilts.com

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Date: Fri, 2 May 2003 20:10:23 -0500 From: "Jeff 'n Sheri Lesh" <jefflesh@netins.net> To: "Quilters Heritage List" <QHL@cuenet.com> Subject: 

> Thanks for several of your responses. I was able to come up with the woman > that wrote the original message to the long arm list, so I just sent a note > off to her, asking for where she got this information. So we will see what > she says and I will certainly let you all know. > > My intent on sending it to this list was for collaboration of this > information, either to disprove it or find out the Smithsonian is doing > this. I just wanted to know. I felt like there were several on this list > with museum connections and others who would find this very interesting to > say the least. I know this information was totally opposite of what we have > always been taught especially when it comes to restoration. > > Thanks for any information. > > Sheri in Iowa >

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Date: Thu, 01 May 2003 15:46:52 -0400 From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> 

Now to put that poly thread rumor to rest per Kathy Dirk. In addition she states that they don't know how the rumor got started but would like to hear from anyone who gets this information from different sources........

Dear Friends,

I am writing on behalf of the Textile Collection at the National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. I have learned of some misinformation making the rounds concerning the care given to the National Quilt Collection, and I would like to correct it. The Textile Collection does not use polyester sewing thread on quilts, or any other object in its collection. Only cotton and silk sewing threads are used by the staff when working on the collection.

If you have any questions regarding the care of the National Quilt Collection, please contact me directly at: dirksk@nmah.si.edu. Sincerely, Katherine Dirks Museum Specialist The Textile Collection

 

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Date: Thu, 01 May 2003 11:29:13 -0400 From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> 

For those of you who might have been slightly puzzed by the Smithsonian's reply to use of type of thread, this message may make it clearer --

>To the best our knowledge, the Smithsonian has issued no guidelines on the >type of thread to be used in quilt restoration or quilt conservation within >the last 30 years. > If you have any questions, contact BallardM@SCMRE.SI.EDU In browsing the site, I did notice a published study on the hanging of carpets, textiles and quilts if that might be of any interest. http://www.si.edu/scmre/takingcare/takingcare.htm there is a menu at left to browse.

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Date: Thu, 1 May 2003 07:57:06 -0500 From: "Karan Flanscha" 

Audrey, There is information at the Shelburne Museum website about the exhibit & upcoming book... sounds wonderful!!

http://www.shelburnemuseum.com/htm/museum/mu_new.htm

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Date: Fri, 2 May 2003 19:03:15 -0700 (PDT) From: Kris Driessen 

The American Antiquarian Society Seminar in American Visual and Material Culture will be held Tuesday, May 13, 2003, at 4:30 p.m. at AAS. Lynne Bassett consulting Curator Textile and Costume /Connecticut Historical Society and co-author of Northern Comfort: New England's Early Quilts will present a talk entitled"Documenting Regional Innovation in New England Whole-Cloth Quilts,1750-1850." for more information about the seminar: http://www.americanantiquarian.org/Seminars0203/bassett.htm

This study examines the domestic production of whole-cloth quilts and the transition of this quilt form from a high-style possession of the economic elite in the eighteenth century to a traditional bedcover among rural families in the nineteenth century.

Refreshments will be provided during the discussion of the paper. Afterwards, a supper -- with wine, barbeque chicken, and baby-back ribs -- will be served in the dining room of the Goddard-Daniels House at $16.00 per person. If you wish to stay for supper, please send your check in the correct amount to arrive at AAS by Wednesday, May 7

for a FREE bibliography of essentials for your Textile/Fibre Arts Library compiled by Lynne please contact Lynne@piperpublishing.com Republishers of historic needlework books. www.piperpublishing.com

__________________________________ 

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Date: Thu, 1 May 2003 08:21:13 -0500 From: "Marcia Kaylakie" 

Hi All, I"m sorry to have to do this but I need to talk to Gaye Ingram and when I use the reply button on my email, her messages keep bouncing to me. Gaye, would you please contact me and put your address in the main body the the message? Sometimes, I really don't like Outlook Express!!! Thanks, Marcia

Marcia Kaylakie, AQS Certified Appraiser Austin, Texas 512/502-0383 www.texasquiltappraiser.com

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Date: Thu, 1 May 2003 08:30:55 -0500 From: "Jeff 'n Sheri Lesh" 

Thanks for several of your responses. I was able to come up with the woman that wrote the original message to the long arm list, so I just sent a note off to her, asking for where she got this information. So we will see what she says and I will certainly let you all know.

My intent on sending it to this list was for collaboration of this information, either to disprove it or find out the Smithsonian is doing this. I just wanted to know. I felt like there were several on this list with museum connections and others who would find this very interesting to say the least. I know this information was totally opposite of what we have always been taught especially when it comes to restoration.

Thanks for any information.

Sheri in Iowa

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Date: Sat, 3 May 2003 22:31:53 -0400 From: "khicks1" <khicks1@prodigy.net> To: 

Hello! In a recent issue of the Smithsonian Associate magazine, there is a listing for "The Glory of the African American Quilt: Seeing It, Saving It." This lecture is scheduled for Wednesday, June 11 from 7pm - 9pm. The speakers will be John Beardsley, who curated the Quilts of Gee's Bend exhibit, and Esther Methe, director of conservation at the Textile Museum here in DC. Here's a link to more details about the one time only program: http://residentassociates.org/rap/otojun/aa-quilt.asp

Kyra Hicks, author, Black Threads: An African American Quilting Sourcebook

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Date: Sat, 3 May 2003 19:24:43 -0700 From: "donbeld" <donbeld@pacbell.net> To: 

Hi, wanted to say several things. First, Gaye, your comments above UGRR and oral traditions wereght on and beautifully said. Thanks. When I lecture about the story in HIPV, I always explain both sides and state that oral traditions are highly unreliable, but can't be totally discounted. Regarding the story in HIPV, I am inclined to think that Ozella's grandmother started making quilts after she returned from Canada after the Civil War as a memento of her trip, and the riddle is part of her memento. But we will never know.

Kris, I am very interested in hearing more about your Pickle Dish 19th Century quilt. Could you give us more information: date?, size, color, etc. I am fascinated by the evolution of quilt patterns and I looked Pickle Dish up in Brackman's book and wonder if it could be the forerunner of Double Wedding Ring.

Finally, does anyone know approximately when Ohio Star was first made. I am current reading a lot about the "Drinking Gourd" song--specifically,in a wonderful book called Beyond the River about Ripley, Ohio and its early 1820-60 contributions to URR (In fact, the term was coined there), and wonder if there is any relationship between the "Drinking Gourd" story (the North Star in the Big Dipper) and Ohio Star? Thanks, Don Beld

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Date: Sun, 4 May 2003 00:04:46 EDT From: Edwaquilt@aol.com To: 

This subject was brought up either on this list or another 3 or 4 years ago. (The use of poly thread in quilts for the Smithsonian). I tracked it down and talked to the quilter who was doing the work and was told that it related to quilting newer quilts (not antique quilts) which were used in general exhibits in the museums. The quilter is in California and does work for the museum and quilts tops for use in exhibits. Perhaps the current thread is something different.

Holice

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Date: Thu, 1 May 2003 15:17:29 -0500 (EST) From: Teri Klassen 

Slaves in the Family does have at least one mention of quilts. Edward Ball is interviewing descendants of slaves on his family's plantation, and they talk about quilting with their mother or grandmother, I believe. He also talks about slaves being given their own garden patch, and that one woman traded her produce for fabric, I believe. Also, note that Jacqueline Tobin says that slaves did not take quilts with them when they ran away, and that quilts were not used as markers on the actual journey, but were used only on the plantation before slaves ran away to help them remember things they needed to know to prepare for the journey. I'm not sure if that's what HIPV says, but that's what she said at the Bloomington Indiana Quilt Guild meeting a month ago. Also she said she had no evidence that any family other than her particular informant's used quilts that way.

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Date: Sun, 4 May 2003 07:09:16 -0700 From: "Christine Thresh" 

Teri Klassen said: > Slaves in the Family does have at least one mention of quilts. Edward Ball > is interviewing descendants of slaves on his family's plantation, and they > talk about quilting with their mother or grandmother, I believe. He also > talks about slaves being given their own garden patch, and that one woman > traded her produce for fabric, I believe.

I remember being struck by the small amount of fabric allotted to each slave. This small allotment would have barely served for garments -- not enough to make quilts. I'll have to re-read the book again to find the amount mentioned.

Christine Thresh

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Date: Sun, 04 May 2003 11:38:53 -0700 From: Newbie Richardson 

Dear list, sorry to be a bit behind in the postings - have been up to my ears in projects ( yippee!) Kids and Quilt Shows: One of the cleverest kid friendly activities I have ever seen was at the Maryland Historical Society's exhibit on Kaledioscope and Album quilts a couple of years ago. The curator had felt boards and felt cut outs of some of the typical Baltimore applique motifs. The children were encouraged to create their own applique block designs. This activity spanned several age groups, was reusable, and did not create a mess, or put pencil/pens in reach of the quilts!. Very much worth the investment in time, effort and materials! Poly thread As I do freelance work in the textile conservation lab at the National Museum of American History ( when another institution is paying my bill!) I can attest to the fact that there is no directive to use poly/ or part poly thread for conservation/stabilization. I would say that I use 100% cotton thread 98% of the time in my practice. Usually #100 or #80 weight with a #14 needle. This is for two primary reasons: cotton absorbs and exhales(!) humidity at the same rate as most natural fibers. So the repair will expand and contract at about the same rate as the original parts. Also, almost all silk threads are far too "sharp" or strong for using on fragile textiles. There are some silk threads that have some "give" to them, but not many. Many conservation studios do use the fibers pulled from "Stabeltex" fabric. This is a very finely woven polyester sheer used to cover damaged areas or to support fragile areas. It is a wild pain to sew with! But it is polyester. It is so very fine ( finer than human hair) that it really is benign and can take no stress on the repair. Just remember that aged textiles are much like aged skin: very sensitive to pressures, too many UV rays, and cannot tolerate the drying of soaps. Fibers, like human skin, lose their elasticity with age. Newbie Richardson Past Crafts Textiles Appraisals, Conservation, & Exhibition Alexandria, VA.

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Date: Sun, 4 May 2003 10:04:39 -0700 From: "Christine Thresh" 

I just ran across a discussion on "How to quilt an antique top" on an internet forum. I marvel when I read these things.

"My dh's grandmother has a few tops that her mother made but never quilted. They are handpieced, and she wants to be able to use them. I believe one is a postage stamp, and another is a double wedding ring, but I haven't seen them yet. Should we hand quilt them, or send them out to a long-arm quilter? Thanks so much." ........................................ "I have a pile of antique tops that I've accumulated (mostly thru ebay) and I'm having them machine quilted. "I had to check them really closely for loose seams and thin fabrics, and repair those things first... I think they will be more useable if they are quilted fairly densely with an allover design. Hand quilting would be nice, but that usually costs 2-3 times as much as machine quilting." .................................... "I thought that might be the case. If it was hand quilted, his grandmother and I would do it. Now I just need to find a long-arm quilter, as I am not comfortable enough with my machine quilting to do it myself. It would be different if it was one that I had pieced, but an antique? I don't know."

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Date: Sun, 04 May 2003 10:34:24 -0700 From: Judi Fibush <judi@fibush.net> To: 

I'm sorry but HORRORS to having an antique top quilted by a long arm machine. I think I need to go lie down after this!

Christine Thresh wrote:

>I just ran across a discussion on "How to quilt an antique top" on an >internet forum. I marvel when I read these things. > >"My dh's grandmother has a few tops that her mother made but never quilted. >They are handpieced, and she wants to be able to use them. I believe one is >a postage stamp, and another is a double wedding ring, but I haven't seen >them yet. Should we hand quilt them, or send them out to a long-arm >quilter? Thanks so much." >........................................ >"I have a pile of antique tops that I've accumulated (mostly thru ebay) and >I'm having them machine quilted. >"I had to check them really closely for loose seams and thin fabrics, and >repair those things first... I think they will be more useable if they are >quilted fairly densely with an allover design. Hand quilting would be nice, >but that usually costs 2-3 times as much as machine quilting." >.................................... >"I thought that might be the case. If it was hand quilted, his grandmother >and I would do it. Now I just need to find a long-arm quilter, as I am not >comfortable enough with my machine quilting to do it myself. It would be >different if it was one that I had pieced, but an antique? I don't know." > > > > > >

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Date: Sun, 4 May 2003 17:29:14 -0500 From: "Marcia Kaylakie" 

HI All, I am looking for a specific article in Quilters' Jouranl, 1981, by Cuesta Benberry on Mountain Mist patterns, and also the book Twentieth Century Quilts, by Thos K. Woodard and Blanch Greenstein, ISBN 0-525-48115-X, 1988. Can anyone help? Thanks, Marcia Marcia Kaylakie, AQS Certified Appraiser Austin, Texas 512/502-0383 www.texasquiltappraiser.com

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Date: Sun, 4 May 2003 15:35:00 -0700 From: "Christine Thresh" 

I found a reference to cloth allocations in Ball's *Slaves in the Family*.

Slaves in the familyp 97 -- "The first person in slavery to the Balls who can be identified by name was a woman called Bella. On November 10, 1720, Elias made a note that 'Bella had of me 3 yards of negero cloth." "'Negro cloth' was a coarse blend of wool and cotton that slaves were given for garments, a fabric manufactured in Europe and distributed by American slave owners. Whites did not wear Negro cloth, whose name and texture separated servers from served. The fabric sometimes took another, more poetic name, 'oznaburgs,' from Osnabruck, a town in northern Germany known for its textiles. The rough blue or sometimes white cloth was the standard uniform on the Ball plantations from earliest colonial days until well into the 1800s. "To judge from the small size of her allotment of cloth, Bella must have been young, perhaps ten years old. In the practice taking shape, adults received five or more yards of oznaburgs per year, children about three yards. Bella reappears in the account book several times, always in the context of taking her basic needs for survival -- usually cloth but also blankets and occasionally a pair of shoes. According to the slave lists, Bella lived for a lest another thirty-three years. No record of her birth or death, and no record of children, if she had them, has survived. We only know her as a person trying to clothe herself."

Christine http://www.winnowing.com

 
 

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