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Quilters Find a way to care

Subject: Butternut and Blue From: The Dougherty Family <dttes@indy.net> Date: Fri, 16 May 2003 08:21:27 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

Our Moda rep showed us a fabric line called Butternut and Blue by Barbara Brackman and Terry Clothier Thompson. I think it's supposed to be shipping in early fall. There are probably ads in the magazines already--sometimes they do that as soon as they have artwork, but the fabric is often not available until 1-3 months after the ads are out.

Teri Dougherty The Back Door 2503 Fairview Place, Suite W Greenwood, IN 46142 (317) 882-2120 mailto:dttes@indy.net http://www.backdoorquilts.com

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Subject: Re: Planned Smithsonian exhibit From: "Christine Thresh" <christine@winnowing.com> Date: Fri, 16 May 2003 10:30:39 -0700 X-Message-Number: 11

Gaye Ingram is one of the most articulate writers on our list. I hope she will volunteer to "draft a letter [to the Smithsonian] outlining the questions the UGRR quilt stories raise, including a bibliography and names of reputable scholars who might present those questions articulately."

I am only an observer, not a teacher, writer or historian. The planned Smithsonian exhibit certainly needs positive input from qualified historians. I do hope someone volunteers.

Thanks for bringing this subject up again.

Christine Thresh http://www.winnowing.com

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Subject: Butternut and Blue From: Jo Morton <jomorton@alltel.net> Date: Fri, 16 May 2003 05:25:07 -0500 X-Message-Number: 14

Karan, Yes there is a fabric line to compliment the book 'Butternut & Blue', I saw it at Spring Market and 'heard' that it won't ship until September-ish. It is a wonderful line. Jo Morton - Prairie Hands Patterns Nebraska City, NE we're not soggy, but liking the much needed rain.

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Subject: Received QHL From: "Neal and Julie Crossland" <crossland_n_j@msn.com> Date: Fri, 16 May 2003 16:57:56 -0400 X-Message-Number: 15

I received the QHL in digest form and I like it. Julie Crossland

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Subject: photos on eboard From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Fri, 16 May 2003 16:56:59 -0400 X-Message-Number: 16

I know some of you are interested in old quilt tape bindings. Several weeks ago there was a discussion on vintage fabrics about hand/tape looms and hand reel/niddy-noddies. Photos of each are now on eboard; both are 19thC. Thought you might be interested in seeing them. http://vintagepictures.eboard.com See general tab. Also, perhaps Xenia can be persuaded to post her charming niddy-noddy ditty. I thought I had saved it, but guess not.

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Subject: RE: Butternut and Blue From: "Karan Flanscha" <SadieRose@cfu.net> Date: Fri, 16 May 2003 21:02:08 -0500 X-Message-Number: 17

Hi, Jo, Wow, we keep having more wonderful books & gorgeous lines of fabric coming out!! We won't run out of inspiration or material to work with :) My friend, Shelly, who also took the Double Handle basket class, and I, are in a small group together. We make birthday blocks for each other. Another friend in the group has a May birthday, so we each made her a Double Handle basket block in pastels (not 30s). They are SO cute... and she was very surprised and just loves them. She is talking about an appliqued vine with spring flowers for a border, sounds perfect :) We have had a busy month here, I have a new grandson, born on May 5th!! His name is Gage Scott Flanscha, and he looks just like his big sister Allison did when she was born :) For Mother's Day, they got me a cute pattern "Posie Patch" by Waltzing With Bears (what a cute name!!) This little quilt has a check fabric set on point between little applique flowers... your tan and blue check will be just perfect for it!! And I have fat quarters of couple of the Aunt Luci's Cottage line that are a perfect match for the tan/aqua blue colors in your check!! Thought it was fun that they matched so well!! Have you gotten any more Dear Jane blocks done?? Happy Spring!! Karan

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Subject: My apologies... From: "Karan Flanscha" <SadieRose@cfu.net> Date: Fri, 16 May 2003 21:47:42 -0500 X-Message-Number: 18

Whoops... I didn't realize that if I hit Reply... the note goes to the list, not to the sender... guess everyone else will want to take note of that too!! Karan

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Subject: on the list From: "Carolyn K Ducey" <cducey@unlnotes.unl.edu> Date: Fri, 16 May 2003 10:14:16 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Hello - I'm happy to say I'm on the list again.

Carolyn Ducey

International Quilt Study Center HE 234, Univ. of Nebraska Lincoln, NE 68583-0838 402/472-6301

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Subject: switch From: "Charlotte Bull" <charlou@mo-net.com> Date: Fri, 16 May 2003 11:08:05 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

THANKS!!! All A+ Rating!

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Subject: Re: Planned Smithsonian exhibit From: Gaye Ingram <gingram@tcainternet.com> Date: Fri, 16 May 2003 16:52:45 -0700 X-Message-Number: 6

Christine, I'm not the one to do this. I think Judy Grow might be. I'll ask her. Surely in those earlier posts there is some bona fide historian to take it on. I think some of the Brackmans of the world ought to tackle it.

I cannot explain why this issue irritates me so, unless it is that it completely disregards the legitimacy of scholarship and fact. And it gets by because of racial issues. When information started surfacing about the real first quilts of America, showing them not to have been made from necessity of wee remnants of clothing, everyone revised their books and museums took note. No issue at all. Very different take on this issue.

I've just gotten a magazine out, done a banquet for 125 people Wednesday night, and now have to prepare from scratch a cocktail buffet for a bride and her fiancee by 7 p.m. tomorrow night. So I'll be thinking other thoughts. Maybe someone will respond to list. If not, I'll talk to Judy and maybe Xenia, who has lots of other projects going.

What about the male historian in Rhode Island or thereabouts?

I'll be happy to draft letter, but bibliographies and Big Names must come from someplace else. Maybe all these quilt study groups that are organizing.

Best wishes for good weekend, Gaye

> > Gaye Ingram is one of the most articulate writers on our list. I hope she > will volunteer to "draft a letter [to the Smithsonian] outlining the > questions the UGRR quilt stories raise, including a > bibliography and names of reputable scholars who might present those > questions articulately." > > I am only an observer, not a teacher, writer or historian. The planned > Smithsonian exhibit certainly needs positive input from qualified > historians. I do hope someone volunteers. > > Thanks for bringing this subject up again. > > Christine Thresh > http://www.winnowing.com > > > > > --- > You are currently subscribed to qhl as: gingram@tcainternet.com. > To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1442640C@lyris.quiltropolis.com

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Subject: gobbledy-gook in messages From: Debby Kratovil <kratovil@his.com> Date: Sat, 17 May 2003 09:18:39 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

this is not a reprimand, just offered as a help. Those who attempt to attach files (photos) or even have a background image added to their email software (so that your email appears pretty with a wallpaper print as a background) end up having those of us on the receiving end view pages of junk. Also, if you have your email client/software configured to read (and send) your email as html (that's what enables your browser - Internet Explorer, for example, to view text and graphics like a printed brochure) are wreaking havoc on those of us who don't. I think it's mainly the AOL and Outlook users, but it's a mess. many times I just throw away the entire email when I have to scroll for pages - it's unreadable. While I can't tell you specifically what to do, just checking your mail preferences to uncheck "view email as html" would help. Also, deselect any background images for your email client/software. this is a friendly email, so please know that I bear no hard feelings. Debby -- Debby (with a "y" and not "ie") Kratovil http://www.quilterbydesign.com

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Subject: Mongolian Quilt From: Ady Hirsch <adamroni@netvision.net.il> Date: Sat, 17 May 2003 16:48:22 +0200 X-Message-Number: 8

ubject: Mongolian Quilt From: Joe Cunningham <joe@joethequilter.com> Date: Wed, 14 May 2003 22:46:33 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 8

"Has anyone ever seen or talked to anyone who has seen the 2000 year old quilt in the Institute of Anthropology in St Petersburg, Russia? I have only seen the black and white photo that was published in a couple of books. But I would very much like to talk to anyone who has seen the real thing or knows how to see it. Joe Cunningham joe@joethequilter.com" I looked in on the Central Asian reference - the "quilt" fragment there closely resembles the felt appliques found in the Alatai Scythian tombs. These, as far as I remember, are even earlier - 5th cent. BCE. I saw these findings, lodged in the Hermitage museum, when they were on loan to the Munich Anthropological Museum in the mid-eighties. Some of the textile articles, including a fabulous felt applique of a horseman facing a woman on a throne, a leather applique rug and two magnificent stuffed felt swans, can be seen in Georges Charriere's "Scythian Art - Crafts of the Early Eurasian Nomads'" Alpine Fine Arts Collection Ltd., New York, NY, 1979. If the book is unavailable, please e-mail me off list. Ady in Israel

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Subject: new curator at DAR Museum From: Newbie Richardson <pastcrafts@erols.com> Date: Sat, 17 May 2003 09:55:54 -0700 X-Message-Number: 9

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Dear list, The DAR Museum in Wsshington has appointed Alden O'Brien as Curator of Costumes and (all) Textiles. Nancy Gibson has been promoted within the Museum. I write this as Alden has great influence with and is respected by the curatorial staff in Social History at the National Museum of American History at the Smithsonian. ( It's the "old Girl" net work, don't cha know!) Alden is not a quilt historian per se - she knows that she is lacking in the specificity of the disicipline and is working over time to overcome her lack of knowledge about quilts. She is, however, a talented historian, an expert in costuming and the social history of women. The collection is in very capable, and concerned, hands. We traveled to an event earlier this week and she querried me quite closely about the controversy surrounding the UGRR and quilts and HIPV. Among other things, her daughter's first grade teacher was using this myth in her social studies/art classes. Even without knowing about the controversy first hand, Alden's instincts told her this was not true! She is no stranger to myths - she has been campaigning against the myths of corsetry for years ( with some success I may add). She is very knowedgable about the history of Abolishon, so this fits right in. When we had an in depth discussion about HIPV some 12/18 months ago on this list, there were some very well written essays debunking the myth. Including some info from the older black gentleman historian in Delaware/Rhode Island? I thought that I had printed it out and put in my files - but I can not seem to find it all. If one of you has those old posts could you forward them to me so I can give them to Alden? Also, I want to get her two books on quilt history ( as a present) to bring her up to speed - quickly. My thoughts are Clues in the Calico and Bishop's America's Quilts and Coverlets - as they cover lots of territory clearly and concisely. Do you all agree? I had also thought about Soft Covers for Hard Times. Remember these are for quick overview - not indepth - which is why I do not think Orlovski is a good choice - at least not initially. Thanks for your input Newbie Richardson Past Crafts TExtiles Appraisals, Conservation, & Exhibition Alexandria, VA

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Subject: Re: My apologies... From: "Laurie Magee" <woodman@vbe.com> Date: Sat, 17 May 2003 10:17:56 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

In any case congratulations on your new grandchild! Laurie

> Whoops... I didn't realize that if I hit Reply... the note goes > to the list, not to the sender... guess everyone else will want > to take note of that too!! > Karan > > > --- > You are currently subscribed to qhl as: woodman@vbe.com. > To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl- 1442709V@lyris.quiltropolis.com >

-- Laurie Magee and Tom Blajeski CoreComm Webmail. http://home.core.com

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Subject: Re: new curator at DAR Museum From: Xenia Cord <xenia@legacyquilts.net> Date: Sat, 17 May 2003 09:21:20 -0600 X-Message-Number: 11

Newbie, there may be some other volumes better suited to bringing Alden "up to speed." The Safford and Bishop book, America's Quilts and Coverlets, is early enough that it has some information now disputed or disproved. Another volume that is a good overview is Kiracofe, the American Quilt.

I would also recommend Ferarro, Hedges, Silber, Hearts and Hands; The Influence of Women & Quilts on American Society (very readable social history). And she should be familiar with Horton (ed.), Quiltmaking in America, Beyond the Myths, which contains selected papers from the ongoing annual journal of the American Quilt Study Group, Uncoverings (1980 ff). Of course the articles published in these volumes are also worthy of study.

Once she is seriously addicted <g>, there are period and regional studies (for instance Soft Covers for Hard Times, Southern Quilts), specific studies on BAQs, friendship quilts, Amish quilts, Chicago centennial exposition quilts, twentieth century quilts (the first half, anyway), crib quilts, and on and on. Then there are all of the state search books, and the county studies coming out of Pennsylvania.

We live in an age of tremendous research and scholarship concerning American quilt history, and are also fortunate enough to have the researchers authors available to discourse with us.

Xenia

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Subject: receiving the list From: "miss luna moth" <misslunamoth@msn.com> Date: Sat, 17 May 2003 10:43:47 -0400 X-Message-Number: 12

Kris, Yes, I am receiving the List. Thanks so much!! ~donna sue in rainy southern Ohio

_________________________________________________________________ Add photos to your e-mail with MSN 8. Get 2 months FREE*. http://join.msn.com/?page=features/featuredemail

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Subject: Re: new curator at DAR Museum From: "Christine Thresh" <christine@winnowing.com> Date: Sat, 17 May 2003 09:02:38 -0700 X-Message-Number: 13

Newbie wrote: "When we had an in depth discussion about HIPV some 12/18 months ago on this list, there were some very well written essays debunking the myth. Including some info from the older black gentleman historian in Delaware/Rhode Island?"

Giles R. Wright wrote a critique of HIPV. (I have a copy which he sent me.) Wright is Director, Afro-American History Program, New Jersey Historical Commission. The address I have is NJ Department of State, Cultural Affairs, PO Box 305, Trenton, NJ 08625-0305. Phone (609) 292-6062. Web site: www.newjerseyhistory.org. Wright co-authored a booklet called "Steal Away, Steal Away...," A Guide to the Underground Railroad in New Jersey, published by the New Jersey Historical Commission.

Judy Grow noted in a QHL post on February 19, 1999: "New York Tims, Thursday Feb 18, page F-11. There is a large article/review by Phil Patton of the book *Hidden in Plain View*. This is the first review or article about the book that I have read or seen that finally casts doubt about the veracity of the facts as stated in the book" Judy gave some examples from the article. (I have a copy of Judy's post which I printed out.)

Christine Thresh

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Subject: Re: new curator at DAR Museum From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessen@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 17 May 2003 11:41:25 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 14

Newbies note sent me on an interesting visit to the NJ History website. They have a couple of books on line in pdf format. Afro-Americans in History; A short history (http://www.njstatelib.org/cyberdesk/digidox/digidox9.htm) has several interesting insights to the early Eastern mind set. One thing I noted was some people in NJ (and presumably elsewhere in the north) were actually against freeing slaves because of the impact that would have on local economy. They feared that ex-slaves would be willing to work for lower wages, throwing many whites out of work. At that time and in that place, immigration was also a factor. There simply weren't enough jobs to go around and without a social network to fall back on, people would literally starve.

I had never looked at emancipation that way before.

Another interesting concept: there is a map in one of the NJ books clearly outlining the various paths that the Underground Railroad took. Where this information came from it didn't say. But it is hard to imagine that enough documentation exists to establish the path taken without also establishing how escaping slaves knew they were on the right path. If there weren't physical conductors, there surely must have been signals of some sort. Could those signals have been quilts? Unlikely, since the railroad only ran at night. Could a map be made of a quilt? Again unlikely as it takes time to make a quilt, and in that time the stops may have changed. Even if not, a quilt is bulky to carry around, and if anyone caught the slave and interpreted the map correctly, a whole line of safe houses would be exposed.

So I decided to take a trip up the Amazon looking for a book that might have more information about the codes used in UGRR to signal safe houses. I found no less than four recently published books that refer to quilt codes. The author of SWEET CLARA AND THE FREEDOM QUILT (1993) admits that although the inspiration for the book came from hearing a quilter on National Public Radio mention escape routes being sewn into quilts, she had never found actual documentation or confirmation and so presented her book as fiction. However, I wonder how many children take it that way?

Bound for the North StarHis Promised LandMost of the books still in print on this topic seem to be for children, and seem to focus more on the emotional aspects of escape. I did decide to order two: His Promised Land and Bound for the North Star  I will read and review them as soon as they arrive.

Any other recommendations?

Kris

 

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Subject: Book -- Black Threads From: "Christine Thresh" <christine@winnowing.com> Date: Sat, 17 May 2003 18:18:48 -0700 X-Message-Number: 15

Black ThreadsHas anyone read a book called *Black Threads: An African American Quilting Sourcebook* by Kyra E. Hicks? A review I read in QNM said it was an "impressive catalog of references to Black quiltmakers in seven categories..." And "an African American quilting history timeline. This unique publication is a tremendous research tool."

Hicks, McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers, 2003, 242 pp., $38.50 (hardcover)

Perhaps this book has information about slave quilts.

Christine Thresh

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Subject: Fw: (qhl)Underground railroad maps. From: <mreich@attglobal.net> Date: Sat, 17 May 2003 21:54:57 -0400 X-Message-Number: 16

> About five years ago, I was asked to make a quilt square depicting the home > of a Connecticut senator who lived in Bloomfield, CT. It was known that his > house was a part of the Underground. I was one of app. 200 quiltmakers > asked to make a block. The block is now included in one of 4 quilt panels > (actually 4 large quilts) in cases in the Main Gallery of the Library/State > Museum. More and more sites are found in our state each year. Believe me, > they are everywhere. It would follow that as new sites turn up, the modern > maps are being drawn. > As I was researching for "Quilts and Quiltmakers Covering Connecticut," I > found that many of the quiltmakers' families took part in the Underground. > I would like to also add that in my research to date, I have not found any > mention about quilts used as signals here in Connecticut. I must admit > that I am researching quiltmaking and the women and men who made them not > the Underground, however, there are at least four quiltmakers in our book > whose families were known to participate in the Underground. Some as early > as the first quarter of the nineteenth century. sue reich >

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Subject: Re: Mongolian Quilt From: Kittencat3@aol.com Date: Sat, 17 May 2003 23:40:08 EDT X-Message-Number: 17

I think Joe might actually be referring to a 2000 year old quilted rug found in a tomb in Siberian. There's a black and white picture in Averil Colby's book =Quilting,= but I've never seen a color photo. The Pazyryk artifacts are appliqued, not quilted.

Lisa Evans

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Subject: Congratulations!! From: "Marcia Kaylakie" <marciark@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 18 May 2003 10:45:57 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

HI Sue, Well, congratulations! I knew you would be fine, and sail through with flying colors! Who was on your panel? I will be sending regular lotes to everyone, but saw your email and thought I would just send my best wishes! Marcia

Marcia Kaylakie, AQS Certified Appraiser Austin, Texas 512/502-0383 www.texasquiltappraiser.com

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Subject: Getting the list! From: "Catherine Kypta" <ckypta@attbi.com> Date: Sun, 18 May 2003 09:32:44 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

Hello! I am receiving the list!! thanks alot, Kris!

One question, though, since I am posting anyway. How do we access the archive mesages? I was never given a password and have tried putting in my email address but that doesn't work. Help! thank you!

Catherine in sunny Sacramento

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Subject: Re: Congratulations!! From: <mreich@attglobal.net> Date: Sun, 18 May 2003 12:22:06 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

The appraiser's group has been very gracious and welcoming. I have received emails and notes from many of you. I will be proud to be a member of this organization. sue ----- 

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: May 17, 2003 From: "Jan Drechsler" <quiltdoc@sover.net> Date: Sun, 18 May 2003 12:04:06 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

Newbie wrote:> The DAR Museum in Wsshington has appointed Alden O'Brien as Curator of > Costumes and (all) Textiles. ... She is, however, a talented historian, an > expert in costuming and the social history of women. ...she querried me quite > closely about the controversy surrounding the UGRR and quilts and HIPV. ... > her daughter's first grade teacher was using this in her social > studies/art classes. Even without knowing about the controversy first hand, > Alden's instincts told her this was not true! When we had an in depth > discussion about HIPV some 12/18 months ago on this list, there were some very > well written essays...

Christine wrote: Has anyone read a book called *Black Threads: An African American Quilting Sourcebook* by Kyra E. Hicks? Perhaps this book has information about slave quilts. ((In the context of first hand documented or history written or dictated by an ex-slave (or conductor or safe house owner) who used a quilt for directions while on the UGRR.))

Kyra Hicks, the author, is a QHL member and African American Quilt Historian. Kyra, I know this has been a touchy subject for many, but can you suggest any post-Civil War books or early 20th c. that references first hand use of 'directional' quilts? Have you found any early documents in your time spent reading in historical society collections? Can you point out anything written to balance some of our views or make us more understanding of how these beliefs are passed on?

With respect for all quilters and their views, Jan

-- Jan Drechsler in Vermont Quilt Restoration; Quilting teacher www.sover.net/~bobmills

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Subject: New Appraisers From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett@fast.net> Date: Sun, 18 May 2003 18:46:00 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Since Marcia brought up the subject, I wanted to congratulate 2 of our members who passed their AQS Appraiser Certification in Paducah last month -- Dawn Heefner of Pennsylvania and Sue Reich of Connecticut. If there is anyone else, please accept my apologies for not including you as these are the only 2 I know of. Congratulations and best wishes.

Barb in southeastern PA

 

 

 

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