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Quilters Find a way to care

Subject: Caddows From: "Kate Knight" <kateknight@optusnet.com.au> Date: Wed, 

Good afternoon everyone,

Found this at

http://www.heritagebooks.com/hn_archives/Heritage%20News%20-%20October%20 Special.txt

where they discuss both Bolton coverlets and caddows: Scroll down to the section entitled "to cover the bed" by Louise  Miller...

"...CADDOW (caddy)-- "Randle Home's 1668 Academy of Armory defines this as a coverlet or blanket, a rough woolen covering. In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, it was used as a local trade name for coverlets of cotton with coarse pattern wefts drawn up in loops that were made at Bolton in Lancashire. See also Bolton Coverlet. (Montgomery, p. 183)" Notice that the words, coverlet, counterpane, quilt and blanket are all in use in describing this one product of the Bolton mills...."

The entire article is very informative ...lots to learn on an  interesting topic..  I wondered about the origin of "caddow" and found that it is synonymous with /Caddiz/Cadiz/Cadis as a surname. Would Cadiz (in Spain)have been  another town renowned for their weaving ? Just some thoughts. Kate

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Subject: book of rates From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Wed, 21 May 2003 08:22:40 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Oops -- that should have been Jill, not Kate on Book or Rates

JG Kane wrote:

> Caddis, however was a worsted, or worsted ribbon, " Caddas or cruel > ribbon" - Book of Rates 1675 .p293. Dresses of servants were often > ornamented with it. > It also came to be usedas a name for woven cotton. > Jill, in Leeds, West Yorkshire. U.K. > > > >

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Subject: caddows From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Wed, 21 May 2003 08:53:03 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Sally, Kate and Jill --thanx for further defining caddows and this site. Re Cadiz, vaguely in the backof my mind it seems that during Moorish occupation of Spain weaving, architechture and medicine made great strides, especially in the southern part of that country. So possibly there is a connection with caddows as a term. If Xerez can phonetically be anglicized as sherry, then so Cadiz to caddows. Kate -- can you tell us more about the Book of Rates?

Kate wrote: The entire article is very informative ...lots to learn on an interesting topic.. I wondered about the origin of "caddow" and found that it is synonymous with /Caddiz/Cadiz/Cadis as a surname. Would Cadiz (in Spain)have been another town renowned for their weaving ? Just some thoughts. Kate

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Subject: Re: QHL test message From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Wed, 14 May 2003 21:08:56 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Kris -- this came through fine for me. Liked your quilt on  eboard..

Joan for those keeping score: Indian Head column vastly upgraded mostly 1950s-70s; 1961 ends IH cloth production http://www.fabrics.net/joan403.asp

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Subject: Re: qhl - fireproofing quilts From: Anne Copeland <anneappraiser1@juno.com> Date: Wed, 21 May 2003 08:10:40 -0700 X-Message-Number: 5

Well the walls of the hospital--the inner walls--are probably not fireproofed, as much as they would like us to believe they are. Sorry, but most inner walls in any building will burn right down to the ground, and if there is a fire, I think that the quilts would be the very last thing that they would have to worry about in a hospital. They would not self combust either. Someone would have to set a match to them. What about mounting them under plexiglass? OK, I know that a lot of folks are against mounting quilts this way, but if it makes the difference between them being accepted for the walls and not, I would say, mount them. The plexiglass will not be any better than any other material in case of a fire, but like I said, I think that would be their last worry.

Sounds like someone is just being really silly at the hospital. By the way, Marilyn and I are great friends and have appraised together, so this isn't intended to be a mean post or anything like that. Just wondering what the hospital is thinking about. Sometimes they go overboard with these ideas. They have so much flammable stuff in hospitals it would make your head spin. Just as an obvious, the laundry and unused garments for the workers are flammable. They may say that they are not, but they sure are. You cannot put a coating on clothes and then wash it daily and expect it to stay on. I used to work in a hospital and I have thought about some of these things from time to time.

Peace and blessings, Annie

http://www.artquiltconsultant.com http://www.fiberartsconnsocal.org

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Subject: Re: - fireproofing quilts From: Gaye Ingram <gingram@tcainternet.com> Date: Wed, 21 May 2003 13:10:52 -0700 X-Message-Number: 6

I have laughed out loud at Anne Copeland's posting re a hospital's requiring quilts be fireproofed! I've tried to take seriously all the discussions of this issue, but having worked only in the business office of a hospital during my college summers back in 1340 when hospitals were even simpler than now, I've had a hard time keeping a straight face.

The very idea of requiring that a quilt be fireproofed in a place that houses oxygen, anesthesia gases, and hundreds of chemicals that combined with heat could knock out a city block just struck me as absurd. I just loved Anne's common-sense, "Sounds like someone is just being really silly at the hospital."

Sometimes the emperor is stark naked, and this seems like one of those times.

Gaye

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Subject: Re: qhl - fireproofing quilts From: "Christine Thresh" <christine@winnowing.com> Date: Wed, 21 May 2003 11:52:19 -0700 X-Message-Number: 7

My local Kaiser facilities have quilts on the walls in waiting rooms (Kaiser clinic, Antioch, Kaiser hospital, Walnut Creek, CA). The quilts are under plexiglass (not squished flat, but mounted behind). I enjoy looking at the quilts when I visit.

Christine Thresh http://www.winnowing.com

"Anne Copeland" <anneappraiser1@juno.com> asked, What > about mounting them under plexiglass? OK, I know that a lot of folks are > against mounting quilts this way, but if it makes the difference between > them being accepted for the walls and not, I would say, mount them. The > plexiglass will not be any better than any other material in case of a > fire, but like I said, I think that would be their last worry. > > Sounds like someone is just being really silly at the hospital.

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Subject: Re: - fireproofing quilts From: sadierose@cfu.net Date: Wed, 21 May 2003 16:07:07 -0500 (CDT) X-Message-Number: 8

Gaye,

<having worked only in the business office of a hospital during my college summers back in 1340 when hospitals were even simpler>

Did they have hospitals back in 1340?? Guess that was before my time... Thanks for the laugh :)

Karan (who is supposed to be working, but needed a laugh :)

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Subject: A quick note from the list mom From: Kris Driessen 

I attended the Maine quilt group on Sunday and then the New Jersey group this past Tuesday, where my car had the phenominal good sense to break down at Judy Grow's house of quilts:-)) I have been forced to stay here an additional two days while Judy and Alan treat me like royalty. I wish their mechanic wasn't so efficient, there is nothing else left to go wrong on the car.

At any rate, I just wanted to touch base and let you know that I am using Judy's computer to correct as many problems as I can. The problems of people continuing to post in MIME, or including the entire digest in their reply, is something I really can't do much about. Y'all need to be ever vigilant when hitting the reply button. Make sure you are not including WAY too much of the post you are replying to - a few lines will usually do it. Double check your E-mail client settings to make sure you are sending in Plain Text, too. Besides filling the digest with obnoxious and annoying gobbledegook, some peoples E-mail clients are trying to interpret it, which results in the digest coming out in colors, or having a black background (NOT the easiest to read:-)) or formatting one word per line.

I promise I will report on the events of the two groups soon. As soon as I get home, I will update the study group web pages and the archives.

Kris

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Subject: Re: A quick note from the list mom From: Gaye Ingram 

Dear Kris,

Oh that car breakdown story is just a little too much for a Louisiana gal to believe. I just can see you and Judy up there chattering away and talking quilts quilts quilts. What did you do---ask Judy to strew the road before her house with car bomblets?

Frankly, I'm jealous.

Pouting in Louisiana, Gaye

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Subject: Fortunate breakdowns From: "pepper cory" <pepcory@mail.clis.com> Date: Wed, 21 May 2003 18:14:27 -0400 X-Message-Number: 11

About that car breakdown-yeah right! Conveniently in a nest of gorgeous quilts...ooooh---as Brier Rabbit said---"Don't throw me into the briar patch!" In a not-very-related incident--I was traveling in northern CA this summer (in 110-degree heat) and had a right tire blow on my rental car. Not a great scenario at 60 mph on a mountain road with a no-guard rail drop off in the mountains. As I wrestled the car to the gravel side of the road (up the mountain), it spun completely around and blew the left rear tire. Flat as rotten tomatoes. Eventually I limped from the car and promptly "sat" down (legs wouldn't work) in the dirt with a case of the shakes. The first car that stops is the sheriff of a small town and his quilter girl friend! While he goes for help, she pats my hand and we talk quilts. The world is a very small and friendly place when you're a quilter! Cheers- Pepper Cory from the Carolina coast

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Subject: Re: - fireproofing quilts From: Gaye Ingram <gingram@tcainternet.com> 

> > Gaye, > > <having worked only in the business office of a hospital > during my college summers back in 1340 when hospitals were > even simpler> > > Did they have hospitals back in 1340?? Guess that was > before my time... Thanks for the laugh :) > > Karan (who is supposed to be working, but needed a laugh :) >

Yes, dear Karan, they had hospitals in 1340.( Haven't you seen "Monty Python and the Holy Grail"? ). But as I noted, they were much simpler.

They also had quilts. As I recall, Richard the (not so) Lionhearted and others discovered the joys of quilting when they took those larks called the Crusades. Rose Wilder Lane, who doesn't always get every historical detail correct, but is right on this one, I think, describes the European knight's awe at seeing Saracen chainmail armor, so light and supple it could be drawn through a man's ring, over quilted vests. Not kevlor, of course, but often enough to slow down an arrow. And big news to the Europeans who wore plate armor and could pretty well be given up for dead if they fell from their horses in battle and who had to have those huge warhorses that were not nearly so agile as the Saracens' horses---and had to have 4 vassals to help them onto those big and tres expensive warhorses. On this I'm not going on my own memory alone, but also Geoffrey Chaucer's, recorded in The Canterbury Tales.

But if you don't trust me, see "Monty Python and the Holy Grail."

Getting foolisher and foolisher as end of school approaches, Gaye

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: May 18, 2003 From: RBCochran@aol.com Date: Mon, 19 May 2003 11:00:35 EDT X-Message-Number: 2

> Since Marcia brought up the subject, I wanted to congratulate 2 of our > members who passed their AQS Appraiser Certification in Paducah last > month -- Dawn Heefner of Pennsylvania and Sue Reich of Connecticut. If > there is anyone else, please accept my apologies for not including you > as these are the only 2 I know of. Congratulations and best wishes. > >

I, too, would like to offer my congratulations to Dawn and Sue. Terrific news! --Rachel

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Subject: reference source From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Mon, 19 May 2003 11:38:13 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

One of the favorite parts of textile references for me is the bibliography; this gives a great wealth of selections, especially vintage, to search for on internet or to get through interlibrary loan. In browsing through Warp and Weft, Dorothy Burnham, she cites one that could be of interest to quilters so I throw it out to you and with a question also. Bolton Quilts or Caddows: a 19thC Cottage Industry, 1971 CIETA Bulletin #27, pp. 49-58.

Question: the names sound veddy UK or Canadian. What are these types of quilts?

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Subject: RE: reference source From: "Gibson, Nancy" <ngibson@dar.org> Date: Mon, 19 May 2003 11:59:49 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

Bolton coverlets are also referred to as raised-weft coverlets. They are  woven on a loom, thus are not quilts. They are unusual and very  interesting. Somewhat like a candlewicked spread, but the embroidery is  woven into the coverlet. I believe one of the AQSG volumes has an  article that discusses them. They were woven in Bolton, England and  exported to the American market in the early 19th century. I'm sure  someone on the list can fill in the blanks here.

Also, I have taken on a new position at the DAR. I am no longer working  for the museum, but working in the public relations department as media  relations manager. My job as textile curator is being taken over by the  museum's costume curator, Alden O'Brien. She is smart and approachable  and the quilt collection is in very good hands. I'm literally one floor  down from her office here at the DAR and am helping introduce her to the  Quilt World. She knows more than she thinks she does! I will still keep one foot in the quilt world, lecturing and writing  etc...Below is my contact information for those who want to keep in  touch. I'll still monitor this great list.  Nancy Gibson (formerly Tuckhorn) Media Relations Manager NSDAR 1776 D Street, NW Washington, DC 20006 202/879-3238 wk 202/412-3246 mobile

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Subject: Bolton type coverlets From: "Julia D. Zgliniec" <rzglini1@san.rr.com> Date: Mon, 19 May 2003 09:18:59 -0700 X-Message-Number: 5

Dear QHL, There is a discussion of Bolton type coverlets in :

Peck, Amelia ( 1990). American Quilts and Coverlets in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Dutton Studio Books

Page 132.

They were woven in Manchester, the English center of the textile industry. The descriptions go on to distinguish these from the French woven Marseilles spreads. Heavy weft threads resembling candlewicking were drawn up into the weave in various places.

I do not know the term "Caddows"

Regards, Julia Zgliniec

Joan Kiplinger wrote: > One of the favorite parts of textile references for me is the > bibliography; this gives a great wealth of selections, especially > vintage, to search for on internet or to get through interlibrary loan. > In browsing through Warp and Weft, Dorothy Burnham, she cites > one that could be of interest to quilters so I throw it out to you and > with a question also. > Bolton Quilts or Caddows: a 19thC Cottage Industry, 1971 CIETA > Bulletin #27, pp. 49-58. > > Question: the names sound veddy UK or Canadian. What are these > types of quilts? > > > > --- > You are currently subscribed to qhl as: rzglini1@san.rr.com. > To unsubscribe send a blank email to > leave-qhl-1442694K@lyris.quiltropolis.com >

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Subject: Re: Fireproofing question From: "Marilyn Maddalena" <quilting@marilynquilts.com> Date: Mon, 19 May 2003 08:37:05 -0700 (Pacific Standard Time) X-Message-Number: 6

0D I've sent this question about fireproofing quilts to the list before, and have gotten a reply or two, but I don't think it reached all the list members during the transition, so I'll try it again. I've been asked by  a local hospital for an opinion on fireproofing quilts. It seems their Engineering Department told the employees that they could not hang quilts in their offices unless they were fireproofed. I have been in touch with so me of the historians and knowledgeable folks around the country and haven't found one yet who thinks this would be a good idea. Most of them say it  has never come up before, to their knowledge.0D 0D The Smithsonian told me their quilts are either in storage or in a displa y case, so this is not an issue. I haven't received a reply yet from the quilt center in Nebraska. Is there anyone on this list who can help me w ith a reasonable answer? I hate to contact them by screaming "No, no, a thousand times no!" at them. Reasonable and logical replies are needed! Thanks for your help.0D 0D Marilyn Maddalena0D Professional Quilt Appraiser0D Judge, Quilt Historian and Speaker 0D Sacramento, California0D www.marilynquilts.com

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Subject: Re: new curator at DAR Museum From: jocelynm@delphiforums.com Date: Mon, 19 May 2003 10:57:42 CST X-Message-Number: 7

Kris, The safe house issue is the main sticking point, as I see it. How COULD you have houses that were guaranteed safe 365 days a year? People neither went on journeys, nor had company? Never got sick, or had babies? No one ever suspected a safe house enough to camp out and keep it under surveillance? I recall seeing a movie years ago, either The Friendly Persuasion or its sequel, Except for Me and Thee, about Quaker families that helped escaping slaves. IIRC, there was a scene where slavecatchers came to the farm, and while they were focused on the father, the wife and children were busily sending signals that their house was no longer 'safe'. But it's been years since I read the books and saw the movie. I agree that there may have been times where quilts were used as signals, along the lines of 'if there's a blue quilt hanging out, the coast is clear'. But just for a specific house, which would otherwise be described. You couldn't just send people North and say, 'Stop at houses with blue quilts'. Jocelyn

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Subject: Re: Fireproofing question From: KareQuilt@aol.com Date: Mon, 19 May 2003 13:12:01 EDT X-Message-Number: 8

 

Marilyn,

When I addressed the question to a Guild member "in the know" locally here in Fairfax county, VA, I was told that our local county exempts "art" and "merchandise." No where in our county do quilt shops or quilt shows have to "fireproof' the quilts in order to have them hanging. I would try your local fire marshall's office or other county administrator. If you can get her/him on yor side, maybe they would intervene and speak to the engineers at the hospital. I would also try writing a letter to the editor or contact art galleries and see how they handle such issues.

Karen Alexander

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Subject: RE: Visitors to D.C. From: Hazelmacc@aol.com Date: Mon, 19 May 2003 14:26:18 EDT X-Message-Number: 9

For anyone coming to Washington, D. C. and they wish to see non-traditional quilts, visit the Renwick Gallery, near the White House. I went to see the Frank Lloyd Wright "Light Screens" and was pleased to see several quilts in Renwick's permanent collection on display. There was a beautiful kimono by Tim Harding. His work is in silk and he does waves. In fact the title was "Cloudwaves Kimono". Teresa Barkely of NJ "Sweat of the Sun, Tears of the Moon, made in 1989 and it depicts a 3 cent postage stamp - when was that? A 3 center? Then there was Natasha Kempers-Collen with Joiede Vivre, 1995 - very colorful and lots of bead work. Carolyn Mazloomi with "The Family Embraces", 1997 - black and white plain dyes of faces and masks and nicely quilted. Ellen Oppenheimer "Kishkra", 1989. Her work is always colorful and busy but the whole was most restful when observed from a distance. Michael Cummings "Haitian Mermaid #2", 1996. His work is always colorful and he used cotton, synthetic and antique fabric and sequins and beads. I liked this piece of a mermaid catching a beautiful fish - lot to see in the whole quilt. Cynthia Nixon - "Crash Quilt" 1994 is a framed pictorial quilt and last L'Merchie Frazier - "From a Birmingham Jail: MLK", 1996. A collection of pictures and newspaper stories about Martin Luther King with fine mesh over all. There were many other craft/art items also to enjoy. As we were leaving I picked up a brochure "Celebrate American Craft Art and Artists" and inside was the beautiful Michael James quilt - "Quilt #150: Rehoboth Meander" 1993. My day was complete.

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Subject: Karen's Mongolian quilt message From: Teri Klassen 

On the website, it lists an applique rug from 1st century AD, but I didn't see a quilt. is the rug what you were talking about, Karen? thanks, Teri Klassen

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Subject: two Schwenkfelder quilt shows! From: "Candace Perry" 

Earlier this year I posted about our current exhibit, The Needle Arts of Schwenkfelder Women...just wanted to let everybody know that the show is open. We have four bed quilts, new to us, in the exhibit, plus a couple of doll quilts. PLUS some wonderful samplers, pocketbooks, and decorated hand towels! From May 24 to June 7 we are having a show of locally made contemporary quilts...including two by Barb Garrett, and Nancy Roan. I just finished putting them up today (with Nancy and her family's help)and they are a splendid array. Such creativity. Hope you can visit! Candace Perry Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center www.schwenkfelder.com

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Subject: Bolton type coverlets From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Mon, 19 May 2003 19:27:06 -0400 X-Message-Number: 12

Julia and Nancy -- thank you for the enlightenment. I wonder if Caddows was a district or section in Bolton or Manchester.

Julia D. Zgliniec wrote:

> Dear QHL, > There is a discussion of Bolton type coverlets in : > > Peck, Amelia ( 1990). American Quilts and Coverlets in the > Metropolitan Museum of Art. Dutton Studio Books > > Page 132. > > They were woven in Manchester, the English center of the textile > industry. The descriptions go on to distinguish these from the French > woven Marseilles spreads. Heavy weft threads resembling candlewicking > were drawn up into the weave in various places. > > I do not know the term "Caddows" >

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Subject: Midwest Fabric Study Group recap From: AmyOKorn@aol.com Date: Mon, 19 May 2003 20:06:58 EDT X-Message-Number: 13

--part1_a9.406912f1.2bfacba2_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; c

The May 18, 2003 meeting of the Midwest Fabric Study Group (Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky and Illinois) was held at the Ohio Historical Society in Columbus, Ohio with sixteen members in attendance. Our hometown hostesses were Dee Dadik and Molly Butler, who provided not only delicious desserts, but extensive printed material on the exhibit and a guided tour.

After lunching in the Archives Library Conference Room, we began the tour of  A Stitch in Time: 200 Years of Ohio Quilts which was divided into four groupings: Coming to Ohio - Quilts for Beauty and Comfort; For Use and Show - Utilitarian vs. Decorative Quilts; Loving Hands - Quilts Made for Someone Else and Picking Up the Pieces - Quilts from the 1900s. The current exhibit will be on display in celebration of Ohio's Bicentennial until the end of June when the quilts will be rotated. In addition to the historical perspective, a unique exhibit of quilts and garments donated to the museum b y Ohio master quilter and internationally known teacher, Lois K. Ide, was on display.

Included in the historical exhibit were a blue resist whole cloth quilt (1750-1800), an early quilted palampore (1775-1800), a whole cloth quilt mad e from a quilted petticoat (1800-1825), and one of the few remaining stenciled  quilts (1835-1845). Also from the circa 1840 time period was a Bowtie in a Framed Medallion set made with paper templates cut from penmanship exercises  and newspapers. Our tour continued with several red and green floral appliqu  quilts (Pineapple, Prince's Feather and Rose of Sharon) with densely quilted  backgrounds of enviable stitches and extensive stuffed work. Several crazy quilts were included and we smiled over a contained crazy made for bachelor,  John A. Gage, by his female admirers and relatives (John was not impressed -  he remained a lifelong bachelor!) Several of our members were fascinated wit h an appliqu Fleur-de-lis Album quilt (1849-1852), carefully measuring and  considering the quilt for reproduction. A Double Wedding Ring, Dresden Plate  and quilt kit from 1953 brought the visual narrative into the 1900s.

Our next meeting is Sunday, July 20, 2003 at the Daisy Barrel, 19 West Main Street in Fairborn, Ohio at 11:00 a.m. The discussion topic will be "An Historical Look at the Color Red" presented by Amy Korn. Please plan to brin g any predominantly red quilts, antique red fabric or red ephemera that cover the time period of 1800 to 1950. Cindy Claycamp (our newest AQS certified appraiser!) volunteered to investigate an Indiana location for the September  meeting, as well as a topic for discussion. Visitors are always welcome!

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Subject: Re: Karen's Mongolian quilt message From: KareQuilt@aol.com Date: Mon, 19 May 2003 20:37:01 EDT X-Message-Number: 14

Terri,

Joe Cunningham was actually asking the question. I just tried to track down a possible answer/source from an american woman living in Moscow.

Karen

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Subject: thank you for your help From: Vyvyan L Emery <vyquilter@juno.com> Date: Mon, 19 May 2003 19:46:17 -0400 X-Message-Number: 16

Hello All,

I just wanted to belatedly thank everyone who helped me locate the origins of my old dogwood quilt. My computer got struck by lightning and I have been off line for awhile (again!).

Pat Nickols got in touch with Shirley McElderry and this is an excerpt of what she had to say about it:

"The picture is of a "Dogwood" kit #1334, made by Progress. There has been one of these kits offered in the past few years on eBay, and also have been a few quilts made from this kit on eBay; the last one I have information about was in October of 2000. This kit was offered by Progress somewhere in the mid 50's. The Progress Company is now Tobin/Progress. Back when I was repairing antique quilts for people, I worked on one of these; the pale pink fabric had not stood up very well to laundering. The Progress quilt kits were sort of "off the wall" as compared to Bucilla and Paragon kits. Their designers were an innovative bunch, I think! Many times the kit quilts had a distinctive scalloped edge; and always a well balanced design. Progress did not advertise extensively in magazines; I think most of their kits were sold directly to department stores by jobbers. Their kits were also sold in Herrschners and LeeWards catalogs; sometimes under different names. Your Dogwood quilt is a fine example of early quilt kits; and would most certainly be worth cloning." Shirley Mc

Thanks, Pat, Shirley, and everyone else who expressed interest in this quilt. I look forward to eventually making it; however at our guild meeting today we signed commitment forms to finish our UFOs. I signed up to finish eight so the dogwood quilt is not in sight yet!

Vyvyan Emery

: Caddows From: "JG Kane" <jgkane84@hotmail.com> Date: Tue, 20 May 2003 07:50:22 +0000 X-Message-Number: 1

Hello, In old east English, a Caddow was a jackdaw! A large black bird with a silver-grey head.

Caddis, however was a worsted, or worsted ribbon, " Caddas or cruel ribbon" - Book of Rates 1675 .p293. Dresses of servants were often ornamented with it. It also came to be usedas a name for woven cotton.

Is this of any use? I'm new to the list, thoroughly enjoying it. - thank you Kris for letting me join!,

Jill, in Leeds, West Yorkshire. U.K.

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Subject: Re: Bolton type coverlets From: "Sally Ward" <sallytatters@ntlworld.com> Date: Tue, 20 May 2003 08:17:46 +0100 X-Message-Number: 2

> Julia and Nancy -- thank you for the enlightenment. I wonder if > Caddows was a district or section in Bolton or Manchester.

It doesn't appear on my Atlas of the UK, the nearest is a place called Cadder in Scotland. And it doesn't really sound like an English place name to me. What it does sound like is an Australian - style derivative of candlewick......<G>

Sally W

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Subject: RE: QHL From: nomad1@attglobal.net Date: Tue, 20 May 2003 21:18:16 +1000 X-Message-Number: 3

Dear QHL'ers and Mama Kris : > Even though you all have not heard from me in yonks, I am still keeping an eye on QHL amidst my mad but fun life! : > Kris, you have done a fab-o to the max job on QHL mate. Good on you and thank you so very much for all your tireless work. Thanks too to you all for the wonderful subjects and discussion on the list. Though life is flat chat here, I have no quilty stuff to share, hence the silence! Thanks again and warm regards to all, Hiranya from Parramatta, Sydney, Australia : >

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Subject: fireproofing quilts From: "Pat Sloan" <pat@patsloan.com> Date: Tue, 20 May 2003 07:41:46 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

At quilt market we must have fire proof curtains and table cloths, but the quilts do not need to be altered. I second Karen that talking to the local fire marshal would be a good idea.

Pat Sloan http://www.QuiltersHome.com sign-up for my yahoo group- Pat-Sloan-Quilts

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Subject: Re: Fireproofing question From: "Patricia C Crews" <pcrews@unlnotes.unl.edu> Date: Tue, 20 May 2003 09:51:12 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

I replied privately to Marilyn Maddalena who posed the question about the fireproofing of quilts, but thought my reply might be of interest to the list.

Some of the solutions used for fireproofing of quilts could be detrimental to the quilts both physically and chemically, as you suspected. Some stiffen the fabrics considerably and some cause them to yellow over time. If any of the fabrics used in the quilt are not colorfast, then that too would be an issue. There are some fireproofing agents for fabrics that have a minimal negative impact because interior designers are frequently faced with this issue for public buildings and must pay to have the interior furnishing fabrics treated. However, they are treating fabrics expected to last 10-20 years, not for generations to come. (On the other hand, if it is acceptable to the maker and the local hospital for the treated quilt to have a life expectancy of only 25 years or so, then that is a decision that they have the right to make--as long as all parties are aware of the implications of the decision to fireproof a textile object.)

Volumes have been published in the textile scientific literature regarding the fireproofing of textiles and the properties of the various agents. However, I could not recommend a specific compound without several hours of library research. The University of Nebraska-Lincoln offers a Textile Testing Service that will do such research for a fee. If you are interested in having them do this for you, please contact them at TTS2@unl.edu.

Patricia Cox Crews, Ph.D. Cather Professor of Textiles and Director, International Quilt Study Center Dept. of Textiles, Clothing & Design 234 HE Building P.O. Box 830838 University of Nebraska-Lincoln Lincoln, NE 68583-0838 PHONE: 402/472-6342 FAX: 402/472-0640 pcrews@unl.edu

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"Marilyn Maddalena" To: "Quilt History List" <qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.com> <quilting@marilyn cc: quilts.com> Subject: [qhl] Re: Fireproofing question

05/19/2003 10:37 AM Please respond to "Quilt History List"

 

I've sent this question about fireproofing quilts to the list before, and have gotten a reply or two, but I don't think it reached all the list members during the transition, so I'll try it again. I've been asked by a local hospital for an opinion on fireproofing quilts. It seems their Engineering Department told the employees that they could not hang quilts in their offices unless they were fireproofed. I have been in touch with some of the historians and knowledgeable folks around the country and haven't found one yet who thinks this would be a good idea. Most of them say it has never come up before, to their knowledge.

The Smithsonian told me their quilts are either in storage or in a display case, so this is not an issue. I haven't received a reply yet from the quilt center in Nebraska. Is there anyone on this list who can help me with a reasonable answer? I hate to contact them by screaming "No, no, a thousand times no!" at them. Reasonable and logical replies are needed! Thanks for your help.

Marilyn Maddalena

Professional Quilt Appraiser

Judge, Quilt Historian and Speaker

Sacramento, California

www.marilynquilts.com

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Subject: Mongolian Quilt From: Joe Cunningham <joe@joethequilter.com> Date: Tue, 20 May 2003 10:27:49 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 6

Apparently I sent my note at a moment when few were receiving the list.I asked if anyone had ever seen the 2000-year-old Mongolian quilt in St.Petersburg, Russia. Karen helped me get in touch with just the right person at the US Embassy there(Thanks, Karen!) and I am communicating with a curator at the Hermitage who will be able to answer my questions. But I am still interested to know if anyone has ever seen the quilt. Joe Joe@joethequilter.com

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Subject: Re: Mongolian Quilt From: Hazelmacc@aol.com Date: Tue, 20 May 2003 16:59:54 EDT X-Message-Number: 7

It is my understanding that Donna and Bryce Hamilton went to Russia in search of this quilt/rug -- at the time when the quilt/rug was made the term "rug" was used to cover a bed or a piece of furniture - not used as floor coverings as we do today. The Hamiltons could not find the quilt. Does anyone have the Hamilton's e-mail or a contact so that they might tell us their story?

Hazel Carter in No. VA

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Subject: Re: Fireproofing question From: Hazelmacc@aol.com Date: Tue, 20 May 2003 17:21:00 EDT X-Message-Number: 8

Yes, quilts might have to be fireproofed if hung in a public building. Several years ago l was asked to hang some of my quilts in a building for their opening - until the quilt they had commissioned was completed. l got special written consent from the powers that be that mine could be there without fireproofing. This question could best be answered by those on the art quilt list who do commissions.

Hazel Carter in No. VA.

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Subject: Re: Mongolian Quilt From: Kittencat3@aol.com Date: Tue, 20 May 2003 23:39:22 EDT X-Message-Number: 9

> It is my understanding that Donna and Bryce Hamilton went to Russia in > search > of this quilt/rug -- at the time when the quilt/rug was made the term "rug" > > was used to cover a bed or a piece of furniture - not used as floor > coverings > as we do today. The Hamiltons could not find the quilt. Does anyone have > the Hamilton's e-mail or a contact so that they might tell us their story? > > Hazel Carter in No. VA

The quilt in question really is a rug. It was found on the floor of a Siberian tomb, where it seemingly had been placed when the tomb was sealed. It was never intended for use on a bed...and isn't "bed rugg" more of a 17th/18th century term anyway?

I'd be interested in hearing the Hamiltons' story...I'd love to see the original....

Lisa Evans

 

 

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