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Quilters Find a way to care

Subject: Springmaid fabric From: Dana Balsamo <danabalsamo@yahoo.com> Date: 

Hi Joan, Thank you for those ads! They are so much fun! I think I mentioned I have some yardage of the Spring Maids from the 1950s...which they are now reproducing. By the way...I called a few quilt shops to see if they would carry the new line, and Springs has left a bad taste in their mouth since they sell to the bigger stores (Joanns, Walmart). So many quilt shops refuse to sell Springs fabric. Hugs, Dana

--0-970604507-1058531648=:73741--

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Subject: Re: Springmaid fabric From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Fri, 

Dana -- lucky you to have this fabric. Is repro fabric in production or available and where? I couldn't find anything on Springs website. Is fabric quality and/or minimal order the reasons why shops won't stock Springs?

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Subject: Re: Springmaid fabric From: "Anita G. Solomon" 

I have some current fabric with 7" girls floating on a solid background. It's reminscent of Vargas as well as the SpringMaiden images that you posted. It's from Michael Miller Fabrics and the pattern, #1293 is called "Party Girls." They are bearing gift-wrapped presents. A bit coquettish and suggestive but not immodest, outfitted in 1950s attire. The fabric has a nice hand and finish.

I came across it while accumulating fabric featuring risque images of girls/women. Anyway, the Miller Miller fabric might strike someone at first glance as being derived from the Springs icons. It's way amusing.

Anita/NYC 

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Subject: Re: Springmaid fabric From: Judy Schwender <sister3603@yahoo.com> 

I was a sales rep in the late 1980s. Quilt shops didn't want to stock fabric that the chains could sell for $1-$2 less than they could. I couldn't blame them. I wouldn't either. Sometimes the same print was available on different base cloth so you weren't comparing apples to apples. Or, instead of printing with 7 different color screens, 5 were used. Same print, just not as defined. Chains place orders of thousands of yards, quilt shops in individual bolts. Chains, whether we like it or not, drive the market.

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Subject: Re: ? about vintage fabric From: Midnitelaptop@aol.com Date: Fri, 18 Jul 

i have some antique/vintage fabric pieces....and one of them has a little=20 paper label glued on to it(the kind you would find on a remmants table)..the= =20 paper and the fabric have yellowed somewhat(its a "calico" type print on fa= bric=20 that feels like very fine pima cotton)... and the label "says"2 1/3yds for=20 85=F8(that's as close as i can come to a cents symbol) can any of you fabulous fabric historians...give me a clue as to when this=20 type of fabric sold for 36 cents@yard? tia jeanL

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Subject: Re: in defense of.... From: Midnitelaptop@aol.com Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2003 

i want to say, very softly, that i buy all of my....backing, dress/jumper, pillowcase, muslin and sewing supplies at either joanns local store or hancocks of paducah on line...i live on a verrrry limited fixed income...and can only afford discount prices...besides i don't have a car and any quilt shop i could get to, is not on a public transportation line.... there really is a need for all types of fabric and sewing notion sources for all types of incomes...sometimes i get the slight feeling of eliteism coming into these discussions of "lower grade" fabrics just a gentle reminder.. jeanL

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Subject: Re: in defense of.... From: Kittencat3@aol.com Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2003 

I buy virtually all my backing fabric at either Joann's or Wal-Mart's. I prefer to save my very limited funds either for a) the front of the quilt, b) the batting, c) the thread (100% cotton or linen only), or d) stuff for my re-enactment group (pure linen, silk, and wool).

Fancy calicoes, batiks, Hoffman's and Alexander Julian's finest...yes, they're gorgeous. But unless the pattern really makes my heart sing, the most I'll buy is 1/4 of a yard. And I try to patronize my local quilt store, but given the choice between lunch for a month and a couple of yards of fabric, I'll choose lunch....

Lisa Evans Easthampton, MA

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Subject: Quilt Calendar, Hershey quilt From: "Laura Fisher" 

Sorry about the various administrative emails on here concerning QUILTS = 2004.=20

The only only we hope you pay attention to is the announcement of our = new quilt calendar, to be available from Barnes & Noble and us by early = August (we hope)

Thanks=20

Laura Fisher and Stella Rubin

p.s. Why did I get a mental image of what the Hershey quilt might be = without ever having seen it ?! -- repeat blocks of "kisses", with a = ribbon coming out of the top of each ! It would make me happy... Laura

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Subject: Quilt Show From: Jackie Joy <joysbees@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2003 

Creative Quilters of Nevada is holding its biennial quilt show, "The Colors of Summer", this Saturday and Sunday, July 19 and 20, as part of Reno's month-long celebration of the arts. The hours are 9-6 on Saturday, 9-4 on Sunday; the location is in the Lawlor Events Center on the campus of the University of Nevada on North Virginia Street. (our main N-S axis, aka Business Hwy 395).

There are classes available with teachers such as Yvonne Porcella, Rami Kim, and Scarlett Rose. E-mail Rita at rknrk@gbis.com for class availability.

Please try to attend. We are a relatively new quild with creative aspirations and need all the encouragement we can get! And Reno is a fun place to visit in the summer.

E-mail me privately if you have any questions.

Jackie Joy Reno, Nevada

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Subject: Studio Quilt Study Group (long) From: "Cinda Cawley" 

Luckily for me Judy Grow has persevered in inviting me to attend a meeting of her study group. On Tuesday Nancy Hahn and I joined them at the Burlington Co. (NJ) Historical Society. The Society has a fabulous quilt collection of which some of the gems are on display in the gallery. There must be about 15 quilts mounted on sliding panels which can be closely examined. It seems the quilts have been "up" for more than 10 years. Of course, we all know that this is NOT a good thing, but I'm really glad this was not brought to the attention of the Society until I got to see them. 

The only published image I can refer you to is on p. 72 of New Jersey Quilts by the Heritage Quilt Project of NJ. That quilt is the twin of one in Burlington. The enormous Lone Star is constructed of the tiniest imaginable diamond pieces (3/4" on a side, maybe). Someone with more patience than I have counted 27 rows in each blade of the large star. The overall impression of the quilt is red and green, but it actually contains a huge variety of fabrics. We found a peculiar green which would have been right at home in the 1950s particularly fascinating. (I often think that the more I learn the less I'm sure of and that all generalizations are false, including this one.) 

There are two chintz applique albums from the early 1840s and an incredible red and green album from the same period with thin red strips appliqued over the seams of the diagonally set blocks. A second Lone Star is done in very subtle colors (some fading, but I think it was intended to be blended) with the blades extending through the borders to the edge of the quilt with sunbursts of diamonds between the blades. There is a log cabin remarkable only because it is set as a strippy. None of us had ever seen that before! 

Other wonderful pieced quilts were a Chimney Sweep with signatures (early 1840s) and Economy blocks (1830-40s) which achieves a very sophisticated look by arrangement of color. The curator brought out some treats from storage. The first box we opened said, "Nice fabric, but ordinary." It contained an early 19th century wholecloth chintz with fanciful flowers, birds and butterflies in buff, beige and pink. It was signed in tiny cross stitch MSP. There was an amazing silk quilt constructed of concentric squares with gold centers and sashing trimmed with silk pompoms. The border was a glorious blue velvet plaid! We saw a double- sided silk quilt: strippy with half-square triangles on one side and 9-patches on the other which appeared to be made of Quaker dress fabrics: gray stripe, beige and brown stripe, dull greens, brown, blue-gray. "Of the best sort, but plain." 

My favorite was a collection of turkey red Mariner's Compass blocks dated 1844-47 which were assembled into a top in 1907. The centers of the blocks are reverse applique and each contained a signature and/or inscription. The blocks are set 5 x 6 and each seems to be a different turkey red print. You could do a whole reproduction line just from this quilt top. There are some fascinating inscriptions, some of them reverse appliqued into the 1907 muslin borders and sashing. The woman who put the top together must have found pieces intended for the centers of blocks as well as blocks in the attic. It makes a great puzzle with enough names and places to make a solution possible. The detectives among us (G) made copies of all pertinent info for future research. 

Judy said she was going to ask Kris to put pictures on the QHL site. I do "word pictures" only. Burlington, NJ is just across the Delaware River from Philadelphia. For anybody traveling on route 95 or the New Jersey Tpk. it would be an easy detour. Hours at the Historical Soc. are Tues.-Sat., 1p.m. to 5 p.m. Phone (609) 386-4773. Go before they realize that they need to give these treasures a rest. Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: Re: Studio Quilt Study Group From: "judygrow" <judygrow@patmedia.net> 

I just went to the study group site and see that Kris has put a link to the photos I sent her. However, the link doesn't work. She was in a hurry I think to take the QuiltBus up to Niagara Falls for the weekend. I am sure when she gets back all will be functioning. The link is....

http://www.quilthistory.com/study/SQSG.htm 

Then scroll all the way down to the bottom of the page.

The actual date is July 15th, not the 12th. And although the e-mail address she has listed for me will work for a while yet, my new and permanent address is judygrow@patmedia.net.

It was so good to have Cinda and Nancy travel all the way up from Maryland for Study Group. They win the prize for the longest distance travelled this time. Our regular long distance travelers, Sue from NW Ct., Jan from SW Vermont, and Kris from East Central NY all couldn't make it this time.

If anyone else wants to get a group together to spend a day at the museum, it will be well worth your time and trouble. Let me know, and I will help you make arrangements and will meet you there.

So far we've only seen 5 quilts from their storage area, but as I help document the quilts back there and uncover more jems I'll let the list know.

And if you are interested in samplers, the museum has a wonderful display of at least 10 beautifully framed early samplers. There is some early NJ furniture, especially clocks and desks, on display, and a room devoted to Revolutionary War history and artifacts. There are also 3 houses on the site which are open for touring.

There is another very small museum in our area, a town museum, that has a few quilts out in room settings, one an early stencilled quilt, and I know they have a much larger collection. However, the curator is NOT receptive at all. She prefers the reenactors and spending her time taking the school children through the local Lenni Lenapi artifacts collection.

Time to go to the board of directors I think.

Welcome to the list, Lynne Bassett! Lynne led a small group of us, assembled by Jan Drechsler, through her new installation at the "attic" gallery at Deerfield just a week ago. It is a beautiful exhibition and should be on everyone's summer travel schedule. The book will be out in the early fall, I hope.

I hadn't been in Deerfield for at least 30 years, and still marvel at how beautiful the town is.

And, a great bonus, there is a wonderful Chinese restaurant nearby that Lynne led us to for lunch. And you know how important food is to quilters! My husband was with us and said his soft shelled crabs done tempura style were the best he's ever had anywhere! He'd make the 5 hour trip just for them.

Judy in Ringoes, NJ judygrow@patmedia.net

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Subject: Re: ? about vintage fabric From: jkip <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Fri, 18 Jul 

Jean -- one could buy muslin and percale and other fabric remnants for that price as recently as the mid-70s at Newberry/McCrory/Murphy/H.L. Green chain and other outlets. Can you post to eboard so we can see colors and print?

> i have some antique/vintage fabric pieces....and one of them has a little > paper label glued on to it(the kind you would find on a remmants table)..the > paper and the fabric have yellowed somewhat(its a "calico" type print on fabric > that feels like very fine pima cotton)... and the label "says"2 1/3yds for > 85°(that's as close as i can come to a cents symbol) > can any of you fabulous fabric historians...give me a clue as to when this > type of fabric sold for 36 cents@yard? >

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Subject: Stonewall Jackson Quilt Pattern From: Gaye Ingram 

Inspired by the Robertson biography of Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson, CSA, I have tried to locate a quilt made in that pattern and, if possible, the pattern, along with any information about traditional colors, date of origin, etc.

It is listed in Brackman's patchwork book (#1061.5) as being a Nancy Cabot design or pub'd by Nancy Cabot.

Does anyone have information about the history of this pattern? any sources for examples of quilts made in the pattern? provenance?

Jackson was a Virginian, noted for his defense of the Valley of Virginia during Civil War and his tenure at VMI. Thus, I wondered if an example might be in the VA Quilt Museum, the Valentine Museum, or other state museum.

I shall appreciate any information.

Thanks and don't even drive through Louisiana right now: you will melt into a puddle of heat, Gaye

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Subject: Re: in defense of.... From: "Wanda" <fattyoldkid@houston.rr.com> Date: 

I agree totally....not all of Joann's and Wal-Mart's fabric is cheap...you just have to know what you are looking for....now I do buy quilt store quality for sewing my own clothes...I just like the feel better...but Joann's and I know each other VERY VERY well...actually tooooo well.

Thanks for mentioning this...I never thought I was being cheap by buying at discount stores...just cost effective.

Hugs Wanda in Texas...where it's hot and rainy.

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Subject: Deep South Quilt Studies From: Gaye Ingram <gingram@tcainternet.com> 

All right, this is it.

I just read through Judy Grow's and Cinda of the Eastern Shore's descriptions of their recent quilt study meeting .Cinda and friend had driven up from Maryland for the meeting. I clicked on Judy's reference to view the photographs of quilts from the previous meeting of this group. I regularly read Xenia's reports of similar gatherings from the Indiana-Ohio region.

And here I sit, in the middle of North Louisiana, thinking 'Why not me too, Lord? Why do I live where no such groups exist?'

Not getting an answer, I looked for AQSG members in Louisiana and Mississippi. Only a handful. Arkansas has more, though probably most are in North Arkansas. Clearly, we are NOT Pennsylvania, Indiana, Ohio, New England.

In North Louisiana, quilting is alive and very well, but so far I've been unable to unearth any vital interest in the study of the history of quiltmaking.

Maybe I'm wrong. Maybe the woods of South Arkansas, Mississippi, and Louisiana north of N.O. are full of people just like me, who long for this kind of study group. If so (and I'm hoping so) or if there is already a group up and going with which I am unfamiliar, I would appreciate knowing about it.

In Louisiana the state Folklife project has done a good job of documenting many quilts, and I am familiar with most of those in our region. But there is much to be learned from these and others not yet identified or studied. If anyone wants to join me in such an enterprise, please email me.

Hopefully, Gaye Ingram

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Subject: Re: in defense of.... From: jkip <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2003 

Wanda and Jean -- Joanne's has started carrying 250-count Egyptian cotton solids in its quilting section and some other fine plains I hadn't noticed before. It seems the company is trying to upgrade quilting and home decor fabrics. You might want to check these out unless you have already spotted them.

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Subject: Upcoming program From: Xenia Cord <xenia@legacyquilts.net> Date: Fri, 

Lyris won't let me send identical messages to QHL and VintageFabrics unless the first line is different.

If you are going to be in the vicinity of Fremont, Ohio, on August 1, there will be an opening reception at the Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Center at Spiegel Grove (Fremont), for the exhibit called "United We Quilt." These are patriotic quilts made in response to the events of September 11, and made by invitation of AQS. AQS contacted every quiltmaker for whom they had published books, asking for a quilt for this theme. The finished quilts were exhibited at Paducah in 2002, and are now traveling.

The reception is at 7pm, and it will be followed by a lecture (by me) called American Spirit: Patriotism & Quilts 1800-2001. it's a Power Point program discussing selected patriotic quilts from the past 200 years.

I hope you will attend, either that evening or in the days to follow, to enjoy the exhibit. For further information, call the Hayes Presidential Center at 1-800-998-7737.

Xenia (Cord)

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Subject: Re: vintage dish towels From: Midnitelaptop@aol.com Date: Fri, 18 Jul 

did anyone else catch the show Flea Market Finds on hgtv, tonite...they had a segment on vintage dish towels...that was lots of fun... jeanL

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Subject: good new book From: "judygrow" <judygrow@patmedia.net> Date: Sat, 19 

I just happened to be in my local Barnes and Noble asking about the upcoming Quilt desk calendar,(they didn't have it yet) and of course browsed the entire the store. I especially like to look in the art section, and in graphic arts I found a new book that interested me enough to bring it home.

It is much like the book "Textile Design" by Meller and Joost (Harry Abrams), but separates the chapters by period and style of historic design. I'd say 90% of the 1000 illustrations are from textile design. It is easy to trace the evolution of any design, naturalistic or geometric. The book is a feast for the eye, with many designs taken by scanning the source, and others from 19th century pattern books.

The captions are very informative.(;-) I especially like the one for an Indonesian batik sarong pattern."Designed and produced for the local market, this batik sarong was made in Java in 1937 by Lies van Zuylen. The motifs on cloths of this type and character had little or no significance, other than to suggest that the wearer was delicate and refined."

Or, on the preceeding page,"The way the hand-drawn wax resist was painstakingly spaced so that it filled the available ground made it expensive to produce. The high price and the use of late summer flowers within the motifs tells us that this cloth was designed to be worn by a prosperous middle-aged Indo-European woman." Where is it written that we fading flowers can only wear late summer flowers? Can't we wear tulips and daffodils and lilacs? Gosh, I've been breaking all the rules.

Look for "1000 patterns: Design Through the Centuries" by Drusilla Cole, Chronicle Books, San Francisco, 2003. ISBN-8118-3979-6. A quality papaerback. $29.95.

Judy in Ringoes, NJ judygrow@patmedia.net

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Subject: Springmaid fabric From: Dana Balsamo <danabalsamo@yahoo.com> Date: 

Hi all, The Springs reproduction line can be found  click here.

The fabric I have is the one with "demure" ladies between the columns with paisley background...37" selvage.

Hugs, Dana

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Subject: wonderful object in our collection From: "Candace Perry" 

While excavating in our collection the other day (that's what it feels like) I came across the MOST wonderful, tiny infant's cap, looks to be pre 1830, pieced with a a daisy-patterned brown cotton (the leaves are green, sort of, not registered correctly) and another more loosely woven fabric, which is sort of a salmon-y color with a diamond "diapering" pattern in brown, and little flowers in each diamond, not colored. (this is a terrbile description). The brown cotton is on each side and the other forms the crown of the cap. Lining is linen. It is no documentation so I am crushed, but it is still a wonderful treasure for us. Candace Perry Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center

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Subject: Stonewall Jackson Quilt From: Donald Beld <donbeld@pacbell.net> Date: 

I have just finished a Stonewall Jackson Quilt, based upon the pattern in Barbara Brackman's Enc. of Pieced Quilt Patterns. I made 52 blocks--2088 pieces--all with different Civil War era repro fabrics. (I work by hand, no machine.) It is quite nice.

To me, the pattern name comes from the fact that if you view the background pattern design, you see a "stone wall" with Blazing Stars (also called Virginia Stars, Jackson's home state) superimposed on the wall.

Jackson got his name at the first Battle of Bull Run when the Southern forces were beginning to panic and retreat by standing up in front of his troops. Brig Gen. Bernard Bee rallied his troops and turn the tide of the battle by saying to his men "Look, there stands Jackson, like a stone wall! Rally behind the Virginians!"

I do not know of an existing Stonewall Jackson Quilt from the post Civil War era; however, I will say that to the best of my knowledge, this is the only pattern named for a principle figure from the Confederacy. Don Beld

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Subject: wonderful object in our collection From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> 

Candace -- definitely a show and tell for the eboard. Please post.

Candace Perry wrote:

>While excavating in our collection the other day (that's what it feels like) >I came across the MOST wonderful, tiny infant's cap, looks to be pre 1830, >pieced with a a daisy-patterned brown cotton (the leaves are green, sort of, >not registered correctly) and another more loosely woven fabric, which is >sort of a salmon-y color with a diamond "diapering" pattern in brown, and >little flowers in each diamond, not colored. (this is a terrbile >description). The brown cotton is on each side and the other forms the >crown of the cap. Lining is linen. It is no documentation so I am crushed, >but it is still a wonderful treasure for us. > > >

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Subject: Re: Stonewall Jackson Quilt From: Wmstories@aol.com Date: Sun, 20 Jul 

//Can you post pictures? Jacqueline, sounds wonderful.

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Subject: Stonewall Jackson From: sewsewsarah@juno.com Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2003 

<<I do not know of an existing Stonewall Jackson Quilt from the post Civil War era; however, I will say that to the best of my knowledge, this is the only pattern named for a principle figure from the Confederacy. Don Beld>>

I thought I'd add a little to this thread. Stonewall Jackson was born close to where I live. He was born in Clarksburg, WV which at the time was still part of Virginia. Jackson's Mill is his boyhood home. It is now a conference center. Every March they hold a quilter's retreat. It's a wonderful place to get away for a weekend.

Sarah J.

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Subject: Re: ? about vintage fabric From: Slnquilts@aol.com Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2003 

In the late 60's you could buy Courtesy Cloth for 3 yards for $1.00. It had a wonderful hand. Sharon Newman

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Subject: Re: ? about vintage fabric From: "judygrow" <judygrow@patmedia.net> 

Sharon,

I have never heard of Courtesy Cloth, and the late 60's was when I was making my own dresses -- from Kettle Cloth mostly, and that wasn't cheap. Do you know who made Courtesy cloth?

Judy in Ringoes, NJ judygrow@patmedia.net

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Subject: Stonewall Jackson Quilt From: "Jan Drechsler" <quiltdoc@sover.net> Date: 

Hi Don, While I'd love to see your real quilt sometime, could you satisfy my curiosity in the mean time by putting a photo on e-board?

Jan -- Jan Drechsler in Vermont Quilt Restoration; Quilting teacher www.sover.net/~bobmills

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Subject: Re: in defense of.... From: jocelynm@delphiforums.com Date: Mon, 21 Jul 

On Fri, 18 Jul 2003 11:02:39 EDT Midnitelaptop@aol.com wrote: sometimes i get the slight feeling of eliteism > coming > into these discussions of "lower grade" fabrics Jean, I'm a graduate student, so money isn't exactly leaping into my pocket. I think that rather than eliteism, it's a recognition that our time is a resource as valuable as our money. It hit me a couple of years ago that I wasn't going t be able to live long enough to make all the quilts I've anticipated making (and that would mean I would stop looking at patterns and fabric, and planning more!). Wal-mart occasionally has some top-line fabrics, in and among the near-gauze. It's like the 180-count sheets- they're cheaper, but in a very short time they start to pill and are uncomfortable to sleep on. It pretty much depends on how long you want the product to stay around. I was raised to buy the best quality because it lasted, and I got into a discussion about it with a college roommate. She said, 'Yes, you can pay more and get a really fine quality shirt- but I can pay the same amount and get 4 shirts at K-mart. And all 4 of them will last about as long as your one shirt, but I'll have 4 different shirts to wear over the years, not one!' She had a point. <G>

Jocelyn

 

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