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Quilters Find a way to care

: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarlton@att.net> Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2003 23:57:23 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

I have posted the 'rainbow' bias tape quilt under quilts on the E-board. Thanks Barb and Judy for your interesting links. Do you think this was "inspired" by the Mc Call's pattern or a separate pattern that was published somewhere? What year was the Mc Call's pattern published? Jean c

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Subject: Carding cloth mill (long -sorry) From: "JG Kane" <jgkane84@hotmail.com> Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2003 09:30:31 +0000 X-Message-Number: 2

Hello,

Joan said in her reply that much cotton fabric "while of lesser quality is still good quality cotton strain, often only a difference of carded vs combed. ", which made my ears prick up.(eyes open ?<G>).

Could you please elaborate on this for a dim Brit?

I had the great fortune to have a private tour of the oldest privately owned card clothing mill last week - James Holdsworths at South Brook Mill in Mirfield, Yorkshire. Mirfield. Mirfield, on the edge of Huddersfield developed around mills, and this firm (started) 1790 is in a wonderful old cotton mill. They make card cloth for all types of manufacturing , and export to 30 different countries. I saw the finest of fine, tiny teethed cloth, that almost looked like velvet and was used for carding cashmere - incredible that metal could look so delicate. There were strong, fearsome looking cloths for carpets, .......and, always needing new markets in a world of change, widely spaced, long ,needled, cloths that are exported to France to put the holes on paper to ventilate baguette bags! The cloth is made of multiple layers of linen bonded together until the thickness required for the strength of cloth. Precision machines, feed wire in, cut the length required for the specific 'needles, bend it, and then push it through the band of cloth at precise angles, and with precise spacing.Any lack of precision would give an irregularity that would damage the cloth it ultimately carded. It is therefore a slow process, and the small machines were trundling away, gleaming, and richly oiled, so they didn't overheat as they ran for hours clacketting out their particular cloth. The lengths are checked by women, as cloth is, and any faults are rectified by them, by hand, extracting particular 'needles' and replacing them by hand. The checking room was at the top of the building, huge and long like th others, with each woman's table in front of a high mill window, to get maximum light. The most expert checker and finisher was a lady who originally was a cloth checker in a cotton mill. The cloth is finally completed by being ground and each needle sharpened as the cloth,seamlessly wound around a drum as it will be in the mills, is burnished by the grinding drums.Sparks fly!

I was so mesmerised by the machines and the processes, that I didn't ask anything about carding V combing! Sad to note that a firm that when it moved to these premises in the 50's would have had difficulty meeting the needs of the immediate area and now the mills are nearly all gone. India, Patagonia, China, Australia, N.Z.,Canada, are some of the destinations on the packing cases we saw -all specially made and sealed to prevent any moisture that would ruin the product.Water is their enemy!

I do hope my rambles aren't too off topic for the list. My apologies Kris if I've boobed.

Jill, blushing, in Leeds. U.K>

_________________________________________________________________ Use MSN Messenger to send music and pics to your friends http://www.msn.co.uk/messenger

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Subject: thoughts about Courtesy Cloth From: Dana Balsamo <danabalsamo@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2003 04:10:13 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

--0-1686213460-1059131413=:15390 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

Hi Barb, Usually you can search RN #s here:

http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/rn/rn.htm/

But nothing came up in the query...maybe you can contact the FTC w/ the # directly?

Hugs, Dana

Quilt History List digest <qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.com> wrote: QHL Digest for Thursday, July 24, 2003.

1. bias drunkard's path photo 2. RE: Cathedral Windows 3. Stonewall Jackson 4. Re: Stonewall Jackson 5. rainbow bias 6. Deerfield update 7. Windows 8. NC Quilts 9. Singer Sewing Machine History Link 10. RE: Cathedral Windows 11. Cathedral Windows 12. Oh dear, what a dummy! 13. Re: Oh dear, what a dummy! 14. Re: Oh dear, what a dummy! 15. Re: bias tape quilts photo 16. Re: Marion Cheever Whiteside Newton 17. HGTV Quilt History Show 18. Re: thoughts about Courtesy Cloth

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Subject: bias drunkard's path photo From: "judygrow" Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2003 00:18:27 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

>Don't over look the old McCalls pattern that used bias tape in a rainbow >pattern almost like Drunkards Path. It has 3 or 4 rows of bias tape to make the >rainbows.

>Holice

If you go to the following address..... http://www.quilthistory.com/study/newpage1.htm the 9th photo down is just such a quilt. Click on the thumbnail to enlarge the photo.

Judy in Ringoes, NJ judygrow@patmedia.net

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Subject: RE: Cathedral Windows From: "Karan Flanscha" Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2003 23:50:05 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

I found a McCall's "How To Quilt It!" magazine ©1973 that has instructions for Cathedral Window (I made a crib size CW piece from these instructions, then ran out of muslin & could never find another to match :) The copyright on this lists ©1953, 1954, 1955, 1964, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973. Don't know if this refers to some of the individual articles in the magazine, which were then combined in this 1973 publication?? Then, I found a book "Cathedral Window- A New View" by Mary Ryder Kline ©1983 That Patchwork Place. In her "History" info, it says: "The earliest printed instructions to be found to date were in an article that ran in the Iowa Farm and Home Register of June 1956. Accompanying the article was the sketch that is redrawn and printed here. No name was given to the pattern. As you will note, little advantage was taken of the bias edges of the fabric that surround the windows. "Quilter's Journal, Winter 1979, carried a rambling account of the earliest known beginnings. They reported that a quilt answering the description of Cathedral Window was seen at the Chicago World's Fair of 1933. Until a little over 10 years ago the pattern was known variously as Daisy Block, Mock Orange Blossoms, Attic Window and Pain-in-the-Neck. History can be so unkind! "If indeed the basic design was created by some innovative, patient person in 1933, then Cathedral Window is half a century old this year. In celebration of this 50th anniversary, we present "Cathedral Window- A New View". Leman Publications (Quilter's Newsletter) was selling kits and/or instructions for CW, copyrighted 1976 & 1977. They gave instructions in the Nov/Dec 1979 issue for CW Christmas ornaments. So, it does sound possible that Barb's CW find could be a 30's or 40's era piece. Happy Stitching!! Karan

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Subject: Stonewall Jackson From: Donald Beld Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2003 22:11:25 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

--0-298314574-1059023485=:18199 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

I am going to take digital photos of the Stonewall Jackson at my guild meeting on Friday morning--It is too tall to hang and photo at my home, and I will post them Friday afternoon if I am smart enough to figure out how. Kris, can any idiot (me) post to your web site? Thanks all of you for wanting to see it. Don Beld

--0-298314574-1059023485=:18199--

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Subject: Re: Stonewall Jackson From: Marthapatches36@aol.com Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2003 09:39:16 EDT X-Message-Number: 4

Can any idiot look it up and see it. I'm fairly new to the computer world and to qhl. Haven't figured out to lookup any of the pictures mentioned here. Tried to see the springmaid ads, and some of the quilts mentioned. But to computer illiterate to find them. If anyone would care to take the time to tell me how I'd appreciate it. Thanks from sunny Seattle. Martha

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Subject: rainbow bias From: "Jean Carlton" Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2003 08:24:43 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

Holice 'll bet THAT'S what I have! Your description sounds just right. I am sorry to be so slow to get it posted. I will do so today under Quilts on the e-Board. If you can tell me more about this McCalls pattern that would be great. I wasn't clear on my first post.....I didn't mean finding a pattern so I could make one now - but researching designs made years ago. Thanks. Jean

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Subject: Deerfield update From: Kittencat3@aol.com Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2003 10:18:24 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Brochures are now available for the "In Search of Origins" symposium at Historic Deerfield this fall. All workshops are on Friday, September 12, 2003, while lectures will take place on the 13th and 14th. The workshop schedule is as follows:

Morning and afternoon:

Lisa Evans - "Medieval Quilting Techniques"

Meg Grossman - "Corded Quilting"

Edward Maeder - "A Closer Look at Calamanco Quilted Petticoats"

Dorothy Osler - "Assembling (and Dis-Assembling) Paper-Pieced Patchwork - 18th century style"

Morning only:

An Moonen - "Going Dutch: How Did the Dutch Quilt And Make Patchwork in the 18th Century?"

Thessy Schoenholzer-Nichols - "Trapunto Fiorentino"

Afternoon only:

Kathryn Berenson - "Inside Embroidery From Within, A Close Look At the Three-Dimensional Quilted Art of Provence"

Hope this helps people plan their schedules. Registration is due by August 15, 2003, and spaces are filling *fast*. Call Joan Morel at 413/775-7201 or morel@historic-deerfield.org for registration and more information.

Lisa Evans

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Subject: Windows From: "Charlotte Bull" Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2003 10:24:32 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

Re Barb's question about dating a Cathedral Windows quilt. Someone else has probably already mentioned this, but I found what looks just like this block with the name Daisy Block. It is mentioned in Brackman's book as being in a 1933 Aunt Martha's publication. Then it was called Attic Windows in ad from Old Chelsea Station which began in 1933. So, Barb, your thoughts re an earlier date might be certainly right on. Later publications using the name we all know now were in the 1950s. There was a sketch of what might be a Cathedral Window called Mock Orange. Does anyone have the Workbasket Vol 9 #11 from 1944 to check that out? I have not gone to my stored collection of these oldies to see if I have any with the answer.

I admit that it is not my favorite technique but I recall a friend who said it took something like 20 yards of muslin for her finished big one!!! That was way back in the 1980s and she was using old print scraps!!! So, that aspect of fabric dating always rears its head in these discussions! She'd started it in the 1970s as a project to do in the car on long trips. So...

Need I add it is hot & humid in MO?

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Subject: NC Quilts From: Palampore@aol.com Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2003 12:24:06 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

I stumbled upon a site today that I thought some of you might enjoy. Go to: "NC Museum of History", and there go to "Artifacts". Type in "Quilt". You will see an inventory of 450 quilt related items. Only about 10-20% have pictures, but at least you have those. And some of those are wonderful!!! They are dated on the inventory by the year they were acquired, and you have to go to the description to find the year they were made. I spoke with Jane Hall of Raleigh about these today and found that she is listed as well because she made some reproduction blocks from the collection. Enjoy!!! Are there other state sites like this out there for those of us who like to look at quilts? Rain, rain, go away....... Lynn Lancaster Gorges, Historic Textiles Studio, textilepreservation.com, New Bern, NC

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Subject: Singer Sewing Machine History Link From: Ark Quilts Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2003 10:16:46 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 9

Hello all!

I just stumbled across an informative web site from the Singer Sewing Machine Company's home page. If you are interested in the history of the Singer sewing machines, they have an historical outline for their machine including a subsite with information based on model / serial number information. I found it most interesting when trying to find out when the first Featherweight model 221's were made (1933). Thought some on the list might enjoy this info. Not all sewing machine manufacturers have this info included on their web sites:

Go to the Singershop.com or main website and use the >History link or use the address below. http://www.singershop.com/history.html

Connie Ark in Mount Victory, Ohio.

__________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software http://sitebuilder.yahoo.com

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Subject: RE: Cathedral Windows From: "Candace Perry" Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2003 14:23:35 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

Well, here's my report on the cathdral windows pattern...my volunteer said that the woman in question who "introduced" her to the pattern was making it in the 60s and early 70s...she also commented that she went to a quilt show in a nearby town in the 60s and there were 2 of them entered... so I'm not much help! Candace Perry

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Subject: Cathedral Windows From: "Jan Drechsler" Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2003 11:48:53 -0400 X-Message-Number: 11

Cathedral Window's are dated by Brackman, no. 460, as 1933 in Aunt Martha's but called Attic Block. Also in Iowa Farm- Cathedral Window, 6/56 and my favorite name, same block and number in Brackman is 'Pain in the Neck Quilt,' 1980. It sounds as though this block had numerous name changes.

My first e-bay purchase many years ago was an attic windows from the '30's-40's and weighs 17 pounds. It came from California and two teenage sisters made it. Their father was very strict and would not permit them to date. My visions of two furious teens making square after square gives this pretty quilt such bad vibes that I won't sleep under it.

Jan -- Jan Drechsler in Vermont Quilt Restoration; Quilting teacher www.sover.net/~bobmills

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Subject: Oh dear, what a dummy! From: "Pam Weeks Worthen"

Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2003 15:44:02 -0400 X-Message-Number: 12

Re: Maine quilt festival: OF COURSE I didn't mean we would give a report on the quilts we hope to appraise, but of the antique quilt exhibit! Jeez!

However, i do need a little QHL help with another appraisal I'm researching. Yesterday I saw a child's quilt, and to me it looked like the source for the design might be an early 20th century magazine pattern. There were 24 blocks, each with a different international figure. The bodies were appliqued cotton, and the details and backgrounds were embroidered with cotton floss. There were Mexican figures, Scottish, Scandinavian, US cowboys, Indian/east Asian to name a few. Any hints?

thanks in advance

Pam Weeks Worthen, blushing brightly in NH

Pam Weeks Worthen

_________________________________________________________________ The new MSN 8: smart spam protection and 2 months FREE* http://join.msn.com/?page=features/junkmail

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Subject: Re: Oh dear, what a dummy! From: "Julia D. Zgliniec" Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2003 13:21:42 -0700 X-Message-Number: 13

Dear Pam and QHL, Is it possible that this is a Marion Cheever Whiteside design? Did she ever do one with "figures of the world"?

Julia Zgliniec >

Yesterday I saw a child's quilt, and to me it looked like > the source for the design might be an early 20th century magazine > pattern. There were 24 blocks, each with a different international > figure. The bodies were appliqued cotton, and the details and > backgrounds were embroidered with cotton floss. There were Mexican > figures, Scottish, Scandinavian, US cowboys, Indian/east Asian to name a > few. Any hints?

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Subject: Re: Oh dear, what a dummy! From: Vivien Lee Sayre Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2003 16:48:54 -0400 X-Message-Number: 14

Julia, Pam and QHL

Yes, I believe she did. Her full name is Marion Cheevers Whiteside Newton. Jennifer Gilbert at the New England Quilt Museum could give you more information. She can be reached at http://www.NEQuiltMuseum.org/

Vivien Sayre

At 01:21 PM 7/24/2003 -0700, you wrote: >Dear Pam and QHL, >Is it possible that this is a Marion Cheever Whiteside design? Did she >ever do one with "figures of the world"? > >Julia Zgliniec > >Yesterday I saw a child's quilt, and to me it looked like >>the source for the design might be an early 20th century magazine >>pattern. There were 24 blocks, each with a different international >>figure. The bodies were appliqued cotton, and the details and backgrounds >>were embroidered with cotton floss. There were Mexican figures, Scottish, >>Scandinavian, US cowboys, Indian/east Asian to name a few. Any hints? > > > > > >--- >You are currently subscribed to qhl as: vsayre@nesa.com. >To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1442705S@lyris.quiltropolis.com

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Subject: Re: bias tape quilts photo From: Barb Garrett Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2003 18:15:54 -0400 X-Message-Number: 15

This link is for a picture of a summer spread that was shown at one of the NJ Quilt Study Days. It was made from 4 feedsacks using bias tape for the designs.

http://www.quilthistory.com/study/images/P5190042.JPG

Barb in southeastern PA

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Subject: Re: Marion Cheever Whiteside Newton From: Xenia Cord Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2003 17:52:00 -0600 X-Message-Number: 16

In the 1995 issue of Uncoverings (Vol. 16 of the Research Papers of the American Quilt Study Group), Naida Treadway Patterson wrote about MCW Newton (pp.67-94). At the end of the article are three appendices, listing women's magazines in which the patterns for her quilts appeared, listing quilts completed from Newton's photo log, and a listing of patterns she intended to work into storybook quilts.

In the second list, of completed storybook quilts, there is one called United Nations quilt. Of all the titles (no illustrations), this one seems most likely to be the quilt Pam described. From looking at the illustrations that are provided, it appears that most of her designs were organized in straight blocks, alternating with squares of plain fabric, so the story could be "read" from left to right, top to bottom.

Xenia

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Subject: HGTV Quilt History Show From: "Avalon" Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2003 19:36:01 -0500 X-Message-Number: 17

http://www.hgtv.com/hgtv/spcl_prsntn/episode/0,1806,HGTV_3909_21607,00.html

I see this show will air on HGTV on Sat. @ 5:00 EDT.

Mary in Wisconsin

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Subject: Re: thoughts about Courtesy Cloth From: Barb Garrett Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2003 20:52:40 -0400 X-Message-Number: 18

In my "collection" I have 2 partial bolts of fabric labeled Courtesy. One is a red and white candy cane stripe, and the other is a triangles cheater cloth. The one end of the bolt says --

COURTESY Fine Cotton Guaranteed Fast to Washing 100% cotton RN14193

There is a small black silohette (sp?) of a man and lady bowing or dancing -- they look very "Williamsburg" to me and are about 1/2" tall.

The other end says -- Guaranteed Fast to Washing 100% Cotton

The fabric is 36" wide and my guess is 1950s. It isn't limp or cheezy -- has a nice hand. This appears to be first line bolt fabric, not seconds or left overs. I don't remember the packaging Sharon describes, but we bought all our fabric in Philadelphia department stores or the mill end store in Eddystone in the 50s, and all I remember is bolts, not pre cut packages.

I just spent a long time with google and they don't recognize Courtesy as a fabric company. Any other ideas where to search?

Barb in southeastern PA

 Pleasures<BR><A href="http://www.rubylane.com/shops/materialpleasures" target=_blank>http://www.rubylane.com/shops/materialpleasures</A> <BR>Affordable Vintage Linens, Lace, Textiles, Buttons &amp; More!</P></DIV> --0-1686213460-1059131413=:15390--

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Subject: Carding & Courtesy Cloth From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2003 07:52:54 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

Jill - It appears what you are describing is carding equipment for specialty manufacturing. Industrial carding machines are huge machines and the process is so sophisticated today that often combing is not required to achieve the same effect and smoothness. But I'm working backwards here. Carding is one of the earliest operations in preparing yarn for spinning, a smoothing and cleansing of fibers to remove debris and other waste. For better quality strains that will have a finer end use, combing is the next step which further cleans, smooths and lays fibers side by side so that as they are spun, ends will mesh with each other to form long, smooth yarns. Once can usually tell combed goods by the touch, smooth and somewhat silky. Obviously this extra operation adds more cost to manufacturing operations. This is not to imply that carded goods aren't worthy -- ironically as one of my books points out, the more that is done to enhance cloth, the more the fibers are weakened. Thus, to get maximum wear and performance from work or sportswear or utility items, they are seldom combed. Hope this explains where I was coming from.

Barb -- you've solved part of the mystery about Courtesy cloth. I also checked internet and my glossaries without any luck. However, being on a bolt could mean fabric might be a sub-brand, much like the names you find on Joanne's bolts, for instance, good quality grey cloth that a converter finishes into seasonal fashion colors and designs at a lower cost; however, it could still mean that the name could be an umbrella label for a mill's ongoing overruns or manufacturer's surplus

JG Kane wrote:

> Joan said in her reply that much cotton fabric "while of lesser > quality is still good quality cotton > strain, often only a difference of carded vs combed. ", which made > my ears prick up.(eyes open ?<G>). > Could you please elaborate on this for a dim Brit? > > I had the great fortune to have a private tour of the oldest privately > owned card clothing mill last week - James

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Subject: McCalls Bias Pattern From: Edwaquilt@aol.com Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2003 08:05:41 EDT X-Message-Number: 5

I have a copy of the original pattern sheet for this pattern. There was also a quilt in the Gettysburg quilt show last year that looked like it may have been of the same time period as the pattern. There have been some reworking of this pattern in recent years and published by another company - notably a shop in California, but the look and technique is the same. Based on what I know, I would put the date of this pattern sometime in the 1930's

Holice

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Subject: good new book - just an FYI From: <mreich@attglobal.net> Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2003 09:02:57 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

I am just back from "Gay Paris" and scanning my emails. It will take me a few days to sort through everything, and, YES, I will tell you about Oberkampf's Toile Museum in Jouy en Josas. HEAVEN!!! First, I must address the new book that Judy has recommended to the group. I purchased this book at the Renwick Gallery in D.C. in June. I thought that it would be a wonderful addition to my library with patterns from all cultures and time periods. As I flipped through the book, I found 7 scans directly from our Connecticut documentation book, "Quilts and Quiltmakers Covering Connecticut." Over 100 or better than 10% of "1000 Patterns" were scanned directly from books published by our publisher, Schiffer. The Amish and Pennsylvania German quilts may have been scanned from one of your books out there in QHL land. I hesitate to say more at this point in time. This book was supposed to be pulled from the shelves but obviously it is still available. Needless to say, this matter is not yet settled as we explore the fine lines of copyright infringement. So if you do purchase the book, I would much appreciate knowing just where you found it. A little jet-lagged, sue reich

----- Original Message ----- From: "judygrow" <judygrow@patmedia.net> To: "Quilt History List" <qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Saturday, July 19, 2003 9:03 AM Subject: [qhl] good new book

> I just happened to be in my local Barnes and Noble asking about the upcoming > Quilt desk calendar,(they didn't have it yet) and of course browsed the > entire the store. I especially like to look in the art section, and in > graphic arts I found a new book that interested me enough to bring it home. > > It is much like the book "Textile Design" by Meller and Joost (Harry > Abrams), but separates the chapters by period and style of historic design. > I'd say 90% of the 1000 illustrations are from textile design. It is easy > to trace the evolution of any design, naturalistic or geometric. The book > is a feast for the eye, with many designs taken by scanning the source, and > others from 19th century pattern books. > > The captions are very informative.(;-) I especially like the one for an > Indonesian batik sarong pattern."Designed and produced for the local market, > this batik sarong was made in Java in 1937 by Lies van Zuylen. The motifs > on cloths of this type and character had little or no significance, other > than to suggest that the wearer was delicate and refined." > > Or, on the preceeding page,"The way the hand-drawn wax resist was > painstakingly spaced so that it filled the available ground made it > expensive to produce. The high price and the use of late summer flowers > within the motifs tells us that this cloth was designed to be worn by a > prosperous middle-aged Indo-European woman." Where is it written that we > fading flowers can only wear late summer flowers? Can't we wear tulips and > daffodils and lilacs? Gosh, I've been breaking all the rules. > > Look for "1000 patterns: Design Through the Centuries" by Drusilla Cole, > Chronicle Books, San Francisco, 2003. ISBN-8118-3979-6. A quality > papaerback. $29.95. > > Judy in Ringoes, NJ > judygrow@patmedia.net > > > --- > You are currently subscribed to qhl as: mreich@attglobal.net. > To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1442039E@lyris.quiltropolis.com

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Subject: Courtesy Cottons From: Bettina Havig <bettinaqc@socket.net> Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2003 08:30:34 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

When I opened my quilt shop in 1977 I carried Courtesy Cottons. They were bolt goods, 36 inches wide and very nice quality and priced at under $1.50 retail! They were among the few fabrics available at the time in 100% cotton. I was able to carry both print and solid Courtesy Cottons. By today's standards quiltmakers would gasp at the prints but remember what was out there in the 1960's and 70's. Within a couple of years companies like V.I.P. and Springs began to make 45" 100% cotton prints...reluctantly as they thought this quilting thing was just a passing fad. Many of the companies producing cottons today for the quilt maker didn't want to bother with them in the late 1970's.

Bettina Havig

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Subject: Courtesy Cottons From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2003 09:48:18 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

Bettina -- do you remember who your supplier was and from which manufacturer cloth was obtained? Anything to narrow the field.

Bettina Havig wrote:

>When I opened my quilt shop in 1977 I carried Courtesy Cottons. They were >bolt goods, 36 inches wide and very nice quality and priced at under $1.50 >retail! They were among the few fabrics available at the time in 100% >cotton. I was able to carry both print and solid Courtesy Cottons. By >today's standards quiltmakers would gasp at the prints but remember what was >out there in the 1960's and 70's. Within a couple of years companies like >V.I.P. and Springs began to make 45" 100% cotton prints...reluctantly as >they thought this quilting thing was just a passing fad. Many of the >companies producing cottons today for the quilt maker didn't want to bother >with them in the late 1970's. > >B > >

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Subject: NC Quilts From: "McShannock, Linda" <linda.mcshannock@mnhs.org> Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2003 09:19:23 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

Lynn, since you ask, I guess I'll stop lurking and report that the Minnesota Historical Society has images of quilts from the collection online. The home page for the website is www.mnhs.org <http://www.mnhs.org> and the direct link to the quilts is www.mnhs.org/quilts. We have a collection of about 240 quilts dating from the late 18th century to the present. 187 of the images are online. There is also a Visual Resources database online, which can be searched for images of many subjects including "quilts"; "quilting", etc. This is found on the Society's home page.

19 of these quilts are currently on exhibit at the James J. Hill House in St. Paul, one of the Society's historic sites. Another 7-8 quilts are on display in the History Center galleries.

Linda McShannock curator, museum collections

 

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Subject: Re: NC Quilts From: Marilyn Woodin <woodin@kctc.net> Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2003 09:55:42 -0500 X-Message-Number: 10

McShannock, Linda wrote:

> Lynn, since you ask, I guess I'll stop lurking and report that the >Minnesota Historical Society has images of quilts from the collection >online. The home page for the website is www.mnhs.org <http://www.mnhs.org> >and the direct link to the quilts is www.mnhs.org/quilts. We have a >collection of about 240 quilts dating from the late 18th century to the >present. 187 of the images are online. There is also a Visual Resources >database online, which can be searched for images of many subjects including >"quilts"; "quilting", etc. This is found on the Society's home page. > >19 of these quilts are currently on exhibit at the James J. Hill House in >St. Paul, one of the Society's historic sites. Another 7-8 quilts are on >display in the History Center galleries. > >Linda McShannock >curator, museum collections > > > > > > > >--- >You are currently subscribed to qhl as: woodin@kctc.net. >To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1442708O@lyris.quiltropolis.com > > >

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Subject: Re: Singer Sewing Machine History Link From: "Cinda Cawley" <lrcawley@dmv.com> Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2003 11:06:40 -0400 X-Message-Number: 11

Neat stuff about Singer. In the early days (1850-80) were there many competing sewing machines as in the early automobile industry? By what date would a sewing machine have been considered an indispensible piece of household equipment? Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: Re: [qhl]?? From: Midnitelaptop@aol.com Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2003 11:35:30 EDT X-Message-Number: 12

anyone know when fabric with CORTLEY FABRICS CONE MILLS INC. printed in the selvedge was milled? jeanL

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Subject: Re: Singer Sewing Machine History Link From: Xenia Cord <xenia@legacyquilts.net> Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2003 10:57:00 -0600 X-Message-Number: 13

During the last 35 years of the 19th century, especially, as this country was enjoying commercial and industrial prosperity (except for a downward blip in the early 1890s), there were probably hundreds of sewing machine manufacturers. Some remained obscure or went out of business, but Singer, Wheeler & Wilson, Grover & Baker, Howe, Wilcox & Gibbs, Remington, American, and Domestic were among the frontrunners. In 1867, for instance, Singer produced 43,053 machines; in 1876, 262,316, and Singer was consistently the largest manufacturer.

Singer's marketing of their machines, particularly the placement of machines in the homes of ministers, where acceptance of the device carried a lot of community weight, was a brilliant one. Singer knew women, sociologically and in the biblical sense (his history is interesting, if scandalous). Certainly by immediately after the Civil War, especially in the north, the sewing machine must have been considered indispensable (most, if not all, where made in the industrial northeast). Obviously the war would have limited production, and machines in existence were turned toward war production, but after the war the pace of production increased dramatically.

This information interpreted from appendices in Carter Bays, The Encyclopedia of Early American Sewing Machines (1993).

Xenia

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Subject: Re: Singer Sewing Machine History Link From: "Laurette Carroll" <rl.carroll@verizon.net> Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2003 09:44:53 -0700 X-Message-Number: 14

Hello Cinda and QHL, According to Charles Law's book, "The Encyclopedia of Antique Sewing Machines", up until 1877, The Sewing Machine Combination, a monopoly formed by the 3 big sewing machine companies, (Singer, Wheeler and Wilson, Grover and Baker) and Elias Howe, had kept sewing machine prices high and out of reach of many households. After it's demise in 1877, small companies began competing to gain a share of the sewing machine sales and there was a slow but steady reduction in sewing machine prices. "By the turn of the century, a basic sewing machine was within reach of most every family in the United States."

Laurette Carroll Southern California

Look to the Future With Hope

> Neat stuff about Singer. In the early days (1850-80) were there many > competing sewing machines as in the early automobile industry? By what date > would a sewing machine have been considered an indispensible piece of > household equipment? > Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: Re: [qhl]?? From: TrueCat66@aol.com Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2003 12:54:53 EDT X-Message-Number: 15

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I don't know if this is the right one or not:

Cone Mills Corporation 3101 North Elm Street Greensboro, NC, 27408 Tel: 910-379-6165 Fax: 910-379-6187 <A HREF="http://www.cone.com/">http://www.cone.com</A>

Betty truecat66@aol.com

 

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Subject: Singer Sewing Machine History Link From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2003 13:04:18 -0400 X-Message-Number: 16

aurette and all -- add to that that according to a commercial textile survey, the 1940s-50s saw the peak of domestic sewing; 2 out of 3 households had a machine. After that, sewing declined slowly.

Laurette Carroll wrote:

>Hello Cinda and QHL, >According to Charles Law's book, "The Encyclopedia of Antique Sewing >Machines", up until 1877, The Sewing Machine Combination, a monopoly formed >by the 3 big sewing machine companies, (Singer, Wheeler and Wilson, Grover >and Baker) and Elias Howe, had kept sewing machine prices high and out of >reach of many households. After it's demise in 1877, small companies began >competing to gain a share of the sewing machine sales and there was a slow >but steady reduction in sewing machine prices. "By the turn of the century, >a basic sewing machine was within reach of most every family in the United >States." > > > > >

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Subject: Re: bias tape quilt posted From: RAGLADY@aol.com Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2003 13:35:31 EDT X-Message-Number: 17

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Relatively new subscriber here. So would someone please post the URL for the QuiltHistory E-board, please. Thanks..

Gloria raglady@aol.com jeancarlton@att.net writes: > have posted the 'rainbow' bias tape quilt under quilts on the E-board. >

--part1_106.25ae9b57.2c52c463_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

<HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE= =3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Relatively new subscriber here.&nbsp; So would someone= please post the URL for the QuiltHistory E-board, please.&nbsp;&nbsp; Thank= s..<BR> <BR> Gloria<BR> raglady@aol.com<BR> jeancarlton@att.net writes:<BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT= : 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">have posted the 'rainbow' bias=20= tape quilt under quilts on the E-board.<BR> </BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_106.25ae9b57.2c52c463_boundary--

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Subject: Sewing machines From: <chrisa@jetlink.net> Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2003 10:56:33 -0700 X-Message-Number: 18

The Sears 1900 fall consumers Guide sells three machines: Edgemere for 12.75, Burdick for14. 95 and 16.90 in a full cabinet, and Minnesota Machines, ranging from 11.75- 27.45. They state they "lead the world in sewing machines." They state they have very little competition because they could make such a large quantity, their price was less then all the others.

Edgemere would send the household a machine for 1.00 to be examined it at the depot. If she decided to try it, she sent the remaining cost plus shipping. Then she had another 3 months of using it and if not totally satisfied, could the money back in full including shipping. The cabinet for the Edgemere is one I see often in antique stores, more than any other style. It has an Arts & Crafts look, straight lines carved on the front and drawers, with dangling circle pull handles-look like miniature towel holders. I have not seen the name Edgemere on the sewing machine in it, which makes me wonder if the cabinets were shared among the manufacturers.

None of the major brands listed were listed in this guide.

Kim Wulfert www.antiquequiltdating.com

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Subject: Sewing machines From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2003 15:03:18 -0400 X-Message-Number: 19

Kim -- If I remember the experts' past dicussions on ISMACS list, these are badge names for Singer and several other major manufacturers but made according to Sears specifications, just as some of Sears Kenmore appliances are made by Whirpool or Fridgedaire today.

chrisa@jetlink.net wrote:

>The Sears 1900 fall consumers Guide sells three machines: Edgemere for >12.75, Burdick for14. 95 and 16.90 in a full cabinet, and Minnesota >Machines, ranging from 11.75- 27.45. They state they "lead the world in >sewing machines." They state they have very little competition because they >could make such a large quantity, their price was less then all the others. > > > > >

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Subject: Re: Singer Sewing Machine History Link From: "Marcia Kaylakie" <marciark@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2003 14:03:46 -0500 X-Message-Number: 20

One this topic, There is a Wheeler and Wilson treadle machine down in San Marcos, TX in an antiques mall that has 1852 cast into the iron parts as the date! It's a neat thing to look at but I just have NO place to put this thing anywhere! Marcia

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Subject: Re: Sewing machines From: <chrisa@jetlink.net> Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2003 12:17:06 -0700 X-Message-Number: 21

Joan-

I've heard that before too. Two of these treadle machines have the Sears name and logo on the foot pedal, the lower priced Burdick and the Edgemere. The Minnesota has no picture, but the 20 year warranty they picture, has Sears name on it.

Kim

Kim -- If I remember the experts' past dicussions on ISMACS list, these are badge names for Singer and several other major manufacturers but made according to Sears specifications, just as some of Sears Kenmore appliances are made by Whirpool or Fridgedaire today.

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Subject: Re: Sewing machines From: "Laurette Carroll" <rl.carroll@verizon.net> Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2003 12:27:24 -0700 X-Message-Number: 22

Hello, There were about 20 major manufacturers of sewing machines in the US, plus another 2 dozen or so from other countries. But there are over 5000 badged machines identified and documented to date, meaning machines made by a major company but carrying another name. These machines were usually sold by department stores or retailers with their own name.

The Edgemere and Burdick machines were made by The National Sewing Machine Co. and sold by Sears. The Minnesota was made by the Goodrich Sewing Machine Co. and also sold by Sears.

Dates on sewing machines and or parts, are often patent dates. It's the serial number that can give a closer date of manufacture.

Laurette Carroll Southern California

> The Sears 1900 fall consumers Guide sells three machines: Edgemere for > 12.75, Burdick for14. 95 and 16.90 in a full cabinet, and Minnesota > Machines, ranging from 11.75- 27.45. They state they "lead the world in > sewing machines." They state they have very little competition because they > could make such a large quantity, their price was less then all the others. I have not seen the name Edgemere on the sewing machine in it, > which makes me wonder if the cabinets were shared among the manufacturers. > None of the major brands listed were listed in this guide. Kim Wulfert

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Subject: qhl(sewing machines) From: <mreich@attglobal.net> Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2003 15:47:10 -0400 X-Message-Number: 23

The three big sewing machine companies of Howe, Wheeler & Wilson and Singer produced thousands of machines that were in homes much earlier than the end of the century. In 1862, Singer, alone, had sold 12,489 sewing machines and by 1872 their sales had jumped to 219,758. It is important to know that the Singer Company was a late-comer to the market place. Singer gets all of the hype in the history of sewing machines but in reality they did not achieve real success until they merged with Wheeler Wilson at the end of the century. Howe and W&W definitely had the lead in sales before that. The Wheeler Wilson company was much better at marketing and sales strategy. Singer sold almost exclusively door-to-door. The others had showrooms and sold the dealers in dry goods shops. Often the backs of trade cards reveal more history then the fronts. These Connecticut-based companies sold all over the east coast and mid-west and foreign countries. By the end of the century, they were even marketing to the ever-increasing immigrants and their homelands. How do I know all of this? These three companies including Weed (Hartford) Sewing Machine, are all Connecticut based. I have been studying the textile sewing industry in Connecticut for years. Also, if any of you are coming to AQSG, I am doing a round table on sewing trade cards. Sewing machine history will be a big part of that. There were incredible sewing machine wars in the mid-century. It finally all got sorted out by the courts and then the industry took off. Here in Connecticut, there were large adds in local newspapers from the late 1850s on. Why we don't see more machine piecing and quilting is beyond me. There were quilting foots by the third quarter of the century. I, also, have many accounts of quiltmakers trying to make these machines work. None of the journals mention brand names but they certainly express frustration using their machines. sue reich

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Subject: Sewing machines From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2003 15:40:45 -0400 X-Message-Number: 24

Kim -- I believe Laurette just answered our questions. :-) She has probably the best sewing machine reference available, if I'm not mistaken.

chrisa@jetlink.net wrote:

>Joan- > >I've heard that before too. Two of these treadle machines have the Sears >name and logo on the foot pedal, the lower priced Burdick and the Edgemere. >The Minnesota has no picture, but the 20 year warranty they picture, has >Sears name on it. > > >

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Subject: Sewing machines From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2003 15:42:40 -0400 X-Message-Number: 25

Laurette -- thanx for coming to the resuce. Were Goodrich and National Sewing later bought by Singer or other major player??

Laurette Carroll wrote:

>Hello, >There were about 20 major manufacturers of sewing machines in the US, plus >another 2 dozen or so from other countries. But there are over 5000 badged >machines identified and documented to date, meaning machines made by a major >company but carrying another name. These machines were usually sold by >department stores or retailers with their own name. > >The Edgemere and Burdick machines were made by The National Sewing Machine >Co. and sold by Sears. The Minnesota was made by the Goodrich Sewing Machine >Co. and also sold by Sears. > > > > >

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Subject: popularity of sewing machines From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcrafts@erols.com> Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2003 16:24:42 -0400 X-Message-Number: 26

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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Dear list, Whenever anyone questions how quickly the sewing machine took over = home sewing, I just remind us all just how fast we all bought (and now = can not live without)our microwave ovens! My best friend's mom got one = in 1970 for Christmas - a neighborhood marvel which cost $1800. Mine = came as a wedding present in 1979 - cost $800=20 ( my bachelor brother had money to burn). I just replaced the one at = our beach house last month - for $64.00=20 Human nature does not change: women appreciate labor saving devices! Newbie Richardson

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Subject: Re: Singer Sewing Machine History Link From: "Sally Ward" <sallytatters@ntlworld.com> Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2003 21:38:07 +0100 X-Message-Number: 27

> aurette and all -- add to that that according to a > commercial textile survey, the 1940s-50s saw the peak of domestic > sewing; 2 out of 3 households had a machine. After that, sewing declined > slowly.

Don't give up on it yet... Our fabric shops may have closed, our schools may no longer 'do' sewing, and yes, I've been rueing the death of the craft amongst the young for years. And yet this week I was in a sewing machine shop where the owner told me he had sold 14 machines on Saturday, all to young women from the local college. The flag still flies <G>

Sally W

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Subject: Re: Sewing machines From: <chrisa@jetlink.net> Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2003 13:46:00 -0700 X-Message-Number: 28

Thanks for this info Laurette. What does your book say about the cabinets? Were they made by the same manuf. as the sewing machine and therefore different named machines are in the same wood frame?

Kim Wulfert

The Edgemere and Burdick machines were made by The National Sewing Machine Co. and sold by Sears. The Minnesota was made by the Goodrich Sewing Machine Co. and also sold by Sears.

Laurette Carroll Southern California

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Subject: Re: Sewing machines From: "Laurette Carroll" <rl.carroll@verizon.net> Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2003 15:02:22 -0700 X-Message-Number: 29

Hello again, Joan, yes the Charles Law book is possibly the best reference on sewing machines. Also the book Xenia mentioned by Carter Bays is very well respected.

As I'm reading more about the Sears brand of machine named "Minnesota" I see that it was manufactured by more than one company and Davis was another maker of this badged or stenciled machine. Evidently Sears Roebuck liked this name because the founder Richard Sears was previously from North Redwood, Minnesota.

The Goodrich company apparently stopped making machines about 1910. The National Co. merged with The New Home Co. which was absorbed by Janome in 1957.

According to Law by the late 1870's the Singer Sewing Machine Co. had established itself as the foremost seller of sewing machines. Singer never made badged machines but sold only in their branch offices and authorized dealers. In 1905 Singer acquired the Wheeler & Wilson Manufacturing Co. but machines continued to be made under that name. In 1929 Singer expanded with the amalgamation of the Standard Sewing machine Co.

The Amasa D. Howe Sewing Machine company was founded in 1853, not by Elias but by his brother . It was found that the E. Howe machine which he had patented did not sew without incorporating features of other manufacturers. The Howe company did not begin large scale manufacturing of sewing machines until after the Civil War, when the old Howe patent expired. The Howe Co. was bought out by the Stockwell brothers in 1873. Stockwell continued to manufacture machines with the Howe name until 1886.

Kim, I'll continue looking in my books for information on the cabinets. I know the first Singer machine came in a wooden shipping box that was to be used as the cabinet or table!

Laurette Carroll Southern California

I believe Laurette just answered our questions. :-) > She has probably the best sewing machine reference available, if I'm not > mistaken. Were Goodrich and National Sewing later bought by Singer or other major player??

>

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Subject: Re: Sewing machines From: "Christine Thresh" <christine@winnowing.com> Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2003 15:36:02 -0700 X-Message-Number: 30

The best quick place to get information on the history of sewing machines is ISMACS -- International Sewing Machine Collectors Society -- at: http://www.ismacs.net/

Some of the information being passed around on QHL is not quite right, but I'm no expert.

Christine Thresh on an island in the California Delta http://www.winnowing.com

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Subject: sewing machines From: "Laurette Carroll" <rl.carroll@verizon.net> Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2003 16:13:11 -0700 X-Message-Number: 31

Besides the ISMACS site, this is also a good resource on sewing machines. It has many articles and photos of antique sewing machines.

http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Plains/3081/

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Subject: Re: a few little holes From: "Wanda" <fattyoldkid@houston.rr.com> Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2003 16:52:23 -0700 X-Message-Number: 32

Karen...I think I would put some fray check on the holes and maybe iron or stitch something on the wrong side of the fabric to reinforce then with hopes of stoping the tearing....just my thought.

Hope it helps Wanda in very hot Texas

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Subject: Stonewall Jackson quilt pictures From: Donald Beld <donbeld@pacbell.net> Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2003 18:22:26 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 33

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Okay, so I can e-mail them, but don't know how to get them onto the chat line. If you would like to see them, send me a private e-mail and I will send them to you. (it only took me one hour and repeated attempts to figure out how to e-mail them.) It's hell getting old and not knowing the latest technology. don Beld

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Subject: Re: Stonewall Jackson quilt pictures From: Wmstories@aol.com Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2003 21:59:47 EDT X-Message-Number: 34

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Don, I would love to see your quilt. Congrats on all your incredible work. Jacqueline

QHL Digest for Saturday, July 26, 2003.

1. Hazzard Civil War Quilt 2. Re: a few little holes 3. sewing machines 4. Re: qhl digest: July 25, 2003

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Subject: Hazzard Civil War Quilt From: "Judy Kelius" <judysue@ptd.net> Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2003 07:44:18 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

I have some exciting news! I have a new job . . . Coordinator of the Quilt & Textile Museum in Lititz, PA. This is a privately owned museum that began with a group of fabulous quilts which all came from one Lancaster County family. I will be doing a little of everything, with my first priority being to find new pieces for our collection. We want to have primarily Pennsylvania quilts and are trying to bring some back to their home state, so if you know of any good PA quilts that may be for sale, please contact me at judysue@ptd.net. The museum's web site is www.lititzjunction.com (one of my jobs is also to redo this web site when I find time), and the current issue of Country Collectibles magazine has an excellent feature article about the quilt museum. The complex the museum is located in is closed this month for some renovations and reorganization, so it would be good to call ahead if you want to visit. We are open 10-4 Tuesday through Saturday, 717-626-5512. I'll be happy to schedule groups and arrange personal tours. The family owned a general store so we also have lots of swatch cards from the late 19th century and other pieces of ephemera.

Although we want to concentrate on quilts from Pennsylvania, this week we just acquired an important Michigan quilt through a local dealer. I wanted to share this with the QHL list and also ask for some ideas on how to display it! Pictures are on our eBoard at http://vintagepictures.eboard.com. I can post all the blocks if the group is interested.

This remarkable quilt was passed down through the family of Philetus Hazzard of Bainbridge Township, Berrien County, Michigan until it was sold an Illinois auction earlier this year. The history saved with it tells the story that Margaret Hazzard, Philetus’ wife, gave the quilt to him when he left home at the age of 35 to enlist in the 12th Michigan Infantry of the Union Army in February 1864. About two months later, he became ill and died in Little Rock, Arkansas, where he was buried, and the quilt was returned to his family. The quilt survived in good condition, and had been professionally cleaned with some minor restoration before we acquired it. Such family histories can often be incorrect and this one sounded too good to be true, but so far everything checks out. (With the exception that the oral history identified Margaret as his mother.)

The quilt depicts buildings near his home that Philetus would have been familiar with and may also show buildings in New York State, where he was born and lived before moving west with his parents around 1840. Many of the blocks show people waving from the quilt! Most are residences, but there is a large church (which may be in New York), two schoolhouses, a log cabin, barn, and what looks like a town hall. One house is shown twice on both sides of the quilt (see below) - I suspect this was Philetus's own home. We have already identified the largest house as the Bainbridge Township home of Nathaniel Brant, husband of Philetus’ sister Martha. There is an etching of this house in an 1880 history of that area, and the local historical society tells me it was probably there at least as early as 1860. The quilt block was probably drawn from the etching (which is not dated).

The blocks are reversed in the middle of the quilt so this is not a good candidate for hanging straight. (Or maybe I can make a package deal with a local chiropractor <GR>!) This is where I would like the group's ideas. My best thought so far is to build a V-shaped (like a roof) display board where we can lay the quilt and put it where visitors can walk around both sides to view it. Since this would expose the quilt's surface to dust, I am also going to recommend we have glass or acrylic panels protecting its surface. Does anyone else have another idea?

Judy Kelius Coordinator, PA Quilt & Textile Museum 55 North Water Street Lititz, PA 17543

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Subject: Re: a few little holes From: 3forks@highstream.net Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2003 08:37:07 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Quoting Wanda <fattyoldkid@houston.rr.com>:

> Karen...I think I would put some fray check on the holes and maybe iron or > stitch something on the wrong side of the fabric to reinforce then with > hopes of stoping the tearing....just my thought. > > Hope it helps > Wanda in very hot Texas > > Yes, that is what I do also. Stitch-witchery, on the roll, is my favorite. You can even seal another piece of fabric to the top that way.

Joan of the South, in Texas > > --- > You are currently subscribed to qhl as: 3forks@highstream.net. > To unsubscribe send a blank email to > leave-qhl-1466471O@lyris.quiltropolis.com >

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Subject: sewing machines From: "Laurette Carroll" <rl.carroll@verizon.net> Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2003 08:31:47 -0700 X-Message-Number: 3

Hello, Kim, more on cabinets. As I said before Edgemere machine that Sears sold was made by the National Sewing Machine Co. and it was a large company that offered several sewing machine models (with different names). Looking at the information on National, I see they offered several treadle cabinets ranging in price from $20 - $75. Indicating that the machine heads could be used in any of several cabinets. The cabinet you see so often was probably a popular style.

National also made machines for Montgomery Ward & Co. One ad shows a basic machine and cabinet sold for $19.50.

National offered a money back guarantee. Machines were shipped subject to a trial in the home and if the customer was not satisfied they received a refund for the machine and shipping both ways. No questions asked!

The above taken from "The Encyclopedia of Antique Sewing Machines" by Charles Law.

Laurette Carroll Southern California

Look to the Future With Hope

> The Sears 1900 fall consumers Guide sells three machines: Edgemere for > 12.75, Burdick for14. 95 and 16.90 in a full cabinet, and Minnesota > Machines, ranging from 11.75- 27.45. They state they "lead the world in > sewing machines." They state they have very little competition because they > could make such a large quantity, their price was less then all the others. I have not seen the name Edgemere on the sewing machine in it, > which makes me wonder if the cabinets were shared among the manufacturers. > None of the major brands listed were listed in this guide. Kim Wulfert

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: July 25, 2003 From: Anne Copeland <anneappraiser1@juno.com> Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2003 10:33:17 -0700 X-Message-Number: 4

I want to see the bias tape quilt, but need the web site. Please send it to me. Thanks much, Annie

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Subject: Hazzard Quilt From: QuilterB@aol.com Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2003 06:51:29 EDT X-Message-Number: 1

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What a wonderful quilt, no matter what the family story was! I would be slightly concerned with the weight of the quilt being supported on a "v" in the middle and would prefer to see it on a flat surface maybe raised in an enclosed space. It should certainly be refolded (or rolled) differently though as I see very heavy fold lines on it lying down. I have seen a lot of damage from quilts that have lain folded in the same way for long periods of time. There are certainly lots of people with conservation experience who could tell you better -- that is a quilt worth conserving!

Beth Brandkamp

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Subject: bias tape rainbow From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarlton@att.net> Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2003 08:55:39 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Sorry - Here's the eboard link to see the bias tape rainbow quilt

Jean.

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Subject: hgtv show about quilts From: Midnitelaptop@aol.com Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2003 12:21:26 EDT X-Message-Number: 3

Quilts:secrets hidden in fabric i sent a request to hgtv, asking when a repeat showing of this program will be take place...will let you know what i hear... i only caught the last 15 minutes of the show and it was wonderful jeanL

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Subject: Re: bias tape rainbow From: RAGLADY@aol.com Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2003 13:23:05 EDT X-Message-Number: 4

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Oh... that is lovely. thank you for the URL. Bookmarked it so I can go back and look through everything later. Recently had a hard drive crash; nothing recoverable. So I'm rebuilding all of my online information - bits and pieces at a time..

Gloria raglady@aol.com jeancarlton@att.net writes: > Sorry - Here's the eboard link to see the bias tape rainbow quilt > http://www3.eboard.com/eboard/servlet/BoardServlet?ACTION=BOARD_SHOW& > SITE_NAME=Destination&BOARD_NAME=VintagePictures&SESSION_ID=d7tbyez3cee2 > > Jean >

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Subject: Re: bias tape rainbow From: "Pepper Cory" <pepcory@mail.clis.com> Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2003 14:13:22 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

This is a test-please ignore- computer glitches. Pepper Cory ----- Original Message ----- From: <RAGLADY@aol.com> To: "Quilt History List" <qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Sunday, July 27, 2003 1:23 PM Subject: [qhl] Re: bias tape rainbow

> Oh... that is lovely. thank you for the URL. > Bookmarked it so I can go back and look through everything later. Recently > had a hard drive crash; nothing recoverable. So I'm rebuilding all of my > online information - bits and pieces at a time.. > > Gloria > raglady@aol.com > jeancarlton@att.net writes: > > Sorry - Here's the eboard link to see the bias tape rainbow quilt > > http://www3.eboard.com/eboard/servlet/BoardServlet?ACTION=BOARD_SHOW& > > SITE_NAME=Destination&BOARD_NAME=VintagePictures&SESSION_ID=d7tbyez3cee2 > > > > Jean > > > > > > --- > You are currently subscribed to qhl as: pepcory@mail.clis.com. > To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1442681I@lyris.quiltropolis.com >

--- [This E-mail scanned for viruses by Cape Lookout Mail Server]

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Subject: qhl(19th century quilt poetry and prose) From: <mreich@attglobal.net> Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2003 15:05:15 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

I need to preface this poem with the events of my past week. I flew to Paris for a week of travel with my daughter. I hate flying and air turbulence makes me ponder the directions of my life, giving me perspective once again to what is really important. I got to thinking about all of the quilt trivia in my collection and just what might happen to it. To my DH, it looks like a bunch of clutter which would most certainly be bound for the trash can. In the process of researching in the 19th century, one comes across oodles poetry and prose in journals, newspapers, diaries, albums, and books reflecting the times. This was a wonderful way of expression that unfortunately has become extinct. I have long collected these pieces to keep and perhaps use in some future article or chapter. Although you may consider it quilt trivia, it does gives a glimpse of 19th century attitudes. These are the very ways of thinking that quilt researchers can usually only guess at. So as I was rocking back and forth over the Atlantic, I decided that every so often I would place a poem or neat story on QHL. Some are humorous and some are pensive, some are even brooding. I hope that you will have as much fun with them as I have. At the end of the 19th century, there were many poems written about crazy quilts. Like quilt aficionados of today, you either like them or you hate them. The first batch of poems are about crazy quilts. Here is the first one from that group. This is a poem that is actually sung to the medley of our national anthem.

Oh—y can you see by the dawn’s early light, What you failed to perceive at the twilight’s last gleaming; A cranky concern that through the long night, O’er the bed where you slept are so ugly streaming; The silk patches so fair, Round, three cornered, and square, Gives proof that the lunatic bed-quilt is there. Oh, the crazy quilt mania triumphantly raves, And maid, wife and widow are bound as its slaves.

The Trenton Times August 27, 1884

sue reich, who is glad to be back home.

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Subject: Carding/combing From: "JG Kane" <jgkane84@hotmail.com> Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2003 19:27:36 +0000 X-Message-Number: 7

Joan - many thanks for the explanation. I feel an idiot! I do understand carding and combing - I have had kids in my class busy carding fleece we had collected. What I hadn't taken in was one being a refining of the other - and I'd got so mesmerised by the process of making the card cloth that I saw, and the fact that it was for finishing processes, that I didn't engage my brain.

_________________________________________________________________ Use MSN Messenger to send music and pics to your friends http://www.msn.co.uk/messenger

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Subject: Carding/combing From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2003 15:41:29 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

Jill [hope I remembered the correct name] -- No apologies. What I just recently learned while watching a fleece-to-shawl group process card, spin and weave into a garment is that wool is not combed when processed manually. At least most persons will tell you this and question combing, some vehemently. We had a big discussion about this and I thought for awhile I was losing my memory. However, as textbooks reveal, combing is essential in the commercial wool industry process for making worsted; in other words, the difference wool is carded; worsted requires the extra step of combing. So next time you acquire homespun wool, it is likely to be carded only.

JG Kane wrote:

> Joan - many thanks for the explanation. I feel an idiot! I do > understand carding and combing - I have had kids in my class busy > carding fleece we had collected. What I hadn't taken in was one being > a refining of the other - and I'd got so mesmerised by the process of > making the card cloth that I saw, and the fact that it was for > finishing processes, that I didn't engage my brain. > >

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Subject: Re: qhl(19th century quilt poetry and prose) From: Xenia Cord <xenia@legacyquilts.net> Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2003 15:21:32 -0600 X-Message-Number: 9

Excellent idea, Sue (Reich) ; bring'em on!

Xenia

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Subject: Double Blue question From: "judygrow" <judygrow@patmedia.net> Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2003 19:15:10 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

Gaye has asked me about *double blue*, and all I can tell her is that the term names a number of small prints of a bright light blue on blue that was beloved and well used by the Penna. German community. It was often used in the typical Pa. German pallette that included (double) pink, red, cheddar, yellow, and green.

I've searched my library of quilting and textile books and the only use of the word "double" with a specific color is found in "Down by the Old Mill Stream: Quilts in Rhode Island" by Ordonez and Welters. There on page 104 she begins a section on "discharges and resists with the madder style" and gives an explanation of how the double pinks and purples are made. Blue is not mentioned at all. The two color plates are of a double pink and a double purple from the Allen Print Works, Providence, RI ca. 1880.

The last paragraphs of the section reads, "One advantage of the cover and pad style was its flexibility. The printer could print many yards of one design of acid resist, then subject it to a variety of covers and pads." I assume this means that after the acid resist, the covers and pads could print any number of colors.

Thinking about the double blues I know and love, I can't recall one which has the same patterns as a double pink or purple. Anyone?

Does anyone know where these blue fabrics were made, who made them, how long they were made, and how far afield they were used away from the SE Pa. area.

Gaye and I both thank you.

Judy in Ringoes, NJ judygrow@patmedia.net

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Subject: Re: Double Blue question From: Xenia Cord <xenia@legacyquilts.net> Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2003 19:21:50 -0600 X-Message-Number: 11

I don't think I can add anything but more questions to the discussion on "double blue"; however, we might want to check the name in two ways: printers and designers sometimes referred to these designs as "two blue"; "two pink" rather than "double." I have a piece of chintz dated (in printing) 1854, and on it the colors are noted, including "two pink."

Second, the shade of blue may be called Prussian blue, and maybe looking for it under that name will yield information. It is a reduced blue. All of the examples I have are not designs so much as tone on tone: darker blue dots spattered on a lighter blue ground.

Xenia

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Subject: Re: Double Blue question From: "Julia D. Zgliniec" <rzglini1@san.rr.com> Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2003 18:14:24 -0700 X-Message-Number: 12

Dear Qhl, In addition to the names already mentioned - I know these "double blues" by the names of "Lancaster Blue" and alizarin blue.

I will post a very typical one to the eboard if you like - I have it in blue purple and pink.

Regards, Julia Zgliniec

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Subject: Re: Double Blue question From: "Julia D. Zgliniec" <rzglini1@san.rr.com> Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2003 18:39:48 -0700 X-Message-Number: 13

Dear QHL, I have posted an example of a "double blue" to the eboard at: http://vintagepictures.eboard.com It is under the fabric tab. Julia

Julia D. Zgliniec wrote: > Dear Qhl, > In addition to the names already mentioned - I know these "double blues" > by the names of "Lancaster Blue" and alizarin blue. > > I will post a very typical one to the eboard if you like - I have it in > blue purple and pink. > > Regards, > Julia Zgliniec > > > > > --- > You are currently subscribed to qhl as: rzglini1@san.rr.com. > To unsubscribe send a blank email to > leave-qhl-1442694K@lyris.quiltropolis.com >

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Subject: Lancaster blue aka Double Blue From: "Karan Flanscha" <SadieRose@cfu.net> Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2003 20:39:34 -0500 X-Message-Number: 14

I first learned of Lancaster blue or double blues when I saw an exhibit of Mennonite quilts in Lancaster, PA. I had not seen this before, living in the Midwest. There is a photo of a quilt with what looks like the Lancaster double blue for background on the cover of "Quilting Traditions- Pieces from the Past" by Patricia Herr. Margo Krager of Reproductionfabrics.com provided the following info on Lancaster Blues in one of her History Packet of the Month mailings: "Like the ever-popular double pinks and purples, double blues are usually small to medium size calicos printed in two or more layers to achieve the depth of coloration. The designs were mostly small vines, flowers or geometrics. Often the background print was so finely printed (textured) as to appear solid. Double blues were being printed in Europe early in the 19th century. American mills offered a good selection of them by the late 19th century. "A few years ago, I had the good fortune to spend 3 'golden hours' with Diane Fagan-Affleck and the fabric sample books at the Museum of American Textile History (at that time the Museum was in North Andover, MA). Amongst the samples I saw that day were examples of blue 'doubles' and 'shirting' prints of mid to late 19th century. I remember opening one of the sample books and being stunned by the vibrancy of some of the blue prints. They were so periwinkle! "These prints (double blues and blue shirtings) were especially popular in southeastern Pennsylvania amongst the German population. Quilters there loved the strong blue-purple color and used it freely in combination with reds, pinks yellows and greens. We often hear clear bright blues referred to as 'Lancaster blues'." Eileen Jahnke Trestain, in her book "Dating Fabrics" gives the following definition of Double prints: A print made by printing several layers of pink, rose or red over one another to create the appearance at a distance of a solid color, but on close examination a textured pink can be seen. The same technique was used to create Lancaster blues, butterscotch (with chrome yellow), purples and browns. ..." pg. 194. There are some current repros of the Lancaster blues, you can see these at the www.reproductionfabrics.com website, if this link is too long, scroll down to the "Timeless fabrics" and click on Double blue/purples. http://www.reproductionfabrics.com/lines.php?subcat=119&PHPSESSID=3e0ba92280 1a1b98dbb7f7270dc46476 Once you have seen this unique color, you will remember it :) Happy stitching!! Karan

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Subject: Double Blues/Lancaster Blues From: Gaye Ingram <gingram@tcainternet.com> Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2003 00:59:28 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

Karen and Julia,

Thanks for the intormation on the Lancaster/Double Blues. You are right, Karen: periwinkle!

What accounts for what appears to be the extreme popularity of these prints among Southeastern PA German population? Was this a taste that had came from Europe with the group? Or was it acquired in consequence of locally available textiles?

Are there other areas with large German settlements that also used these WOW blues?

Are there antique fabric dealers who stock these fabrics?

Finally, are they related to the Prussian blues?

Thank you for the information.

Gaye

P.S. Judy, thanks for passing along to list.

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Subject: Double Blues From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2003 07:58:55 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Julia -- thanx for posting this.. Such examples are of great help to us who are not quilters and would not recognize the significance if we did come in contact with this type of cloth -- would be just another allover blue print. I willl post this to vintage fabric list.

Joan new column live -- the inventive man who gave us Sanforizing & new meaning to licensing http://www.fabrics.net/joan.asp

Julia D. Zgliniec wrote:

I have posted an example of a "double blue" to the eboard at: http://vintagepictures.eboard.com It is under the fabric tab.

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Subject: Kansas City Star patterns From: Debby Kratovil <kratovil@his.com> Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2003 09:08:27 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

I have finished drafting (by computer) the KCStar patterns of the Roly Poly Circus and all the Stencils (27) from the Star. (Memory Bouquet is done, too, but I found a quilt). I am hoping to locate a quilt made from the Roly Poly designs that I might be able to use the photo of for my newest CD. You can see all of the 20 animal designs here: http://www.quilterbydesign.com/KansasCityStar2.html and from there you can get a link to the page about the Stencils. I would also love to see any quilts using any of these stencil designs. Some of them remind me of sashiko.

I am most grateful to this list for helping me track down some quilts for the Memory Bouquet quilt and in fact, my guild helped me make one this past winter. It's beautiful and we're hoping to find a local charity to donate it to for its raffle.

My next projects (I would like to see quilts for) are: Garden Bouquet - 1931 - by Nancy Page (boy, are there are lot of words accompanying each pattern!!) and the Farm Life redwork patterns (26 designs) from 1931 and the Fruit Basket Quilt (32 designs) - 1932. Anyone having any leads on quilts for these, please let me know.

BTW, I do have copyright permission from the Star to reproduce these patterns for this project. While they probably don't have some legal authority over some of the series, I wanted more than anything to use their name in my labeling and promotions. I contacted a granddaughter of Ruby McKim and she assures me the McKim estate has no claim on the patterns. And I did want to include them in the QuiltPro patterns I've done for QuiltPro, but since these are embroidery and appliqu=E9 designs, they are a bit tricky to reproduce in their software. I use a high-end vector based graphics program and I'm able to then put them in a page layout program and convert to Adobe Acrobat files so EVERYONE, no matter their computer platform, can view and print them - and the original text is included. These are wonderful patterns that I'm finding have quite an appeal to the quilting world. Thanks for all your help and historic advice! Debby -- Debby (with a "y" and not "ie") Kratovil http://www.quilterbydesign.com

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Subject: Re: Double Blues From: "Julia D. Zgliniec" <rzglini1@san.rr.com> Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2003 07:25:18 -0700 X-Message-Number: 4

You are most welcome! I found it really EASY to post the picture - the directions were very clear. It was fun. If you want any other examples at any time - just ask. If I have a sample - I am happy to share.

Julia

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Subject: Double Blues and other doubles From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2003 10:49:58 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Julia and all -- I think it would be a great educational treat if those in the know posted samples of doubles, dye peculiarities, etc., to make us non-quilters and others more aware and knowledgable about dyes and color names and quilter terminology for them. I know terms differ from commercial/industrial textile language in some instances. For instance are there double colors for only certain ones or all? There are persons like moi who look at a print and see it as various colors rather than overprint or double and think it nothing special, just another pretty or ho-hum print -- that is aside from printing defects. So it would be welcome to have such lessons. I have many books on printing but not personalized such as posts with examples would be. I or others can keep VF list aware of these when they posted.

Julia D. Zgliniec wrote:

> You are most welcome! > I found it really EASY to post the picture - the directions were very > clear. It was fun. If you want any other examples at any time - just > ask. If I have a sample - I am happy to share. >

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Subject: Re: Kansas City Star patterns From: "Maurice Northen" <3forks@highstream.net> Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2003 10:41:17 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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Ruby McKim Vintage FARM LIFE Quilt Blocks Item number: 2546538620

----- Original Message ----- From: "Debby Kratovil" <kratovil@his.com> To: "Quilt History List" <qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Monday, July 28, 2003 8:08 AM Subject: [qhl] Kansas City Star patterns

Here are the farm blocks for sale. Perhaps you can chart who buys and get the photos?

Joan of the South

http://www.quilterbydesign.com

--- You are currently subscribed to qhl as: 3forks@highstream.net. To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1466471O@lyris.quiltropolis.com

------=_NextPart_000_0018_01C354F4.C68D0570--

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Subject: blues From: "Charlotte Bull" <charlou@mo-net.com> Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2003 12:15:48 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

Years ago while at AQS Paducah Show I bought a wonderful small pieced quilt top done in Double Pink and that Eli Walker Green with the yellow & black print. That was fabric combo was my passion at the time. Well, it still is!

As I was looking at it I noticed that there were tiny scraps of torn Double Blue fabric all around the outside edges. There had been a Blue Border. I asked for an explanation. The seller admitted she had ripped it off as she thought it looked ugly with the Green Border next to it! I could have "ripped into her" but I just demanded a big reduction on price because she had ruined it!!! I got it too! ..... Oh I do hope none of you were that Vendor! : ) Charlie

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Subject: poems From: "Charlotte Bull" <charlou@mo-net.com> Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2003 12:04:13 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

Sue, don't you think you should pursue permission to place all of this fascinating collection into one book ??? Poetical Quilt Threads from the Past!!! charlie

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Subject: forwarding a message from Pat Nickols From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessen@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2003 10:32:46 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 9

To QHL Re: Barb Garrett

In my "collection" I have 2 partial bolts of fabric labeled Courtesy. One is a red and white candy cane stripe, and the other is a triangles cheater cloth. The one end of the bolt says -- COURTESY Fine Cotton Guaranteed Fast to Washing 100% cotton RN14193

There is a small black silhoette (sp?) of a man and lady bowing or dancing -- they look very "Williamsburg" to me and are about 1/2" tall. The other end says -- Guaranteed Fast to Washing 100% Cotton The fabric is 36" wide and my guess is 1950s. It isn't limp or cheezy.

If you have access to mail order catalogs, Sears, Montgomery Wards, etc. they may give you some information as they often illustrated a type of fabric with some different patterns, some in color, and sometimes carried the promotional language the manufacturer used.

Finally enjoying nice weather in San Diego - Pat L. Nickols

__________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software http://sitebuilder.yahoo.com

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Subject: bias tape From: "Charlotte Bull" <charlou@mo-net.com> Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2003 13:43:31 -0500 X-Message-Number: 10

For those interested in Bias Tape. While doing some research for a new friend I noted a Bias Tape Whale shown in Brackman's book Encyclopedia of Applique.

I have some vintage bias birds too, both patterns and one Tea Towel. Sorry! I can't scan! Have Not yet figured out How! I know Why I should learn, but When is an unknown aspect of my life! Charlie

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Subject: anybody going to textile history forum? From: "Candace Perry" <candace@schwenkfelder.com> Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2003 16:08:16 -0400 X-Message-Number: 11

I am, just wanted to know if there were any friendly QHLers I should look out for! Candace Perry

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Subject: Re: Double Blues and other doubles From: Gaye Ingram <gingram@tcainternet.com> Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2003 17:17:02 -0700 X-Message-Number: 12

> There are persons like moi who look at a print and see it as > various colors rather than overprint or double and think it nothing > special, just another pretty or ho-hum print -- that is aside from > printing defects.

Joan, I second your request for people to post samples of "doubles,' especially of Double Blues.

But you could not think the Lancaster blues "ho-hum"---they light up a quilt. This is an "aHA!!" color with a pulse.

For instance, go to University of Minnesota site recommended by Linda McShannock--- www.mnhs.org/quilts. Type "6358" in keyword category and see if you could go "ho hum." See also the Touching Stars quilt listed on Stella Rubin's web site-----http://www.StellaRubinAntiques.com. Are you "ho-humming"?

<g> Gaye

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Subject: Double Blues and other doubles From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2003 19:03:57 -0400 X-Message-Number: 13

This is a multi-part message in MIME format. --------------000208000303070209050700 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Gaye -- ho-hum referred to nothing specific. Just those that are ho-hum by the longest stretch of the word.. :-( Actually I thought the double blues very attractive which is why I would like to see more prints in the doubles category. Capische??

Gaye Ingram wrote:

>Joan, I second your request for people to post samples of "doubles,' >especially of Double Blues. > >But you could not think the Lancaster blues "ho-hum"---they light up a >quilt. This is an "aHA!!" color with a pulse. > > > >

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Subject: Re: Double Blues and other doubles From: "Julia D. Zgliniec" <rzglini1@san.rr.com> Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2003 18:43:06 -0700 X-Message-Number: 14

Dear Gaye and QHL, I have posted 2 more swatches of "doubles" the first is of the same print as the first blue , in pink and chrome orange. The second is another popular double blue.

Anyone have these in purple?

Regards, Julia

Gaye Ingram wrote: >

> > Joan, I second your request for people to post samples of "doubles,' > especially of Double Blues. > > > > > --- > You are currently subscribed to qhl as: rzglini1@san.rr.com. > To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1442694K@lyris.quiltropolis.com >

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Subject: Double Blues and other doubles From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2003 22:03:59 -0400 X-Message-Number: 15

Julia -- thanx for posting these. Lovely prints, definitely not ho-hum.

Julia D. Zgliniec wrote:

> Dear Gaye and QHL, > I have posted 2 more swatches of "doubles" the first is of the same > print as the first blue , in pink and chrome orange. The second is > another popular double blue. > Anyone have these in purple? > >

 

 

 

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