Quilt History banner

Home Page

 

Archives

 

Appraisers

 

Articles

 

Bibliography

 

Books

 

Cleaning

 

Conservation

 
Dating  
Gallery  
Quilt Restoration  

Member Links

 

Study Groups

 
Subscribe  

Teachers

 

Search

 
   

Comments

 

 

Quilters Find a way to care

Subject: Quilt Study Groups From: "judygrow" <judygrow@patmedia.net> Date: Fri, 

Dear friends,

Since Gaye has brought up the subject of study groups I'd like to continue the discussion. I will be heading a round table on "local study groups" at the AQSG conference in Dallas in October. To that end, and so that I know what is going on all over the country and not just in my small sphere of knowledge, I'd appreciate it if all of you who are in study groups, or who have been in study groups that no longer meet, get in touch with me. I'd like to send each of you a short questionnaire (e-mail) about your group experience. I won't expect you to write essays. Probably short one or two word answers will be sufficient. If you have tried to get a study group started and have failed, please let me know about that too.

I will make sure that all the information I gather comes back to QHL. Thanks for your cooperation.

Judy in Ringoes, NJ judygrow@patmedia.net

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Yet once more, oh ye laurels From: Gaye Ingram 

and ye plants that bear the berries red

Like my face.

Sorry to have sent Pat Kyser's post to the list, but perhaps it is a way to remind those of you who are in the Deep South of our effort, which shows real possibilities of developing .

We could also use mission statements from any groups that have them and would not mind sharing. I've planned to make up some brochures to post in museums that show many textiles, textile depts of universities, major quilt shows and shops. Since this kind of thing is not commonplace in our area, having a mission statement and related materials might help clarify purpose.

East Texans who do not make it to the Dallas guilds would be naturals for such a group, since that area is very much like North Louisiana and parts of Mississippi and Alabama. Naturally southern Arkansas is also within our range.

I laughed at the very organized and efficient woman from MS with whom I spoke. She said her folks were affiliated with so many organizations, she felt to levy dues for yet another would dampen interest. Mississippians are gung-ho joiners and workers, but I suspect the fact that Uncoverings will now be one of the perks of membership will encourage them to reconsider AQSG. I've noted this from experience, Mississippi women are organized and diligent in whatever they undertake

Now we need some more Louisianians!

Gaye

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Giving Clients Really Bad News From: Anne Copeland 

A lady once brought me a quilt that was probably mid 19th century, and very fine, but suffering from the worst case of mildew I ever saw. She said she wanted me to try to get it out regardless. Of course I told her the prospects looked pretty glum, but she wanted me to try anyway. Well, I tried everything, and the quilt was already so badly damaged from the mildew that honestly, nothing would have gotten it out. So I called her and told her the situation. I told her I would be lucky if I could save even any of the blocks. Well, I managed to do that more or less. There were still signs of the mildew on the few blocks that I salvaged. But the lady didn't want it at all if it couldn't be whole, and unfortunately the damage from the mildew had actually eaten through parts of the quilt, or I should say had destroyed parts of the fabric. It was even in the batting.. That was about the worst news I had to tell anyone. Peace and blessings, Annie

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: cotton batting stain From: "Maurice Northen" 

Hi, Joan of the South here working as a conservator. I use "pure lemon juice" right from the bottle, but be sure to strain it. Soak on top and bottom. That is all.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: cotton batting stain From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" 

Meg of Northern California here working as a conservator. Remember that the "pure lemon juice" whether strained or unstrained MUST also be rinsed out with copious amounts of deionized water. Or else the lemon juice will also cause staining in the future (and embrittlement since it is an acid). Margaret (Meg) Geiss-Mooney mgmooney@moonware.net Professional Associate, AIC

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: handkerchief book From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Fri, 08 

Just picked up mail and there was Betty Wilson's new handkerchief book. Absolutely gorgeous. It's more than hankies, a wonderful nostaglic trip through catalogs, posters, magazines and an amazing collection of hankies of every type. Many hanky quilts shown plus other items such as aprons and party favors including the umbrella one. You won't put this one down! A must for quilters and others who like hankies and who enjoy creating with them.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Deep SOuth From: "Teddy Pruett" <aprayzer@hotmail.com> Date: Fri, 08 

Gaye writes: And how would you like to be a charter member in a Deep South Quilt Study Group like those lucky women up east have?

Well, it sounds absolutely wonderful - except that you have forgotten, that for some of us the "Deep SOuth" location to which you refer is actually way "up nawth" Teddy Pruett in Florida, who never fails to be amazed when people tell me I can't be from Florida because I have a southern accent!

Teddy Pruett

MSN 

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Deep SOuth From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Fri, 08 Aug 

Teddy -- that's because everyone in Florida is from O-hy-er and New Jawsey.

Teddy Pruett wrote:

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Deep SOuth From: Laurajbr@aol.com Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2003 19:07:48 

Not true--my hubby is 4th generation Floridian and no accent at all. And to make this antique quilt related, he loves my collection of appliqued red and greens. Laura

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: cotton batting stain From: ARabara15@aol.com Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2003 

I have just begun using a product called Yellow Out, it is made by Iron Out-their other product. I have had great success with it on small dark stains by making a paste and rubbing it on with a soft toothbrush or rubbing it in with my fingers. It is also great for rust stains. It comes in a small yellow-looks like a liquid, container but it is a powder.Ft Wayne In. 1-800-654-0791.www.ironout.com

Good Luck

Donald Brokate The Crazy Quilt Collector Trenton, NJ

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Antique Show at The Soverign Bank Arena-Trenton, NJ Sat Aug 9th 

For anyone close to Trenton NJ, this is a nice show. The arena is located on the intersections of S. Broad St, Hamilton Ave, and Rt 129. The show will open at 10:00AM and close at 4:00 PM. I will be set up with my quilts, some textiles and linens on the concourse-section 112. If I don't know you personally please introduce yourself as a QHL member. Best Regards,

Donald Brokate The Crazy Quilt Collector Trenton, NJ

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Antique Show at The Soverign Bank Arena-Trenton, NJ Sat Aug 9th 

What show? When? There was no posting to QHL, or at least one that I got.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Deep SOuth From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessen@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 

Many years ago - pre kids - my husband and I went to Disney World and amused ourselves by asking everyone we met where they were born. We did not meet ANYONE born in Florida, but we did meet a lot of New Yawkers. We told this story to our neighbor when we got back to our home in New Yawk, and she told us she had been born in - you guessed it- Florida.

To make this quilt related, I didn't see anything having to do with quilts in Disney World. I did learn this catchy tune, though.

Kris

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: 19th century quilt poetry and prose (The Crazy Quilt Involved in Politics?) From: <mreich@attglobal.net> Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2003 21:51:56 -0400 

Between 1893 and 1894, I have come across articles in newspapers throughout the country involving the crazy quilt and politics. The crazy quilt term was used to describe the famous McKinley Crazy Quilt Tariff Bill of 1890. McKinley was from Ohio. He got this bill passed when he was a member of the House before becoming President. Supposedly, McKinley was sympathetic to those of less fortune. The tariff raised duties on imported goods higher than they had ever been in our nation's history. This was McKinley's way of securing American manufacturers against competition from foreign producers. The bill was widely unpopular but it seems that these high tariffs remained a political issue until after the McKinley Presidency ended and Wilson became President. 

The bill, also, precipitated an economic crisis in Hawaii and contributed to political turmoil due to the importation and tariffs on sugar. After reading the following newspaper article and attempting to understand the symbolisms in Crazy Quilts better, you will have to now wonder about the crossovers between politics and the designs of crazy quilts. So often we have looked to the religious, Masonic, spiritual, Japanese symbolisms. Perhaps with the use of campaign ribbons in quilts, Crazy Quilt makers are trying to us much more. Here is the first reference I found to the Crazy Quilt and politics. It is from 1883 and speaks to the Scott Liquor Law in Ohio not the McKinley Tariff, but I believed it set the stage for using the Crazy Quilt to describe certain political situations.

The Scott Crazy Quilt from the Newark Daily Advocate, Newark, Ohio – April 25, 1883

There is a rage among the ladies just now for what are called “crazy quilts,” wherein the patches are of every imaginable discordant hue and shade and are put together in the most absurd, chaotic and contradictory manner. The more absurd and meaningless the quilt is, the more of a success it appears to be. 

This “crazy quilt” fever appears to be no longer confined to the domestic circle. It is contagious. It has invaded the halls of legislation, and our two-thirds Republican Legislature has had it very bad. As a result thereof, behold that beautiful piece of absurd, irrational, and contradictory legislative patch-work, known as the Scott liquor bill. It is a veritable “crazy quilt:” of Republican cunning, bigotry and hypocrisy. It has just about as much design and unity and consistency as has the original “crazy quilt:” and it is not meant to have any more. It would make an utter failure of the real crazy quilt, if any intelligent meaning could be discovered in the intricacies of its absurd patch-work; and this legislative quilt, in all its idiotic verboseness, adheres strictly to this utter want of design. 

In the real crazy quilt, every hue and shade and color is combined in every imaginable and unimaginable way, to please the fancy and taste, or want of taste of every chance beholder. There are red and blue and green and yellow; light tints and dark shades; stripes, squares, diamonds, circles – anything and everything under the sun, to please almost any fancy. It is true that the entire effect is most absurd and incongruous, but that seems to be a proof of the perfect success of the crazy quilt. And so it is with this equally crazy piece of Republican legislation. It is fish, flesh, or fowl, anything or everything, according to the taste. 

Here is a big red patch in it for the license men; there is a blue one for the Prohibitionists; here is a yellow patch for the saloon-keeper, there is a purple one for the local option men, all strung together in the most absurd and incongruous manner. And so it goes, color on color, patch on patch, till Joseph’s famous coat of many colors was not a patching to this famous piece of Republican legislative patch work! St. Scott and the other originators and designers of this famous crazy quilt, doubtless hope that its many colored hues and its grotesque shaped patches will catch all eyes. But, the design is too inconsistent, and the thread with which it is sewed will not stand the test of that tribunal – the Supreme Court – where such brilliant pieces of legislative patch-work go – to pieces! 

Alas, for the Scott crazy quilt! It aims to cover everything: but it covers nothing, successfully. It aims to conciliate the liquor element, and the temperance element, and it succeeds in harmonizing – neither. Indeed, this want of harmony is the usual fault of all crazy quilts, we believe. Stretch this wonderful quilt all you please, but it will not cover all that it aims to cover. Pull it up over the chest, and the feet stick out, bare and cold: cover up the feet snugly with it, and the chest is freezing. And all the time, the numerous chinks and holes, where the grotesque patches do not quite meet, reveal all too plainly, the nakedness of the poor Republican party! We know of but one way in which this famous quilt can be utilized, and that is, as a shroud, next fall, in which to bury the corpse of the Republican Party!

By the way, this is not a commentary on my party affiliation, sue reich

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Deep and Deeper From: Gaye Ingram <gingram@tcainternet.com> Date: 

>you have forgotten, that > for some of us the "Deep SOuth" location to which you refer is actually way > "up nawth" Teddy Pruett in Florida,

Teddy, hon, pay no attention to that Ohio woman, Joan Kiplinger. It's just that the Deep South is a big old piece of geography, and one does have to come to meetings, you know.

We're not like those PA-NY-NJ folks who live in different states but fairly close as the crow flies (Imagine Joan K. as the crow, Teddy). I'm still reeling with delight that an Atlantan would consider making the drive. And a Dallasite. And folks from North Alabama. That's what probably made me neglect the hanging chad down yonder below Gawja. Puleeze accept my apologies for thinking only of the Deep South and omitting the Deeper South.

Getting deeper and deeper, Lawd, Gaye

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Deep SOuth From: "deb" <deb@quiltingposs.com> Date: Fri, 8 Aug 

Kris said she didn't see anything to do with quilts in Disney World. Look in FutureLand in the carousel of time I believe - there is a Bernina sewing machine in the home of the future - no quilt but at least someone is still sewing!

Debbie in NJ

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Deep and Deeper From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Fri, 08 

Gaye -- sweetiekins, we must get you a shovel to pile them grits somewhere. :-P When I moved to Miami in 1959 the first 20 persons I met, my neighbors, were from O-hy-er and NJ with a smattering of NY. I think it was 4 months before I actually met a genuine bred Floridian. Y'awl can keep the deep or near deep or kinda deep South or as we in the Rust Belt say, Sud. Ain't nothing as welcome as the breezes of Lake Erie where we breed sea gulls, not crows.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Deep SOuth From: Gaye Ingram <gingram@tcainternet.com> Date: 

> > > Gaye writes: And how would you like to be a charter member in a Deep South > Quilt Study Group like those lucky women up east have? > > Well, it sounds absolutely wonderful - except that you have forgotten, that > for some of us the "Deep SOuth" location to which you refer is actually way > "up nawth" Teddy Pruett in Florida, who never fails to be amazed when > people tell me I can't be from Florida because I have a southern accent!

Teddy, hon, pay no attention to that Ohio woman, Joan Kiplinger. It's just that the Deep South is a big old piece of geography, and one does have to come to meetings, you know.

We're not like those PA-NY-NJ folks who live in different states but fairly close as the crow flies (Imagine Joan K. as the crow, Teddy). I'm still reeling with delight that an Atlantan would consider making the drive. And a Dallasite. And folks from North Alabama. That's what probably made me neglect the hanging chad down yonder below Gawja. Puleeze accept my apologies for thinking only of the Deep South and omitting the Deeper South.

Getting deeper and deeper, Lawd, Gaye

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Another Disney Quilt From: Jennifer Perkins <qltrstore@harlannet.com> 

My quilting buddy and I had our picture taken in front of Minnie Mouse's quilt hanging on the wall of her sewing room. I don't think it will fade or anything-it was plastic! :-) Jennifer in Iowa

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Deep and Deeper From: Gaye Ingram <gingram@tcainternet.com> 

> > Y'awl can keep the deep or near deep or kinda deep South or as > we in the Rust Belt say, Sud. Ain't nothing as welcome as the breezes of > Lake Erie where we breed sea gulls, not crows.

Dear Miz Kiplinger of Oheyer, Who could argue with you re breezes of Lake Erie, or , for that matter, nearly any breezes off any cool lake? Not any of us from the deep/deeper/deepest South. And yes, Florida does not strike me as the Deep South culturally any longer, though it once was, as Margarorie K. Rawlings recorded, a vital Southern state. But I'm thinking, for a woman who snatches curls for her dolls from unsuspecting poodles, Florida might be a nice place to visit for a while.

And we do intend to keep the Deep, Deeper, and Not So Deep South, for even with its heat and humidity and redbugs/chiggers and curious politics and relative poverty, it is still a really democratic part of this republic, where we know one another by names and family histories and where we learn to laugh at our idiocies, of which there are many, and know exactly what dishes to take to a family's backdoor when there has been a death or shotgun wedding.

When outsiders do polls of our reading habits, they neglect that our hometown daily newspapers provide stories better than any fiction writer could devise. In our town, for instance, one bright and sunny Monday Morning, a robber walked into a branch bank, brandished a gun, and said, "Give me all your quarters." The teller could not believe her ears and offered him bills of sundry denominations. Surely, she said, you want at least $10 bills. He said no, he wanted quarters---lots of them. So she complied, and he took off on foot, his getawaay plan, to the bus station where he bought a ticket to Central Louisiana on a bus of the sort Mexicans tell stories. While he took a restroom break, the bus left. A week later, again broke, he went back to the station and asked for a refund and was, of course, nabbed. by the Sheriff's officers whose offices were directly across the street.

A recent headline in the nearby Monroe newspaper read, "Cross Dresser Robs Bank." The man, dressed in drag, entered a bank and indicated a gun in his jacket and said, "Give me all your Dum Dums." Again, the tellers started pulling open their cash drawers. But no, he wanted candy, Dum Dums, of which here was a huge complimentary dish on the counter. The police trailed him by the candy wrappers and found him happily licking the last one (grape flavored, the paper said) and watching Oprah. That night the bank manager went on t.v. to remind people that the Dum Dums at their bank officers were free.

We read stories about a woman shoplifter in a grocery store who, to "demonstrate her innocence" ripped off her bra and out fell a pound of hamburger meat and lip balm. Such an intersting combination.

Then there was the front page news in our town when a police officer rescued a goat who had gotten tied up in his tether. The officer received a citation for his seriousness of purpose, and the goat got an extra special meal thanks to a local feed and seed.

A recent personal ad in our newspaper read, "Need to talk to someone? Call Mr. Gene, a male model. Guaranteed not to interrupt or give opinions unless invited. Will listen courteously. $10/hr." Where can you beat that?

So we will just quilt away and an eye out for our poodles and welcome crows, who are local forecasters of rain. You should come down and see us, Joan dee-ah.

<g> Gaye

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: August 08, 2003 From: Bluecrookedtooth@aol.com Date: 

I alway tried to get "organized" been doing that since I can remember, but fail miserably/. I think know that ti is just anal to be organized, becasue if one is so concerned with organiztion, they would never quilt. To me getting the machines threaded and material and the things I need is enough organizational trappings enough. Completing a quilt is organizational enough for me too. But the clutter of material and ther things..like dirty dishes to deal with......Hubby can deal with it if he dont like it. lol Getting organized.....ask Erma Bombeck were it puts you.....in the gave earlier. lol

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: August 09, 2003 From: Bluecrookedtooth@aol.com Date: 

I am wondering if there is any Quilters who would like to exchange squares? I embroider. (Machine and hand sewn) Now I dont want beginners. I am a perfectionist when it coems to my sewing..oh well, at elast i try to be.lol But would be interested in gathering names for a signature quilt with dfferent patterns. I prefer to learn new ones. Do you all have a favorite or a State blck pattern? Just curious. If your interested in an exchange contact me personally, susana

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Huntsville Museum of Art exhibit From: "Barbara Vlack" 

Thanks, Pat Kyser, for posting about this special exhibit. I'll be in Huntsville the second weekend in September for the Martha Pullen Quilting Academy. I hope I can get over to the museum to see this crazy quilt.

I don't know if anyone even knows that I am on the faculty for the Academy, along with the big stars, because I'm in the "And others" category --- which I am now assuming as an occasional alias. "Oh, yes, I'll be teaching at the show. I'm Ann Dothers." VBG The magazine ads mention that there are some pre-Academy classes on Thursday, with the Academy opening on Friday. Yep, I'm there for Thursday. But my arrangements say I'm there for the weekend with availability to work in the vendors' mall, I guess. I'm expecting this to be a fun experience.

Anyway, I hope I can get to the Museum of Art without the need for complicated transportation. I have no clue.

Barb

Barb Vlack cptvdeo@inil.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Ada Robacher From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarlton@att.net> Date: Sat, 9 

Hi all I am interested in hearing from anyone with knowledge about Ada Robacher, collector of all things PA 'Dutch'. I know she and her husband had a huge collection and held auctions etc....I am appraising some quilts from her estate that made their way to MN. Also, there are 2 pieces the owner calls 'show towels'; embroidered door hangings about 6 ft long. I had not heard the term before. Familiar to anyone from 'out East'? Thanks Jean Carlton MN Quilt Appraiser

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Ada Robacher From: "Judy Kelius (judysue)" <judysue@ptd.net> Date: 

Earl Robacher wrote Arts of the Pennsylvania Dutch (1965) and Pennsylvania Dutch Stuff (1980). He and his wife were well-known collectors. I don't have either book in my library to see if there are any quilts pictured - you may want to look at them to see if the quilts you are appraising are shown.

Show towels were common among PA Germans in Southeastern Pennsylvania, virtually unknown elsewhere. After stitching a sampler, a girl would often make a show towel with cross-stitch and drawn work on a long piece of homespun linen. In most instances this represented her best needlework skills. Most towels date to the late 18th/early 19th centuries. These are close cousins to samplers - they hung on the wall or in the doorway between the kitchen and parlor. They were not made to be used!

Best reference is This is the Way I Pass My Time by Ellen J. Gehret in cooperation with Tandy Hersh, Alan G. Keyser, and Frederick S. Weiser, The Pennsylvania German Society, 1985.

At 08:38 AM 8/9/03, you wrote: >Hi all >I am interested in hearing from anyone with knowledge about Ada Robacher, >collector of all things PA 'Dutch'. I know she and her husband had a huge >collection and held auctions etc....I am appraising some quilts from her >estate that made their way to MN. Also, there are 2 pieces the owner calls >'show towels'; embroidered door hangings about 6 ft long. I had not heard >the term before. Familiar to anyone from 'out East'? >Thanks >Jean Carlton >MN Quilt Appraiser > > >--- >You are currently subscribed to qhl as: judysue@ptd.net. >To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1444947Y@lyris.quiltropolis.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: it's getting deep around here From: "Pepper Cory" 

Hello all-I am very envious of those antique quilt lover buddies who can = travel to a gathering for show-n-tell (around here we also call it = 'drag-n-brag'). I am on a peninsula that juts out into the Atlantic and = while it's picturesque, it's a right trot to anyplace else. Just up the = road 45 miles is Lynne "Palampore" Gorges and we get together once a = month or so to help each other (she's known as 'the file queen') but we = admit our true agenda is to stroke, feel, ooh and aah over our latest = quilts. However, if there's a Raleigh and eastward contingent of = QHL'ers, maybe we should try for a gathering? Please check in and maybe = we can try for a confab, quilt flap, and potluck since any gathering of = Southern women requires refreshment, preferably anything in a pastry = crust. On the subject of South and South-er: people say "You don't sound like = you're from the South-" to which I reply, "That's because you've never = heard me mad, as in 'Duck, you sum bitch-' when I sling plates." When I = was 17 I left South Carolina and went to school in Vermont. My nickname = was 'Y'all.' When I moved to Michigan a year later, I carefully studied = newscasters onm TV and their way of pronouncing words and sho' nuff, = I've practically eradicated my southern accent.Just don't get me mad!! >From the everlastingly rainy coast- Pepper Cory

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Dutch Doll versus Sunbonnet Sue From: "Molly Mandeville Fryer" 

I am the curator for a small town museum in southeast Texas. As I was hosting an antique quilt show, the question of the difference between Sunbonnet Sue and Dutch Doll quilts came up. Some of the quilts brought in were described as one and some the other. I know Sunbonnet Sue became popular from a book series in the 30s. I am wondering if Dutch Doll was an earlier version that was the very basic, simplest one. Possibly Dutch Doll is a Southern name.

I am new to the list and have certainly enjoyed the discussions and knowledge that passes from one to the other. I am considering trying to become an AQS quilt appraiser, but at this point am overwhelmed by the information that is available. I don't know if I can ever attain enough knowledge to be qualified. Maybe some of you would share with me the expriences of becoming appraisers and how you aquired your knowledge. I have some experience from working through the museum, but am afraid that it is limited to my area.

Thanks to you all. Molly

 ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Ada Robacher From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421@comcast.net> Date: 

I just looked in the 3 books I have that were written by Earl Robacker and one of them mentions "door towels".

In Pennsylvania Dutch Stuff (c1944), it says --

There are the Handtuchen, or fancy towels, those elaborate forerunners of the modern guest towels. Almost always of a fine quality of homespun linen, these towels were adorned with handwork embellishments in white as well as in blue, red and occasionally other colors. In a sense the decorations suggest those of some early samplers, with their rows of conventionalized floral designs, representations of birds, animals and human figures, and the name of the maker, together with the date of execution.

Cross-stitching was the favorite method of carrying out the design, although the whole repertoire of needlework possiblilites seems to have been brought in to play. The door towels were originally for show, and were used as covers for the very unromantic, everyday roller towel. In Europe, particularly in Switzerland, there was a painted or stenciled case built purposely to accommodate these towels, but no example of any such creation has a yet been identified in PA.

Me again <grin> -- If you come to Lancaster and want to see an excellent collection of "show towels", I highly recommend the Heritage Center in Lancaster. They have a wonderful collection on display. The museum is in downtown Lancaster, next to an old Farmers Market (open Tuesday and Friday I think) -- a wonderful stop when you come to Lancaster for Quilt Week in April.

Mr. Robacker was born in 1904 and taught himself German so he could read old PA Dutch manuscript writing. The Robacker Collection of folk art and antiques began to take shape in the early 1930s.

Barb in southeastern PA

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Ada Robacher From: "Julia D. Zgliniec" <rzglini1@san.rr.com> Date: 

Dear Barb and Qhl, There is a nice discussion of hand towels and other household linens by Patricia Herr in her book:

Herr, Patricia T. (1998). Amish Arts of Lancaster County. Schiffer Publishing Co. Atglen, PA

I addition to quilts, I also collect hand towels - which I think are miniature masterpieces of the needleworker's art. There are many different techiques used on towels and it is possible to collect samples of them for a modest investment.

Regards, Julia Zgliniec - Poway, CA - hot ( but its a dry heat)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: hot From: Crm793@aol.com Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2003 16:20:34 EDT 

So's a blow torch.

cm, texas

------------------------------

Subject: Show Towels From: "BOBBIE A AUG" <qwltpro@msn.com> Date: Sun, 10 

Jean, Gerald Roy and I have a new book coming out this Spring. It's called, An= tique Quilts and Textiles: A Price Guide to Functional and Fashionable C= loth Comforts, published by Schroeder Publishing/Collector's Books. In i= t are some show towels. I realize that this will not help you presently,= but for future reference...

Bobbie Aug

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: quilted petticoats From: "Charlotte Bull" <charlou@mo-net.com> Date: 

As I was browsing some suggested sites found in a current 9 patch news I saw a reference to quilted petticoats on a site I'd never heard of. It's a costumer history site. Very interesting. Two articles on quilted petticoats under the 18th c title. You might enjoy this. I'm always glad to find something new & informative to add to my stash of information! www.reconstructinghistory.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: About the Robachers From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarlton@att.net> Date: 

Judy, Barb, Julia and all, Thanks for the references. I have seen two of the books mentioned but need more time with them - and the auction booklets of the final auction in 1989 - two stages. I will look for the P. Herr book. If anyone would like to see my photos of one of the 'towels' please email me privately. Apparently, Ada loved to buy quilts. My client was helping with the auction and told to go work on the quilts on the beds. She thought there would be one quilt on a bed - there were stacks on each bed! She ended up choosing to be paid in quilts - wise decision! Jean

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: History site From: "Sally Ward" <sallytatters@ntlworld.com> Date: Mon, 

saw a reference to quilted petticoats on a site I'd never heard of. It's > a costumer history site. Very interesting. Two articles on quilted > petticoats under the 18th c title. You might enjoy this. I'm always glad > to find something new & informative to add to my stash of information! > www.reconstructinghistory.com

This is a very interesting site, but having looked at the page on quilted petticoats I have written to the author with some new information. The bibliography from which the page was written does not give any of the standard sources on British quilting, most of which do at least touch on quilted petticoats, and in particular the most recent relevant publication is the 2000 issue of the journal of the British Quilt Studies Group, containing a paper by Clare Rose on 'Eighteenth Century Quilting in London'. The website page opens with the statement 'Petticote fabric was normally quilted in workshops in France and shipped to England and then the American Colonies where it was made up into garments for local consumption'

I feel that this is only part of the story, as new research is revealing that there was a thriving industry in the quilting of silk petticoats in London in the 18th Century, as well as them being made in coarser fabrics in the domestic scene in the North of England. Some of the quilted silk petticoats in collections in the UK as various as the V&A, the Snowshill Collection, and the Quilters Guild of the British Isles Heritage Collection, show design similarities which are suggesting to researchers that they may be eventually traced to a common workshop, or workshops, in London.

In her paper in Quilt Studies Clare Rose describes how she made a study of trade cards and invoices of the period from the collection in the Guildhall, Heals, Banks and Museum of London archives and states:

'the fact that quilted items are descrived as 'French' or 'Marseilles' might be seen as evidence that these valued goods were imported from the state-sponsored workshops in Provence. But a closer examination of the tradecards shows that 'Marseilles' referred to the style of the work, not its place of origin. London haberdashers were also advertising 'Neatest and Genteelest Patterns for Stitching (sic), French Quilting...' or Cotton thread for working Knitting and French Quilting.' Some of these patterns may have been sold to leisured ladies who could not afford imported Marseilles quilts. However, they were also available wholesale for other traders, who were making up quilted items for sale. The existence of professional quilters in London is implied by the tradecard of wholesale-only haberdashers offering 'French quilting Cotton, Cotton Wool for Quilting'. Clare concludes (as always) that there is more research to be done, but it seems clear that we should not underestimate the trade in quilted items made in England at the time.

Quilt Studies journals are available from the Quilters GUild of the British Isles at which is available from the Quilters Guild of the British Isles (www.quiltersguild.org.uk/)

Regards

Sally Ward, Yorkshire UK

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Rail Fence Block From: "Ann Waby" <quilty@quiltalotamus.com> Date: 

Hi

Can someone tell me anything about the history behind the Rail Fence Block, I have been searching the internet and not managed to find much at all.

Thanks very much for your help with this. Quilt www.quiltalotamus.com ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: History site From: Xenia Cord <xenia@legacyquilts.net> Date: Mon, 

Oh, well done! We need your "outsider" voice to make us think about the fact that the world doesn't stop at our borders. QHL tends to be more flexible that way than VF, but still.... We get so involved with our particular focus that we forget we didn't invent vintage clothing, or quilting, or (you name it)!

Had a nice exchange with Sandie Lush, who for some reason went looking for information on kit quilts and found the BQHL site. Then she lost it, and when she did a Google search, turned up not only the reference again, but her own name! That was because I named her as the source for my designs for the wholecloth I made for mother. So she felt moved to write.

Has it cooled off any?

X

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Pre-worked embroideries From: Pat Kyser <patkyser@hiwaay.net> 

In reference to the 1877 Crazy Quilt currently being show at the Huntsville, Alabama, Museum of Art:

The borders are wine velvet with a linear spray of daisies centered on each one, using only about half the length of the velvet. The daisies are made from a ribbon/tape with horizontal lines in the weave, which I've seen before. My question is: does anyone know if these borders were purchased, were available from some commercial source? They are so identical, so perfect in stitching that it brings the question to mind. The stitcher of the quilt did excellent work, but these borders seem far more "perfect" than the rest of the spectacular quilt. Hope someone out these has encountered this in the course of study and observation.

Pat

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Dutch Doll versus Sunbonnet Sue From: "Sherry" 

Molly, My grandmother made me a Dutch Doll quilt but the pattern is identical to what I have always called Sunbonnet Sue. As far as I know they are one and the same, but I've been wrong once before! teehee.... Sherry Massey New to the Board and loving all the postings!

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Rail Fence Block From: "Sherry" <smassey@ok-history.mus.ok.us> 

Ann, I recently found an article at www.fabrics.net entitled Quilt Pattern Names by Laurette Carroll. In the article, the author refers to patterns that quilters used to reflect things in everyday life, and the Rail Fence pattern is supposedly a reflection of life on the farm. Hope this is helpful. Sherry Massey

 

> Hi > > Can someone tell me anything about the history behind the Rail Fence > Block, I have been searching the internet and not managed to find much at > all. > > Thanks very much for your help with this. > Quilt > www.quiltalotamus.com > --- > You are currently subscribed to qhl as: smassey@ok-history.mus.ok.us. > To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1469008N@lyris.quiltropolis.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Pre-worked embroideries From: "Marcia Kaylakie" 

Pat, I encountered a very similar sounding border on a crazy quilt top I looked at here in Texas. Date ont he top was 1887. I do wonder if preworked borders could be purchased? Marcia Kaylakie ----- Original Message ----- From: "Pat Kyser" <patkyser@hiwaay.net> To: "Quilt History List" <qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Monday, August 11, 2003 8:50 AM Subject: [qhl] Re: Pre-worked embroideries

> > In reference to the 1877 Crazy Quilt currently being show at the > Huntsville, Alabama, Museum of Art: > 

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: QHL Gathering for North Carolina From: Sabrina Thompson 

After talking to Pepper, she has suggested I post this to the list. I am willing to coordinate a gathering of QHLers that would be meeting for the day (preferably a Saturday)in central NC close to Raleigh. If there is an interest in this, I'll book an historic building and we can have show and tell, pot luck, and what ever else anyone wants to do. Please e-mail me off list and we'll start working out the details. ALL SUGGESTIONS ARE WELCOME!!! Of course, anyone that wants to come from out of state is welcome also. Right now, October looks good to me.

Sabrina Thompson quiltsew@earthlink.net Holly Springs, NC

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Pre-worked embroideries From: <chrisa@jetlink.net> Date: Mon, 11 

Hi Pat,

I have a silk Tumbling blocks quilt, same era as the crazies, that has a wide wine silk taffeta (I'm guessing) border with daisies and leaves almost completely filling it from side to side and top to bottom. This quilt is batted and backed, so I can't see if it's machine or hand. It's so perfect, I have always wondered if it's machine. My hunch is yes. There is no embroidery in the pieced section for comparison. It was made in northern Minnesota and I bought it from a relative. She is too far removed to know much about the makers sewing talents, unfortunately.

Kim Wulfert

> In reference to the 1877 Crazy Quilt currently being show at the > Huntsville, Alabama, Museum of Art: > > 

---------------------------------------------------------

: Dutch girl From: "Charlotte Bull" <charlou@mo-net.com> Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2003 

I found a side facing applique Dutch Girl that definitely looks DUTCH. The wing tipped traditional Dutch hat and big wooden shoes + carrying a pot of tulips! It was in Nancy Cabot column in Chicago Tribune in 1933! But there is another profile Little Dutch Girl that looks more like Sunbonnet Sue. Source said to be Frank's. See Brackman's Encyclopedia of Applique.

There were several front facing Dutch Girls. The Little Dutch Girl could almost be a duplicate of Sue but has very big shoes. It seems to depend on personal attitude, perhaps? But normal Sues simply don't look "Dutch"! The Sunbonnet is so typical of older mid-western habits. I have a sunbonnet my grandmother in KS wore in the garden. By the way, the Ladies Art Company had a Sue pattern possibly as early as 1900 with a 1925 cutoff date. In your experience, would you say that might be earliest source? The others seem to be from columns in the 1930s. Just curious.

The one my grandmother made for me was 1932-1933 and was the more sophisticated Windblown Lassie. You do have to separate Sues into basic age brackets. Some are chubby little girls, some are more slender adolescents, and some are sophisticated ladies! So now I've learned that a few may be Dutch!!! Thanks for the interesting questions that keep me looking things up! c

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: rail fence From: "Charlotte Bull" <charlou@mo-net.com> Date: Tue, 12 

I hope someone speaks up on the Rail Fence block. What I found totally surprised me. I had thought it was a block made up of 5 or 6 repeated long narrow rectangle rails and the block was twisted or alternated back & forth. But the source book showed me triangles such as in 1000 triangles and various other single shape "charm" quilt types. 3 or 4 different shapes, but each called a Rail Fence. So which one was the question about???

Again, I am simply curious and trying to expand my own knowledge. You all keep me excited, but it's amusing to me that I got turned on by a fence today as my barbed wire fence needs repairs! Maybe I should call a guy to do that! I may play with rotary cutters and butcher knives but I do not do barbed wire! Have a good day. c

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: FVF Seminar From: <mreich@attglobal.net> Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2003 

If I haven't said this before, put me on the yes list. Are you going to the appraisers' retreat? Do you know if we should bring quilts? sue reich ----- Original Message ----- From: "Phyllis Twigg" <ptwigg@radix.net> To: "Quilt History List" <qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Sunday, June 15, 2003 4:19 PM Subject: [qhl] FVF Seminar

The "Fran's Vintage Friends" quilt study group has scheduled a new seminar to be held March 5,6,7, 2004 at the Bird-In-Hand Family Inn in Bird-In-Hand, Pennsylvania near Lancaster. Those of you who attended in 2001 will find a similar format including textile talks by a variety of FVF speakers and the same excitement and camaraderie of spending a weekend in the heart of quilt country with quilt history and fabric enthusiasts. This year's special opportunity will be eating Saturday night dinner in the home of a young, local Amish family. Detailed information will be released this September. The seminar is limited to 30 people (Amish dinner limit 22). The organizers are Peggy and John Armstrong and Phyllis Twigg. Please circle the first weekend in March on your calendar and plan to spend it with us. Registration will begin in September.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: FVF Seminar From: "Phyllis Twigg" <ptwigg@radix.net> Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2003 12:14:01 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

Sue, Yes, I'm going to the appraiser's retreat. I'm packing this afternoon. It's fine to bring quilts. People frequently bring along a few (not a lot) of favorite things to show unless they live so far away that it's a problem with suitcases on the airplane. You can ask Vivian if there will be an official show & tell time. Most of the time it is more impromptu, I think. Each retreat is organized a little differently. I'll your name on our FVF list. Here's the list of speakers: 1. Judi Gunter - "Antique Doll Quilts: A Mirror of Their Times" 2. Barb Garrett - "The Fabulous World of Feedsacks" 3. Fran Fitz - "Conservation, A Practical Approach" 4. John and Peggy Armstrong - "Antiquing With John & Peggy" 5. Suzanne Cawley - "Granny's Scrap Bag" 6. Cinda Cawley - "Finding Aveline: The Women Who Made the Quilts" 7. Mary Perini - Plenary Session 8. Phyllis Twigg - "To Tell the Truth: Playing Quilt Detective"

See you soon, Phyllis

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: FVF Seminar Plans From: "Phyllis Twigg" <ptwigg@radix.net> Date: Tue, 

The FVF Quilt Study Group of Maryland has finalized plans for the 2004 = Textile Seminar in Bird-In-Hand, Pennsylvania. The dates are March 5-7, = 2004 at the Bird-In-Hand Family Inn in Bird-In-Hand, Pennsylvania. The = speakers and topics will be as follows:

1. Judi Gunter - "Antique Doll Quilts: A Mirror of Their Times" 2. Barb Garrett - "The Fabulous World of Feedsacks" 3. Fran Fitz - "Conservation, A Practical Approach" 4. John and Peggy Armstrong - "Antiquing With John & Peggy" 5. Suzanne Cawley - "Granny's Scrap Bag" 6. Cinda Cawley - "Finding Aveline: The Women Who Made the Quilts" 7. Mary Perini - Plenary Session 8. Phyllis Twigg - "To Tell the Truth: Playing Quilt Detective"

The event will open on Friday evening with the FVF Banquet at 6:00 PM at = the Bird-In-Hand Family Restaurant. The weekend will include an optional = Saturday night dinner ($17) at the home of a young Amish couple in = Lancaster County. The Sunday morning breakfast buffet is included in the = basic fee. The Seminar concludes on Sunday afternoon at 12:30 PM.

Those of you who attended in 2002 will remember the excellent Show & = Tell sessions around the big table in the meeting room. We will do that = again. This year we are requesting participants bring along a pair of = white gloves. Time will be allowed for antiquing and/or fabric shopping = in the area. March is a great time to do see Lancaster County without = the presence of a multitude of tourists.

More information about the Bird-In-Hand Family Inn can be found at = www.bird-in-hand.com=20

Reservations are now being accepted. The cost of the seminar is $200. = That amount includes two nights lodging at the Bird-In-Hand Family Inn = (double occupancy), the Friday night banquet, Sunday breakfast, and = admittance to all 8 sessions. Persons wishing to attend the Amish Family = Dinner should include $17 additional for a total of $217. Checks can be = made payable to FVF Seminar treasurer Peggy Armstrong and mailed to: John & Peggy Armstrong, 110 Lincoln Road, Chambersburg, PA 17201

The seminar is limited to 30 persons and the Amish dinner limit is 22. = Meals include tax and gratuity. CANCELLATION POLICY: All cancellations = must be made prior to February 2, 2004. There will be a 20% = administrative fee deducted. No refunds can be made after the February = 2nd deadline. You may, however, arrange for another person to take your = place.

For additional information or questions contact Phyllis Twigg at = ptwigg@radix.net

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Stains on Quilts From: "Penni Ryan-Pitre" <penniquilts@cox.net> Date: 

I haven't posted on this list in a long time so I hope it turns out correct. I would like to know if anyone could tell me how to take rust stains out of a quilt? I also need to know how you can take out a marking pencil (blue) that feels kind of waxey? Just now I received a call from a man who wants me to restore a quilt for him. Problem is that someone broke into his house and poured used cooking oil (from a home fryer) on the quilt. I told him I couldn't work on it oily but I don't know how to tell him to get it out. Any of you experts out there have any advice? Thank you so much for any input.

Penni Pitre In HOT HOT Phoenix, AZ penniquilts@cox.net

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Calendar From: Mary Persyn <Mary.Persyn@valpo.edu> Date: Tue, 12 Aug 

The mind is failing. Where can I find the antique quilt engagement calendar?

Thanks, Mary

 

 

""

""


Copyright ©PhoebeMoon Web Design Solutions   All rights reserved.
 Material on these pages may not be reproduced in any form without expressed written permission.