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Quilters Find a way to care

Subject: Re: Mrs. Lincoln and Mrs. Keckly From: "Sally Ward" 

Hi Judy Anne

Your message caught my eye because I have only just received the most recent of a regular recurring enquiry - about a quilt made using 'scraps of Queen Victoria's dress'. I've never been able to find anything to verify this assertion, although that is not to say that it is not true....it would be like looking for the proverbial needle in the haystack to get provenance for a quilt with a family name and link that name to someone in Victoria's employ, or close enough to get hold of such fabric. Our Royals have always been notoriously thrifty in strange ways (soap from visiting guests was not discarded but re-cycled etc.) so it is quite possible that it happened, but of course unverifiable.

I hope poor Victoria, with only rags to wear because everyone was using her wardrobe for quilts, will get a mention in your piece <G>

Sally W Yorkshire, UK  (see examples below)

These are thumbnails, click on them to see them close up
whole_1.jpg (54624 bytes) 8.jpg (51002 bytes) 9.jpg (38125 bytes) 1.jpg (42954 bytes)

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Subject: UGRR corrections and additions From: "Fawn Valentine" 

Re what Serena Wilson told her audience in Lewisburg WV in February of = this year, Jackie Tobin was an assistant professor, not assistance = professor. Also, I forgot to put in the part that the Code quiltmaker's = husband was a preacher and a blacksmith, so he traveled to other = plantations as well and could spread the UGRR message. While preaching = he lapsed into an African language which the white people thought was = speaking in tongues but the black people understood. Both the Code = quiltmaker, Eliza Farrow, and her husband, Peter Farrow, were black and = were slaves. I am not sure if the plantation in Edgefield, SC, that = Serena talks about, owned by her white grandfather, David Strother, is = the plantation where the Farrows lived.

Fawn Valentine in 'West Virginia=20

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Subject: Mrs. Lincoln and Mrs. Keckley From: AmyOKorn@aol.com Date: Mon, 1 Sep 

In response to Judy Anne's request for further documentation on Elizabeth Keckley (the slave who supposedly bought her freedom with her needlework skills), I have come across her story in several books: One of her quilts is pictured and some information given in The American Quilt (Kiracofe), Gladys-Marie Fry quotes James E. Newton in "Slave Artisans and Craftsmen: The Roots of Afro-American Art" and makes reference to Elizabeth's 1868 autobiography, Behind the Scenes and Kyra Hicks gives several references to Elizabeth's story (including Cuesta Benberry's Always There: The African-American Presence in American Quilts and Ruth Finley's Old Patchwork Quilts and the Women Who Made Them quoted by Ricky Clark in Uncoverings 1995). The Lincoln Quilt was once in Finley's personal collection and is now in the Kent State University (Ohio) Museum.

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Subject: Re: Mrs. Lincoln and Mrs. Keckley From: "Julia D. Zgliniec" 

Dear QHL,

There is also mention of Elizabeth Keckley, with a portrait and picture of quilt made from the dress scraps of Mary Todd Lincoln in:

Ferrero, Hedges, and Silber (1987). Hearts and Hands: the Influence of Women & Quilt on American Society. The Quilt Digest, San Francisco. Pg 76,77.

ISBN 0-913327-15-8

Regards,

Julia Zgliniec

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Subject: Quilt Engagement Calendar From: "Bobbi Finley" <bobbi_finley@msn.com> 

I was at our local Barnes & Noble last week (which also happens to be the College of William and Mary bookstore) and inquired about the Quilt Engagement Calendar. The young man did find a listing in their computer with the following ISBN number 0760740372 and lists B&N as the author/publisher. He suggested I go the the B&N website. Just thought I'd let you know that there is an ISBN # and it is in the B&N computer. Perhaps the calendar will be along shortly.

Bobbi

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Subject: Re: UGRR quilt facts From: "jajb" <anne_j@worldnet.att.net> Date: Mon, 1 

Here are some online resources:

http://www.culver.org/news/quilts.asp Barbara Brackman

http://www.antiquequiltdating.com/ugrr.html Kimberly Wulfert

http://historiccamdencounty.com/ccnews11_doc_01a.shtml Giles Wright's Critique of HIPV (had you found this page?)

> Lest it be lost in this long message, my question is---is there anything > published which refutes the quilt history part of HIPV? >

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Subject: 2004 calendars From: "Maurice Northen" <3forks@highstream.net> Date: 

I just now found a seller on E-bay listed as DISCOUNT CALENDARS who is currently selling the 2004 quilt calendar. She also has a store, and shows that she will sell multiples. Try it. Joan of the South 

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Subject: Re: 2004 calendars From: Judi Fibush <judi@fibush.net> Date: Mon, 01 

Joan,

If the one I found on eBay is the same as yours, it is not written by Laura Fisher and the other author.

Juid

> >

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Subject: Re: 2004 calendars From: "Judy Kelius (judysue)" <judysue@ptd.net> 

The one on eBay is a wall calendar. There is supposed to be a new Quilt Engagement Calendar with antique quilts, edited by Stella Rubin and Laura Fisher and published by Barnes & Noble - Stella is trying to find out when it will be released.

At 03:07 PM 9/1/03, you wrote: >I just now found a seller on E-bay listed as DISCOUNT CALENDARS who is >currently selling the 2004 quilt calendar. >She also has a store, and shows that she will sell multiples. Try it. >Joan of the South > >--- >You are currently subscribed to qhl as: judysue@ptd.net. >To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1444947Y@lyris.quiltropolis.com

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Subject: RE: qhl digest: August 31, 2003 From: "Alice Kober" 

In reply to Fawn's request for information on the false claims about quilts and the Underground Railroad, these are some websites I discovered when I did some recent research. I know many of you have explored this topic in depth, but hope some of this is information you don't already have. Alice Kober apkober@earthlink.net

http://www.fortunecity.com/victorian/magenta/14/id16.htm

> The author of the website for Hart Cottage Quilts presents arguments against the idea that quilts were used as codes for runaway slaves, supporting the argument with quotes from several historians who doubt the story. The author shows examples of the different quilt designs supposedly used along the Underground Railroad and discusses how some of them weren't yet created during the days of slavery.

>

>

> http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/UNDERGROUND-RR/2002-03/1017160716

> Historian Christopher Densmore, Curator of the Friends Historical Library at Swarthmore College, states that the idea of quilts being used as secret signals to runaway slaves is implausible and presents numerous reasons why he does not support the theory presented by the authors of Hidden in Plain View.

>

> http://www.antiquequiltdating.com/ugrr.html

> Kimberly Wulfert, PhD, begins her article, "To many of us, the use of quilts as messengers on the Underground Railroad (UGRR) is a myth. It cannot be proven through recorded historical documents or defendable oral history." She goes on to discuss why she discounts the theory.

>

 

> http://historiccamdencounty.com/ccnews11.shtml

> Historian Giles R. Wright, New Jersey's top authority on Camden's black history, is cited as "New Jersey's Underground Railroad Myth-Buster." He states that fewer than one percent of all slaves went north after they escaped-most stayed in the south. Wright claims that the book presents a very appealing idea, but it is based on "sheer conjecture and speculation."

>

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Subject: Elizabeth Keckley From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplex@starband.net> Date: 

Hello All, Julie Silber here. =20

Elizabeth Keckley (this is the "official" spelling) wrote an = autobiography, "Behind the Scenes, Thirty Years a Slave and Four Years in the = Whitehouse" (New York: Arno Press and The New York Times, 1968). In it she does not refer to making a quilt from Mrs. Lincoln's dresses. But she was = definitely a skilled quilt maker.

A color image of Keckley's wonderful "Liberty" Medallion QUILT is on = PAGE 76 of our book, "Hearts and Hands." On PAGE 77 is a PHOTO portrait of = Keckley herself. Both pages have extended captions.

In the body of the text, on PAGE 45: "Some slave women were able to use their needlework skills to buy their freedom. Probably the best known of these is Elizabeth Keckley, who became seamstress to Mary Todd Lincoln. = At one point in her life as a slave, Keckly supported seventeen people by = her needlework skills, including members of the family of the = then-impoverished white owner. In 1855, she was able to buy her own and her mulatto son's freedom for twelve hundred dollars. The money was lent to her by white society women in St. Louis for whom she sewed, and she quickly repaid it through her sewing skills...."

From one of the captions: "... Later, Keckley employed the needle to further benevolent causes. In her autobiography, she talks about how = she [an] got the idea to adapt the concept of the Sanitary Commission fund raisers for her own cause, the Contraband Relief Association..."

______________________________________________________________________

Mrs. Lincoln and Mrs. Keckly I'm wanting to add a little to my myths webpage on the myth of quilts = made from the dresses of famous personages.

There is one instance where it seems to be documented but I have learned that just because something about quilt history is in a book or in a = museum we still can't be sure it is true. At http://dept.kent.edu/museum/collection/textiles.html there is a quilt = shown saying it was made by Mrs. Lincoln's dressmaker from scraps left over = from making some of her dresses. They site as the authority quilt historian Ruth Findlay. Is this an alternate spelling for Finley?

There is also a book, "Mrs. Lincoln and Mrs. Keckly: The Remarkable = Story of the Friendship Between a First Lady and a Former Slave" that I = understand tells about Mrs. Keckly making this quilt. I do not own the book so I = can't verify it nor do I know what documentation the book was based on.

I am very eager to hear anything any of you might know about this.

Judy Anne historyofquilts.com

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Subject: RE: 19th century poetry and prose From: "Jocelyn" 

> > Beauregard – General Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard, (1818-1893), West > Point 1838, commanded the forces that fired on Fort Sumter on April 12, > 1861. He was one of the heroes of Fort Sumter and was appointed > General of > the Confederate Army.

And Scarlett O'Hara's first child was named in his honor. <G>

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Subject: Re: Australian convicts' supply list From: "Jocelyn" 

> When DD left home I jokingly gave her a bundle of knicker elastic > which had been in my bits box for years. She asked 'why on earth...?' I flippantly > replied 'because a girl never knows when she will need some knicker > elastic'. Recently she told me how many different uses she had found for > it, and asked for more.................

Sally, In their youth, my parents purchased a parachute. I have no idea why; neither of them have ever USED a parachute for its intended purpose. But you would be surprised at all the useful things that can be made from a parachute. One of the oddest was a harness for our cat, Ching, so that we could let him out of his cage during a move. :)

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Subject: RE: 19th century quilt poetry and prose. From: "Jocelyn" 

Today, the more common term is "altered > mental status." > I wonder if crazy quilt mania hit today; it would be called the > altered-mental-status quilt! sue reich > Sue, 'Crazy' comes from pottery, describing a glaze that has minute cracks in the surface. That's the original meaning of the word, and if you've seen a crazy glaze, you know how it resembles a crazy quilt. The application to mental illness came from the idea that the mind was broken, or cracked. :)

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Subject: Re: Australian convicts' supply list From: "Sally Ward" <sallytatters@ntlworld.com> Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2003 09:36:13 +0100 X-Message-Number: 1

> In their youth, my parents purchased a parachute. I have no idea why; > neither of them have ever USED a parachute for its intended purpose. But you > would be surprised at all the useful things that can be made from a > parachute. One of the oddest was a harness for our cat, Ching, so that we > could let him out of his cage during a move. :)

What a well dressed cat! Parachute 'silk' was often used over here during the war for wedding dresses and underwear. I think the parachutes used to 'fall of the back of lorries' <G>

Sally W

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Subject: reference books From: "Kathleen Holland" <kathieholland@worldnet.att.net> Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2003 07:20:09 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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As I have begun to collect quilt history books and old quilt books I = began to wonder which ones do you use the most? For those of you with a collection of these wonderful books can you tell = me the top 5 books you refer to the most? Thanks, Kathie in NJ kathieholland@worldnet.att.net in case you want to email privately Thanks! ------=_NextPart_000_0023_01C37122.A4806310--

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Subject: RE: 19th century poetry and prose From: Judi Fibush <judi@fibush.net> Date: Tue, 02 Sep 2003 06:04:31 -0700 X-Message-Number: 3

I thought her child was named Bonnie Blue?

Judi

>>Beauregard – General Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard, (1818-1893) >> >> >And Scarlett O'Hara's first child was named in his honor. <G> > > > > > > >

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Subject: Re: reference books From: Dana Balsamo <danabalsamo@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2003 06:20:52 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

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Hi Kathie, For old books I like: #1 "Quilts, Their Story and How to Make Them" Marie Webster 1915 #2 "Historic Quilts" Florence Peto 1939 #3 "Old Patchwork Quilts and the Women Who Made Them" Ruth Finley 1929 #4 "The Romance of the Patchwork Quilt in America" Hall & Kretsinger 1935 #5 "America's Quilts and Coverlets" Florence Peto 1949

I also love Ruby McKim's 101 Quilt Blocks (it's downstairs so I don;t have the correct title and date) For newer books...anything by Barbara Brackman (Encyclopedia or Pieced Blocks and Applique blocks, 2 different books, Clues in the Calico) American Quilts by Roderick Kiracofe is another newer goody.

It all depends on the era of quilts you like. I collect any first edition and anything Depression Era and Victorian Crazy Quilts. If you are into those periods I can give you another list of specific books for those eras.

Good Luck! Dana, NJ Kathleen Holland <kathieholland@worldnet.att.net> wrote: As I have begun to collect quilt history books and old quilt books I began to wonder which ones do you use the most? For those of you with a collection of these wonderful books can you tell me the top 5 books you refer to the most? Thanks, Kathie in NJ kathieholland@worldnet.att.net in case you want to email privately Thanks!

--- You are currently subscribed to qhl as: danabalsamo@yahoo.com. To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1476849A@lyris.quiltropolis.com

Material Pleasures http://www.rubylane.com/shops/materialpleasures Affordable Vintage Linens, Lace, Textiles, Buttons & More!

--0-1997254815-1062508852=:82782--

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Subject: RE: 19th century poetry and prose From: "jocelynm@delphiforums.com" <jocelynm@delphiforums.com> Date: Tue, 02 Sep 2003 14:18:39 +0000 X-Message-Number: 5

On September 2, 2003, Judi Fibush wrote:

> I thought her child was named Bonnie Blue? >=20 > Judi

Judi, Bonnie Blue was her third child. Beau was her son with her first husband, the one who was supposed to marry = one of the Wilkes girls. I forget his name. Ella was her daughter with Fran= k, who was Suellen (her sister's) beau; Bonnie was her daughter with Rhett.

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Subject: Re: Parachute silk uses From: KareQuilt@aol.com Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2003 10:19:07 EDT X-Message-Number: 6

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I met an 86 year old woman in the San Juan Islands who told me she was trying to make a quilt during the early years of WWII but was having a hard time coming up with the fabric. (She lived on the mainland at the time.) She mentioned it to some "fly boys" and they surprised her with a silk parachute that could no longer be used by them and she made her quilt. Her daughter still has it. I hope to see it next summer when I return to Washington State.

Karen Alexander

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Subject: Re: Australian convicts' supply list From: "jocelynm@delphiforums.com" <jocelynm@delphiforums.com> Date: Tue, 02 Sep 2003 14:22:22 +0000 X-Message-Number: 7

On September 2, 2003, Sally Ward wrote:

> What a well dressed cat! Parachute 'silk' was often used over here during > the war for wedding dresses and underwear. I think the parachutes used to > 'fall of the back of lorries' <G>

Sally,=20 I don't know if it were true of the old silk parachutes, but for awhile in = the 1960s and 1970s, the 'army surplus' parachutes were highly flammable, a= s people who bought them for making tents learned to their sorrow.=20 Mom made the harness for Ching out of the parachute cording, as she figured= it was the softest and strongest material she could get. We even decorated= it across the withers. <G> Ching was still in his kittenhood, in those day= s, and he quickly outgrew his fine wardrobe. <G>

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Subject: RE: 19th century poetry and prose From: Judi Fibush <judi@fibush.net> Date: Tue, 02 Sep 2003 07:27:26 -0700 X-Message-Number: 8

This is interesting as I thought Beau was another one of the twins and Suellen was her sister. Also Scarlet wasn't that old only in her twenties when all this happened but it has been a long time since I read the book. I thought Bonnie was her only child.

Judi

> >

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Subject: RE: 19th century poetry and prose From: "jocelynm@delphiforums.com" <jocelynm@delphiforums.com> Date: Tue, 02 Sep 2003 14:36:25 +0000 X-Message-Number: 9

On September 2, 2003, Judi Fibush wrote:

> This is interesting as I thought Beau was another one of the twins and=20 > Suellen was her sister. Also Scarlet wasn't that old only in her=20 > twenties when all this happened but it has been a long time since I read= =20 > the book. I thought Bonnie was her only child.

Judi, Yes, Suellen was Scarlett's sister; she was evil enough to steal her sister= 's beau, Frank Kennedy. Scarlett's first husband, the father of Beau, was the brother of Melanie, I= IRC. He was an Atlanta boy who came down for the barbeque at Twelve Oaks, a= nd Scarlett accepted his impulsive proposal after Ashley turned her down. A= ll the boys were going off to war. I checked a fan site, and Scarlett's nam= e was given as O'Hara Hamilton Kennedy Butler, so his name must have been H= amilton, but I can't remember his first name. He wasn't a very major charac= ter. <G> Scarlett was still in her teens when the book started- 16 and 18 come to mi= nd, but I don't remember which was her age and which was her waist. <G> She had Beau in the early days of the war, c. 1861-2, and then married Fran= k after the war was over, and Rhett even later. You're right, I think the b= ook ended before she turned 30.

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Subject: scarlett's kids From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Tue, 02 Sep 2003 10:51:46 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

What happened to the baby born after the famous night Rhett carried her up the stairs followed by her famous morning smile?? Was that a miss?? Think first hubby Hamilton first name was Charles.

jocelynm@delphiforums.com wrote:

>Yes, Suellen was Scarlett's sister; she was evil enough to steal her sister's beau, Frank Kennedy. >Scarlett's first husband, the father of Beau, was the brother of Melanie, IIRC. He was an Atlanta boy who came down for the barbeque at Twelve Oaks, and Scarlett accepted his impulsive proposal after Ashley turned her down. All the boys were going off to war. I checked a fan site, and Scarlett's name was given as O'Hara Hamilton Kennedy Butler, so his name must have been Hamilton, but I can't remember his first name. He wasn't a very major character. <G> >Scarlett was still in her teens when the book started- 16 and 18 come to mind, but I don't remember which was her age and which was her waist. <G> >She had Beau in the early days of the war, c. 1861-2, and then married Frank after the war was over, and Rhett even later. You're right, I think the book ended before she turned 30. > > > >

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Subject: UGRR quilts From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessen@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2003 08:00:20 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 11

I was poking aound the web this morning looking for places to stay when we go to Michigan and Ohio next week and I found this: http://www.oberlin.edu/external/EOG/threads_of_freedom/threads2.html Threads of Freedom: The Underground Railroad Story in Quilts. Looked like a good exhibit that did not take advantage of myths. I am glad they left the web page up!

By the way, if anyone in the Ann Arbor through Cincinnati are would like a visit from the QuiltBus, we are available Sept 15 - 19:-))

Kris

__________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software http://sitebuilder.yahoo.com

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Subject: 19th century quilt poetry and prose From: <mreich@attglobal.net> Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2003 16:02:50 -0400 X-Message-Number: 12

This article is an account of what must have been one of the most fabulous exhibits of crazy quilts + ever seen. I had to read it over and over again to absorb its contents. This is, also, the first time values have been attached to finished quilts of the period. There must be photos of this event somewhere in the New York archives. There was a similar show that preceded it in Boston. I have found one other reference to that show. Here, we can really see what is meant by Crazy quilt M-A-N-I-A! (The following does have misspellings, but I transcribed it exactly as it was printed.) sue reich

“The Marion Weekly Star Marion, Ohio Saturday, November 21, 1885

INSANE NEEDLEWORK Crazy Covers, Scarfs and Collars, Shams and Quilts.

Made by Men as Well As Women, Soldiers, Serfs, Girls and Seamen – Autographs of Noted Men and Scraps from Skirts of Doted Women – All Crazy.

New York, Nov 20. – If all the Japanese in Japan should set up all night and put together all their eccentric ideas of color in one complicate mass, they couldn’t get up anything more intricately distracting than the show at Masonic hall in West Twenty-third street. It looked as if somebody had shattered two-thousand rainbows and heaped the fragments into two thousand different mounds of rich and wonderful color. The hall looked that way because it held the collection of art eccentricities and art beauties that make up the national crazy work and art needlework show. It was the first show of the kind that anybody ever had a chance to see in Gotham, and devotees of crazy work had sent in crazy things from all over the country to make it something that Gothamites wouldn’t forget in a hurry. The instant the doors were thrown open in the morning there was a blockade of women at the box office. They all wanted to get the first view of the show. All day long the crush of women kept up inside. All the theatre seats had been taken out, and the exhibits were displayed in glass cases, heaped on the stage and hung in alcoves behind polished brass railings all along the walls. Fred Kyle who ran the crazy show in Boston, was there to keep things straightened out, and lots of pretty girls promenaded up and down behind the brass railings and explained the individual and collective beauties of things to visitors who didn’t fully understand what an artistic and admirable thing crazy work is. There were nearly 2,500 things to look at, and no two were alike. Nearly all of them were crazy things, and crazy quilts were but a part. There were crazy floor mats, crazy tidies, crazy scarfs, crazy table cloths, crazy screens, crazy lambrequins, crazy pillows, crazy shams, crazy collars, crazy mantel falls, crazy sofa covers, crazy panels, crazy hand bags, and crazy aprons. There were crazy catalogs to keep the visitors from losing their senses trying to remember what they were looking at. There were lots and lots of things that weren’t crazy. Rows of pictures embroidered in wool were ranged along the edge of the crazy quilts, as well as bits of lace, rich old tapestries, and heaps and heaps of needlework. Crazy workers from six to eighty-four years old made the quilts. The best one in the show is a $3,000 beauty that belongs Mrs. Theodore Moss. The late John McC (illegible) made her a present of it. He brought it from India. It is blue stain, lined with cream silk and covered with Kensington embroidery, which was done in Japanese style by a Japanese boy. The “autograph quilt” is a $1,000 novelty in white satin with white silk stars. Every bit of silk bears an autograph written with pen and ink. Queen Victoria, the Prince of Wales, Gladstone, and his wife, Disraeli, Gen. Grant, President Cleveland, Cardinal Newman, Archdeacon Farrar, Edwin Booth and several hundred other notables contributed their signatures. Mrs. Wright, of Minneapolis, exhibits it. A quilt that contains pieces of dresses worn by the Empress Eugenia, Sara Jewett, Rose Coghlan, and a dress worn by the occupant of the White House is a third novelty. Lots of the quilts are the work of gentlemen crazy workers. Among these is the one that took William G. Milligan, a soldier in the British army, two and a half years to make. It consists of 8,700 tiny squares. Each square was contributed by officers and soldiers in her majesty’s service. The 8,700 pieces together are valued at $3,000. Gentlemen crazy workers have sent heaps of other specimens, too. They include satchels, hand bags, handkerchiefs, rugs, and any number of other curious things. There is a picture of an eight-oared crew in a barge. George W. Johnson worked it in silk. There are a sofa cushion, chair back, a pin cushion, a pair of slippers, and a lace pillow sham that a man made to make time drag less heavily on his hands while he was getting over an attack of sickness. There are also “log cabin” quilts and pillow cases that men who were not sick at all spent midnight oil in getting into the requisite condition of craziness to gain admission to the show list. On the stage of the hall lay a rug that is said to have been made historic by the fact that every needleful of thread used to make it was threaded by a different slave. Hanging near by is a Turkish curtain that Sultan Perdhi owned in 1582, and another that belonged to Sultan Hamed I, to whom it was presented by the Italian government it 1409. There are curiosities among the beautiful things tucked into the show cases. One of them is a dress embroidered by hand. It took a lady eighteen years to finish it. It was intended as a graduating dress for her daughter. She became blind as a result of the task. Among the lace is one tiny bit that goes back to Louis XIV’s time, and once claimed Queen Christine of Spain as at owner. There is an embroidered picture of St. Genevieve that it took the worker twenty-seven days to make. The peculiarity of it is, though, that the first day’s work began 1852, and it was thirty years later before the last day’s work was completed. One of the quilts of distractingly complicated design has 939 pieces, another 1,000, still another 1,449, and three others contain respectively 3,164, 4,724, and 5,819 bits of material curiously combined. Miss Jennie W. Pope, of this city was credited by Manager Kyle, with having exhibited the handsomest bit of embroidery in the show. Her exhibit is a flannel skirt, made ornately beautiful by Kensington embroidery. The show will probably be kept agoing night and day for eight weeks. “

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Subject: Scarlett, Rhett, & All That From: Gaye Ingram <gingram@tcainternet.com> Date: Tue, 02 Sep 2003 17:14:45 -0700 X-Message-Number: 13

What is this, folks? I check my email in the morning, go to school and teach Hawthorne's "Scarlet Letter" and John Donne's love poems, and when I come in, everyone is obsessing over Miss Scawlett O'Hara. What is going on here?

I love the movie---so beautiful--- and when I was a child, I read a page a day as I neared the end of the book "Gone With the Wind" in order to prolong the imaginary world it evoked.

But may I remind us all that Margaret Mitchell did not mean for Scarlett to be admired, something the book makes plainer than the movie? Never mind that 3 zillion little southern girls have been named after the amoral, materialistic little temptress (Freud, Freud, where are you when we need you?). She was no fit role model, and Mitchell said that repeatedly, though no one seemed inclined to listen.

GWTW was the story of a woman who would do anything---anything---to preserve her "station" in life. Yes, there is that scene with her grubbing for potatoes and declaring, "Ah will never be hungry again!" And there is the part about the land and its sacredness. But nothing is sacred to Miss Scawlett. Not Tara. Not the land. Nothing. Unlike Rhett and many of the southern women whose quilts we seek to document, she was truly defeated by the war and could not bear the burdens it brought.

Scarlett O'Hara represents a class of Southerners who arose after the Civil War who raped the land (timber barons, clean cutting and leaving the land fit for nothing but kudzu) and who had no real connection to the agrarian and family values espoused by Gerald O'Hara. Think Enron here. Think Leona Helmsley. Folks who sit in the midst of chaos and devastation of an entire land and think only of their own material comfort.

And as for General P.G.T. Beauregard, as Cinda C. and I know (we've been reading bio of a truly great Southern leader---Scots-Irish, Presbyterian, a man who defied Virginia law to set up a Sunday School class and literacy instruction for African-American slaves, who could lead men to march 30 miles over mountains in the dark of night and a pouring rain and then give successful battle---Thomas J."Stonewall" Jackson), Beauregard flashed and dashed and faded fast when the crunch of war came.

I say this as a woman whose ancestors served in his command, as a native of Louisiana, and as the onetime owner of the best terrier known to our parts, General Pierre Gustave Beauregard, Suh, Ingram. We named our Beau for the head of the Fighting Tigers because he seemed a bit TOO feisty and impulsive, though we loved him dearly and in time came to value his noble and immeasurable devotion to our family.

Scarlett would have named her Beau for the fact that the waw-uh seemed such a grand and "glorious" affair to many Carolinians and to Gen. Beauregard, who did not foresee what Lee and Jackson foresaw. The former anticipated a 6-day war replete with bands and bunting.

Can any one of us imagine Scarlett making bedcovers? I think not.<g>

Even on our worst days, we're better women than she.

Now, what about the question Sally Ward raised about Scots Irish traditions in quilts/quilting? I went back and reread Fawn Volentine's remarks about the famous Margaret McKee Boggs quilt discovered during the West VA quilt documentation; also her notes on the long-staple Irish linen thread used to quilt the Gatewood quilt. But IS there a distinct Scots-Irish quilting tradition? In pattern choice? In quilting design?

Okay, so I admit it: I thought Scarlett had only one child to survive infancy, Bonny Blue.

Owned by a sturdy Louisiana rat terrier named Gen. Thomas J. Jackson, Gaye

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Subject: Re: update to the quilt study pages and misc question From: ARabara15@aol.com Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2003 19:31:05 EDT X-Message-Number: 14

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My understanding is that not all feeds were available in cotton printed feedsacks. The burlap was far to rough to become a domestic textile but farmers did reuse them for other things. Wrapping saplings or trunks of fruit trees etc. I still use gunny sacks for gardening and construction type things. They are stronger than plastic, do not rip as easily and are biodegradeable.

Donald Brokate Trenton, NJ

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Subject: Re: scarlett's kids From: ARabara15@aol.com Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2003 20:19:32 EDT X-Message-Number: 15

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Ladies, Husband #1 was Charles Hamilton- Melanie's brother, Ashley's sister was to marry him(her 1st cousin) Husband #2 was Kennedy, SueEllen's beau.

Scarlet was very busy, Donald Brokate

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Subject: GWTW From: Gloria Hanrahan <gloria@ak.net> Date: Tue, 02 Sep 2003 16:29:52 -0800 X-Message-Number: 16

After reading these posts, I'm going to have to break down and read this book. I always figured if you saw the movie, reading the book wasn't so much fun.

OK, off to the library.

Gloria in Alaska

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Subject: Re: update to the quilt study pages and misc question From: Marthapatches36@aol.com Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2003 20:39:08 EDT X-Message-Number: 17

Much feed came in burlap bags here in Western Washington. However, some chicken feed came in the cotton bags we now covet. My mother would take her burlap bags back to the feed store and trade them for the softer cotton bags. She made sheets, dishtowels and underwear for us with them. If she got the printed ones they served as tablecloths, headscarves etc. I don't remember having the printed ones until the late 40's and in the 50's. As I grew up I thought only rich people had whole "boughten'". If a section of sheet wore out she replaced it with another bag the same size, it was sewn together with flat feld seams. The underwear always had a lazydaisey embroidered on the front, usually in Pink. Then little kids could tell the front from the back. Memories in Puget Sound area. Martha

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Subject: Re: update to the quilt study pages and misc question From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Tue, 02 Sep 2003 20:56:42 -0400 X-Message-Number: 18

Printed feedsacks came out in mid-30s and on through 50s in rayons, ginghams, percales and quality muslins. They were a boon to Depression folk and the government encouraged using sacks to replenish fabric during WWII.

Marthapatches36@aol.com wrote:

> I don't remember having >the printed ones until the late 40's and in the 50's. As I grew up I thought >only rich people had whole "boughten'". If a section of sheet wore out she >replaced it with another bag the same size, it was sewn together with flat feld >seams. The underwear always had a lazydaisey embroidered on the front, usually >in Pink. Then little kids could tell the front from the back. Memories in >Puget Sound area. Martha > > > >

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Subject: Re: Scarlett, Rhett, & All That From: SaritaX@aol.com Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2003 21:24:39 EDT X-Message-Number: 19

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In a message dated 9/2/03 5:24:35 PM Central Daylight Time, gingram@tcainternet.com writes:

>

Wonderful! But will you now tell those who have not been to the South what kudzu it?

A daughter of the South (Arkansas and Louisiana) living in the great state of Texas, which is not the South!

Sarah O'K

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Subject: Re: Scarlett, Rhett, & All That From: Gaye Ingram <gingram@tcainternet.com> Date: Tue, 02 Sep 2003 21:28:18 -0700 X-Message-Number: 20

Well, Texas is a world unto itself, but we in North LA consider East Texas as part of the South. And perhaps Austin. And maybe Ft. Worth.

Kudzu is a a vine imported by the conservation service in the 1930's to prevent erosion. It either initially was brought to MS, AL, GA. or just found itself happiest there, for those areas are where it grows most prolifically. It's called the Foot-a-Day vine by many, for it grows almost that rapidly. It can take over a field in a matter of a week or so. When you drive along the interstate highways in these states, you can see it literally blanketing areas, sometimes even covering fair-sized trees. Very gothic look at twilight. Evidently reseeds itself rapidly and easily.

If you have an enemy you truly, desperately hate, sow a few kudzu in her/his lawn or flower beds.

Gaye

> From: SaritaX@aol.com > Reply-To: "Quilt History List" <qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.com> > Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2003 21:24:39 EDT > To: "Quilt History List" <qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.com> > Subject: [qhl] Re: Scarlett, Rhett, & All That > > In a message dated 9/2/03 5:24:35 PM Central Daylight Time, > gingram@tcainternet.com writes: > > >> > > Wonderful! But will you now tell those who have not been to the South what > kudzu it? > > A daughter of the South (Arkansas and Louisiana) living in the great state of > Texas, which is not the South! > > Sarah O'K > > > --- > You are currently subscribed to qhl as: gingram@tcainternet.com. > To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1442640C@lyris.quiltropolis.com >

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Subject: RE: update to the quilt study pages and misc question From: "Jocelyn" <jocelynm@delphiforums.com> Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2003 21:36:09 -0500 X-Message-Number: 21

Kris, Gunny sacks were used for items that needed to be stored dry, such as potatoes. The loose weave of the burlap allowed the potatoes to have air circulation. Grain, OTOH, that would be spoiled if it got wet, would be stored in a tighter-woven bag.

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Subject: RE: Blank Messages From: "Jocelyn" <jocelynm@delphiforums.com> Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2003 21:36:00 -0500 X-Message-Number: 22

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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Kris and all, I continue to get a lot of blank email messages. I'd previously talked with Kris about it, that the email would be blank, but when I hit 'reply', it would quote the email. Now, it's totally blank. This happened after I had to switch to POP3 instead of webmail, because of changes with my email provider. I'm getting quite a few blank QHL messages (like 1 in 3). This doesn't happen on any other email list. Does anyone have any ideas what's going on? Or what to do about it? It was happening on QHL before the change in the list address, as well.

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Subject: RE: scarlett's kids From: "Jocelyn" <jocelynm@delphiforums.com> Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2003 21:42:55 -0500 X-Message-Number: 23

> What happened to the baby born after the famous night Rhett > carried her up the stairs followed by her famous morning smile?? Was > that a miss?? > Think first hubby Hamilton first name was Charles.

I didn't think she actually got pregnant that night. I don't remember. :) Charles may be right. For some reason, the name Wade pops to mind- or was that a son she had with Frank??? The movie and the book differ on the number of kids, IIRC.

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Subject: k-k-k-kudzu! (as in " Atchoo!") From: "Patricia Magyar" <magyars@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2003 23:40:43 -0400 X-Message-Number: 24

Well y'all-Kudzu may be a noxious weed to some but when you can't beat 'em, eat 'em. Check out www.kudzukingdom.com or the Blythewood Kudzu festival (and the kudzu leaf-eating contest) to see how hardy Southerners cope with this imported vine. Personally I've heard from local types that kudzu can be very useful when needing to camouflage a still or disguise your uncle's ole rusty car and pass it off as 'yard art.' Just think of it as fast-growing horizontal topiary. Handmade kudzu baskets are beautiful, it's one of the hottest herbal supplements going (no claims here), and now it's being fried, boiled, and pickled. I'm making a quilt with a design of red vines growing all over the nice neat blue patchwork blocks. I just plucked some kudzu leaves and used them as applique templates! Cheers from the Carolina coast where we're happy that Fabian seems to be staying away and still wondering where Elvis went- Pepper

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Subject: RE: scarlett's kids From: Gaye Ingram <gingram@tcainternet.com> Date: Tue, 02 Sep 2003 22:44:47 -0700 X-Message-Number: 25

Okay, I admit defeat. Scarlett might be a wretched woman, but she's obviously got some power still. The chubby very pale and silly husband was indeed named Chas. Hamilton. There is no Wade in the book, though there is a Wade in S.C., Rhett's homeland----Gen. Wade Hampton, who would not have stepped into Scarlet web down in Middle Georgia.

Listen, Karen has it right: when we snatched those curtain down, we would immediately have been impressed with their potential as bedcoverings. Our fingers would have itched for needles and thread. This Scarlett girl is just that--scarlet, as Belle, the standard goodhearted Lady of the Evening well knew.

Now, let's get to those Scots Irish who transported the log cabin inland and defended the Alamo and----well, just lots of good things. Did they or did they not make a distinctive contribution to quilt history?

Inquiring minds want to know, gaye

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Subject: Compile List From: quiltpd@mi.cl Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 07:34:55 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

I always follow the conversation about the Underground Rail Road and the HIPV. I think someone made a compile list of reasons why HIPV it is close to a myth than history. I would like to have all the ideas that I have seen in this Digest refering this subject a little bit more organized. Any one can help? Thank you, Pilar Santiago, CHILE ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: September 02, 2003 From: Pat Kyser <patkyser@hiwaay.net> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 06:54:41 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Amen to Sarah O'K's comment that Texans are not Southerners. As a sixth=20=

generation Texan whose great grand pappy and all his brothers fought in=20=

The War, I thought I was. But in my forties, I moved to Alabama and=20 encountered the Real South. Texans are Texans, not Southerners. I also=20=

encountered kudzu here. I've seen it cover whole houses and an=20 abandoned line of old railroad cars. Am intrigued re: Scots/Irish quilt=20=

traditions. Hope we learn more as we chat. Pat

On Tuesday, September 2, 2003, at 11:00 PM, Quilt History List digest=20=

wrote:

> Subject: 19th century quilt poetry and prose > From: <mreich@attglobal.net> > Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2003 16:02:50 -0400 > X-Message-Number: 12 > > This article is an account of what must have been one of the most=20 > fabulous > exhibits of crazy quilts + ever seen. I had to read it over and over=20=

> again > to absorb its contents. This is, also, the first time values have = been > attached to finished quilts of the period. There must be photos of=20=

> this > event somewhere in the New York archives. There was a similar show=20 > that > preceded it in Boston. I have found one other reference to that show. > Here, we can really see what is meant by Crazy quilt M-A-N-I-A! (The > following does have misspellings, but I transcribed it exactly as it=20=

> was > printed.) sue reich > > =93The Marion Weekly Star > Marion, Ohio > Saturday, November 21, 1885 > > INSANE NEEDLEWORK > Crazy Covers, Scarfs and Collars, Shams and Quilts. > > Made by Men as Well As Women, Soldiers, > Serfs, Girls and Seamen =96 Autographs of > Noted Men and Scraps from Skirts > of Doted Women =96 All Crazy. > > New York, Nov 20. =96 If all the Japanese in Japan should set up all=20=

> night and > put together all their eccentric ideas of color in one complicate=20 > mass, they > couldn=92t get up anything more intricately distracting than the show = at > Masonic hall in West Twenty-third street. It looked as if somebody = had > shattered two-thousand rainbows and heaped the fragments into two=20 > thousand > different mounds of rich and wonderful color. The hall looked that = way > because it held the collection of art eccentricities and art beauties=20=

> that > make up the national crazy work and art needlework show. It was the=20=

> first > show of the kind that anybody ever had a chance to see in Gotham, and > devotees of crazy work had sent in crazy things from all over the=20 > country to > make it something that Gothamites wouldn=92t forget in a hurry. > The instant the doors were thrown open in the morning there was a=20 > blockade > of women at the box office. They all wanted to get the first view of=20=

> the > show. All day long the crush of women kept up inside. All the = theatre > seats had been taken out, and the exhibits were displayed in glass=20 > cases, > heaped on the stage and hung in alcoves behind polished brass railings=20=

> all > along the walls. Fred Kyle who ran the crazy show in Boston, was=20 > there to > keep things straightened out, and lots of pretty girls promenaded up=20=

> and > down behind the brass railings and explained the individual and=20 > collective > beauties of things to visitors who didn=92t fully understand what an=20=

> artistic > and admirable thing crazy work is. > There were nearly 2,500 things to look at, and no two were alike. =20=

> Nearly > all of them were crazy things, and crazy quilts were but a part. =20 > There were > crazy floor mats, crazy tidies, crazy scarfs, crazy table cloths, = crazy > screens, crazy lambrequins, crazy pillows, crazy shams, crazy collars,=20=

> crazy > mantel falls, crazy sofa covers, crazy panels, crazy hand bags, and=20 > crazy > aprons. > There were crazy catalogs to keep the visitors from losing their=20 > senses > trying to remember what they were looking at. There were lots and=20 > lots of > things that weren=92t crazy. Rows of pictures embroidered in wool = were=20 > ranged > along the edge of the crazy quilts, as well as bits of lace, rich old > tapestries, and heaps and heaps of needlework. > Crazy workers from six to eighty-four years old made the quilts. =20 > The best > one in the show is a $3,000 beauty that belongs Mrs. Theodore Moss. =20=

> The > late John McC (illegible) made her a present of it. He brought it = from > India. It is blue stain, lined with cream silk and covered with=20 > Kensington > embroidery, which was done in Japanese style by a Japanese boy. The > =93autograph quilt=94 is a $1,000 novelty in white satin with white = silk=20 > stars. > Every bit of silk bears an autograph written with pen and ink. Queen > Victoria, the Prince of Wales, Gladstone, and his wife, Disraeli, Gen. > Grant, President Cleveland, Cardinal Newman, Archdeacon Farrar, Edwin=20=

> Booth > and several hundred other notables contributed their signatures. Mrs. > Wright, of Minneapolis, exhibits it. A quilt that contains pieces of > dresses worn by the Empress Eugenia, Sara Jewett, Rose Coghlan, and a=20=

> dress > worn by the occupant of the White House is a third novelty. > Lots of the quilts are the work of gentlemen crazy workers. Among=20=

> these > is the one that took William G. Milligan, a soldier in the British=20 > army, two > and a half years to make. It consists of 8,700 tiny squares. Each=20 > square > was contributed by officers and soldiers in her majesty=92s service. = The > 8,700 pieces together are valued at $3,000. Gentlemen crazy workers=20=

> have > sent heaps of other specimens, too. They include satchels, hand bags, > handkerchiefs, rugs, and any number of other curious things. There is=20=

> a > picture of an eight-oared crew in a barge. George W. Johnson worked=20=

> it in > silk. There are a sofa cushion, chair back, a pin cushion, a pair of > slippers, and a lace pillow sham that a man made to make time drag = less > heavily on his hands while he was getting over an attack of sickness. =20=

> There > are also =93log cabin=94 quilts and pillow cases that men who were not=20=

> sick at > all spent midnight oil in getting into the requisite condition of=20 > craziness > to gain admission to the show list. > On the stage of the hall lay a rug that is said to have been made=20 > historic > by the fact that every needleful of thread used to make it was=20 > threaded by a > different slave. Hanging near by is a Turkish curtain that Sultan=20 > Perdhi > owned in 1582, and another that belonged to Sultan Hamed I, to whom it=20=

> was > presented by the Italian government it 1409. > There are curiosities among the beautiful things tucked into the = show > cases. One of them is a dress embroidered by hand. It took a lady=20 > eighteen > years to finish it. It was intended as a graduating dress for her=20 > daughter. > She became blind as a result of the task. > Among the lace is one tiny bit that goes back to Louis XIV=92s time,=20=

> and > once claimed Queen Christine of Spain as at owner. There is an=20 > embroidered > picture of St. Genevieve that it took the worker twenty-seven days to=20=

> make. > The peculiarity of it is, though, that the first day=92s work began=20 > 1852, and > it was thirty years later before the last day=92s work was completed. > One of the quilts of distractingly complicated design has 939 = pieces, > another 1,000, still another 1,449, and three others contain=20 > respectively > 3,164, 4,724, and 5,819 bits of material curiously combined. Miss=20 > Jennie > W. Pope, of this city was credited by Manager Kyle, with having=20 > exhibited > the handsomest bit of embroidery in the show. Her exhibit is a = flannel > skirt, made ornately beautiful by Kensington embroidery. > The show will probably be kept agoing night and day for eight weeks.=20=

> =93 > > > ----------------------------------------------------------------------

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Subject: Re: k-k-k-kudzu! (as in " Atchoo!") From: "Marcia Kaylakie" <marciark@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 07:25:43 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Well, I guess that puts legs on the old adage.."If you can't beat'em, join'em...eat'em, make art out of 'em, etc. etc.!" Marcia

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Subject: feedsack clarification & scarlet's kids From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 08:37:05 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

Re the introduction of printed feedsacks -- I did not word my thoughts very well. Printed sacks did appear as early as 1924 -- Gingham Girl patented by George Plant Milling Co. for exampe, but they were the rare exception and sack fabrics used were dress fabrics. The real push to grab consumers came during the early 30s when printed feedsacks took off. This was prompted by a booklet published by the Household Science Institute in Chicago in the late 1920s, Sewing with Flour Sacks. [Recycling Feedsacks, CSA Journal 1990, Lois Connelly]. Anna Lue Cook gives vague dating re printed feedsacks in her book Textile Bags stating that "sometime during the 1920s or early 30s the bag manufacturers began to make the figured or dress print textile bags..... popularity reaching its peak during the 30s-50s." Sorry if I mislead anyone.

Re Scarlett's kids ---- wasn't there a baby born or at least a pregnancy following the famous climbing the stairs scene with a vehement Scarlett beating Rhett as he carried her followed by her famous smile of satisfaction the following morning??

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Subject: Re: GWTW From: Judy Roche <jrocheq@pil.net> Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 09:15:20 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Gloria--don't read--have it read to you on tape as you sew-- wonderful---! Judy Roche

Gloria Hanrahan wrote:

>After reading these posts, I'm going to have to break down and read this >book. I always figured if you saw the movie, reading the book wasn't so >much fun. > >OK, off to the library. > >Gloria in Alaska > > >--- >You are currently subscribed to qhl as: jrocheq@pil.net. >To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1458669E@lyris.quiltropolis.com > > > >

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Subject: Mrs. Keckley From: "jajb" <anne_j@worldnet.att.net> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 06:54:24 -0700 X-Message-Number: 6

Thanks everyone for all the Keckley information. I now have her correct spelling and several references. I even have the 1995 Uncoverings in the smattering of the journals that I own. I must have bought it for other articles as I hadn't read the Ruth Finely article yet.

I just found the entire 1868 book that Keckley wrote at http://149.123.1.7/dynaweb/digs/wwm9713/@Generic__BookTextView/67;cd=3;td=2; pt=56

I love the title.

BEHIND THE SCENES.

BY ELIZABETH KECKLEY, FORMERLY A SLAVE, BUT MORE RECENTLY MODISTE, AND FRIEND TO MRS. ABRAHAM LINCOLN. OR, THIRTY YEARS A SLAVE, AND FOUR YEARS IN THE WHITE HOUSE.

Judy Anne

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Subject: parachute silk From: "McShannock, Linda" <linda.mcshannock@mnhs.org> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 10:10:36 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

I have in this collection at the Minnesota Historical Society, a wedding gown from post-WWII that is made of "parachute nylon", not from an actual parachute, but sold as fashionable yard goods at a local department store. I am looking for evidence that marketing it as "parachute nylon" gave it a particular cache'. I know that nylon was a popular and fashionable fabric newly available after the war, but I'm not versed in how nylon was marketed. The fabric in this particular dress is not parachute weight, but a nylon faille. I'm very curious about this donor's memory that it was labeled "parachute nylon" and that she chose it because it was new and unusual.

-----Original Message----- From: Quilt History List digest [mailto:qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.com] Sent: Tuesday, September 02, 2003 11:01 PM To: qhl digest recipients Subject: qhl digest: September 02, 2003

This message uses a character set that is not supported by the Internet Service. To view the original message content, open the attached message. If the text doesn't display correctly, save the attachment to disk, and then open it using a viewer that can display the original character set.

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Subject: Many topics From: Palampore@aol.com Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 11:33:33 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

Someone from Dana, Illinois needs a redwork signature quilt that is on Ebay. (This is not my quilt.) I am just a sentimental slob who thinks this quilt should go back to the Christian Church in Dana. If this church still exists they would love to buy it back I bet..... (I put in a bid to donate it, but they want more.) I recently received a new magazine in the mail---Vintage Fashion Magazine. It is pricey ($50 for 6 issues), but very nicely done. Just thought you fabric feelers might be interested. fashionreporting@aol.com If NC members are interested in a "group grope" of quilts I will volunteer my studio for a site to meet. How about a regional meeting for AQSG in late Feb.? Let me hear from you. (I know Pepper has begun the process. She and I will coordinate.) Off and running before the tropical storm rains begin tomorrow. Thank goodness we are not going to get a full hit. My 16 yr. old son is delighted to get good waves! I promise to have pictures up of the orange quilts within one week. I have now made a promise of a set time, so I will have to stop procrastinating. Lynn Lancaster Gorges Textile Conservator Historic Textiles Studio New Bern, NC

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Subject: Scarlett & "that night" From: "Lisa Erlandson" <quilter@cooke.net> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 08:21:19 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

After Scarlett was swept up the stairs by Rhett, she became pregnant and informed him when he returned from one of his trips (as a gunrunner?) He made a comment about hoping she and the father would be very happy or something implying infidelity and she tried to slap him, lost her footing and fell down the aforementioned staircase, causing a miscarriage. Rhett -of course- felt horrible, but she calls out for Ashley during her delirium - and that was basically the icing on the cake for Rhett. This is shortly before Melanie dies, etc. at the end of the book. For those of you who haven't read the book - do so - it is a great look at the south and re-reading as an adult, you find references to the daily lives of the women that you probably wouldn't have noticed in your pre-quilt historian days. Lisa - a Texan with Southern Belle roots

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Subject: Scots Irish From: "Jan Drechsler" <quiltdoc@sover.net> Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 12:20:16 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

Gaye, exactly what is a 'Scots Irish'? Are you referring to a mixed religious breed of Protestant Scots and Catholic Irishmen and women? Those people who on their own separate islands in Great Britain know they are superior to the other? :)

Goodness, from one so very particular about southern history and territory, I should expect a more delicate approach. Even their respective languages, Scottish gaelic and Irish gaelic evolved differently. Their tradional music of jigs and reels is markedly different (to the musical ear) and certainly many other social and cultural norms. For example, the Scottish men like to paint their faces blue and toss large logs in very hot weather!!! Scots Irish indeed!!!

Joking aside, I don't quite understand your question since it seems so broad. After extensive research, gained by hours of reading signs on I-81, and noting town names such as 'Scotland', many parts of the Appalachians were heavily settled by Scots. And the Appalachians, also a long band of mountains, have a quilting history documented in state documentation books.

Take us a little further in what you specifically are thinking about.

Jan, with her Highland tongue planted firmly in cheek!

-- Jan Drechsler in Vermont Quilt Restoration; Quilting teacher www.sover.net/~bobmills

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Subject: Re: parachute silk From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 12:34:29 -0400 X-Message-Number: 11

Nylon was marketed as yardage and RTW, most of it horrible stuff. Nylon tricot blouses and slips yellowed very quickly; nylon yardage frayed by the second; thread to sew on it was not suitable, causing puckers. Some nylon as in housecoats and more like parachutes, stiffened after washing or wrinkled so badly it was impossible to get creases out. Some nylons turned flimsy and wispy after washing, causing static. Parachutes were advertised in many magazines, some the actual silk used at beginning of war, for sewing garments and proved to be a popular seller. If I remember correctly there were different grades of parachute nylon, some excellent quality, others not so hot. I have an ad from early 50s which I'll post to eboard.

McShannock, Linda wrote:

>I have in this collection at the Minnesota Historical Society, a wedding >gown from post-WWII that is made of "parachute nylon", not from an actual >parachute, but sold as fashionable yard goods at a local department store. >I am looking for evidence that marketing it as "parachute nylon" gave it a >particular cache'. I know that nylon was a popular and fashionable fabric >newly available after the war, but I'm not versed in how nylon was marketed. >The fabric in this particular dress is not parachute weight, but a nylon >faille. I'm very curious about this donor's memory that it was labeled >"parachute nylon" and that she chose it because it was new and unusual. > > > >

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Subject: Re: Scots Irish From: Countrycupboard7@aol.com Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 12:51:50 EDT X-Message-Number: 12

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My mother's family was Scotch/Irish. In other words, Irish who were Protestant. trudy

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Subject: Re: Scots Irish From: Jackie Joy <joysbees@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 10:00:25 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 13

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Jan Drechsler <quiltdoc@sover.net> wrote: [E]xactly what is a 'Scots Irish'?

It is a Scottish Protestant who resettled (or was resettled) in Northern Ireland. There are Scots Irish in my ancestry, also.

Jackie Joy

--------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software --0-1906613685-1062608425=:70548--

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Subject: Re: Scots Irish From: Kittencat3@aol.com Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 13:12:34 -0400 X-Message-Number: 14

I believe there's also some connection to the Scots who were resettled in Ireland after the Battle of the Boyne in the late 17th century as a way of producing loyal non-Catholic Irish for the British crown. A lot of them emigrated to what is now the United States in the 18th century, and the descendants of others are now the Protestants in Northern Ireland.

Of course, this may be wrong, and I'd welcome any corrections...

Lisa Evans Easthampton Massachusetts

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Subject: Re: Scarlett, Rhett, & All That From: Jackie Joy <joysbees@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 10:28:58 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 15

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I knew I had grown up when I realized that it was Melanie Hamilton Wilkes who was the true heroine of GWTW, and not Scarlett. And yes, I can see Melanie piecing a quilt top.

Jackie Joy

Gaye Ingram wrote:

"But may I remind us all that Margaret Mitchell did not mean for Scarlett to be admired, something the book makes plainer than the movie? . . .She was no fit role model, and Mitchell said that repeatedly, though no one seemed inclined to listen."

"Can any one of us imagine Scarlett making bedcovers? I think not."

--------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software --0-286188007-1062610138=:37397--

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Subject: Parachute fabric From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 13:40:50 -0400 X-Message-Number: 16

1950 ad for both silk and nylon parachute fabric now on eboard. http://vintagepictures.eboard.com general tab

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Subject: RE: Parachute fabric From: "Candace Perry" <candace@schwenkfelder.com> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 14:22:34 -0400 X-Message-Number: 17

At the Textile History Forum I attended in August, Katherine Dirks of the National Museum of American History presented a paper titled "Airplanes, Balloons and Cartridge Bags: A Few Fabrics of WWI." She discussed the uses of excess military linen and silk that was sold after the war. It was a fascinating lecture!

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Subject: Obituary of Scarlett's husband From: "Carol H. Elmore" <celmore@ksu.edu> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 15:39:03 -0500 X-Message-Number: 18

I can't say that I've read Gone with the Wind but I do read the NY Times. Today's midwest edition p. A17 has an obituary for Rand Brooks who played Scarlett's husband Charles Hamilton in the movie Gone with the Wind. He wasn't particularly proud of his portrayal.

All students at Kansas State University pay a fee for subscriptions to several newspapers. If we get to the machines in time in the morning we can get "free" copies of several newspapers. The New York Times is one of them. It's a small perc for being a student again.

Carol Elmore AQS Appraiser and K-State student

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Subject: NYT, Quilt & Obituary of Scarlett's husband From: "Anita Grossman Solomon" <solo57@worldnet.att.net> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 17:05:06 -0400 X-Message-Number: 19

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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From: Carol H. Elmore [mailto:celmore@ksu.edu]=20 >I can't say that I've read Gone with the Wind but I do read the NY = Times.

In my copy of the Times, front page, under the masthead, was a photo of = Ms. Jessica Porter, 19 of Hudson Falls, Fla, who is making a quilt for = every family who lost a relative in Iraq.=20

I don't think I've ever seen a quilter, a quilt, a sewing machine, a = serger and spools of thread displayed together, let alone so prominently, in = the Times. I did a search, the image is a bit different in the online = version.=20 Anita/NYC

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Subject: Re: A question for you textile experts From: "Sherry" <smassey@ok-history.mus.ok.us> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 16:52:04 -0700 X-Message-Number: 20

Trudy,

I have posed your question to our textiles curator and she suggested that if it is new material, not antique, of course, and is on an area that will not show, try Energine or Imperial cleaner. They are solvents and should remove the fusing residue.

Sherry Massey ----- Original Message ----- From: <Countrycupboard7@aol.com> To: "Quilt History List" <qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Saturday, August 30, 2003 7:17 AM Subject: [qhl] A question for you textile experts

> This isn't quilt but textile related. I was ironing the blank areas on a > hand embroidered sampler for my daughter and some fusing material that I didn't > realize was on my iron left a couple of reminders on the sampler. It is on the > outside part; but if I take off that area it will be an odd size to frame. > Any ideas on how to remove the fusing residue? trudy > > > --- > You are currently subscribed to qhl as: smassey@ok-history.mus.ok.us. > To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1469008N@lyris.quiltropolis.com >

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Subject: Re: A question for you textile experts From: Countrycupboard7@aol.com Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 18:14:23 EDT X-Message-Number: 21

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Thanks so much, Sherry. I'll try this. All that handwork! trudy p.s.- I've cleaned my iron, lolol

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Subject: Parachute silk memories From: "Patricia Magyar" <magyars@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 18:52:16 -0400 X-Message-Number: 22

This is my second post in two days-must be the oncoming full moon. In certain circles during the war, my Mom said, parachute silk dresses were very chic, rather patriotic. But maybe you had to have a service man boyfriend who worked in the chute packing shed! After the war, you could purchase real parachutes for very cheap--accounts for the canopy for the backyard reception at my first marriage--a huge silk cargo chute, in orange and white sections, that hung suspended from the enormous pecan and magnolia trees. I was decked out in a home-sewn wedding dress of flowing multicolored flowered polyester chiffon, coifed with a crown of blue hydrangeas, accessorized with dainty white sandals and a long hand-woven belt of green ribbons. Another of Mother's maxims applies here: "Your taste is in your mouth, Pepper!" Small wonder I grew up to make scrap quilts that make coordinated folks cringe. Pepper on the Carolina coast

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Subject: Re: scarlett's kids From: Judi Fibush <judi@fibush.net> Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 16:58:27 -0700 X-Message-Number: 23

She miscarried on that one as I recall.

>

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Subject: Re: GWTW From: Judi Fibush <judi@fibush.net> Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 16:59:45 -0700 X-Message-Number: 24

Oh the book is so much better!

> >

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Subject: RE: scarlett's kids From: Judi Fibush <judi@fibush.net> Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 17:02:01 -0700 X-Message-Number: 25

I still think that Beau was one of the twins that wanted to marry Scarlett at her 18th birthday party. The twins were supposed to be gorgeous and dumb. Charles sounds right to me and I can't find my book anymore! Boo Hoo

Judi

> >

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Subject: RE: Obituary of Scarlett's husband From: "Jocelyn" <jocelynm@delphiforums.com> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 19:00:18 -0500 X-Message-Number: 26

Carol, That's true at KU, too. But I can still get a paper on the way to the bus stop in the afternoon. :) I don't know if that means that at KU, the program is better organized so that there's always enough papers for everyone, or if KSU students read more newspapers. <G> (For those who don't know, KU and KSU are vigorous rivals in just about everything. Take any derogatory college joke, and it's been told by the students of one university about the students at the other. With the exception of Aggie jokes, which are only told on KSU, since it's the Ag college. :)) > > All students at Kansas State University pay a fee for > subscriptions to several > newspapers. If we get to the machines in time in the morning we can get > "free" copies of several newspapers. The New York Times is one > of them.

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Subject: RE: Parachute silk memories From: "Jocelyn" <jocelynm@delphiforums.com> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 19:00:19 -0500 X-Message-Number: 27

> trees. I was decked out in a home-sewn wedding dress of flowing > multicolored flowered polyester chiffon, coifed with a crown of blue hydrangeas,

My sister knows an artist who was an Italian war bride. She was reduced to using worn-out sheets for 'canvas' during the war, and the beautiful cathedral in which she'd always dreamed of marrying was bombed during the war. There was no money for a wedding dress, so the wedding was quite simple. In her home, over the mantel, hangs a picture of her and her husband, standing at the altar of the pre-war cathedral, and she is wearing a beautiful, ornate wedding gown. She said that after about 30 years of marriage, it hit her she COULD have the dream wedding after all. :) She also started a picture of Jesus and the little children, originally painting a multiethnic group of children. She made the mistake, though, of using her first grandchild as a model. After that, she had to keep repainting it with each successive grandchild, so that now, all of them bear a family resemblence. <G>

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Subject: RE: scarlett's kids From: "Jocelyn" <jocelynm@delphiforums.com> Date: 

Those were the Tarleton twins. Someone settle the bet for Judi and me, 'cause I'm still sure that Beau was Charles' son. <G> I may be wrong- but I'm certain! <G>

> -----Original Message----- > From: Judi Fibush [mailto:judi@fibush.net] > Sent: Wednesday, September 03, 2003 7:02 PM > To: Quilt History List > Subject: [qhl] RE: scarlett's kids > > > I still think that Beau was one of the twins that wanted to marry > Scarlett at her 18th birthday party. The twins were supposed to be > gorgeous and dumb. Charles sounds right to me and I can't find my book > anymore! Boo Hoo > > Judi > > > > > > > > > --- > You are currently subscribed to qhl as: jocelynm@delphiforums.com. > To unsubscribe send a blank email to > leave-qhl-1442652W@lyris.quiltropolis.com

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Subject: RE: scarlett's kids From: Judi Fibush <judi@fibush.net> Date: Wed, 03 Sep 

Well at least I got the sister right and the miscarriage. You were right about the Tarleton twins names. I know Scarlett was married to Charles but never thought she had a child with him. someone settle this for us. <G>

Judi

> > > >

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Subject: catalogue available for hexagon exhibition in France From: ZegrtQuilt@aol.com Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 20:26:31 EDT X-Message-Number: 30

For immediate release:

Catalogue available for purchase Mosaic Textiles: In search of the Hexagon

Two exciting patchwork exhibitions opened on May 16, 2003 in Normandy, near=20 Rouen, France. The catalogue, written in French, is now available for purcha= se.

The first, an exhibition of historical patchwork pieces with the hexagon=20 motif, includes 50 examples from nine countries of the Western world (Franc= e,=20 United Kingdom, U.S., Netherlands, Sweden, Switzerland, Australia,=20 Norway,Denmark) These "Mosaiques d'Etoffes" (fabric mosaics in English) date= from the early=20 1800's to the 1930's and have never been gathered together by a museum in=20 France or anywhere else in the world. This exhibition is being presented in the superb Mus=E9e des Traditions et A= rts=20 Normands housed in the Chateau de Martainville.

This exhibition is curated and the catalogue prepared by noted French textil= e=20 expert Janine Janniere, a member of the prestigious textile organization=20 Centre International d'Etudes des Textiles Anciens (C.I.E.T.A). The purpose=20= of=20 this exceptional gathering of historical pieces and its accompanying catalog= ue is=20 to allow a better understanding of the evolution of techniques and styles in= =20 mosaic piecework in European countries but also in the western world. The=20 catalogue includes the story of Janine's discovery of the early 19th century= bed=20 with its bedcoverings using French printed fabrics from several manufactures= .=20 Ms. Janniere initially published an article on this research in The Magazine= =20 Antiques in December 1995,The bed discovery in 1990 was the impetus for her= to=20 look at the possibility of patchwork traditions in other countries where no= ne=20 had been uncovered to date.. Her research on mosaic quilts is presented in=20 the catalogue as well as chapters on some of the other countries are written= by=20 such experts as Dorothy Osler, An Moonen and Annette Gero. . All of the quil= ts=20 in the exhibition are pictured in color in this exceptionally high quality=20 catalogue=20 =20 At the same time in a nearby regional museum, le Mus=E9e Industriel de La=20 Corderie Vallois, there is an exhibition of contemporary hexagon quilts sele= cted by=20 France Patchwork (The French Quilt Guild).These textiles were chosen from a= =20 national contest organized on the hexagon pattern. It is of interest to see=20 the current expressions of this historical motif which has inspired so many=20 women in Great-Britain and the rest of the western world..40 of the 80 quilt= s were=20 selected for inclusion in the catalogue.

To order the catalogue: send 33euros (20e plus 12.80 shipping.) by=20 International postal money order only to: payee=20 Monsieur le Regisseur des Musees Departementaux de la Seine Maritime=20 Postal address Conseil G=E9n=E9ral de la Seine Maritime Regisseur des Musees Departementaux=20 1, Quai Jean Moulin 76101 Rouen Cedex France Shipping is by air-it should take approximately one week. There are no other= =20 options for the shipping.Enclose an additional 4 euros for registration shou= ld=20 you wish to do so. For more information email:agnes.gomes-peixoto@cg76.fr

The 2 exhibitions are open from May 16- October 27 2003 Hours of visit: Mus=E9e des Traditions et Arts Normands au Chateau de Martainville: Everyday, except Tuesday ,from 1Oh-12h30 AM, and from 2PM-6PM (closed on=20 Sunday morning). Tel: 33-(0)2 35 23 44 70 Mus=E9e Indusqtriel de la Corderie Vallois: Every day from 1h30PM to 6PM tel: 33-(0)2 35 74 35 35 =20

Shelly Zegart zegrtquilt@aol.com 502-897-7566 <A 

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Subject: Searching for Stifel From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 20:34:25 -0400 X-Message-Number: 31

If you have Stifel calicoes, indigoes or other fabric, labels, ads, etc., please contact me privately.

 

 

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