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Quilters Find a way to care

: JBQUILTOK@aol.com Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2003 05:36:58 EDT X-Message-Number: 1

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I've never seen this pattern before, but wish I had before I pitched the pile of equilateral triangles I cut a few years ago & then got tired of sewing together!

Janet

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Subject: UGRR Rebuttals & St Charles From: "Teddy Pruett" <aprayzer@hotmail.com> Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2003 10:43:12 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

I was pleased to see Sue's request for info on rebuttals to the UGRR baloney. To my horror, I've recently found out that the guest speaker at my guilds upcoming annual show (small) will be talking about this very thing. I will try so hard to be good and be nice, and keep my mouth shut and sit on my hands and all that, but I, too, wish I had the time to read all the materials and find a few short, specific statements that would succinctly relay my feelings about the matter. Who has time to read??? Not me!

BTW, while I have your attention, let me tell you that I've just returned home from a working vacation to St. Charles, MO, where they celebrated the second year of their new annual show, Quilts on Main. Because there was a Civil War encampment there the same weekend, I was asked to give my lecture on the effects of the war of northern aggression on the quilts and textiles of the women of the South. It sold out early, so I actually gave it twice, and followed with "Other People's FLeas". All lectures were sold out far in advance, so I would determine that they have a quilt-hungry audience. Either that, or everyone just wanted a place to sit down. Well, let me tell you, these lectures are the antithesis of one another. We were all bawling and teary eyed at the first two, and crying tears of hysterical laughter at the latter. The audience was amazing - and rowdy, and fun. Oh well. Never bored. But St. Charles' historic district is a not-to-be-missed destination. Just delightful. I was treated like a queen, every need anticipated by my hosts at the B&B, and I left walking on air. Just to arrive home and realize I still had to clean the toilets...........Teddy Pruett, Lake City, FL, wondering about Isabel

_________________________________________________________________ Need more e-mail storage? Get 10MB with Hotmail Extra Storage. http://join.msn.com/?PAGE=features/es

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Subject: Re: solid repro colors From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421@comcast.net> Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2003 14:26:41 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Hi Jan -

This isn't Don, but I'd love to see you samples of the complete selection of solids -- the samples you mentioned -- so if he isn't coming, could you bring them anyway. The only 30s solids I have are Marcus Brothers. Thanks, Barb

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Subject: Re: UGRR Rebuttals & St Charles From: Gaye Ingram <gingram@tcainternet.com> Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2003 16:32:17 -0700 X-Message-Number: 4

> From: "Teddy Pruett" <aprayzer@hotmail.com> > Reply-To: "Quilt History List" <qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.com> > Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2003 10:43:12 -0400 > To: "Quilt History List" <qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.com> > Subject: [qhl] UGRR Rebuttals & St Charles > > I was pleased to see Sue's request for info on rebuttals to the UGRR > baloney.

Now, Teddy dear, you really MUST learn to speak your mind.

<g>Gaye

Subject: UGRR Rebuttals From: "Pilar Donoso" <quiltpd@mi.cl> Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2003 08:15:05 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Dear Teddy:

About a week ago I asked this list if someone had a "compile" list against the myth of HIPV and the UGRR, because I don´t have too much time for searching myself. I did not received an answer, but I found out the Critique of Mr. Giles R. Wright a good way to start.

Check: http://www.historiccamdencounty.com/ccnews11.shtml and then read Mr Wright´s critique

Pilar Santiago, Chile

> Subject: UGRR Rebuttals & St Charles > From: "Teddy Pruett" <aprayzer@hotmail.com> > Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2003 10:43:12 -0400 > X-Message-Number: 2 > > I was pleased to see Sue's request for info on rebuttals to the UGRR > baloney. To my horror, I've recently found out that the guest speaker at my > guilds upcoming annual show (small) will be talking about this very thing. > I will try so hard to be good and be nice, and keep my mouth shut and sit on > my hands and all that, but I, too, wish I had the time to read all the > materials and find a few short, specific statements that would succinctly > relay my feelings about the matter. Who has time to read??? Not me! >

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Subject: Re: UGRR Rebuttals From: Judy Schwender <sister3603@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2003 06:24:37 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

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Pillar- My apologies, I missed your inquiry. Here's a posting from a while back. I have an HIPV folder on my computer desktop that I save items relating to this thorny question, and Alice's reply has proven most useful time and time again. Giles Wright's persuasive article should be saved to everyone's desktop! Judy

In reply to Fawn's request for information on the false claims about quilts and the Underground Railroad, these are some websites I discovered when I did some recent research. I know many of you have explored this topic in depth, but hope some of this is information you don't already have. Alice Kober apkober@earthlink.net

http://www.fortunecity.com/victorian/magenta/14/id16.htm > The author of the website for Hart Cottage Quilts presents arguments against the idea that quilts were used as codes for runaway slaves, supporting the argument with quotes from several historians who doubt the story. The author shows examples of the different quilt designs supposedly used along the Underground Railroad and discusses how some of them weren't yet created during the days of slavery. > > > http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/UNDERGROUND-RR/2002-03/1017160716 > Historian Christopher Densmore, Curator of the Friends Historical Library at Swarthmore College, states that the idea of quilts being used as secret signals to runaway slaves is implausible and presents numerous reasons why he does not support the theory presented by the authors of Hidden in Plain View. >

> http://www.antiquequiltdating.com/ugrr.html > Kimberly Wulfert, PhD, begins her article, "To many of us, the use of quilts as messengers on the Underground Railroad (UGRR) is a myth. It cannot be proven through recorded historical documents or defendable oral history." She goes on to discuss why she discounts the theory. >

> http://historiccamdencounty.com/ccnews11.shtml > Historian Giles R. Wright, New Jersey's top authority on Camden's black history, is cited as "New Jersey's Underground Railroad Myth-Buster." He states that fewer than one percent of all slaves went north after they escaped-most stayed in the south. Wright claims that the book presents a very appealing idea, but it is based on "sheer conjecture and speculation." >

Pilar Donoso <quiltpd@mi.cl> wrote: Dear Teddy:

About a week ago I asked this list if someone had a "compile" list against the myth of HIPV and the UGRR, because I don´t have too much time for searching myself. I did not received an answer, but I found out the Critique of Mr. Giles R. Wright a good way to start.

Check: http://www.historiccamdencounty.com/ccnews11.shtml and then read Mr Wright´s critique

Pilar Santiago, Chile

> Subject: UGRR Rebuttals & St Charles > From: "Teddy Pruett" > Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2003 10:43:12 -0400 > X-Message-Number: 2 > > I was pleased to see Sue's request for info on rebuttals to the UGRR > baloney. To my horror, I've recently found out that the guest speaker at my > guilds upcoming annual show (small) will be talking about this very thing. > I will try so hard to be good and be nice, and keep my mouth shut and sit on > my hands and all that, but I, too, wish I had the time to read all the > materials and find a few short, specific statements that would succinctly > relay my feelings about the matter. Who has time to read??? Not me! >

--- You are currently subscribed to qhl as: sister3603@yahoo.com. To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1442697G@lyris.quiltropolis.com

--------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software --0-52607136-1063459477=:13893--

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Subject: Re: UGRR Rebuttals From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421@comcast.net> Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2003 14:06:35 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Yesterday at my local Quilt Guild Meeting I saw a very disturbing poster and wondered if others have seen it.

A woman brought in a poster that her daughter who lives in Alaska and works for the Forestry Service had sent her. It was titled "Women's Quilts and the Underground Railroad" and featured either 9 or 12 blocks and their meanings according to HIPV. I know there were 3 columns of quilt blocks, but I don't remember if there were 3 or 4 rows. I didn't get to study the poster as everyone exclaimed over how beautiful it was, but I do remember churn dash, bear's paw and something that meant go over the Appalachian Mts. Each block was in color, named, with an explanation below it. I think it also said something about making a sampler to learn the meanings -- I wasn't able to study it (darn) <grin>.

At the bottom it said Sponsored by NE/NA Civil Rights Committee and Civil Rights Eastern Region Multicultural Team. The U.S. Forest Service name and emblem were also printed along the bottom. I don't know anything about these organizations, but it appears our government is continuing to aggressively promote the concept.

Has anyone else seen this poster?

Barb in rainy southeastern PA

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Subject: Convention in October From: "Vera Brown" <ilene3@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2003 17:05:46 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

Hi, I would like more info about the upcoming ISMAC convention in Charlotte, NC. Like the hours open on each day and how much to attend and can you pay at the event for the day? And where it will be held in Charlotte? Thanks. Ilene Brown Raleigh, NC

Vera Brown ilene3@earthlink.net Why Wait? Move to EarthLink.

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Subject: QHF Documentary - long From: KareQuilt@aol.com Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2003 17:48:23 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

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Subject: websiite correction From: KareQuilt@aol.com Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2003 19:54:57 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

I did not type the QHF website address correctly in the press release I just posted. Many of you savvy internet folks may have caught that immediately. The crrected address is below.

Karen Alexander

QHF WEBSITE: http://www.quiltershalloffame.org

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Subject: Wonderful things in New Jersey (long) From: "Cinda Cawley" <lrcawley@dmv.com> Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2003 22:30:13 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

Went with Nancy Hahn to see the quilt exhibit at the New Jersey State Museum in Trenton. My oft stated rule is "If you wouldn't hesitate to drive 10 miles to see one beautiful quilt, it only makes sense to drive 300 if you can see 30." Well, I might have to make that 15 miles because I drove 380 miles (roundtrip) to Trenton and there were 27 quilts. It was wonderful. Thanks Judy Roche and Judy Grow for telling me about it. It is such a shame that the Museum failed to publicize the exhibit where quilters would learn about it. There was hardly anybody else there during the nearly two hours that Nancy and I lingered over the quilts and the exhibit closes tomorrow. I have only been able to find one of the quilts in any of my books, a 1983 catalogue from the Morris Museum called New Jersey Quilters: A Timeless Tradition, p. 14: eight appliqued teardrop shapes (all turkey reds-this exhibit is a turkey red-lovers heaven.), signed in the centers, set on the diagonal with narrow strips of a floral fondue fabric (put together to give the appearance of being woven). The inking on this quilt, as on many of the others, is exceptionally varied and interesting. It was a presentation piece to a teacher from her students. Most of the quilts are signature or albums and we could actually get close enough (albeit with many reprimands from the guards) to decipher the inscriptions. My favorite was a Caesars Crown of turkey reds and that crazy green (Judy Grow very aptly calls it "pistachio green"--we really do need to agree on a color vocabulary). There were some real puzzles about the construction of that quilt. The Crowns were appliqued to the background, but the background blocks had diagonal seams as if each was put together from four triangles. Why on earth would anybody do this? Two of the quilts have a border completely new to us, a combination of reverse applique scallop and dog tooth. The Museum did a great job of pointing out the stylistic peculiarities of New Jersey quilts. Read the New Jersey book to see what those are. There were a couple of dating problems resulting from a too ready acceptance of inked dates while ignoring fabrics of obviously later date. However, I was pretty generally impressed by the signage (my current hobby horse). The labels were concise, yet still gave information that led the viewer into the object, pointing out details of each quilt that made you want to study it closely. I don't understand why museum people do not take a few simple steps to "fill the pews" Not just quilt magazines, but all special interest publications, have events calendars which are free and give you a chance to reach an interested audience. All it takes is a call to the reference dept. of the public library or a few minutes online and you'd have a list of address (this is assuming you don't know a single quilter; one of us would probably say "I'll have a list to you by the end of the day."). I had a delicious experience (topped off by a chili dog on the way home); I just wish more of you had been able to share it. Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: NJ State Museum show From: "judygrow" <judygrow@patmedia.net> Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2003 22:56:05 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

Cinda,

I am so glad you got to see this show. When Barb G. and I were there we lingered over that quilt that the students of Hannah Hoyt made. We scribbled down almost every saying as well, including the longer poem in the center. The workmanship was remarkable, and the block, using those tear-drop shapes to form a star was unknown to me. Sue R. and I went again a few weeks later -- that's when we lost her in downtown Trenton.

The inking on all those quilts was remarkable, but especially on the Caesar's Crown. There were so many decorative elements surrounding the signatures. That was my absolute favorite too, and not at all like the typical NJ quilt of the period.

I'd love to know what you and Nancy made of the quilt that contained the silhouette block of the horse "Simon". There were two dates on it, either 1854 or 71 but definitely 1903 in the center block large as life. Many of the fabrics were fresh and new looking, as though they hadn't ever been washed, and seemed to be very late 19th century, but the signatures looked as though they had been washed to death -- not just faded from light exposure.

I wrote a long rant letter to two friends active in NJ preservation about the museum not only not getting the word out about the show, but also refusing a respected quilt researcher access to the quilts. One friend has written back that no notice was ever received by Preservation New Jersey, or the East Amwell Historic Preservation Committee.

She also said that she has that kind of trouble when she tries to do research at the Hunterdon County Historical Society. They really do believe it's their "STUFF".

And yet, the Burlington County Historical Society couldn't have been more friendly and receptive to quilters than they have been. I think it must just be whoever is in power at the moment.

If those in our own state who would be most interested in a show of historic artifacts of any kind were not notified, then why was the show mounted -- with our tax dollars. One would think that a state that is cutting millions of dollars that normally go to the arts would welcome a huge turnout to a State Museum for a special show.

Candace, I sure wish you would weigh in on this.

Judy in Ringoes, NJ judygrow@patmedia.net

Message-Number: 1

A simple to email to the NJ State Guild or emails to the shops listed there would have been lots of free publicity for them.

Debbie Quilting Possibilities Bayville, NJ

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Subject: re: Caesar's Crown question From: "Patricia L. Cummings" <quiltersmuse@comcast.net> Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2003 06:04:20 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Cinda wrote:

My favorite was a Caesars Crown of turkey reds and that crazy green (Judy Grow very aptly calls it "pistachio green"--we really do need to agree on a color vocabulary). There were some real puzzles about the construction of that quilt. The Crowns were appliqued to the background, but the background blocks had diagonal seams as if each was put together from four triangles. Why on earth would anybody do this?

I recently made a Caesar's Crown block to illustrate an article about Bible Blocks. Funny, while making the block, it occurred to me that it would have been a lot easier to appliqué the main unit onto a background square than to do the circular piecing needed to join the design area to each of four corners.

At any rate, the block is aptly categorized as one for "advanced" quilters.

Thanks for the account about the exhibit, Cinda. Wish we could have seen it.

Pat

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Subject: alternative payment methods for the Hexagon catalogue From: ZegrtQuilt@aol.com Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2003 14:20:00 EDT X-Message-Number: 3

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From Janine Janniere re=A0 payment for the Hexagon catalogue from the=20 exhibition in Normandy, France

I called Agnes Gomes , she's the treasurer of the Conseil G=E9n=E9ral. She s= aid=20 she could accept other forms of payment except Credit cards. So

1) either your bank wires the money directly on their account. Here is the=20 information your bank needs, that is their bank references: Code Banque: 10071 Code Guichet: 76000 Account Number: 09 002 000 274.=20 Cle RIB: 40 The Bank is=A0 Tresor Public (The French State) =A0=A0=A0 =A0=A0=A0 =A0=A0=A0 =A0=A0=A0 =A0=A0=A0 Quai Jean Moulin =A0=A0=A0 =A0=A0=A0 =A0=A0=A0 =A0=A0=A0 =A0=A0=A0 76101 Rouen Cedex =A0=A0=A0 =A0=A0=A0 =A0=A0=A0 =A0=A0=A0 =A0=A0=A0 France =A0 2) Or a bank check written in Euros to the order of Tresor Public, and sent=20 to the address written=A0=A0 in the previous posting about how to order the=20 catalogue The check must be written by your bank, and the amount has to be exact, not=20 33 euros but 32,80 euros.

Shelly Zegart zegrtquilt@aol.com 502-897-7566 <A HREF=3D"www.shellyquilts.com">www.shellyquilts.com</A> <A HREF=3D"www.centerforthequilt.org">www.centerforthequilt.org</A>

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Subject: re: Caesar's Crown question From: "judygrow" <judygrow@patmedia.net> Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2003 16:10:00 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

When I made my Mariner's Compass quilt I had a choice of appliqueing the circles to a large square or piecing them into 4 cut arc/quadrants. I chose the latter because it used far less fabric. By turning the template for each of the 4 pieces so it snugged into the curve of the one before, I bet I used half the yardage than if I'd cut big blocks. It certainly wasn't an easier process.

My seams were at the halfway point of the long sides, not into the corners, but I can still see that turning the template for each one would be far less wasteful of fabric.

If cost is a consideration, as it might have been in 1840, then there's your answer.

Judy in Ringoes, NJ judygrow@patmedia.net

> I recently made a Caesar's Crown block to illustrate an article about Bible >Blocks. Funny, while making the block, it occurred to me that it would have >been a lot easier to appliqué the main unit onto a background square than to >do the circular piecing needed to join the design area to each of four >corners.

> At any rate, the block is aptly categorized as one for "advanced" quilters. >

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Subject: Sources for UGRR Rebuttals From: "Pilar Donoso" <quiltpd@mi.cl> Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2003 20:39:40 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Thank you Judy. That was exactly what I was looking for. I started my own file. Pilar Santiago, CHILE > > Pillar- > My apologies, I missed your inquiry. Here's a posting from a while back. I have an HIPV folder on my computer desktop that I save items relating to this thorny question, and Alice's reply has proven most useful time and time again. Giles Wright's persuasive article should be saved to everyone's desktop! > Judy

 

 

 

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