Quilt History banner

Home Page

 

Archives

 

Appraisers

 

Articles

 

Bibliography

 

Books

 

Cleaning

 

Conservation

 
Dating  
Gallery  
Quilt Restoration  

Member Links

 

Study Groups

 
Subscribe  

Teachers

 

Search

 
   

Comments

 

 

Quilters Find a way to care

: Re: Wonderful things in New Jersey (long) From: ARabara15@aol.com Date: Mon, 

Last week, I visited the museum and thoroughly enjoyed the exhibit. A year and a half ago I spoke with the curator(Who had just started) and questioned him about the museum's quilt collection, the possibility of a study group coming and the study the quilts and the possibilty of an exhibit. Even though this is a state museum it is a small facility. Their archives are off limits to the public and I was told that there are no rooms available for private study of any of the museum's collections. After viewing the exhibit, I met and spoke with the curator in person (Jim Turk)and asked the same questions that I had asked before(I don't give up easily) . I basically got the same answers. He did however inform me that the museum was planning a renovation of the second floor to include a small but permantant space for the showing of textiles. the collection would be rotated thru the space in conjunction with the other exhibits on the floor. He reminded me that money for historic projects and the arts was cut off thanks to our Governor.Being a Trenton resident and also being involved in Historic preservation of properties in the city and having a taste of local as well as state government right on my doorstep, change at this level comes VERY slowly. I genuinely thanked Jim for the lovely exhibit and walked away, glad that quilts and textiles had finally gotten their way to the public eye and hopeful for the future of that second floor exhibit of textiles. Those who know me know that I am not the complacent type and am very tenacious. My concern in reading many of the latest emails about this exhibit are that the pleasure that we all enjoyed at experiencing it is being marred by the complaint fest that has begun. Several well placed , constructive phone calls and letters would do more good that what I have been reading. Best regards and happy quilting (Autumn is just around the corner)

Donald Brokate The Crazy Quilt Collector Trenton, NJ

--part1_15a.2478b5a5.2c970eb5_boundary--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Illustration of John Hewson quilt From: Anita Loscalzo <aloscalz@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2003 06:25:14 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

For all the early American quilt junkies who attended the Deerfield symposium and anyone else who loves early quilts, there is a photograph of a stunning patchwork quilt with a John Hewson print center medallion on page 203 of the October 2003 ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST. The quilt hangs on the wall in the Manhattan apartment of Susan & Jerry Lauren.

Anita Loscalzo

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Illustration of John Hewson quilt From: Kittencat3@aol.com Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2003 09:34:57 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

And God willing, it will never become a piece of upholstery in an upscale apartment....:)

Seriously - the symposium was *wonderful*. I loved meeting everyone from the list, and hope the other participants had as good a time as I did. I learned more in three days than I had in the previous five years!

Kudos to all the presenters, and especially the staff Deerfield, which did a magnificent job. What a great program!

Lisa Evans Easthampton, Mass.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: crazy quilt square From: ARabara15@aol.com Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2003 

Sherry, I would be willing to loan you a square. I have a grouping of 11 or 12 inch squares. I can send you the best example. They are silk and although they are in good condition, ithe square would need to be handled,stored, displayed properly to avoid damage.Please send me the mailing info:

Donald Brokate The Crazy Quilt Collector 104 Cornwall Ave Trenton NJ 08618

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: crazy quilt square From: ARabara15@aol.com Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2003 10:37:17 EDT X-Message-Number: 5

Sherry, I also have a large collection of other squares. Do you need to borrow anything else? Donald Brokate

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: QHF Documentary - long From: <chrisa@jetlink.net> Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2003 08:46:11 -0700 X-Message-Number: 6

Hi Karen,

I have posted the first press release about the celebration next year on my website as I told you I would. Would you like this one also?

If you have apicture of the house, or Georgia or anything about the Hall of Fame building that I could include with the announcements, that would be great.

My email server has been on and off lately, so I don't know if you got my last one about sights on the way to the Shelburne museums. If you didn't and want the info, let me know. If you did, the Hildene House in Manchester VT is the name of A. Lincoln son's home I mentioned.

Piece, Kim

----- Original Message ----- From: <KareQuilt@aol.com> To: "Quilt History List" <qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Saturday, September 13, 2003 2:48 PM Subject: [qhl] QHF Documentary - long

The Quilters Hall of FamePRESS RELEASE - September 2003

DOCUMENTARY TO BE MADE OF THE QUILTERS HALL OF FAME AND THE HISTORY OF QUILTING IN THE 20TH CENTURY

Georgia Bonesteel of television's longest running quilting series, Lap Quilting with Georgia Bonesteel, announced during her induction into the Quilters Hall of Fame in Marion, Indiana, on July 16, 2003, that she will be making an hour long television documentary in conjunction with University of North Carolina Television during the Grand Opening of The Quilters Hall of Fame in July 2004, covering the history of the Quilters Hall of Fame and other notable aspects of quilting history in the 20th century. The documentary will focus on the dedication of the Marie Webster house as the headquarters of The Quilters Hall of Fame as well as on the overall history of what the honorees have brought to the quilt world, which will include many aspects of the late 20th century quilt revival history. Hazel Carter of Vienna, VA, Founder and President of The Quilters Hall of Fame, responded in an interview following Bonesteel's induction, " When I founded The Quilters Hall of Fame in 1979, my dreams were pretty small in comparison to what the dream has now evolved into. The long awaited opening of The Quilters Hall of Fame in the restored house of Marie Webster that will take place in July 2004 will be the capstone of a remarkable journey. When Rosalind Webster Perry offered to donate her grandmother's condemned house in Marion, Indiana, to The Quilters Hall of Fame in 1991 as our permanent home, I don't think any of us expected the journey of restoration to be quite so long. The years of volunteer hours that have gone into this project are almost incalculable. To see the dream take still another giant step towards capturing quilting history as Georgia Bonesteel plans for the making of this television documentary simply takes my breath away. This documentary will make it possible to share the reality of The Quilters Hall of Fame and the significance of quilting history within our cultural heritage with quilters and quilt lovers far beyond the boundaries of Marion, Indiana or even North America. We hope quilters and quilt lovers from around the world will voice their appreciation of this documentary by becoming members of the Quilters Hall of Fame, as well as by letting Georgia Bonesteel and UNC-TV know that they wholeheartedly support this effort to record our quilting history. And don't forget to ask your local PBS stations to air it as well! When quilters set their mind to accomplish something, they can make an enormous difference. I am continually humbled and awed by that reality." For additional information about The Quilters Hall of Fame's Grand Opening Celebration, July 15-18, 2004, please send a self-addressed stamped envelope to QHF Grand Opening, P.O. Box 681, Marion, IN 46952-0681. For information about the Grand Opening Quilt Contest, send a self-addressed stamped envelope to QHF Grand Opening Quilt Contest, P.O. Box 681, Marion, IN 46952-0681. PRESS SECRETARY: Karen B. Alexander KareQuilt@aol.comQHF ADMINISTRATION: Shea Buck quilters@comteck.com (765) 664 - 9333QHF WEBSITE: www:quiltershalloffame.orgLOCATION: 926 South Washington Street, Marion, INADDRESS: P.O. Box 681, Marion, IN 46952-0681

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: HIPV/UGRR issues From: "jajb" <anne_j@worldnet.att.net> Date: 

Lori, What a miserable situation! I can't believe they wouldn't listen to you. I knew this myth had staying power but never dreamed it was so bad.

I have made it my goal to do what I can to discourage teachers from using lesson plans about quilts being used in the UGRR. http://www.womenfolk.com/historyofquilts/research.htm

My goal is to have correct information about the myth come up at or near the top on any possible phrases used to search for information about the UGRR. You really have to be in the first two or three results on Google to make a difference though.

Any of you here who have a website can help by putting a link to good articles like http://www.antiquequiltdating.com/ugrr.html http://historiccamdencounty.com/ccnews11.shtml http://www.culver.org/news/quilts.asp

The more they are linked to the higher they will show in a Google search and the more people will find accurate information on the Internet.

Judging from Lori's experience someone needs to write an article on the topic geared to Guilds. I would be glad to link to any such article.

Judy Anne

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: HIPV/UGRR issues From: "Sally Ward" <sallytatters@ntlworld.com> 

> > Any of you here who have a website can help by putting a link to good > articles like

What a good idea! Over here in the UK I am very much a lone voice on this subject, and only maintain a very modest website, but I've done exactly as you suggest. Every little helps.

Sally W

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: P. S. to new quilt group From: pkeirstead@comcast.net Date: Tue, 16 Sep 

Gaye just reminded me that I overlooked several states. She has names of interested quilters from Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and Arkansas, so anybody else from those states is welcome, too. In fact, no matter where you live, we'd love to have you join us. It's just that I haven't figured out how to describe such a wide geographic distribution!

Peggy Keirstead

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: blank messages From: diane shink <dimacquilt@sympatico.ca> Date: Tue, 

Topics look interesting but I am rarely getting the text in the messages. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks Diane M Shink

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Ebay sellers plagurizing my quilt history articles From: "jajb" 

I hope this isn't too far off topic. If so just delete it Kris.

I've had some problems with Ebay sellers plagiarizing my quilt history articles. Earlier it was a person selling what was supposedly 'Amish' quilts and now it is someone selling an African American quilt. http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3242578435&category=947

The text is word for word what I have at http://www.womenfolk.com/historyofquilts/afam.htm I know my articles are short and don't look like much but I put in hours of reading, writing and rewriting on each one. I guess I should be mad but I just feel discouraged.

What is the Ebay policy on copying other's work? Do sellers really know they shouldn't and just do it anyway? What really frustrates me is that I have to sign up for Ebay and even give my credit card number in order to write to Ebay and issue a complaint. Since the auctions are only up for a few days I wonder if it's worth it. <sigh>

Judy Anne (formerly just Anne)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Ebay sellers plagurizing my quilt history articles From: "Judy Kelius 

Since I do a lot of selling on eBay, I reported to eBay that the seller is using copyrighted material in their description . . . they might stop the auction. They have a specific policy prohibiting sellers from copying another seller's text and photos, and I hope it extends to this kind of plagiarism as well.

Did you write the sellers and tell them this is wrong? You could ask them to put a link to your article if people want to learn more . . . this is what I do sometimes when I list something and there is a good article on the internet telling more about the item. That way you both win!

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Ebay sellers plagurizing my quilt history articles From: Dana Balsamo 

Judy Anne, That is just disgusting. It definitely is worth complaining about. Your material is copyrighted and this listing infringes upon that. Recently the woman who owns a store named "Shabby Chic" went and had her name copyrighted and now no one is allowed to try to sell an item with that description. That, in my personal opinion is petty, but she was able to get ebay to terminate many auctions with that phrase, and it is to my understaning that ebay pays a fine if they don't. Granted, you will come up with 900+ listings using that phrase still, but I know of sellers who have had there's cancelled for this reason. Contact VERO at ebay for this: http://pages.ebay.com/help/confidence/programs-vero-ov.html

Here's where you can report it: http://pages.ebay.com/help/confidence/vero-image-text-theft.html

Good luck, Dana

jajb <anne_j@worldnet.att.net> wrote: I hope this isn't too far off topic. If so just delete it Kris.

I've had some problems with Ebay sellers plagiarizing my quilt history articles. Earlier it was a person selling what was supposedly 'Amish' quilts and now it is someone selling an African American quilt. http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3242578435&category=947

The text is word for word what I have at http://www.womenfolk.com/historyofquilts/afam.htm I know my articles are short and don't look like much but I put in hours of reading, writing and rewriting on each one. I guess I should be mad but I just feel discouraged.

What is the Ebay policy on copying other's work? Do sellers really know they shouldn't and just do it anyway? What really frustrates me is that I have to sign up for Ebay and even give my credit card number in order to write to Ebay and issue a complaint. Since the auctions are only up for a few days I wonder if it's worth it.

Judy Anne (formerly just Anne)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: architectural Digest quilt From: <chrisa@jetlink.net> Date: Tue, 16 Sep 

In case you don't have a chance to see the John Hewson quilt pictured in the October issue of Arch. Digest, it is the same one that is in Kiracofe's book on page 54. There's been a slight change in date perhaps, as the magazine says circa 1790 and the Kiracofe book(1993 pub. date) states c. 1800. The magazine picture is large and colorful (perhaps a little lightened, using the indigo triangles as a comparison), and grand except for the metal ram sculpture sitting upon a white contemporary parson's table which together cover up half of the Hewson panel- The owners are heralded as top American folk art collectors, with an emphasis on sculpture.

Kim Wulfert

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: shabby chic From: <chrisa@jetlink.net> Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2003 18:02:26 

Funny you should mention this today <<Recently the woman who owns a store named "Shabby Chic" >>

For years I lived a few blocks from the original store in Santa Monica CA. Perhaps the person Dana referred to is a different lady but on Sunday I was at the Rose Bowl Flea market where stopped by a vendor selling some vintage looking fabric clothing. They didn't have my size and I was told that the store in SM that was called Shabby Chic is now called Subtle Tones. It seems odd that she would fight the copyright battle and change her name, unless the name change came first.

Kim Wulfert

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Ebay sellers plagurizing my quilt history articles From: 

Judy- a vendor from eBay asked to use part of a website article of mine sometime back. I told her no permission was being granted, but I feared she may not care. I have never checked on it, but haven't heard from anyone she has. I think you have every right to feel the way you do. I know you put a lot of time and effort into your articles. How dare she use parts AND not give you credit. If it is the same vendor, perhaps getting a no from me got her to thinking it was best for her not to ask. WRONG. Carry on and fight this plagiarizing. It could effect her sales if word gets out to even conscience individuals. This list was a good place to start.

Kim Wulfert

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilting by Women on the Western Frontier, 19th century From: Debbie Cupp <Cupp5@Cox.net> Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2003 05:49:14 -0400 

I have been reading

The Language Police

>"The Language Police" is the first full-scale expose of this >cultural and educational scandal, written by a leading historian. It >documents the existence of an elaborate and well-established >protocol of beneficent censorship, quietly endorsed and implemented >by test makers and textbook publishers, states, and the federal >government. School boards and bias and sensitivity committees >review, abridge, and modify texts to delete potentially offensive >words, topics, and imagery. Publishers practice self-censorship to >sell books in big states. >

Many examples are given in the book about committee comments/cuts/censorship on topics in tests, books, textbooks for children. Including the passage below:

>WOMEN AND PATCHWORK QUILTING > >The bias and sensitivity reviewers rejected a passage about >patchwork quilting by women on the western frontier in the >mid-nineteenth century. The passage explained that mothers in that >time taught their daughters to sew, and together they made quilts >for the girl's dowry when she married. Quilting was an economic >necessity because it saved money, and there were no factory-made >quilts available until the end of the nineteenth century. The >passage briefly explained how quilts were assembled and described >them as works of art. The information in the passage was >historically accurate, but the bias and sensitivity panel (as well >as the "content expert panel") objected to the passage because it >contained stereotypes of females as "soft" and "submissive." >Actually, the passage did nothing of the sort. It was a description >of why quilting was important to women on the frontier and how it >was done. Nothing in the passage excluded the possibility that >mothers and daughters were riding the range, plowing the fields, and >herding cattle during the day. The reviewers objected to the >portrayal of women as people who stitch and sew, and who were >concerned about preparing for marriage. Historical accuracy was no >defense for this representation of women and girls, which they >deemed stereotypical. >

Interesting! Debbie Cupp, hunkering down in Virginia Beach

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: UGRR Info From: "Teddy Pruett" <aprayzer@hotmail.com> Date: Wed, 17 

<<Judging from Lori's experience someone needs to write an article on the topic geared to Guilds. I would be glad to link to any such article.>>

Well, duh!!! Why didn't I think of that??? The editor of the statewide Sunshine State Quilter's Guild has asked me to write articles, and it never even occurred to me to blast the pants off "the myth that won't die". Well, perhaps that is a bit overzealous, but it would be nice to plant a seed in the minds of our quilters that perhaps HIPV and the use of quilts on the UGRR are less than accurate.

Now, all I have to do is find some time between 3 and 4 a.m. every morning to get this thing written - my only free time until next May. Teddy Pruett

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: E-bay Plagiarism From: Jackie Joy <joysbees@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 17 

I feel that plagiarism is really awful, so I took it upon myself to write to the e-bay seller. She responded:

"Hello,

Thank you for bringing this to my attention! I have someone else listing my items for me.

There should have been a link or credit. I did not know it was copied. However, it was my

responsibility to make sure someone gets credit for their work.

Thank you again,

Louanne LaRoche"

 

I hope this makes the author feel better.

Jackie Joy

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: update on plagiarized article From: "jajb" <anne_j@worldnet.att.net> Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2003 10:37:46 -0700 X-Message-Number: 4

A member here wrote to the seller for me and she was quite apologetic. Apparently someone else puts up her auctions for her. Unfortunately the earlier time this happened my DIL wrote and the seller claimed that everything on the Internet was public domain and threatened to report her because she has used the brand name of some clothing she was selling.

I guess I need to sign up for Ebay just so I can write to people in these circumstances. You just never know what the reaction will be. I have >>America's Quilting History © 1998 - 2003 Anne Johnson Please use the information on this site for personal and noncommercial purposes only.<< on my homepage but it looks like I need to put it on all pages. Not that it would stop everyone.

I can't believe someone copyrighted shabby chic. It seems to me that general descriptive terms should not be copyrighted. Kim, I'll bet that shop had to change their name because of the copyright.

>>They have a specific policy prohibiting sellers from copying another seller's text and photos, and I hope it extends to this kind of plagiarism as well.<<

I think they should specifically add written material and photos from anywhere on the Internet as well to the policy.

Thanks everyone for the help and feedback.

Judy Anne

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: update on plagiarized article From: Ark Quilts <quiltarkmv@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2003 12:20:44 -0700 (PDT) 

Hello all! It is very sad that we have so many people using the Internet that are not information literate. As a school teacher and library media specialist, I stress and stress and preach and preach to students that they cannot copy & paste any items they find without giving credit; asking for permission to use; or, following current copyright guidelines.

If your materials have been plagiarized, it really would be best to spell out to viewers of your internet pages the copyright terms of use for your materials. If they read the entire page--or maybe you should create an entire page explaining it--maybe they will get the point. If the explanation is clearly posted, they have no excuse for abusing the copyright terms of use. (And maybe if you want to sue, you have a basis for that if you want to check with a lawyer.)

I have always been very careful of my quilting class handouts, patterns, and anything that is published. I once had a student who took my class, took notes on how I taught the class, and then turned around & taught my class, using my class handouts at a local air force base. I found out when she asked me a question and she had 20 copies of my handout in her hand. I asked why she made copies when it clearly said at the bottom that the material was copyrighted and copies could not be made without my written permission. When she could not explain..I asked her outright if she was teaching my class some place else. I further explained that this was a situation where her copying my handouts and "stealing" by class could be addressed in a lawsuit situation because it deprived me of income. She apologized to me and told me she had been teaching my classes and copying my class handouts. I told her in very clear terms that she did not have my permission to do that and that I would not give anyone permission to do that. I was beginning to wonder why fewer and fewer people were signing up for my classes and I found out why that day. She registered for my classes, took them, and then turned around & copied the lessons & taught the class herself. She claimed that since she paid 1 registration fee that she was entitled to make any copies she wanted & was free to teach the class.

Since I had her address, I simply copied the current copyright guidelines that dealt with "deprivation of profit" and "copying without written permission" and mailed them to her. Then I tracked down the sponsoring agency at the local air force base & informed the person in charge what the woman had done. She was immediately dropped as an instructor. Needless to say, she never signed up for another one of my quilting classes.

And since that time I have taken the time to explain at the beginning of EVERY class that I do not give permission to copy my class or my handouts. I haven't had further problems. And yes, it was more work for me, but I always thought it was worth it to eliminate future problems in case any of the students taking my classes were thinking along those lines.

However, there are so many people out there that do not understand it.......best of luck to you.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilt Poetry and Prose From: <mreich@attglobal.net> Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2003 19:41:05 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

This is my favorite quilt poem for autumn. So to welcome a favorite New England time of the year, I hope you enjoy it as well. sue reich

Needlecraft: the Magazine of Home Arts October 1931

AUTUMN SONG By Nyleen Newton

FROM the sharp - scented cupboards bring tonight The ancient patchwork quilts, so dreaming-bright; Without, the crickets’ drowsy song, the sound Of ripe fruit falling to the frost-warped ground, The little winds; so fold us into sleep – Dear homely quilts, give rest so dim and deep.

TONIGHT a moon swings lanthorn-like and low; Bring out the quilts and heap them, so, High in the white-wreathed sky the stars are cold; Now is the time when all the earth is old. About my room the winter’s shadows creep, Dear brave and humble quilts, give me to sleep.

AND I – so young – I love the autumn peace, The crickets’ violin, that knows no cease – Each day I sew of all my dreams a quilt – Of all the laughter that my youth has spilt – I make it thus, so when I wish to sleep, Happiness-woven, it will fold me deep.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Virtual Fundraising Quilt announced From: macdowel@msu.edu Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2003 09:40:29 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

--============_-1148230047==_ma============ Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" ; format="flowed"

Tradition turns to cyber space MSU MUSEUM'S GREAT LAKES QUILT CENTER LAUNCHES VIRTUAL FUNDRAISING QUILT

MSU MUSEUM, EAST LANSING, MICH. - The Michigan State University Museum's Great Lake Quilt Center has launched the first-of-its-kind virtual fundraising quilt. A minimum contribution of $25 helps support GLQC documentation, preservation and programming activities; and donors names are added to the quilt square for the quilt that grows and grows in cyberspace. The quilt can be viewed at: http://www.museum.msu.edu/glqc/rafflequilt.html .

The design of this cyber-quilt is based on a Churn Dash Quilt made in 1893 by Martha Marian Lovina Hoskins Spencer of Hillsdale, Mich., in the collection of Michigan State University Museum, East Lansing, Mich. The fabrics in the virtual block are represent styles found in RJR Fashion Fabric's Michigan State University Reproduction Fabric line, also drawn from historic MSU Museum quilt collections.

Creating quilts for fundraising efforts is a deep tradition. For decades, individuals (mostly women) have raised funds for worthwhile causes through selling, raffling or auctioning off whole quilts. Women have also made subscription quilts, whereby individuals pay a sum of money for the privilege of having their name inked or embroidered on to a quilt square.

"The virtual fundraising quilt takes that tradition to new places and allows the quilt can grow virtually forever while at the same time helping to preserve our actual physical quilts," explains Marsha MacDowell, curator of folk arts at the MSU Museum and the Center's director.

"Expanding, caring for, and using the collections all demand substantial financial support," she adds. "While Michigan State University provides the basic space and utilities for the collections, the majority of the additional costs must be raised through grants and donations. The generous support of individuals and organizations are critical to the quilt collection maintenance and the center's activities."

The MSU Museum's Great Lakes Quilt Center, houses a collection of more than 500 historic and contemporary quilts kept in a state-of-the-art, rolled-storage system in the museum's collections center. Full and part-time curatorial and collection management staff members supervise the daily care and special uses of the collections. In 2001 the museum and the Great Lakes Quilt Center established an affiliation with the Alliance for American Quilts in a nationwide effort to further the recognition of quilts; to preserve the history of quilts and quilt-makers; and to establish the Center for the Quilt, a place that actively communicates with people about quilts and quilting. For more information about the center, see http://museum.msu.edu/glqc/index.html.

The Michigan State University Museum is Michigan's natural and cultural history museum, and an affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. The MSU Museum features three floors of special collections and changing exhibits, and is open seven days a week free of charge (donations are welcome). The museum is located on West Circle Drive next to Beaumont Tower on the MSU campus, and is accessible to persons with disabilities. For more information and to learn if there are quilt exhibits on view, contact (517) 355-2370 or see www.museum.msu.edu. ####

--============_-1148230047==_ma============--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: copyright of term From: "Nancy Roberts" <aquilter@alltel.net> Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2003 10:28:05 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

I'm curious about the Shabby Chic copyright. Isn't there a program on HGTV titled the same? And maybe the hostess even has a book by that title? Is the tv personality also the shopowner who copyrighted? I'm always surprised by the ease with which common use terms are copyrighted. Nancy Roberts

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Virtual Fundraising Quilt announced From: macdowel@msu.edu Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2003 11:10:51 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

--============_-1148224642==_ma============ Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" ; format="flowed"

Aargh!!! I sent the press release that did not have the updated website. Here is the correct one. My apologies! -- Marsha

Tradition turns to cyber space MSU MUSEUM'S GREAT LAKES QUILT CENTER LAUNCHES VIRTUAL FUNDRAISING QUILT

MSU MUSEUM, EAST LANSING, MICH. - The Michigan State University Museum's Great Lake Quilt Center has launched the first-of-its-kind virtual fundraising quilt. A minimum contribution of $25 helps support GLQC documentation, preservation and programming activities; and donors names are added to the quilt square for the quilt that grows and grows in cyberspace. The quilt can be viewed at: http://museum.msu.edu/glqc/virtualquilt.html .

The design of this cyber-quilt is based on a Churn Dash Quilt made in 1893 by Martha Marian Lovina Hoskins Spencer of Hillsdale, Mich., in the collection of Michigan State University Museum, East Lansing, Mich. The fabrics in the virtual block are represent styles found in RJR Fashion Fabric's Michigan State University Reproduction Fabric line, also drawn from historic MSU Museum quilt collections.

Creating quilts for fundraising efforts is a deep tradition. For decades, individuals (mostly women) have raised funds for worthwhile causes through selling, raffling or auctioning off whole quilts. Women have also made subscription quilts, whereby individuals pay a sum of money for the privilege of having their name inked or embroidered on to a quilt square.

"The virtual fundraising quilt takes that tradition to new places and allows the quilt can grow virtually forever while at the same time helping to preserve our actual physical quilts," explains Marsha MacDowell, curator of folk arts at the MSU Museum and the Center's director.

"Expanding, caring for, and using the collections all demand substantial financial support," she adds. "While Michigan State University provides the basic space and utilities for the collections, the majority of the additional costs must be raised through grants and donations. The generous support of individuals and organizations are critical to the quilt collection maintenance and the center's activities."

The MSU Museum's Great Lakes Quilt Center, houses a collection of more than 500 historic and contemporary quilts kept in a state-of-the-art, rolled-storage system in the museum's collections center. Full and part-time curatorial and collection management staff members supervise the daily care and special uses of the collections. In 2001 the museum and the Great Lakes Quilt Center established an affiliation with the Alliance for American Quilts in a nationwide effort to further the recognition of quilts; to preserve the history of quilts and quilt-makers; and to establish the Center for the Quilt, a place that actively communicates with people about quilts and quilting. For more information about the center, see http://museum.msu.edu/glqc/index.html.

The Michigan State University Museum is Michigan's natural and cultural history museum, and an affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. The MSU Museum features three floors of special collections and changing exhibits, and is open seven days a week free of charge (donations are welcome). The museum is located on West Circle Drive next to Beaumont Tower on the MSU campus, and is accessible to persons with disabilities. For more information and to learn if there are quilt exhibits on view, contact (517) 355-2370 or see www.museum.msu.edu. #### --============_-1148224642==_ma============--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: copyright of term From: "Christine Thresh" 

A book title cannot be copyrighted. Trademarks protect names or certain symbols used with names.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: copyright of term From: "jocelynm@delphiforums.com" 

I really would be interested in hearing the story behind this one. Copyright protects original work, and I don't see how a common phrase could= be attributable to one person's original work. OTOH, trademark refers to a phrase that's uniquely associated with a partic= ular product. I suppose someone could try to trademark it, but since it's n= ot exclusively associated with one product, I'm not sure anyone could trade= mark 'shabby chic', either.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: copyright of term From: "Nancy Gibbs" <izannah1@msn.com> Date: 

<,OTOH, trademark refers to a phrase that's uniquely associated with a = particular product. I suppose someone could try to trademark it, but = since it's not exclusively associated with one product, I'm not sure = anyone could trademark 'shabby chic', either. >>

Yes, "shabby chic" is trademarked (not copyrighted). Rachel Ashwell = wrote a book back in the mid '80s about this style, and then developed a = whole business around it--bedding, slipcovered furniture, decorative = items, more books, etc., etc. There are some stores too (maybe just in = California??). The cable show is hers also, although I've never seen it. = So no one else can use the term as a trademark, but I'm not sure that = extends to the sort of common use in conversation to describe a style.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Newark Museum Forms From: danabalsamo@yahoo.com Date: Thu, 18 Sep 

Hi all, For those of you that requested the Registration Forms for the Newark Museum Quilt Extravaganza: I have received them from the museum and they will be mailed out Friday morning. If anyone else is interested, just email me you address and I will get one out to you. Hugs, Dana ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: More early quotes From: Xenia Cord <xenia@legacyquilts.net> Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2003 11:29:59 -0600 X-Message-Number: 8

Not to horn in on Sue's delightful historical entries, but I ran across this and thought it might also resonate:

The Prayse of the Needle

To all dispersed sorts of Arts and Trades I write the Needles prayse (that never fades) So long as children shall begot and born, So long as garments shall be made and worne, So long as hemp or Flax or Sheep shall bear Their linnen Wollen fleeces yeare by yeare; So long as silkworms, with exhausted spoile Of their own entrailes for man's gaine shall toyle; Yea, till the world be quite dissolved and past, So long at least, the Needles use shall last.

-John Taylor, 1580-1653

Consider that cotton was not a commercial product in Europe when he wrote this!

Xenia

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilt Poetry and Prose From: <mreich@attglobal.net> Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2003 12:55:34 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

Xenia, This is not my territory alone. I think it is wonderful when we have something this great and we share. sue

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: More early quotes From: Kittencat3@aol.com Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2003 13:32:31 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

Just one tiny correction: cotton *was* a thriving industry in Europe during the Renaissance, at least in Italy. There were cotton guilds in virtually every major city, many associated with quilters' guilds. There was even a special type of striped cotton woven specifically to back bed quilts.

There's some excellent information in Maureen Mazzaoui's =The Italian Cotton Industry in the Later Middle Ages, 1100-1600. The end notes in particular are excellent, and well worth reading for the look at the thriving quilting industry of the late Middle Ages and Renaissance.

Hope this helps -

Lisa Evans Easthampton, MA

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: New quilt study group From: pkeirstead@comcast.net Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2003 18:30:19 +0000 X-Message-Number: 11

Please continue to send me your name if you're interested in joining our new group. However, I'm going on vacation until Sept. 29, so I won't reply to your e-mails until after that date.

Peggy Keirstead pkeirstead@comcast.net

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: NANCY CABOT DESIGN Query From: Gaye Ingram 

Does anyone have a set of Nancy Cabot designs containing the design for a quilt pattern named "Stonewall Jackson, listed ("#1061.5) in B. Brackman's patchwork book as being a Nancy Cabot design or pub'd by Nancy Cabot?

Thanks, Gaye

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: NANCY CABOT DESIGN Query From: Xenia Cord <xenia@legacyquilts.net> Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2003 17:48:17 -0600 X-Message-Number: 13

Ok, I have looked at a ba-zillion newspaper cuttings from Cabot and Wheeler (lord, women loved to cut and save that stuff!) and not a Stonewall Jackson in the bunch. It occurs to me that even in the 1930s, the title may have stirred up old animosities, and so the design was given a pass.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: September 17, 2003 From: Jody Pickens 

I am new to the list and very interested in quilts and history. Does the Dear Jane quilt qualify as an historical quilt? I attended a Quilting School at bestsew.com and the Brenda Papadakis was the featured quilter. The quilt was so unique.

Jody

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: copyright of term From: "Patricia Magyar" <magyars@earthlink.net> 

Hello friends-Christine's right-the title of a book cannot be copyrighted nor the title of a song. I researched this when I wrote my book on Drunkard's Path way back when. I wanted to call it 'Happy Trails' and found that several books have been written over the years with that title, including one put out on hiking by the Sierra Club! 

65.jpg (111992 bytes)Now that the DP book's in print again with Dover Books, its title is the much drier '65 Variations on the Drunkard's Path Pattern.' Speaking of drier--we're very lucky here on the coast in NC. Isabel roared onshore about noon today after blowing a gale for ten hours before. Although there was some shingle loss and branches down (the pecan will never be the same-) we're out of the woods. The power came back on at 7PM, just in time for a tasty dinner of Spam fillets with Swiss cheese topping. Ummmm-hurricane food--all the salt and fat you can eat! Pepper Cory (just to the left of the Cape Lookout lighthouse)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: NANCY CABOT DESIGN Query From: Gaye Ingram <gingram@tcainternet.com> Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2003 21:41:17 -0500 X-Message-Number: 16

Thanks, Xenia. I think ESPECIALLY in the '30's. In the late 40's that war was very real for my grandmother Rice. I also think this is a peculiar thing---no Lee block. It interests me. I wonder what colors were recommended, out of curiosity.

gi

 

""

""


Copyright ©PhoebeMoon Web Design Solutions   All rights reserved.
 Material on these pages may not be reproduced in any form without expressed written permission.