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Quilters Find a way to care

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: September 27, 2003 From: Pat Kyser <patkyser@hiwaay.net> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 

I received the following advertisement via email today, unsolicited from Fabric Merchant Bulletin <dispatcher@fabricmerchant.com> :

Liberty Hill Vintage Reproductions This week we're pleased to announce the arrival of Liberty Hill, a wonderful new series of reproduction prints from Baum Textile's Windham Fabrics division. The Liberty Hill series is based on prints gathered from private collections dating from 1865-1885. Many of these prints hail from the American Underground Railroad and are somewhat brighter than the deep browns, blacks and reds of earlier American periods. Bright and unique, Liberty Hill is a definite "must have" for reproduction fabric buffs. 

I received the following advertisement via email today, unsolicited from Fabric Merchant Bulletin <<dispatcher@fabricmerchant.com> :

Liberty Hill Vintage Reproductions

This week we're pleased to announce the arrival of Liberty Hill, a wonderful new series of reproduction prints from Baum Textile's Windham Fabrics division. The Liberty Hill series is based on prints gathered from private collections dating from 1865-1885. Many of these prints hail from the American Underground Railroad and are somewhat brighter than the deep browns, blacks and reds of earlier American periods. Bright and unique, Liberty Hill is a definite "must have" for reproduction fabric buffs.

 

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Subject: Baum Textiles.com and Underground Railroad fabrics - here we go again! From: 

When I checked my email this morning, there was a Baum Textiles promo for their new lines of fabrics. Baum Textiles is a company in New Jersey that reproduces some great vintage designs. Those of us in Judy Grow's New Jersey Study Group love this company's fabrics. So as I clicked through the new choices, one was for Liberty Hill. Up came the fabric collection with this title - Liberty Hill Underground Railroad - Historical Reproduction Prints Circa 1865-1885 Please, here we go again. First of all, my trust in this company's authenticity as now been shaken. Someone needs to give them both a history lesson and a quilt history lesson. Fortunately, for all of us there is a Contact link on the site. With ease we can all send an email in our humble attempt to correct this quilting myth. The following is the email I sent this morning. "Let me say up front your fabric lines of reproduction prints are fabulous. From my standpoint as a quilt history researcher, lecturer and quilter; I am very disappointed your excellent company feels the need to capitalized and promote the myth taht joins the Underground Railroad and quiltmaking. If you are going to give certain prints you produce an historic link then you need to be more responsible in researching your connection. Quilt historians around the nation are going to cringe when they see the association you have made." I would encourage all of you to take a minute, check out this site, www.baumtextile.com and hopefully on Monday morning they will come to the office inundated with our emails. Thanks, sue reich

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Subject: Re: Baum Textiles.com and Underground Railroad fabrics - here we go again! From: 

Thanks for the tip, Sue...I'll see if I can dig up my copy of the debunking pamphlet from the historical society in New Jersey. Even so, I have this horrible feeling that this has become Part of Quilt History, rather like "patchwork started when thrifty colonial housewives needed to make bedcovers."

*whimper*

Lisa Evans

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Subject: Re: Baum Textiles.com and Underground Railroad fabrics - here we go again! From: "judygrow" 

I think the owner's name is Dan Baum. There is a fabric store in my area, Flemington NJ which is normally a furnishings fabric place with one wall of quilter's cottons. This summer I noticed that they had the entire first reproduction collection from Baum Textiles prominently displayed, and I found out that the owner of the store, the Fabric Factory, is none other than Dan Baum.

Since Mr. Baum is in the store at least one day a week, perhaps some of us could make an appointment to see him in person. I'm not going to do it alone.

At the Fort Washington show Mary Koval showed me the mock-ups of the line of fabrics she is doing for Baum which will be out at market. I asked her to point out the document fabric in the different colorways for one of them and she said they didn't print it!

Judy in Ringoes, NJ judygrow@patmedia.net ----- Original Message ----- From: <mreich@attglobal.net> To: 

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Subject: Re: Baum Textiles.com and Underground Railroad fabrics - here we go again! From: Dana Balsamo 

Hi Judy, Wow! I emailed a comment to Baum textiles, but would be glad to go down there in person. I shall call on Monday to see if I can get an appointment or find out when he is there. I guess it would be wise to print out some of the information about how the URR and quilt connection is a myth.

I am not playing devil's advocate, but do you think they are just calling it "Underground Railroad" because of the period? I noticed an Abraham Lincoln fabric. Granted, an uneducated quilter who only knows the one side of the story might mistaken the line as repros from fabrics actually used in quilts believed to be used in the URR. Has anyone seen where they actually promote these fabrics as such, or are they just using it as a time period? I don't want to go down there and not have my facts straight. Judy knows how ill confident I am even when I know what I am talking about. Doesn't stop me from trying, though.

Hugs, Dana, NJ

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Subject: The Baum Underground Railroad fabric line From: <mreich@attglobal.net> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 

Like everything else this is such a marketing gimmick. The Underground Railroad period (1865-1885) they have assigned is wrong. That was after the Civil War and as far as I know there was no need for an Underground then? This is the reason they need a history lesson. Slavery was abolished in 1865!!! www.nationalgeographic.com/railroad/ is a great site with a very good timeline. Guess what people, they don't mention Hidden in Plain View at all in the sources or their bookstore. Plus they don't breathe a word about quilts on the whole web site. Hurray!!! sue reich

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Subject: Re: The Baum Underground Railroad fabric line From: Gaye Ingram <gingram@tcainternet.com> 

From Sue Reich:

> Like everything else this is such a marketing gimmick. The Underground > Railroad period (1865-1885) they have assigned is wrong. That was after the > Civil War and as far as I know there was no need for an Underground then? > This is the reason they need a history lesson. Slavery was abolished in > 1865!!! www.nationalgeographic.com/railroad/ is a great site with a very > good timeline. Guess what people, they don't mention Hidden in Plain View > at all in the sources or their bookstore. Plus they don't breathe a word > about quilts on the whole web site. Hurray!!! sue reich >

Sue, Maybe the reference is to a tunnel then <g>!

If not, the dating is off even more for some: slavery was abolished in the southern states long before the end of the Civil War---months after Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation, which abolished slavery only in the seceding states and which was meant to encourage those states to re-enter the union.

Me, I'm holding out for a tunnel, Gaye

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Subject: 19th century quilt poetry and prose From: <mreich@attglobal.net> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 22:14:23 

It seems appropriate to share this little story as many of us begin backing our bags for the AQSG Seminar in Dallas. Trust me, there is quilt story here with great information. You Texas gals need to translate for the rest of us. I transcribed it exactly as it appeared in the paper. Secretly, I am very glad that I'm not coming to Texas to search for a husband.

Morning Oregonian Portland, Oregon November 19, 1875

Texas Courtship

He sat on one side of the room in a big white oak rocking-chair. She on the other side in a little white-oak rocking-chair. A long-eared deer-hound, snapping at flies, was by his side; a basket of sewing by her’s. Both rocked incessantly, that is, the young people, not the dog and basket. He sighs heavily and looks out the window at a crape-myrtle tree, she sighs lightly and gazing out the east window – at the turnip patch. At last he remarks: “This is mighty good weather to pick cotton.” “Tis that, if we only had any to pick.” The rocking continues. “What your dog’s name?” “Coony.” Another sigh broken stillness. “What is he good fur?” “What is who good fur?” said he abstractedly. “Your dog. Coony?” “Fur ketchin’ ‘possums.” Silence of half an hour. “He looks like a deer dog.” “Who looks like a deer dog?” “Coony.” “He is – but he’s kinder bellowsed an’ gettin’ old an’ slow now. An’ he ain’t no count on a cold trail.” In the quiet ten minutes that ensued she took two stitches in her quilt; it was a gorgeous affair, that quilt was, made by the pattern called “Rose of Sharon.” She is very particular about the nomenclature of her quilts, and frequently walks fifteen miles to get a new pattern, with a “real purty name.” “Your ma raisin’ any chickens?” “Forty odd.” Then more rocking, and, somehow, after awhile the big rocking-chair and the little rocking-chair were jammed side by side. “How many has your ma got?” “How many what?” “Chickens.” “Nigh on to a hundred.” By this time the chairs were so close together that rocking was impossible. “The minks has eat all ours.” Then a long silence reigns. At last he observes; “Makin’ quilts?” “Yes.” She replies, brightening up, “I’ve just finished a ‘Roarin’ Engul of Brazeel,’ a ‘Sitting Sun,’ and a ‘Nation’s Pride.’ Have you ever saw the ‘Yellow Rose of Tarary?” “No.” More silence; then he says: “Do you love cabbage?” “I do that.” Presently his hand is placed accidentally on hers. She does not know it – at least does not seem to be aware of it. Then after a half hour spent in sighs, coughing and clearing of throats he suddenly says: “I’se a –mind to bite you.” “What you great a –mind to bite me fur?” “Kase you won’t have me.” “Kase you ain’t axed me.” “Well, now, I ax you.” “Then, now, I has you.” Then Coony dreams he hears a sound of kissing. The next day the young man goes to Tigerville after a marriage license. Wednesday, the following week. No cards.

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Subject: RE: 19TH CENTURY PROSE From: Gaye Ingram <gingram@tcainternet.com> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 21:34:04 -0500 X-Message-Number: 10

SUE,

Thanks for sharing your Texas courtship story! What a tale. I love it!

But I must ask (sorry)---do you know a =8CRoarin=B9 Engul of Brazeel,=B9? And =8CYellow Rose of Tarary?=B2

Hate to be a pest, but the latter sounds Irish, and there is the Yellow Ros= e of Texas---are they related? Or does the writer know what he's doing. Sounds like it.

Inquiring minds and all, Gaye

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Subject: Re: Primary research materials From: Ark Quilts <quiltarkmv@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2003 05:16:40 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

Dear Karen-- I late reading my QHL email & took special note of your posting that you have imported quilt clippings you would like to dump. I moved 4 years ago and took EVERYTHING with me much to my husband's disappointment but we have room for it now and I am getting down to cleaning everything out over the winter. I have 3 filing cabinet drawers of clippings from catalogues, newspapers, ads, and assorting items. If you still have the imported quilt clippings, I would be interested in paying for the postage. If you have no other offers, please let me know. It's nice that you took the time to note the source & date on these items. I wrote several articles on imported quilts for the NQA publications and still intend to study them. Having color photographs of the imports helps me identify them on Ebay when they are listed as "old", "vintage", and "antique" quilts. Hope to do appraising in the future & use them. Thanks-Connie Ark

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Subject: Re: Union quilt personages From: Wmstories@aol.com Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2003 10:27:56 EDT X-Message-Number: 2

Don, perhaps you should be thinking of a book on this topic? Jacqueline

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Subject: RE: 19TH CENTURY PROSE From: Jackie Joy <joysbees@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2003 10:01:57 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

Gaye Ingram wrote:

'But I must ask (sorry)---do you know a ŒRoarin¹ Engul of Brazeel,¹? '

"Angle of Brazil" maybe?

 

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Subject: RE: 19TH CENTURY PROSE From: "Christine Thresh" 

My grandfather's family was from the south (early 1800's). His name was William Brazil Romine. I've never been able to figure out where the Brazil came from.

Christine Thresh http://www.winnowing.com

From: "Jackie Joy" <joysbees@yahoo.com> > Gaye Ingram wrote: > > 'But I must ask (sorry)---do you know a ORoarin¹ Engul of Brazeel,¹? ' > > "Angle of Brazil" maybe?

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Subject: RE: 19TH CENTURY PROSE From: Gaye Ingram 

Christine, the woods of North Louisiana are filled with Brazeels (variously spelled Brazell and Brazi). There is a main state road 2 miles north of Ruston indirectly named for the family----it is called the White Lightining Road. They are Scots-Irish and came into this part of the country with a large post-Civil War migration seeking unworn-out land and, in their case, I suppose, a little isolation. One of the children was in my class several years ago and persuaded a relative to show me his old still. It did not appear "old" to me, but who am I to know such things. The family took great pride in the high quality of the moonshine they produced in this exceedingly dry parish. They were also known for their daring and rambunctiousness. My student was brilliant, so I suspect high intelligence runs in the family.

So I can imagine where the "roarin'" and "Brazeel" comes from <g>, but what is "Engul"? Eagle? some sort of gull?

Maybe one of the British/celtic/Nova Scotia members of the list can help.

Gaye

P.S. Do you know the poet and newspaperwoman Dannye Romine Powell, a North Carolinian but born in Georgia? In our area the name is pronounced "ro-main."

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Subject: UGRR quilt myth From: bsythmbl@ctel.net Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2003 20:35:04 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Eleanor Burns of Quilt in a Day has a book "Underground Railroad Sampler" that is perpetuating the HIPV myth---also produced a video to accompany the book. I've had several customers come to my shop looking for Civil War reproduction fabrics----Eleanor used Judie Rothermel's "Gettysburg" line in her book samples. I have told each one about the myth....all were disappointed and one seemed not to believe me. I felt I had to speak up (even if I lost the sale which I didn't) when the first person mentioned that she was a teacher and was doing this as a class project. As for the new Baum fabrics, I saw the samples a couple weeks ago and felt that the UGRR was just a marketing ploy as there was no mention of the book or the quilt blocks. The new lines were marked "quilt shop only" so they sould not be showing up in the chain stores...........Cyndi in Maine

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