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Quilters Find a way to care

Subject: 19th century quilt poetry and prose. (A Civil War Veteran quilter.) From: 

When we documented quilts for the Connecticut Quilt Search Project, we found three male quiltmakers who had been soldiers in the Civil War. It was neat to find this accounting of a male quiltmaker/Civil War Veteran in a 1902 Pennsylvania newspaper. sue reich New Oxford Item New Oxford, Pennsylvania April 11, 1904 Novel Piece of Patchwork John Billingsley, an inmate of the Soldier’s Home, has completed a unique patchwork quilt, upon which he has been working for two years past. The quilt is made entirely of satin and sateen, and is designed to depict the glories of the Union as they appear to an old soldier. There are 984 distinct pieces and 1,132,755 stitches in the article. The spread is a little over five feet square. In the centre is a large star, made up of small diamond-shaped pieces. In this star are set portraits of Washington, Lincoln, Grant, Garfield, and McKinley photographed upon silk. The star is surrounded by 24 badges of the army corps of the civil war and by 45 national flags representing each state. Then there are the flags of eight foreign nations with which the United States at some time or other has been engaged in war. The quilt is bordered with parallel stripes of red, white and blue and edged with a fine gold fringe. The whole is artistically put together and reflects credit upon the workmanship of the maker. Billingsley was a member of the Eighty-first Pennsylvania when the civil war began, but later entered the service of the regular army. ---Washington Post. ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: 19th century quilt poetry and prose. (A Civil War Veteran quilter.) From: Xenia Cord 

Is there any hope of recovering and seeing the quilts described in these accounts of quilts connected to the Civil War? Xenia ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Marseilles Spread From: "BOBBIE A AUG" <qwltpro@msn.com Date: Fri, 7 

 charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Gaye, While I do not have one with nursery rhymes, one that I have has the patt= ern number overstitched on each hemmed edge. It is 19th century. It is,= "PAT. 18.30 .4" and I don't have others like this. I would be intereste= d to know if others have seen similar pattern identification on theirs. Bobbie Aug ------=_NextPart_001_0003_01C3A504.D23F93A0-- ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Art Needlework Catalog From: "Julia D. Zgliniec" <

 4 Good Morning Everyone, A few weeks ago, while attending a quilt show, I stopped by the show's "Pink Frog" booth to see what I could find. After rummaging around in a box of old patterns and what not, I found a bag of old papers and catalogs for $1.50. I figured there would be at least one thing of interest - so I bought it! Well.... one of the things in addition to an Ann Orr catalog was, Aunt Ellen's complete Art Needlework - catalog no. 8. There is no date - so I am wondering when this might have been published by Modern Handcraft, Inc. from Kansas City. The second page has a letter from Aunt Ellen and the picutre is of a factory that says "Home of Aunt Ellen's Workbasket. It also goes on to say " As a WORKBASKET subscriber, you are entitled to an Aunt Ellen's Needlework Club Member discount. Is this different than the Workbasket magazines? The reverse of the cover page shows stamped designs for a State Bird Quilt and a State Flower Quilt. These are stamped blocks. Yet another variation on this theme? Does anyone have any information on this catalog? Regards, Julia Zgliniec ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: blue batting From: Hazelmacc@aol.com Date: Fri, 7 Nov 2003 11:20:09 EST X-Message-Number: 5 Perhaps this blue batting everyone has spoken of is not wool but is cotton. l have a quilt with a background that appears tinted green -- when l had it washed my friend was quite surprised when the water turned green. As the quilt dried the color was less and less green and now appears tinted. Luckily we had learned from Rabbit Goody that cotton growers in the early 1900s attempted to grow cotton in colors. l have seen a quilt batting in Williamsport PA museum that is pink. When visiting a friend in No. Carolina she gave me a sample of the cotton that growers there are trying to grow today -- it is brown. Hazel Carter No. VA 

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Subject: Colored Cotton From: "Julia D. Zgliniec" 

Good Morning Again! Here is a link to a brief page about Sally Fox who has been developing various colors of cotton since the 80s. http://www.foxfibre.com/sally_fox_story.htm Type Sally Fox and Fox Fiber into your browser and you will get other links with information about colored cotton. Julia Zgliniec ( my other hat is a spinner's cap ) ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: blue batting From: Kittencat3@aol.com Date: Fri, 07 Nov 2003 11:49:54 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7 Hm. It sounds from Lynne Bassett's description as if this is a bright indigo blue, but I haven't actually seen one. Interesting idea. I know there was a line of organic tinted cotton clothing a few years ago (pastel green, pink, yellow and beige) but wasn't aware that they were doing it so long ago. Interesting.... Lisa Evans ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: blue batting From: "Maurice Northen" 

 Hazel and all, When this was last discussed I did some research in the book EARLY AMERICAN WEAVING AND DYEING by J. & R. Bronson, sub-titled The Domestic Manufacturer's Assistant and Family Directory in the Arts of Weaving and Dyeing. (Mine is a reproduction of the 1817 version) on page 159 are "the directions for an excellent Black on Woollen: to produce a superior black, you must in the first place dye the cloth a light indigo blue in the warm dye which to be done before fulling; then full and it for coloring." Yes indeed, in Texas we grow several colors of cotton, green and tan most common, there is a yellow, but poor. Joan of the South ------------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: blue batting From: "Sally Ward" 

An English researcher with whom I discussed the question of dyed battings happened shortly afterwards to be visiting the Netherlands, where a contact told her that dyed battings are not unusual, and indeed that they didn't seem to worry about putting dark battings into light coloured quilts. One suggestion was that the indigo dye was regarded as 'hygienic'. This might tie in with the suggestion of the habit arising in the US because of the scarcity of water as a resource, and so a good cleansing hot dyebath was not to be wasted . We still can't find evidence of dyed battings over here, but then in the UK we don't tend to be short of the odd swift-flowing stream or two to cleanse the fleeces. Sally W ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: core badge star quilt From:

There is a picture of a cotton and silk star of Bethlehem quilt, circa 1901, with military core badges and 4 president's pictures on it, in Sandi Fox's recent book on California Quilts. It's on page 104-107. I saw it in person and it's most unique. The president's pictures are in sepia tone on heavy cardboard, which is glued to a larger square piece of fabric, which is then appliqued to the quilt. The background color of the top is bright yellow, with all the other colors of the rainbow in the star. The core badges, from hats I believe, maybe shirts, of soldiers, were used to identify which group they were with as the head soldiers could not always remember, so the story is told. These pages are actually symbols, with a number on them too. They are also in bright colors. This quilt has flags and possible tobacco premiums around the star and in the corners of a red, white and blue border, which is surrounded by yellow fringe to finish it off. It is hand quilted and made entirely by a man an injured soldier of the Spanish American War, it is believe, but no provenance is known. It has been in the owner's family for many years. It measures 79- 96. For more information, if you have the spring 2003 issue of Blanket Statements, there is a blk & Wh picture of a portion of it and an article I wrote with more information on it. Kim Wulfert www.antiquequiltdating.com ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Studio Quilt Study Group meeting coming up 

The November meeting of Studio Quilt Study Group will be on Tuesday the 18th at the Pennsylvania Quilt and Textile Museum in Lititz, Pa., the brand new museum that Judy Kelius directs, and you are invited. The museum is only open by appointment now, although Judy says it will have a grand opening probably in December. Here's a little teaser about what we will see at the Museum in Lititz. http://members.ebay.com/aboutme/paquiltmuseum/ Judy Kelius has planned a wonderful day for us, which I am quoting below. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

10 AM - Noon On arrival, go directly to Museum. We are going to set up a large table with chairs around it so we can meet and lay out quilts that are not hanging. I thought we could start out by looking at the quilts on display. There are about 40 quilts plus many extras, so knowing this group, I don't think they will get bored <GR. Noon - 1 PM Lunch 1:00 - 1:30 or whenever Tour of the Kready's Country Store Museum 1:30-3:00 or whenever Return to the Quilt Museum and look at more quilts - our collection has around 100 now, so there are plenty more in storage to look at (actually, some of the best are currently stored). I can pull out the ones I think people will be most interested in seeing. I can also show you a notebook I put together which contains photos and descriptions of everything we own, in case you would see something you think I missed. If you are coming from a distance, you might want to consider coming on Monday and spending the night. Judy recommends the Warwick Inn on Route 501, less than a mile from the museum. Their rate is $87 (includes continental breakfast) or $78 with an AAA or AARP membership. This is a small, fairly new place, the nicest in Lititz. The Warwick Inn number is 1-800-264-7143. A few of us have already made our reservations there. My husband, Allan, has said he wants to share the day too, so I've got my roommate. I think other husbands might find they actually enjoy spending the day with us, and they are most certainly welcome, as are other friends you may want to share the experience with. If you can give me an indication of how many of you would want to come and spend Monday night I can call and see if we can get a better rate. Put your pajama parties together yourselves, or let me know if you want roommates and I can act as a clearing house to put people together. I need to give Judy a list of all those who will be there at least a week before so that the food can be ordered and prepared, etc. So, I am going to arbitrarily set Monday, November 10th as the deadline for responding. Directions for getting to Lititz: Take the Pennsylvania Turnpike West to Exit 21, Denver/Lancaster/Ephrata. When you come out of the toll gates, stay left and turn left on Route 222 South. Go about 6-7 miles to the second exit on 222 for Route 772. Stay right at the end of the exit ramp and take 772 into Lititz (about 6 miles). As you come into Lititz, you will go past the light at Locust Street. Then look for Water Street on the right (across from the Linden Hall School for Girls and the Moravian Church). There is no light at Water Street, but there is a sign for Brunnersville and Clay. Lititz Junction is in the first block on the right, plenty of parking in front. If the main main door isn't open (especially for latecomers), there is an intercom buzzer to ring to be let in. J

there will be a flat fee of $15 per person which will include lunch and admission to the two museums. They will do a sandwich buffet lunch with beverages and dessert for the group. They usually have soup as well. Judy says she has seen what they do for other groups and it is always very nice. Judy in Ringoes, NJ judygrow@patmedia.net

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Subject: 19th century quilt poetry and prose (A memorial for Veteran's Day) From: 

I have read parts of this article before. I think that Virginia Gunn published the part relating to quilts in an Uncoverings paper. Here is the rest of the story. sue reich The Coshocton Age Coshocton, Ohio March 11, 1865 Woman’s Sympathy for our Soldiers. There is a touching pathos in some of the markers attached to the blankets, shirts, handkerchiefs, and the like, sent to the Sanitary Commission for the soldiers in camp and hospital. Thus on a bed quilt was pinned a card having this tender inscription: “My son is in the army; whoever is made warm by this quilt, which I worked on for six days and most all of six nights, let him remember his own mother’ s love!” Who can doubt that these simple words have made some weak one strong again, filled some sad heart with joy and hope? On a pillow sent to the commission was written: “This pillow belonged to my little boy, who died resting on it; it is a precious treasure to me, but I give it to the soldiers!” On a box of beautiful lint was this inscription: “Made in a sick room, where the sunlight has not entered for nine years, but where God has entered, and where two sons have bid their mother good-bye, as they have gone to the war.” What a spirit of sacrifice and saintly heroism shines through this little sentence; sunshine, joy, sympathy, coming out of the shadow, the camp fire and the hospital. But the tenderest of all inscriptions we have seen is this, written on some eye-shades; “Made by one who is blind. Oh! How I long to see the dear old flag you are all fighting under.” ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Studio Quilt Study Group meeting coming up From: "batwoman522 aka 

 X-Message-Number: 3 Hi Judy, I can't wait. I am really excited. My husband, Mahmoud Sami, will join me. He will probably do his own thing, take pictures in and around the area. Please include us in your list for overnight. Can we get together for dinner? I have AAA and AARP; see if you can do any better. Thanks, Arlene Marin PS. There are lots of quilts to see there. Are we supposed to bring our own too? Overkill? 

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Subject: Re: blue batting From: "Lynne Z. Bassett" <lzbassett@comcast.net Date: Sat, 8 Nov 2003 13:26:44 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6 No, really, it's wool--not cotton. Lynne Perhaps this blue batting everyone has spoken of is not wool but is cotton. l have a quilt with a background that appears tinted green -- when l had it washed my friend was quite surprised when the water turned green. As the quilt dried the color was less and less green and now appears tinted. Luckily we had learned from Rabbit Goody that cotton growers in the early 1900s attempted to grow cotton in colors. l have seen a quilt batting in Williamsport PA museum that is pink. Hazel Carter No. VA ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: blue batting From: "Lynne Z. Bassett" <lzbassett@comcast.net Date: Sat, 8 Nov 2003 13:56:17 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7 In New England, where I found the dyed quilt battings, water is definitely not scarce (witness the hundreds and hundreds of water-powered mills that popped up all over the region in the 19th century), but I certainly wouldn't be surprised if a dyebath was used for as long as possible. I sure wouldn't want to haul all that water for just a small project! Sally, do you have any period references to the idea of indigo dye being considered hygienc? I find the idea surprising, considering that urine is such an intrinsic part of the indigo dyeing process, which was well known for its stench. Best, Lynne An English researcher with whom I discussed the question of dyed battings happened shortly afterwards to be visiting the Netherlands, where a contact told her that dyed battings are not unusual, and indeed that they didn't seem to worry about putting dark battings into light coloured quilts. One suggestion was that the indigo dye was regarded as 'hygienic'. This might tie in with the suggestion of the habit arising in the US because of the scarcity of water as a resource, and so a good cleansing hot dyebath was not to be wasted . We still can't find evidence of dyed battings over here, but then in the UK we don't tend to be short of the odd swift-flowing stream or two to cleanse the fleeces. Sally W ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: blue batting From: "Sally Ward" <sallytatters@ntlworld.com Date: Sat, 8 Nov 2003 20:21:35 -0000 X-Message-Number: 8 Sally, do you have any period references to the idea of indigo dye being considered hygienc? I find the idea surprising, considering that urine is such an intrinsic part of the indigo dyeing process, which was well known for its stench. Sorry Lynne, it wasn't my suggestion...passed to me third hand but from a very reputable source. I'll see if I can find out more. Sally 

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Subject: Re: blue batting From: Kittencat3@aol.com Date: Sat, 8 Nov 2003 17:58:05 EST X-Message-Number: 9 --part1_14b.26840ffe.2cdecefd_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit An indigo exhaust bath produces a faint mintish green color, not blue. I got a nice batch of green linen from one once, but the color wasn't light fast so I didn't do it again. Also, an indigo exhaust bath is quite obvious. Anyone who did any dyeing at all would know instantly that the result wouldn't be blue.... Lisa Evans Easthampton, MA --

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Subject: 19th century quilt poetry and prose From: <mreich@attglobal.net Date: Sun, 9 Nov 2003 09:13:04 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1 Here is another Civil War account that includes a quilt. Reading it will take you beyond sadness, however, it depicts the realities of war. sue reich The Gettysburg Compiler Gettysburg, PA November 11, 1862 A touching scene is related as transpiring in a Philadelphia hospital recently. Some benevolent ladies had distributed ice cream to the invalid soldiers, and all gladly partook of the refreshment, save one young, pale, handsome boy. His eyes were closed, and one of the ladies observing him, whispered, “the poor little fellow is asleep; we must not disturb him.” “No, ma’am, I am not asleep,” he answered, in a silvery voice, full of the sweetness of innocence and boyhood. “Well, my little fellow,” continued the lady, as she drew nearer, “are you fond of ice cream?” “Very much so,” he replied. “Didn’t you see me place this on your little table?” reaching for the plate of cream. “Oh, yes,” he answered, tremulously, “but I shut my eyes and cried to myself.” “Cried, my child? Why, what made you cry, my dear?” “Oh, madam! If you pull the quilt down a little you will see.” The lady did so, and found that he had no arms. Both of them he had lost in battle.

 

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