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Quilters Find a way to care

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Subject: Re: textile behind M. Khadafi From: "Alan R. Kelchner" 

I'm not certain what Gadafi's people would call this particular style of tent, but patchwork festival tents exist in that part of the world. Several years ago, I bought what I thought was a summer-weight folk art quilt. Turned out to be a tent wall for an Indian tent, called a shamiana. The piece is mainly appliqued and reverse appliqued, including the running diamond borders ! It has a naive quality to the craftsmanship, but the amount of handwork on the piece is incredible. The shamiana is even quilted in embroidery-weight thread, parallel lines 1/2" apart running the length of the piece.

Alan

Alan

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Subject: Male reporting.......... From: "Sally Ward" <sallytatters@ntlworld.com> Date: 

> Do you really think a male would be that savvy about > fabric name or did someone supply him with that information??

Not being sexist there are you Joan? <G>. I think any man who can tell a designer camouflage shirt from an army one, and notes when calf-length boots are being worn under 'slacks' (not common parlance amongst the males in my household), is quite likely to know chiffon when he sees it <G>.

Sally W

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Subject: RE: Gunboat Ladies From: "kerrybrack@ozemail.com.au" 

i am humbled donyou donated the quilt backfo r sure lets see a pictureawesomekerry in sydney australia Original 

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Subject: tulle and patches From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Tue, 23 Dec 

Right on, Gaye, you echo what I always feel about despots. The journalist's description provided a stark contrast of humankind's ability to produce finery and beauty on one hand and on the other hand to destroy it with acts of brainless deeds.

Gaye Ingram wrote:

>As we ponder this subject, I am struck by a recurring question: do you think >the people at Lockerby or the parents of students from Syracuse U who would >be parents themselves by now or any of those who loved people on that plane >that went down in Scotland would care what the Libyan Brother Leader lives >under? but loving our neighbor does not include excusing his atrocities. I >don't think there is enough pink chiffon in the Middle East to disguise Col >Khadafi's crimes against humanity. > > > >

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Subject: Male reporting.......... From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Tue, 23 

Sally -- guess I am. I'd say the gent is sharp on men's apparel but chiffon?? No way. Someone clued him in -- the Fab 5 perhaps were on hand??? :-D Alan and Don -- is there any way you can post your shamiana and quilt to eboard??

Sally Ward wrote:

>Not being sexist there are you Joan? <G>. I think any man who can tell a >designer camouflage shirt from an army one, and notes when calf-length boots >are being worn under 'slacks' (not common parlance amongst the males in my >household), is quite likely to know chiffon when he sees it <G>. > > > >

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Subject: 1820's Hexagon Quilt From: Donald Beld <donbeld@pacbell.net> Date: Tue, 

So, Happy Holidays everyone--I finally decided to learn how to post to the

vintagepictures.eboard.com to show the Gunboat Ladies quilt--thanks Joan for your

help. I wasn't sure it was appropriate as it is a raffle quilt. Anyway, as a thank you, I also posted pictures of the unbelievable 1820's English paperpieced Hexagon quilt I have come across in my travels. You MUST look at this quilt. Every cell is fussy cut and is unbelievable. I love the snail fabric and would die for the browns. It was never made into a whole quilt--it is just the top, but that adds to its interest and you can see the basteing stitches on the cells and on the back is the paper piecing complete with faint brown writing from the paper used. I would estimate that there are approximately 8000 individual cells in this quilt. The maker was a seamstress and used a loop hemming stitch to sew the pieces together. It is in magnicent condition and belongs to a family in Long Beach California.

Family history is that it was made in New York City in the late 1820's by an English seamstress immigrant. ENJOY! Don Beld

--0-1120867251-1072202419:3512--

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Subject: Quilts of Provence From: "Celia Eddy" <celia.eddy@btinternet.com> Date: 

I wonder if anyone can give me contact details for Kathryn Berenson, the  author of this wonderful book?

For those who have not come across it yet, it is essential reading for  anyone interested in the history of quilts and quilt making. Both text  and illustrations are superb.

Thanks in advance - I feel confident that, as usual, someone on this  List will come up with the necessary information -you have never let me  down yet! Although I don't often post to it , I keep a close eye on it  and find it a mine of information.

Best wishes and a happy Christmas to everyone, Celia 

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Subject: 1820's Hexagon Quilt From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Tue, 23 

Don -- that's some quilt! What is fussy cutting and is hexagon the same as grandma's flower garden??

Do you all get the impression there's no stopping Don now that he has the key to the eboard???? :-D

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Subject: Re: Quilts of Provence From: Xenia Cord <xenia@legacyquilts.net> Date: 

Kathryn Berenson's book is called Quilts of Provence; The Art and Craft of French Quiltmaking. New York: Henry Holt and Company, 1996. (published in Canada by Fitzhenry & Whiteside, Ltd., Markham, Ontario.) ISBN 0-8050-4639-9.

I believe there is also a second volume, although I don't have it.

Publishers' addresses if you need them - you might reach her through one or the other. She divides her time between France and the Washington, DC, area, I think.

Xenia

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Subject: Re: 1820's Hexagon Quilt From: Xenia Cord <xenia@legacyquilts.net> Date: 

Joan's question was to Don, but in the interim may I say that "fussy cutting" is centering design elements inside the shape before it is cut, or in some other way making the figures on the fabric serve as a second layer of design (stripes, for instance, cut in hexagons, can be lined up to make hexagonal rings of stripes).

There is a lot of fabric waste in fussy cutting, something that goes against the grain (sorry!) for most traditional quilters. Hexagons especially can be cut edge to edge with no fabric waste, if they are cut without regard for fabric design.

The pattern we know of as Grandmother's Flower Garden, composed of hexagons in a repeating set of rings, with a yellow center and then rings of coordinated print and plain fabrics and separated by rings of white hexagons, is a 20th century designation. In the 19th century the design was known as Honeycomb or Mosaic, usually pieced over papers in the English method and joined with very tiny whipped stitches (or variations thereof).

Happy Holidays! Xenia

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Subject: gunboat ladies From: Judy White <jawhite@infionline.net> Date: Tue, 23 

The gunboat ladies quilt is spectacular, Don. I'm guess that it is about 144" square. Am I anywhere close?

Judy White

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Subject: 1820's Hexagon Quilt From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Tue, 23 

Thanx for cutting across the grain to explain this, Xenia. Also, is Kathryn Berenson any relation to the famous art collector, dealer, expert and critic, Bernard Berenson and his granddaughter actress Marisa Berenson?

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Subject: very preliminary thoughts on "cotton" exhibit From: "Candace Perry" 

Something for you all to mull over in the next few days!

These are very brief, very early thoughts on the direction of my proposed 2005 exhibit on cotton in PA German life. I would appreciate any comments or criticisms, or "you're full of it!" Thanks, Candace Perry Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center Pennsburg, PA

Cotton in Pennsylvania German Life Exhibition, Programming, Publication, Online Exhibition

Introduction

By the mid 19th century, southeastern Pennsylvania German residents had nearly abandoned the use of linen spun at home and woven by custom weavers in their rural communities in favor of readily available mass-produced cotton prints for clothing and household textiles. The array of color and pattern certainly must have delighted them, in keeping with the love of color and design that is shown in their decorative arts. These prints made into clothing and domestic objects, most specifically, quilts.

Objective

The exhibition will introduce audiences to the use of mass produced cotton fabric among the Pennsylvania Germans, and place it within its historical context. Visitors will leave with a better understanding of the roots of Pennsylvania German quilting in particular, which roughly paralleled the introduction and availability of these fabrics.

Method

1. Exhibition 4/2005 through 9/30/2005 in local history/art gallery 2. Symposium 3. Related school activities 4. Possible school age exhibit – textile printing 5. Online exhibit 6. Publication

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Subject: hexagon quilt From: Donald Beld <donbeld@pacbell.net> Date: Tue, 23 Dec 

"you say honeycomb" "I say hexagon"--let's call the whole thing off--to paraphrase the song.

Xenia is, of course, absolutely right. Hexagon was an 18th century quilt pattern brought over to the US by English settlers and is one of the earliest pieced patterns--remember the more complicated the pattern, the earlier it is likely to be. Grandma's flower garden is the 20th Century version and usually is made with bigger pieces. The earlier quilts have 1/2 inch to 1 inch pieces and were very labor intense. They probably were popular as a way to show off the maker's skill (a sign of breeding and class in the 18th and early 19th Century).

The little, as Xenia calls them, "whipped stitches" that sew the combs together are so close and small on this quilt that when I first saw them, my heart sank because I thought they were machine which would have been impossible in the 1820's. (yes I know there were sewing machines, but none could have made a hexagon quilt.

This quilt is so vibrant and special. The fabric colors are so bright. It dispels all the dull"browns" talk about 19 Century fabrics. I am glad you all are enjoying seeing it. The woman who currently owns it saved it from brothers and sisters who were going to cut it into four pieces so everyone could have part. Thank God she was a quilter and said absolutely not! Her work is quite good also, she is a little obsessive compulsive like I am and takes great pride in her work. She does outstanding applique pieces. I am trying to get her to donate this quilt to a good museum, but they don't want to part with it. Time will tell. Don

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Subject: Re: Quilts of Provence From: "Celia Eddy" <celia.eddy@btinternet.com> 

Thanks, Xenia. I'll try to contact Kathryn Berenson via her publishers, as you suggest.

Happy Christmas! Celia

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Subject: hexagon quilt & cheers From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Wed, 

Thanx Don for the additional description. A treasured save by owner, indeed.

My best wishes to all for the occasion you are celebrating or observing. May it be filled with family love and surrounded by friends.

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Subject: Kathryn Berenson From: "Anne Datko" <datkoa@erols.com> Date: Wed, 24 

As of a couple of years ago:

Kathryn Berenson PO Box 39128 Washington DC 20016 USA 202-686-346, Fax 202-686-2034 kwberenson@aol.com

3, rue Brea 75006 Paris, France tel/fax 011-331-46-34-16-21

Kathryn gives a very nice talk, by the way.

AnneD 

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Subject: Re: Quilts of Provence From: "kerrybrack@ozemail.com.au" 

it is xmas day in sydneycheerseveryone 

i have this aforementioned book and it is something i have by my bedside t o look at before i go to bedwe pay a lot more for our books h ere in australiai paid $100 for itthis book is one of those  forever beautiful bookskerry Original Message: ----------------- From: Celia Eddy celiaeddy@btinternetcom Date: Wed, 24 Dec 2003 12:35:43 -0000 To: qhl@lyrisquiltropoliscom Subject: [qhl] Re: Quilts of Provence

Thanks, Xenia I'll try to contact Kathryn Berenson via her publishers, as you suggest

Happy Christmas! Celia

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Subject: Re: Quilts of Provence From: "Ruth Cattles Cottrell" 

Amazon is selling this book for quite a bit less than $100. Take a look.

Ruth

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Subject: Re: Quilts of Provence From: "Quiltstuff" <quiltstuff@optusnet.com.au> 

Don't forget Ruth, Kerry was talking about aussie dollars. Our dollar has gone up recently or rather your has gone down or whichever.. But at the current Amazon price of $45 US plus at least $10 postage , it would have cost well over a $100 until quite recently. And we are still paying $26 for fabric!! VBG

Suzy

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Subject: Re: 19th century poetry and prose (A Christmas Eve poem from a new Gran... 

Thankyou for sharing a lovely poem and welcome to grandparent society. My grandchildren range from 29 to almost 3. When the last one was born I had retired and had time to visit lots. When we rocked I would sing to him. One song is one my mother sang to me. Gradually I begin to remembered the words. But now as it is Christmas I realize I've again forgotten many of the words. Hence I'm asking if anyone knows the song? it is Hang the baby's stocking, I do remember some of the lines. they are [not in order Hang up the baby's stocking be sure you don't forget the dear little darling has never seen Christmas yet Pin Grandma's stocking to it and fill it to the toe..... It doesn't take much to hold the wee little toes of Babe. I know this isn't quilt related and I should have written the words done a couple years ago,or when my mother was around to tell me . Has anyone heard this song? May the seasons blessings be with you whatever you celebrate. Martha Grandmother to 14 and greatgrandmother of 4.

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Subject: The Baby's Stocking From: "Sally Ward" <sallytatters@ntlworld.com> Date: 

I've never heard this song, but tried it in Google. Follow links on this site http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/smhtml/sm1870Titles137.html (the link to the exact page is too long to paste here) and you can get to a facsimile of the sheet music, you can even turn the pages to see the words and music.

Compliments of the Season to all QHLers, and thanks for your generous friendship.

Sally W in UK

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Subject: Where are pictures? From: "Audrey Cameron" 

Merry Christmas to all, I know I should know, but could someone post me the information on where to find quilt pictures put up by members of the list. I would most like to see Don's hexagon one. Thanks.

Audrey Cameron in Lincolnshire, England audreycameron@onetel.net.uk

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Subject: 19th century quilt poetry and prose (The Baby's Stocking) From:  4

Thanks Sally and Audrey for the reference to this sweet poem. I have added it to my collection. Here it is from the site Sally gave. What a Christmas treat! sue reich

Hang up the Baby' stocking. 
Be sure you don't forget! 
The dear little dimpled darling. 
She ne'er saw Christmas yet; 
But I've told her all about it, 
And she opened her big blue eyes, 
And I'm sure she understands it, 
She look'd so funny and wise.

Dear what a tiny stocking, 
It doesn't take much to hold 
Such little pink toes as baby's 
Away from the frost and cold. 
But the for the baby's christmas 
It will never do at all, 
Why Santa wouldn't be looking 
For any thing half so small!

I know what we'll do for the baby- 
I've thought of the very best plan- 
I'll borrow a stocking of Grandma, 
The longest that ever I can; 
And you'll hang it by mine, dear mother, 
Right here in the corner so,
 And write a letter to Santa, 
And fasten it on to the toe.

Write, "this is baby's stocking 
Be sure you don't forget! 
You never have seen her, Santa, 
For she only came this year; 
But she's just the blessedest baby, 
And now before you go, 
Just cram her stocking with goodies, 
From the top clear down to the toe

Chorus 
Hang up the Baby's stocking, 
Be sure you don't forget! T
he dear little dimpled darling, 
She ne'er saw Christmas yet.

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Subject: Skinners Civil War Quilt Posted on Eboards. From: DDBSTUFF@aol.com Date: 

A while back there was a discussion of the "Civil War" quilt being sold at Skinner's Auction. I had posted a picture on the Eboards. Well, I just read where it had sold for $149,000. Yes, one hundred forty-nine thousand US dollars. Gee, its nice to know some quilts are selling for real money.

By the way, I have forgotten the Eboard password. Can someone give me a reminder.

Thanks and Merry, Merry, Happy, Happy to you all;

Darwin Bearley

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Subject: Post-Holiday opportunity in Maryland From: "Phyllis Twigg" 

If you are interested in attending the Elly Sienkiewicz lecture at the  Baltimore Museum of Art on Sunday afternoon, January 4th, and need a  place to stay...

Or, if you want to recuperate from the Holidays, with no cooking  involved...

Or, if you think your "post-Holidays" days might need an uplift...

Then, women, I have an offer for you!

The Baltimore AppliquE9 Society will be holding a retreat the weekend  of January 2,3,4 about one hour south of Baltimore. It will be an easy  going, rest, chat, read, or sew what you like (doesn't have to be  appliquE9) event, with five delicious meals and two nights waterfront  lodging for only $99.

Please email me for additional information on how you can join us! Phyllis Twigg ptwigg@radix.net

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Subject: Cold Mountain From: "Jeff 'n Sheri Lesh" <jefflesh@netins.net> Date: Fri, 26 

My husband were home by ourselves for the first time in 30+ years, so we went to a movie in the afternoon. I wanted to recommend it to you. It is a moving story, the battle scenes were accurate and heart rendering. As well as the situations of the Home Guard, what a horrid group of people they were. If you go, watch for the textiles too. Ada, played by Nicole Kidman wore a quilted apron that the camera pans, there was a quilted bonnet, and the details on a couple other shot of blouses and pillow slips were wonderful too. The story is not necessarily pro north or south, but more really anti-war. The dissolution of soldiers going to war with one idea, and the reality has changed them and repulsed them.

We also happened to see a show on Tuesday evening on the Discovery Channel, they did a repeat of the History Explorered on Gettysburg, then followed it with Cold Mountain Revealed, or something like that. I might not have the name exactly. I would assume they will show it again, so you might want to look for that. They talked about the book the movie is based on as well as true situations that happened that are portrayed in the movie. The historical background to the Home Guard, etc. So you might want to look for that also.

I'd be interested to know what you all come away with this movie with.

Sheri in windy, but warm Iowa

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Subject: eboard From: Judy White <jawhite@infionline.net> Date: Fri, 26 Dec 2003 

Darwin, here's the address to eboard.

vintagepictures.eboard.com

Judy White

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Subject: sanitary commission quilts From: "Laura Fisher" <laurafisher@netlink1.net> 

I just remembered I had an intriguing Sanitary Commission Quilt that I  sold several years ago to the Lynn, Massachusetts Historical Society. It  is documented in Jennifer Regan's book "American Quilts and the Stories  They Told" (it's probably out of print, if someone needs further info I  can probably find my copy and xerox the chapter on the quilt)

It is pieced in the Wheel of Mystery or Winding Ways pattern. Each white  pie shaped segment of this red and white fundraising quilt contains  cursive writing in ink that records the activities of the Boston Street  Aid Society, a women's Methodist Church group, in relation to the  Sanitary Commission -- making and sending shoes (the town was a center  for shoe manufacturing); sending bandages, collecting money, etc.

Jennifer did research in the town archives to document the quilt for the  book. When the town learned of the quilt, they undertook a fundraising  campaign to acquire it. This made the quilt have the lovely distinction  of raising money twice, in two centuries, for good causes!

Laura Fisher ------_

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Subject: Re: sanitary commission quilts From: Kittencat3@aol.com Date: Fri, 26 Dec 

Question: how many of the original Sanitary Commission quilts are left? I read somewhere (Hearts & Hands, perhaps?) that almost none had survived the war because they were literally used until they shredded. Is this true, or do some still exist?

Then again, there's all sorts of buried treasures in local historical societies...I'm waiting until after the holidays to check out a few in western Massachusetts. Should be fun, and a lot more stimulating than the usual "it's January in Massachusetts so let's all hibernate until maple sugar season" mode that everyone seems to go into on January 2nd. :)

And before it's too late: Merry Christmas, Happy Solstice, Happy Channukah, Happy Kwanzaa, and a joyous, peaceful, and prosperous New Year to one and all on the list.

Lisa Evans Easthampton, Massachusetts

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Subject: White House Quilt From: "Laura Fisher" <laurafisher@netlink1.net> Date: 

I have a fun quilt depicting the White House that I would like to get  more information on if anyone on the list may have knowledge of this  pattern.

It shows the familiar portico view -- the semi circular bay with  columns, the fountain on the lawn down in front, the trees flanking it,  etc. -- all done in applique in traditional 1930s style and colors.

I have seen a lot of 1930s quilts, but never this one before. I hope,  but don't know, if it is unique. Does anyone have any knowledge of it?

Thanks and happy new year to all.

I look forward to the continuous fountain of fascinating information  from QHL in 2004! It is such a pleasant respite from having to  straighten up my shop to be able to read about quilt and textiles thanks  to the diligent efforts of the members of the list!

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Subject: U.S. Sanitary Commission Quilts From: Donald Beld <donbeld@pacbell.net> Date: Fri, 26 Dec 2003 21:53:32 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 1

Regarding the survival of the Sanitary Commission quilts. There were two types of Sanitary Commission quilts and a few of each type survive. First was raffle quilts--frequently made of silk and used to raise funds for the Northern War cause. There are several of these still existing. They usually were raffled at the Sanitary Commission Fairs that were held around the North in major cities to raise funds and supplies for the war cause. There is the one mentioned on the list today, one at the DAR museum in Washington that is a duplicate of a quilt given to Lincoln, one in St Louis that was a presentation quilt to Sherman that he donated to a raffle (Cuesta Benberry was nice enough to tell me about that one).

The other type of Sanitary Commission quilts are the ones given to soldiers for use by them on the front or used in the military hospitals as bed covers. These are the quilts they requested to be 50 by 84 inches and were called "Long Quilts". I know of only five of these quilts that have survived, but there are probably others in family attics and the family doesn't know what they are. The DAR has one, a musuem in New England has one (I am not sure which one), the A.K.Smiley Library/Lincoln Shrine in Redlands, Calif has one and it is one public display, and there are two documented by Brackman as being in private hands. To the best of my knowledge the Smithsonian doesn't have one.

The reason so few survived is that they were worn out and discarded during the war; and when soldiers died, they frequently were buried in their quilts as there was a shortage of wood coffins.

Remember that to be a genuine Sanitary Commission quilt, they must be ink stamped on the back with one of the several stamps used by the Sanitary Commission to mark donated items--they stamped everything, socks, clothes, quilts, etc.

I wrote an article in the Winter 2002 issue of American Quilters (Society) Magazine about America's responses in times of War, and the Lincoln Shrine quilt and the delightful story that goes with it is featured in that article. The article, of course, was brillantly written by me, and although the magazine didn't footnote my article, it did in fact have foothotes and references. I, personally, think this is wonderful area of research on our history and the contribution of American quilters. If anyone finds another real Sanitary Commission quilt I hope they let us--and especially me--know about it.

Another area of research in this area is the Red Cross quilts from WWI. I would love to come across one of those also--more of them exist in museums and private hands and I suspect more of them survived than the Sanitary Commission quilts. Don Beld

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Subject: Red Cross quilts From: "Sally Ward" <sallytatters@ntlworld.com> Date: Sat, 

> Another area of research in this area is the Red Cross quilts from WWI. I would love to come across one of those also--more of them exist in museums and private hands and I suspect more of them survived than the Sanitary Commission quilts. Don Beld

Hi Don

I've been trying to research the Red Cross quilts for several years over here, since I stumbled upon the small collection in the keeping of the Quilters Guild of the British Isles. Their story is very similar to that of the Sanitary Commission quilts - there were fund raisers, and ones to be used. Although I very recently heard the story of one which appears to have done both. This year it was returned to its place of making in Canada after the death of its elderly gentleman owner. He had kept it all his life along with his family bible. When I saw pictures of the quilt being handed over I was astounded to see that it was a signature quilt which must surely have been made as a fund-raiser and then shipped over for use in war relief. It will be going on display in Sault St Marie in the new year, and I'll send more information then.

In all my time of seeking, and leaving my name everywhere and anywhere, I've managed to find and photograph about 20 of these quilts here in the UK, and own three. They have a distinct style of making and use of materials which identify them, but like the Sanitary Commission quilts they can only be regarded as authentic if they still carry their small red and white 'Gift of the Canadian Red Cross' label. Again like the SC quilts I am sure many were worn to extinction. A few survive with their stories, but most turn up in flea markets and a poor condition.

I've tried many places for documentation but there just isn't any....my theory is that the record keepers were men who didn't see any difference between a quilt and a blanket <G>. I can't even find Red Cross records about organisation and methods, although I could tell you the exact specifications for boxes of bandages. The small pieces of information we do have point to the quilts having been made and shipped in many thousands. What I can tell you is that every time I have found one with an original owner they speak of how they brought colour and brightness to an existence which was very monochrome. As time wore on and manufacturing focussed on the war effort there was no paint and no new textiles to brighten homes where blackout blinds were left up all day, or windows painted or covered with brown paper so the arrival of bright fabrics on a warm covering was something which left a lasting impression. And for those who were displaced by bombing or relocation they were a godsend.

I'm sorry, I can bore for England on this subject. That's probably enough for today <G>

Sally W in UK

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Subject: Red Cross quilts and WW I quilts From: <mreich@attglobal.net> Date: Sat, 

There are many surviving WW I, Red Cross quilts in the U.S. In addition, almost all of the 20th century, town histories and archives in Connecticut contain detailed information regarding the activities of organizations, and detailed descriptions of Red Cross chapters and their fundraising efforts for WW I. The rules for Red Cross chapters were fairly strict, (even including specific ways to dress) so much so that some organizations had to by-pass the rules to be involved in the War effort. Connecticut's documentation book, "Quilts and Quiltmakers Covering Connecticut" has an examples of two Red Cross quilts. One is in the collection of the Connecticut Historical Society. It follows the directions given in the 1917 Modern Priscilla for the construction of a fundraising quilt. The other is on the same page. It is a photo of a Red Cross worker (dressed to look like a nurse) standing in front of another signature, fundraising quilt of a different style. At least two other documentation books have quilts that follow the Modern Priscilla design; one of them is the Arizona D-Day book. I was privileged to be able to research for the bio the Connecticut Red Cross quilt. 

I found so much information throughout our state that I am convinced that this was the last great fundraising effort in our country. Organizations and Red Cross chapters set up to work in shifts - 24 hours a day. There were fundraising quilts of all sorts, signed and unsigned. There were quilts sent to the front and those that stayed at home.

 I have a quilt with a WW I story. My neighbor in Ohio gave it to me nearly 30 years ago. When she first told me the quilt's story, I balked and thought it was not true. Having researched for "Quilts and Quiltmakers," I now believe it to be true. The quilt is a "Hole in the Barn Door" from the 3rd quarter of the nineteenth century probably from Iowa. It came to Ohio with my former neighbor's mother when she married. During the War, my neighbor's sister had a boyfriend who was going to the Front. He came to visit them with another soldier, also, headed for the Front. My neighbor, Bertine, and her mom and sister had to quick piece a quilt to cover the fainting couch where this young soldier was going to sleep. So they took this old quilt top, used a blanket as a bat, put on an equally old batting and tied it with the wool yarn they were using to knit socks for the War effort. I

 have since found a WW I, Modern Priscilla featuring direction for knitting socks for the War. The recommended wool is exactly the same yarn used to tie the quilt. My neighbor was a teenager at the time of the War. I now believe her story about this quilt is true. I treasure this humble little quilt and give it a place of honor on my dining room table every fall. If our quilts could only talk!!! If Bertine had just given me this humble little quilt without its story, I would have never known its significance. How many more quilts have this same kind of story to tell? sue reich

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Subject: Re: U.S. Sanitary Commission Quilts From: "Judy Kelius (judysue)" 

>The other type of Sanitary Commission quilts are the ones given to >soldiers for use by them on the front or used in the military hospitals as >bed covers. These are the quilts they requested to be 50 by 84 inches and >were called "Long Quilts".

sampler.jpg (34594 bytes)If I ever read about the size of these, it didn't sink in! Very interesting. I have had several tops that were around this size . . . I wonder if they could have been intended for the Sanitary Commission? In fact, I just sold one on eBay (http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item2581680627) that could easily be Civil War period - it was a sampler top, 46 by 73", a little smaller than 50 x 84, but approximately same dimensions. It seemed like a finished design, but maybe a border was intended? I thought it was meant for one of those narrow beds under the eaves. We'll never know, but the Sanitary Commission connection seems a definite possibility. Someone could have gathered up a few odds and ends of quilt blocks and assembled them for this purpose.

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Subject: Re: U.S. Sanitary Commission Quilts From: barbara s 

i am a young quilter, and maybe thats why i never heard of this, but im fascinated with it and would like to thank you for sharing that info. i plan on doing some more research online, and maybe even the library may have something.

happy holidays,

barbara in indiana

Barbara S.

from Indiana

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Subject: Re: Red Cross quilts and WW I quilts From: "Sally Ward" 

Hellos sue!

Well, this is why I mention the RC quilts whenever I have the chance, because you never know when information will turn up. I've contacted all sorts of Red Cross archivists and been told there is nothing for me to look at!

We can find information about the fund-raising quilts quite easily, because they usually stayed in the US with the raffle winners and were much prized, but not about the organisation of the construction of the utility quilts that were sent over here. The quilts themselves vary between ones which we reckon must have been donated tops, because of their quality and intricacy of design and some really rough and ready examples. I've seen crazy quilts, blocks, even a strippy. Many have baptist fan quilting, but as many more are tied or very roughly grid quilted - they certainly look as if they were done in a frame with ladies on both sides with different quality stitches. The backing fabric is more often than not flannelette pyjama fabric, striped in blues or pinks or greens, or else plain pastel colours. The edges are almost always finished by turning the backing over to the front.

What we don't know is how the organisation worked on the ground....if you can find the answers to these questions you will have found our pot of gold <G>

*was backing fabric centrally distributed, or was it just what was available in every home town store and recommended?

*same question about the wadding (batting) which is almost inevitably white cotton batting which has worn incredibly well (although blankets were sometimes used)

*was fabric for the tops donated by companies, bought by the red cross, or donated by the makers (we think this unlikely because of the sheer quantity)?

*the Red Cross were meticulous about directions for other projects, so did they dictate size and construction techniques, or did the makers have a freer hand?

*how were they collected, transported and shipped?

*did anyone keep central records of numbers?

Its almost too late to find anyone who actually worked on these quilts. I've had a few leads, but they tend to dry up without producing anything. Anything at all you can give me would be wonderful....I am gradually collecting my information, photographs and stories and will probably ultimately give it all to our Quilters Guild of the British Isles archives. May I add your quilt's story to that file?

Sally

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Subject: Re: Red Cross quilts and WW I quilts From: Xenia Cord 

Apparently the Red Cross used fundraising and care package quilts effectively during the world wars; the quilts from WWI seem to have been primarily fundraising, while the quilts in WWII were donated, especially to people in England.

The instructions in Modern Priscilla in December 1917 were directed toward small groups of women, or even individuals, suggesting that they could make a difference if they completed a quilt and the fundraising as directed in the article. By soliciting names for both sides of the quilt, and by obtaining signatures of notables for the center, quiltmakers could buy an ambulance, many pounds of knitting wool, bedding for over 100 hospital beds, or quantities of bandages. There was even a sample "ticket" form to use when obtaining signatures and funds. The specific nature of the donation made the quiltmakers feel intimately involved with alleviating suffering.

There are quite a few of these quilts, with varying formats, still in museums and private hands; by their very nature, signature quilts eventually lose their public appeal as the signers become less recognized and the raison d'être less critical. Especially those quilts that were raffled or auctioned and thus passed into private hands come onto the market because their purpose and impact have become less important. The local museum in my town has one that is identical to the one shown in Modern Priscilla, and contains the names of the president, the governor, the mayor, and several other dignitaries. It was apparently never auctioned, but was given to the Red Cross chapter by the church circle that made the quilt. It was subsequently given to the historical society. I know about several others, also in museum collections.

Sally Ward has written about the other Red Cross quilts, those sent "overseas" from the US and Canada for the benefit of those more immediately affected by WWII, the Blitz, relocation, and other hardships.

Xenia

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Subject: More Red Cross quilts From: Xenia Cord <xenia@legacyquilts.net> Date: Sat, 

A Google search for "Red Cross Quilts" will turn up a number of sites, including these:

http://www.redcross.org/press/other/ot_pr/030312quilt.html http://www.redcross.org/article/0,1072,0_332_455,00.html

There are also links to the Changi quilts, which are dramatic and noteworthy in their own right, and other quilt references.

Xenia

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Subject: Re: Red Cross quilts and WW I quilts From: "Sally Ward" 

Two apologies: First, I was so excited by Sue's reply that I didn't read it properly and realise she was talking WW1, not 2, and second, because I have mail diverted to a separate folder for anything Red Cross, I thought I was replying to a private email, not a list one. I wouldn't have gone on at such length otherwise. Can you tell its an obssession<G>

Sally W

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: December 26, 2003 From: Trishherr@aol.com Date: Sat, 27 

My husband were home by ourselves for the first time in 30+ years, so we went to a movie in the afternoon. I wanted to recommend it to you. It is a moving story, the battle scenes were accurate and heart rendering. As well as the situations of the Home Guard, what a horrid group of people they were. If you go, watch for the textiles too. Ada, played by Nicole Kidman wore a quilted apron that the camera pans, there was a quilted bonnet, and the details on a couple other shot of blouses and pillow slips were wonderful too. The story is not necessarily pro north or south, but more really anti-war. The dissolution of soldiers going to war with one idea, and the reality has changed them and repulsed them.

We also happened to see a show on Tuesday evening on the Discovery Channel, they did a repeat of the History Explorered on Gettysburg, then followed it with Cold Mountain Revealed, or something like that. I might not have the name exactly. I would assume they will show it again, so you might want to look for that. They talked about the book the movie is based on as well as true situations that happened that are portrayed in the movie. The historical background to the Home Guard, etc. So you might want to look for that also.

I'd be interested to know what you all come away with this movie with.

Sheri in windy, but warm Iowa I have not yet seen the movie Cold Mountain yet but thought you might want to know that most of the textiles used in it are reproductions woven at Family Heirloom Weavers, a wonderful place owned by good friends of ours, David and Carole Kline and their son Patrick. They live in Red Lion, PA and have a shop on 795 Dietz Road, York, PA 17402. The ingrain carpet, stair runners, uniform materials, bedcoverings, etc. were woven especially for this project. They make many carpet reproductions for historic houses and wonderful Jacquard, or figured and fancy weave coverlets, and shaft-woven coverlets and placemats to order. Patrick has developed a wide line yard goods many used by Civil War re-enactors for costume and daily use. They are great craftspeople and designers and have a wonderful building full of early refurbished period looms. They do have a website too <familyheirloomweavers.com>.

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Subject: Sanitary Commission Quilts From: "Pilar Donoso" <quiltpd@mi.cl> Date: Sat, 

Dear Laura :

As a proud owner of a reproduction Sanitary Commission Quilt made by Don Beld, (sent it to me as a present), I would love to have any information you have about this quilts, since I pretend to put it in a show in Chile and talk about this kind of Quilts.

Any information will be welcome since I don´t have too much access to books and information from here.

Thank you, Pilar

Pilar Donoso I. The Quilt Shop Vitacura 7867 Santiago, Chile Fono/Fax 211 9877 EMail: quiltpd@mi.cl

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Subject: Red Cross and quilts From: <mreich@attglobal.net> Date: Sat, 27 Dec 2003 

Since we are on the topic of the Red Cross, I thought that I would dip into my newspaper articles about WW I and the Red Cross. Here is an article about one chapter's activities. In case you are wondering just what a scultetus is; it is a binding-type cloth dressing that is used on an abdomen to keep the contents of said abdomen in, that is from dehiscing. There are a series of wraps that go from one side of the abdomen to the other to hold everything in. Scultetus binders were still being used when I was in nursing school in the late 60s. Just in case you wanted to know. To all you nurses out there; how was my description? sue reich

Atlanta Constitution Atlanta, GA May 5, 1918

Third Ward Red Cross Auxiliary

The Third Ward Red Cross auxiliary work room will be open Wednesday, the 8th, when underwear will be made. All members are urged to attend, as there will be some special business to come before the auxiliary, and visitors are cordially invited. The business meeting of this auxiliary took place last Wednesday, with a large attendance of members and many visitors present. It was decided to adopt one of the fatherless children of France through this auxiliary, and an “orphan” box will be provided in the work room for contributions by members and all interested in this most worthy cause. At the close of the meeting a pleasant social half hour was enjoyed, and refreshments were served. A May festival will be given Friday, the 31st, on the large lot, corner Oakland and Woodward avenues, and the general public is cordially invited to attend, thereby aiding in Red Cross work being done through the Third auxiliary. A splendid program, including musical and other features, is being arranged for, and ice cream cake, sandwiches, candy and other delicacies will be sold. All those having promised feather pillows will kindly get them to the work room as soon as possible; also those having quilt squares are urged to send them in promptly, in order that the quilt may be completes at an early date. Following is report of work done by this auxiliary during April: Made 1,-14 face masks, 134 outing scultetus, 55 triangular, 5 abdominal and 5 many-tailed bandages, 18 operating gowns, 10 hospital bed shirts, 34 pairs of socks repaired for Red Cross house, 2 pairs of socks, 4 pairs of wristlets, and 2 mufflers knitted and 5 feather pillows furnished for the unit at Fort McPherson which is soon to go to France.

 

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Subject: Re: 19th century quilt poetry and prose (The Baby's Stocking) From: 

Sue Thanks for the poem. As I said my mother used to sing it with slightly different 2nd and 3rd verses. Never the less I am very happy to have this. Will forward it to my children and niece who have fond memories of it. Martha

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: December 27, 2003 From: Pat Kyser <patkyser@hiwaay.net> 

re: Cold Mountain/OT Loved the site given for the woven reproductions. Thank you. An aside on the movie, not quilt related: a small church at Henager, Alabama provided background singing in shape note or sacred harp singing style. I found it incredible that one of the singers is project manager at the super computer for NASA here in Huntsville. Remarkable and lovely that people very much "into" the 21st century at the same time are maintaining a very old religious singing style. In most cases, whole families participate in the singing. Can't wait to see the movie now, both for story which I loved in book form, and now for music and reproduction textiles. Thanks to list for sharing such interesting insights on it. Pat in Alabama

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Subject: New Book on Toile From: "Suzanne Cawley" <ccawley@alleganyinternet.net> 

Hi All!

I just received my copy of "Toile de Jouy", a newly published book by Melanie Riffel, et al. Published earlier this year in French (Melanie is curator at the Musee de la Toile de Jouy near Paris), it is now out in English from Thames & Hudson publishers. If you love old fabrics (okay, who amongst us doesn't?), you will really like this book. It covers the history of toile and includes wonderful color photos.

P.S. Did you know that if you receive a gift certificate for Borders Books, you can use it at Amazon.com? That's how I got this book at 30% off (plus free shipping). No affiliation, just sharing a way to save money.

Suzanne Cawley In wild, wonderful Keyser, WV

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Subject: Re:Cold Mountain/shape notes From: Gaye Ingram 

Pat,

Does this group sing from The Sacred Harp hymnal? Singings from this hymnal still take place all over the South and have a long communal history, though many people like your project manager at NASA have grown interested and eventually involved with them.

I've just recently discovered a Sacred Harp group in our area who are active and am eager to attend a singing.

The late Donald Davidson of Vanderbilt University has an interesting essay called "The Sacred Harp in the Land of Eden" in his collection of essays titlted "Still Rebels, Still Yankees," widely available in public libraries. It is an "appreciative" essay (Davidson was a singer himself and much influenced by the old ballads), not "technical," but most readable.

Gaye > > re: Cold Mountain/OT

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Subject: Re:Cold Mountain/shape notes From: "Cheryl Wolf" <cwolf@verizon.net> 

The NY Times ran an article about this last week; it should be available on the site for another week or so before it slips into the paid archive: http://www.nytimes.com/2003/12/23/arts/music/23SHAP.html

pax- Cheryl

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Subject: linsey-woolsey From: "Lisa Erlandson" <quilter@cooke.net> Date: Sun, 28 

Does anyone have any hints/experience/advice on cleaning a linsey-woolsey quilt? Only slightly soiled. Thanks, Lisa

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: December 28, 2003 From: Pat Kyser <patkyser@hiwaay.net> 

RE: Shape note singing/Cold Mountain The group at Henager and Ider, Alabama, are folks who have a long family history of sacred harp singing. Generations of them have been involved. There was a great article on them in The Huntsville Times over the holidays. I went to the movie yesterday and when the voices began singing there was a noticeable twitter in the theater as folks realized it was this group. I want to go again just for the detail in the movie. In one scene I'd swear Nicole Kidman was wearing a quilted petticoat or skirt. It moved too fast to study. I recommend the movie, think they did a good job of the original book. I have heard of rural "singings" ever since I moved here 28 years ago and never realized what it was, will try to go to one now. Go to a search engine and put in shape note or sacred harp or fasola and you'll find a lot on it. There is info on our Alabama group in the movie at www.fasola.org/ I discovered in following those leads that a genealogy friend of mine is a part of the local group.Can't wait until she returns from Christmas trip to get her talking about it! Isn't it wonderful how we have contacts in one area of interest and haven't a clue about other facets of their lives? Pat in Alabama

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: December 28, 2003 From: Marilyn Woodin 

In Kalona, Iowa some Mennonite church hymnals have shaped singing so it is not only in Alabama. The singing is beautiful with harmonies and no accompaniment. Marilyn Woodin

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: December 28, 2003 From: Kittencat3@aol.com Date: Mon, 29 

Sacred Harp singing is quite popular in New England. There's a major sing in Northampton every March, plus several groups in the Boston area. I've done it off and on for years and have two copies of the Sacred Harp, the Christian Harmony, and the Southern Harmony, plus a couple of 19th century shape note hymnals. It's a rich tradition, and wonderful to sing and listen to.

Lisa Evans Easthampton, MA

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Subject: movies, Southern singing & quilting From: Gaye Ingram 

'Lest we in North Louisiana be completely outdone by North Alabama and Iowa, I feel duty bound to add that the Cox Family, whose singing provided the background and the best of the foreground for "Oh Brother, Wherefore Art Thou?," live within a few short miles of Ruston, LA. And when the elder and father-of-them-all Cox was in a rehabilitation hospital where one of my students' mothers is a nurse, one of the items he insisted on bringing from home was a Seven Sisters quilt for his bed.

My daughter's first piano teacher, a classical pianist and a woman with a voice trained for opera, is a member of a family that sings both from The Sacred Harp and from an orally perpetuated repertoire of sacred music. When her father died a year ago, the family covered his casket with a quilt and the children in the group sang him to Heaven, I think, with all the old songs through which they had learned the pathway.

Like indigenous quilting traditions, music traditions enrich and sustain community life in the hinterlands, where the lack of self-consciousness keeps it vital even today. Which is one reason I love living in the hinterlands.

And which, if I might veer slightly, is why Nicholas Cage should have played the role George Clooney played in "Oh Brother," as anyone who has seen "Raising Arizona" and heard a real Sacred Harp singing will understand.

from the red clay hills of North Louisiana, Gaye

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Subject: great book - New Book on Toile From: "kerrybrack@ozemail.com.au" 

hi guys

yes we have this book in the new south wales art gallery bookshop looked at it and thought will i pay 100 aussie dollarsand put it back for a moment as my birthday is january 7so you know how it goe sbig grin and it is a great bookkerry in sydney

From: Suzanne Cawley ccawley@alleganyinternetnet Date: Sun, 28 Dec 2003 18:08:02 -0500 To: qhl@lyrisquiltropoliscom Subject: [qhl] New Book on Toile

Hi All!

I just received my copy of "Toile de Jouy", a newly published book by Melanie Riffel, et al Published earlier this year in French (Melanie i s curator at the Musee de la Toile de Jouy near Paris), it is now out in English from Thames & Hudson publishers If you love old fabrics (okay, who amongst us doesn't?), you will really like this book It covers the his tory of toile and includes wonderful color photos

PS Did you know that if you receive a gift certificate for Borders  Books, you can use it at Amazoncom? That's how I got this book at 30% off (pl us free shipping) No affiliation, just sharing a way to save money

Suzanne Cawley In wild, wonderful Keyser, WV

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: linsey-woolsey From: "Lynne Z. Bassett" <lzbassett@comcast.net> 

Dear Lisa,

Are you talking about an antique quilt? I have seen a number of antique whole-cloth wool (aka "linsey-woolsey") quilts that have been ruined by inappropriate washing. I really think you should have it evaluated by a professional textile conservator. If it is only slightly soiled, a gentle vacuuming through a fiberglass or nylon screen may be all that is needed. See: "Protecting Your Quilts," published by the American Quilter's Society, or "Preserving Textiles, A Guide for the Nonspecialist," by Harold Mailand and Dorothy Stites Alig (Indianapolis Museum of Art, 1999) for more information.

Best, Lynne 

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: December 28, 2003 From: Pat Kyser <patkyser@hiwaay.net> 

RE: Shape note singing/Cold Mountain The group at Henager and Ider, Alabama, are folks who have a long family history of sacred harp singing. Generations of them have been involved. There was a great article on them in The Huntsville Times over the holidays. I went to the movie yesterday and when the voices began singing there was a noticeable twitter in the theater as folks realized it was this group. I want to go again just for the detail in the movie. In one scene I'd swear Nicole Kidman was wearing a quilted petticoat or skirt. It moved too fast to study. I recommend the movie, think they did a good job of the original book. I have heard of rural "singings" ever since I moved here 28 years ago and never realized what it was, will try to go to one now. Go to a search engine and put in shape note or sacred harp or fasola and you'll find a lot on it. There is info on our Alabama group in the movie at www.fasola.org/ I discovered in following those leads that a genealogy friend of mine is a part of the local group.Can't wait until she returns from Christmas trip to get her talking about it! Isn't it wonderful how we have contacts in one area of interest and haven't a clue about other facets of their lives? Pat in Alabama

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: December 28, 2003 From: Marilyn Woodin 

In Kalona, Iowa some Mennonite church hymnals have shaped singing so it is not only in Alabama. The singing is beautiful with harmonies and no accompaniment. Marilyn Woodin

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: December 28, 2003 From: Kittencat3@aol.com Date: Mon, 29 

Sacred Harp singing is quite popular in New England. There's a major sing in Northampton every March, plus several groups in the Boston area. I've done it off and on for years and have two copies of the Sacred Harp, the Christian Harmony, and the Southern Harmony, plus a couple of 19th century shape note hymnals. It's a rich tradition, and wonderful to sing and listen to.

Lisa Evans Easthampton, MA

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: movies, Southern singing & quilting From: Gaye Ingram 

'Lest we in North Louisiana be completely outdone by North Alabama and Iowa, I feel duty bound to add that the Cox Family, whose singing provided the background and the best of the foreground for "Oh Brother, Wherefore Art Thou?," live within a few short miles of Ruston, LA. And when the elder and father-of-them-all Cox was in a rehabilitation hospital where one of my students' mothers is a nurse, one of the items he insisted on bringing from home was a Seven Sisters quilt for his bed.

My daughter's first piano teacher, a classical pianist and a woman with a voice trained for opera, is a member of a family that sings both from The Sacred Harp and from an orally perpetuated repertoire of sacred music. When her father died a year ago, the family covered his casket with a quilt and the children in the group sang him to Heaven, I think, with all the old songs through which they had learned the pathway.

Like indigenous quilting traditions, music traditions enrich and sustain community life in the hinterlands, where the lack of self-consciousness keeps it vital even today. Which is one reason I love living in the hinterlands.

And which, if I might veer slightly, is why Nicholas Cage should have played the role George Clooney played in "Oh Brother," as anyone who has seen "Raising Arizona" and heard a real Sacred Harp singing will understand.

from the red clay hills of North Louisiana, Gaye

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: great book - New Book on Toile From: "kerrybrack@ozemail.com.au" 

hi guys

yes we have this book in the new south wales art gallery bookshop looked at it and thought will i pay 100 aussie dollarsand put it back for a moment as my birthday is january 7so you know how it goe sbig grin and it is a great bookkerry in sydney

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: linsey-woolsey From: "Lynne Z. Bassett" <lzbassett@comcast.net> 

Dear Lisa,

Are you talking about an antique quilt? I have seen a number of antique whole-cloth wool (aka "linsey-woolsey") quilts that have been ruined by inappropriate washing. I really think you should have it evaluated by a professional textile conservator. If it is only slightly soiled, a gentle vacuuming through a fiberglass or nylon screen may be all that is needed. See: "Protecting Your Quilts," published by the American Quilter's Society, or "Preserving Textiles, A Guide for the Nonspecialist," by Harold Mailand and Dorothy Stites Alig (Indianapolis Museum of Art, 1999) for more information.

Best, Lynne

 

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Subject: WW I and Red Cross quilts, plus a directive for female Red Cross workers 

Most of the WWI Red Cross news is in 1917 and 1918 newspapers. There is little to be found in the earlier years of the War. Here is part of the Red Cross Notes from a Texas paper. What I found particularly interesting is the appeal made to the women of this country. sue reich

Commerce Journal Commerce, Texas December 14, 1918

Anyone having any quilts, quilt tops or pieces for making quilts, please leave them at once at the Red Cross room.

Remember our big rally next Saturday and our Christmas drive next week. $15,000,000 for Christmas --- let the boys know you care.

WOMAN RECRUIT MUST BE DRILLED.

As we can not expect the raw recruit in the army to step forth in a day prepared to do all he should do as a soldier, neither can we expect the woman recruit in her branch of the war service to do all that the exigency of the hour requires of her. Like her brother soldier, she must be drilled in her work. Like her brother, She must be taught the work assigned her. Like her brother soldier, she must learn to use her head. But like her brother soldier, she must forego her ease, her individuality and her pleasures that she may become effective as a group worker. And if she does not consent to this she will become as contemptible a slacker as the man in all things qualified as soldier and yet refuses to shoulder his gun. “More supplies, more supplies, supplies to take the place of those lost in Italy. Supplies to replace those lost by the debacle of Russia. Supplies for the late extraordinary contests around Cambrai. Supplies to be ready when our millions of men shall reach the fighting lines and need them. More supplies, more supplies.” These words come to us daily through the press and over the wires. HONOR IS IN SINCERE EFFORT. The patriotic women of the Red Cross now sew, knit and make bandages three and four days in the week, when a few months ago they thus worked only one day in a week. But in spite of the labor the demand for more becomes shriller. Can any right-feeling woman hear it without heed? Can any woman worth the name of being or becoming an American mother fold her hands in idleness or employ her time in frivolous enjoyment when she hears the cry for more bandages for the wounded and for warm clothes for those who stand in the trenches that liberty and civilization may not be destroyed. There are hundreds and thousands of good women who can not sew and knit and make bandages. There are thousands of men in the army who never soot a gun. The former must earn as the latter are learning. The honor is not in doing alone. It is in sincere effort to do. The time has come when every man of military age is scanned as he passes by. And the time has come when the absence of a woman from Red Cross workshops is noted. We are not charitable to male and female slackers now. We are going to be severe with such slackers later one. For this is a time when not only every man, but every woman of our country is expected to do his and her duty.

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Subject: Re: linsey-woolsey From: "Lisa Erlandson" <quilter@cooke.net> Date: Tue, 

I guess I should have been more precise in my original question. I am aware of the dangers of improper cleaning of quilts and other textiles. I do quilt restoration and find that most of my work comes from exactly this problem. I have a client with an antique linsey-woolsey quilt that needs some minor repair and she wanted to have it washed too. I told her I wouldn't - but that I would check with those who might have experience washing this type of quilt. So, thanks to all who replied to me by saying "don't" - I already knew that answer, but am still looking for someone with experience in such things.

Thanks, Lisa Erlandson Quilt Appraiser, certified AQS Professional Quilt Restoration Quilt Historian and Lecturer

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Subject: Sanitary Commission quilt in Vermont From: Sandi or Mike Hardy 

In reading all the information about Sanitary Commission quilts I remembered one that was displayed at the Vermont Quilt Festival last summer. It is owned by the Vermont Historical Society and there was a nice article printed in the Times Argus paper about it.

Here is the article - http://www.timesargus.com/Story/73007.html

It was great to actually see it in person. I don't know when it will be exhibited again. Hopefully the museum will be able to display it.

Sandi in Vermont

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Subject: Christmas travels (long) From: "Cinda Cawley" <lrcawley@dmv.com> Date: 

I'm exhausted; 1300 miles on the odometer! Naturally I had to see what quilts were within a reasonable distance of my family. The Newark Museum is exhibiting quilts from their collection: from a wool Wild Goose Chase c. 1800 to Michael James. We were there on the Sunday before Christmas and I was excited that there was to be a gallery talk that afternoon. I hate to complain, but it was painfully obvious that the Museum had done nothing to train the docent who led the tour. She was a very nice lady, but she didn't have a clue about quilts. For instance she thought that the dates on the labels, for instance 1840-1850, meant that it took the maker 10 years to finish the quilt. I've done a lot of quilt-related volunteer work with museums and I know from experience that a plea for help to local quilt guilds always meets with an enthusiastic response. The MD Historical Society did a marvelous job of training volunteer docents for the Baltimore Album Quilt Tradition exhibit in 2001. Enough complaining! The quilts are wonderful. There's a Dover publication: Antique Quilts Postcards from the Newark Museum, ISBN 0-486-28919-2. My copy cost $4.95. Not everything in the exhibit is in the book, but it gives you an idea. 

There was a glorious, unfinished piece of hexagon patchwork from New Castle, DE. The foundation papers date between 1792 and 1803. It was pieced by a mother and daughter who must have owned a great pair of scissors--the fussy cutting is phenomenal. The quilt top is displayed on a tilted board which allows you to get really close and appreciate the wonderful array of early chintzes. A first quarter 19th century Star of Bethlehem coverlet from Perth Amboy, NJ has an unusual color scheme (predominantly various shades of green and beige) with chintz applique birds between the legs of the star. The show stopper is a Princess Feather variation with alternating Mariners Compasses surrounded by a primitive floral vine (everything including the compasses is appliqued. All the feathers are a large scale turkey red stripe. There's a wonderful whitework signed Jane Vorhees 1830-1831. The Jacobean motif quilting designs are straight from the New England wool quilt tradition. The quilt was a gift of Florence Peto. The most unusual quilt consist of diagonal strips of a pink chinoiserie chintz appliqued across a white background with fabulous quilting of grapevines echoing the strips. I've never seen anything quite like it; it's attributed to two sisters from Charleston, SC. New Jersey album quilts are distinctive and this exhibit shows enough examples (1850 to 1880) to make the point. 

My favorite has 90 small, simple applique motifs enclosed in a Garden Maze set. It was made in Hackensack, NJ for a wedding in 1876. Speaking of 1876 there's a wonderful collection of Centennial commemorative prints framing a bandana from the Philadelphia Exhibition. The exhibit includes 35 quilts; there are a number of pieces by African American quiltmakers of the mid-20th century and a couple by contemporary artists, Michael James among them. QuiltArtQuilts is an annual exhibit at the Schweinfurth Memorial Art Center in Auburn, NY. These are all contemporary quilts (many of them quite wonderful) which give me a much needed jolt out of my 19th century mind-set. The little town of Auburn which sits at the top of Owasco Lake has realized that quilts bring people and a number of local sites have jumped on the bandwagon. The Seward House (a wonderful Victorian mansion, home of Lincoln's Secretary of State), the Harriet Tubman House, the Tiffany Chapel (designed and furnished by Louis Comfort Tiffany) and the Cayuga Museum all key into the two month long quilt exhibit. Another great thing about going to Auburn is that it gives me an excuse to go through Skaneateles, the prettiest village in New York State (IMHO), and to have lunch at Doug's Fish Fry! 

The Cayuga Museum is showing a group of contemporary Amish quilts from the Swartzentruber Amish community. These are not the glorious wool quilts of Lancaster County. They are quilts produced by women of one of the most conservative Amish communities (the Swartzentrubers arrived in St.Lawrence County, NY in the winter of 1974-75 from Michigan and Ohio; they settled on farms that had been abandoned.) who are making quilts to sell outside the community to supplement the family income. Some of the quilts contain print fabrics and bright colors which are allowed only if brought to the quilter by a non-Amish person who then takes away the quilt and any remaining scraps. In this way the standards of the community are preserved while the quilter is allowed to please the tastes of her customers. I found this exhibit extremely interesting in its presentation of the commercial side of 21st century Amish quiltmaking. I almost got through the season without buying a quilt until I stopped in a shop in Cazenovia (another beautiful village). 

On the floor was a red and green Whig Rose that had reached the end of the line. The shopkeeper dismissed it as "too worn even for a cutter." Them's fightin' words! This quilt was somebody's treasure. I told my daughter who had come with me in hopes of a nice lunch, that there is a special place in hell for children who don't take care of their mother's quilts (she already knows this, of course). So this lovely wraith is now airing on my porch. It's 72" square. Sixteen 12" Whig Rose blocks set on point alternate with plain blocks quilted with feathered wreaths. The border is plain strips alternating red, white, red with Nine Patch blocks at the corners. The flowers are plain turkey red and double pink; the stems and leaves are a two-step green and black print. The central rose has eight lobes and there are two diagonal branches with large leaves and buds and two with smaller leaves. It's the quilting that makes it wonderful: 14 stitches per inch, a quarter inch apart, except for the roses which are quilted in 1/8" diagonal lines; the other appliques are outlined in double lines of quilting about 1/16" apart. The quilting is holding it together; the green fabric is almost completely worn away in places. I live by Phyllis Twigg's four foot rule, "If it looks good from four feet away, it looks good enough," and this little beauty has a home with me. Hope you all had a much fun as I did over Christmas. Cinda on the sunny Eastern Shore

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: December 29, 2003 From: EMetcalfe@aol.com Date: Tue, 30 

Have really enjoyed all the posts about the Cold Mountain film, and especially the remarks about the textiles. Does anyone know if quilted aprons were common during the Civil War? I have read of quilted petticoats, but not of quilted aprons. Is there any referance online pertaining to the aprons?

I also enjoyed the information on shape note singing, thanks so much. Schultz in Ga.

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Subject: Happy New Year From: Gaye Ingram <gingram@tcainternet.com> Date: Tue, 

Yesterday something happened that reminded me what a remarkable thing QHL is and how fortunate I am to be a part of the community it creates and serves.

As many of you know, some of us are endeavoring to begin a quilt study group in the Deep South and environs. Spurred by admiration of the gatherings reported by Cinda, Xenia, Judy Grow, and others, I had posted a query to this list asking whether any Southerners out there might be interested in joining for such study. And 'lo and behold, responses came in almost immediately from Atlanta, Huntsville, Dallas, Houston, and parts in between and tangential. To say I was surprised is to deal in rank understatement. Imagining a group of possibly 10 people, I volunteered Ruston, LA, as a gathering place for an organizational meeting and oggling center.

At the time, I did not know a single soul within 45 miles of Ruston who was interested in the study of the history of quiltmaking. I had contacted guilds, posted notices in quilt and fabric shops, dialed up people I knew who owned older quilts--all to no avail. Lots of people interested in making new quilts, nobody interested in studying the new quilts other generations had made.

Then Judy Grow gave a presentationat LA Tech on the history of quiltmaking. I had posted information on our wannabe Deep South Quilt Study Group at the entrance to the auditorium where Judy's presentation took place. After Judy's talk, two women from a town 25 miles away answered that "altar call." For years, they had faithfully attended the Internation Quilt fest in Houston, had taken classes, collected books on quilt history, and were, as we say in these parts 'raring to go with a study group. Kindred souls! Those of you who live in historic quilt conscious areas probably cannot understand the excitement I felt, knowing that just down the road lived someone with whom I could talk about old quilts as well as about new quilts.

Yesterday, one of those women, Martha Gilbert, spent the afternoon with me. We had intended to discuss the February meeting of the southern quilt study group, but you know how it is: first, we had to look through quilts and tops and fabrics. And as we talked and looked at quilts and bits and pieces of old fabric and reproduction prints and discussed future projects, I found myself saying, "I sent a jpeg to Xenia Cord, who specializes in quilt kits, and asked her about this quilt before I bought it." And Martha would reply, "And Xenia had not seen one like it?" Or I when I showed her the fabrics for the quilt I want to reproduce, I said, "This Lancaster Blue print is Pepper Cory's design. Xenia found some for me, but I need just a little more of it. I asked Pepper if she knew where I could find some." To which my New Friend replied, "Pepper just tickles me, the way she presents things." And when we were talking about making miniature quilts as a way to satisfy our desire to copy old quilts (Martha makes exceptionally lovely miniature quilts, I must add), I ventured, "Barb Garrett, who lives in Southeastern PA, has made over 100 miniature reproductions, which she uses in her presentations." Martha said, "Yes, I've seen some of Barb's quilts." Well, it went on that way for much of the afternoon.

I was a little surprised that she seemed to know these people whom I had come to know gradually and sometimes only slightly though QHL over a period of 2 years and on whom I had laid eyes for the first time in Dallas this past October. I assumed she had met them in Houston, and yet I knew that some of them were not regulars there. We Southerners tend not to use first names until we've gotten to know people, and she was using first names. Finally, my curiosity got the better of me, and I asked, "How do you know Barb, Pepper, Jane Staples, et al?"

Well, wouldn't you know?-----Alex Anderson's "Simply Quilts"!!! Turns out my new friend had faithfully watched, copied, and catalogued every episode of "Simply Quilts." Through watching that program and her homemade "re-runs," she had indeed come to know all these people and to be affected by them in a very personal way. She had learned from them, been inspired by them.

Suddenly, it occurred to me how much we tend to take for granted. At least, how much I take for granted. Here were all these "stars" whom my friend had "met" on "Simply Quilts," a program my work schedule and inability to program my vcr with reliability generally precludes my seeing, and for two years I had thought nothing of posting questions to them via QHL. I had access to their knowledge, could follow up on questions as one who only saw them on Alex Anderson's program could not. In some cases, they had become nothing less than friends, people whose successes elicited my joy and whose sorrows concerned me deeply.

Among them were Barb Garrett and Judy Grow, who had taken the time to provide me with a terrific Pennsylvania antiquing itinerary; Xenia Cord, who had sent pages of historic textile samples when I first taught a directed-study class on quilt history and who earlier had sent me membership forms for AQSG with a personal encouragement to send them in pronto; Valerie Rake, who had taken the time to send me via email her doctoral dissertation; Teddy Pruett, who (bless her!) had shared a bit of fabric bearing the image of Stonewall Jackson; Pepper Cory, who had shared one of the most endearing stories I know and one to which I recur often---that of being sure her dear mama had on bright red lipstick when she left this world Well, just too many to name indiviudally here. But these and many more were people of whom I had thought many times as I baked and decorated and reflected over friendships at Christmastime, They were friends.

Now that might not seem much of an insight to many, but it struck me forcibly----how QHL confers routine access to a likeminded community on all of us stuck in places where we have no physical contact with people who share our interest in historic textiles and quiltmaking; how it creates a community in the truest sense.

And so as this year ends, I want to acknowledge my own debt to Kris Driessen, who has kept this community alive even when she was dealing with a home-destroying fire, and to all those members of the community who have so generously shared their knowledge and understanding of the history of quiltmaking and of quiltmaking techniques with me.

And I would like to introduce Martha Gilbert, from Jonesboro, LA, and a new member of this list and AQSG. I told Martha she needed to introduce herself, but she seemed reticent about that. Martha is particularly interested in miniature quilts and southern quilts and knows a lot about both. I purchased one of her little quilts recently at our regional artist tour and sale, and it hangs, beautifully mounted (she is also a framer) in the hall just outside my study.

May the coming year bring health, peace, and happiness to each member of QHL. And thank you to each of you who has brightened my days and so generously enlightened me in the year past.

Gaye Ingram

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Subject: quilt sizes From: Donald Beld <donbeld@pacbell.net> Date: Tue, 30 Dec 

Hi everyone, someone whose knowledge I respect recently told me that it was fairly "standard" in the 1840-60's for quilts to measure 85 inches square. I found that very interesting. Although I know that other sizes were made, can anyone speak to this issue?

If that was a routine size for quilts, when did "double" bed size become more popular?

Also, thanks for the info about the Sanitary Quilt in Vermont. I am going to contact the reporter and see if there is a way for us to get a photo of it. (that makes six now)

Don Beld

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Subject: Re: quilt sizes From: Xenia Cord <xenia@legacyquilts.net> Date: Wed, 31 

I'm going to venture a guess that 19th century mattress sizes affected quilt sizes, so we will need to learn when standard sized mattresses became available, replacing home made mattresses. I know that the kit quilt industry in the 20th century made double ("full") sized kits to be a standard 72" x 90" finished. Stearns & Foster (also makers of Mountain Mist batting) began business in 1851, so possibly their history would yield information on standard bedding.

We might also look at the mobility of the American population as an aspect of bed and quilt sizes; those who migrated west in non-mechanized conveyances took bedding, but sometimes not the cumbersome bedsteads themselves. These could be replaced by carpenter/craftsmen at the destination, or could possibly be obtained commercially if there were major towns within reach. Consider, for instance, the Mormons who walked to Utah from departure points in Missouri and elsewhere the trains stopped, pushing all of their possessions in 2-wheeled hand carts. Anyway, the point is that under those conditions beds were non-standard sizes, so quilt sizes would also be varied.

Following that line of thought I looked at the 1897 reproduction Sears catalog under mattresses, and discovered that filled mattresses in excelsior, wool, cotton, moss, and hair could be had for just a few dollars, and that the purchaser was to inform Sears of the size of the bed! No sizes are given for the mattresses, just contents and price. I also looked at blankets and found a notation for "regular 10-4 size." Sears also sold brass beds and iron beds; the iron beds were 6' 2" long by either 4' or 4' 6" wide. Brass were 6'4" long and came 3'6", 4', or 4'6" wide.

Enough musing for this last day of 2003 - Happy New Year, everyone!

Xenia

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Subject: Re: quilt sizes From: Judy Schwender <sister3603@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 

I used the International Quilt Study Center's on-line data base (www.quiltstudy.org) to start looking at the claim of 85 X 85 as being standard for the period 1840-1860. I've worked through 20 of 153 examples, and none are 85 square. I'm going to check this out more thoroughly later today and will post the results, probably by tomorrow. Some thoughts occurred to me: Should the search be limited to dated quilts? Medallion quilts are most typically square, and they are earlier than block-style quilts. The block style easily allowed less for less square quilts. Could your resource be thinking of medallion quilts? Xenia's info on bedsteads would help modify the results to reflect the bias of survival- the quilts that didn't make it to today, well, who knows what sizes they were. Judy Schwender

Donald Beld <donbeld@pacbell.net> wrote: Hi everyone, someone whose knowledge I respect recently told me that it was fairly "standard" in the 1840-60's for quilts to measure 85 inches square. I found that very interesting. Although I know that other sizes were made, can anyone speak to this issue?

If that was a routine size for quilts, when did "double" bed size become more popular?

Also, thanks for the info about the Sanitary Quilt in Vermont. I am going to contact the reporter and see if there is a way for us to get a photo of it. (that makes six now)

Don Beld

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Subject: Re: quilt sizes From: "Judy Kelius (judysue)" <judysue@ptd.net> Date: Wed, 

Most PA quilts up to the early 1900s were square, but based on quilts in the PA Quilt Museum's collection, the size ranges from 72 to 90" and even larger (we have one that is 107" square!). We don't find as many rectangular quilts prior to 1900 and then it is often the result of the pattern not producing a square design. I think this is because either (1) most beds had high foot boards, and there was no room for a drop at the bottom or (2) quilts were not made as decorative bed covers but as covers for warmth and they did not have to fit a bed. I have never heard of a standard size such as 85" - I can look when I go back to work (not until after the New Year) to see if we have any that are in the range of 85". (Remember that the size tended to be smaller after quilting so you will also need to look at quilts close to this size but not exact - also, many quilts are nearly but not quite square - I count them as "square".)

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Subject: Museum catalogue From: Litwinow@aol.com Date: Wed, 31 Dec 2003 

Help, A finish up files for '03 and begin '04, I've misplaced the note on the Museum in Michigan that has/will publish a catalogue of their quilts. Who, where and how? Plus, Iowa/Illinois Quilt Study Group will be meeting in Kalona, IA Feb 7th. Contact : Sue Wildemuth at ksandbcw@geneseo.net for mor information. Catherine Litwinow

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Subject: quilts on view in NYC From: "Laura Fisher" <laurafisher@netlink1.net> Date: 

If anyone is making a trip to Newark to see that wonderful quilt  exhibition described in such picturesque detail by Cinda, hop the PATH  train or NJ Transit to NYC and go to the Met Museum, where there is an  (unpublicized) exhibition of Amish quilts. They hang in a long corridor  in the American Wing . A visit there gives the opportunity to spend time  up close, unencumbered by the crowds for El Greco, to see lovely  workmanship and vivid graphics.

Don't you agree that there should be a universal New Year's resolution  that there must be a quilt exhibition on view within a twenty-mile  radius of wherever one is!

Concerning quilts of the Red Cross, consult Woodard & Greenstein's  Twentieth Century Quilts for a full page view of one from the West  Point/Newburgh New York area. It is signed all over, has town names, the  names of the Hudson River Dayliner boats, etc. it is made in the fashion  of a redwork quilt with embroidery, but the squares are all original, as  I recall. When I bought it, it came with no provenance, so anything  known about it has to be deciphered from the inscriptions.

I have had several Red Cross quilts. One was a single large red cross in  the center, and red white and blue narrow borders. I think it must have  been a published pattern, though it is the only one I've seen, similar  in feeling to the five-point star Air Force quilt that has insignia  appliques in the corners. Does anyone (Xenia?!!) have information on the  origins of either design?

I also had a Red Cross quilt made up of small squares each centered with  the embroidered (by machine I recall) little Red Cross insignia that was  sewn to one's white uniform on the arm and in the center of the hat,  circa World War I. I think there's a picture of the red cross workers  in the 20th Century book There were dozens of patche, each probably less  than 3" square each.

I heard somewhere that red crosses on a quilt signified membership in or  sympathy with the Ku Klux Klan!! just as blue and white quilts in the  late 19th century were supposed to symbolize membership in the Women's  Christian Temperance Union.

Does anyone know if this is true? If so, do the crosses differ? Is the  cross the elongated Christian-type, or the equilateral red cross type?

Happy new year to all. Keep the information flowing in 2004......!!

Laura Fisher

 

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Subject: Re: A New Year's Greeting From: "Nancy Kirk" 

Warm wishes for a wonderful new year to all on this list. Hug your children, tell someone how much they have meant to you this year and save a quilt or make a new one. God bless us every one.

Yours,

Nancy Kirk The Kirk Collection www.kirkcollection.com

 

2004

 

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