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Quilters Find a way to care

click on the thumbnailDate: Sun, 16 Feb 2003 09:29:40 -0000 From: "Sally Ward" <sallytatters@ntlworld.com> 

Can anyone tell me anything about this curious blanket I found on ebay?

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2508924819&category=2221

 

Sally W in the UK

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Date: Sun, 16 Feb 2003 16:29:42 CST From: jocelynm@delphiforums.com To: 

On Fri, 14 Feb 2003 17:36:12 EST Kittencat3@aol.com wrote:

> Not to mention that it doesn't look particular 1930s or particularly German. > I wonder if there's some family story behind the Nazi label? >

Probably the same sort of family history that reasons: This quilt was made by Grandma, Grandma was born in 1902, so the quilt is over 100 years old. :)

Jocelyn

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Date: Sun, 16 Feb 2003 18:40:19 -0500 From: "Sharon's" <sstark@nni.com> To: 

Over the past few weeks we've seen a number of strange quilts from various sellers on eBay, including the recent "Nazi" quilt. One thing that is clear, is that it takes no qualifications, nor scruples, to be able to sell on eBay. And in fact, some sellers seem to rely on the uninitiated, the gullible and the naive in order to make their listings successful.

But today, a quilt appeared that seems to embody the worst of all worlds: The HIPV myth is reborn in this quilt, though it's attributed to the 1930's (looks more like 60's or so to me from the backing). The seller uses plenty of doubletalk to avoid making any real claims, it seems she knows little if anything about the quilt. Or about quilts in general?

click on the thumbnailHere is the listing: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=2221&item=2509038898

Check it out....

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Date: Sun, 16 Feb 2003 16:28:20 -0800 From: ikwlt@cox.net To: qhl@cuenet.com Subject: 

also, as far as the "homes of the underground railroad" on hgtv... i watched this when it was first aired (probably last year in february for "black history month") and as i recall there was very little mention of quilts in only one segment, however there was a log cabin quilt prominantly displayed on the railing of a house as a bit of what i considered to be subliminal support of the theory. recently in a quilting class the theory of the black center came up and i was able to explain to the group the debate in the historical community about quilts being used along the UGRR. hopefully more people were encouraged to not take at face value statements made without evidence, and i encouraged them not to help spread the rumor. patti

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Date: Sun, 16 Feb 2003 22:45:56 EST From: Kittencat3@aol.com To: qhl@cuenet.com Subject: 

First, it doesn't look 1930s. Second, the applique and the quilting are pretty crude, although that means little. Third, the binding is very definitely new. I'm wondering if this is a semi-old top that's just been quilted?

Lisa Evans Easthampton, MA

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Date: Mon, 17 Feb 2003 09:06:15 -0600 From: "Barbara Vlack" <cptvdeo@inil.com> To: "QHL" 

Patti wrote, referring to the bidding on the so-called Nazi quilt: << the thing that caught my eye was that the starting bid on the quilt is listed as $500, yet his one and only bid far exceeded that coming in at $1500!>>

RESPONSE: That happens because there was a reserve price on the quilt. The opening price was $500. The scenario could be this: the buyer wanted the quilt and put in a bid higher than $500 in order to find the reserve price. Evidently, with only one bid showing, the reserve was met at $1500. Any bid lower than $1500 would not win the auction if the $1500 bid had not been made.

With a provenance of limited information for this quilt, could it also be possible that it is a quilt older than the 30s (turkey red and white quilts were made frequently in the late 1800s - early 1900s)? The symbol we've come to despise as the swastika used to be a symbol for good luck before Hitler picked it up.

The seller is calling it a Nazi quilt, but perhaps he doesn't know beyond today's association with the symbol. It's a guess on my part.

In my opinion, collecting memorabilia from WWII, including this so-called Nazi quilt, doesn't mean you embrace the principles of Naziism. Owning these things does not make you a Nazi. Owning them as a collection could mean you like to collect these things. It is a slice of history many of us consider to be evil, but it is history just the same and cannot be denied.

Barb Vlack cptvdeo@inil.com

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Date: Mon, 17 Feb 2003 10:43:11 -0600 From: "Barbara Vlack" <cptvdeo@inil.com> To: "QHL" 

I'm catching up on a few days' digests (reason why a previous response I sent about the so-called "Nazi" quilt was no longer timely) and had to respond asap to Joe Cunningham.

Penny's company is THE ELECTRIC QUILT COMPANY, to correct Joe. The one Joe mentioned is the "other one". VBG

I checked my guidebook for Penny's first quilt show series, and it is copyright 1981. The book for the second series is copyright 1982.

I first "met" Penny through the TV series in 1981. Then several years later I met her in person at the AQS show in Paducah, where she was vending the Electric Quilt software. We became acquainted, and as I showed her more and more what I was doing with the software, I was eventually invited to travel with EQ to demonstrate the program and to write books for them. I am now writing my third book for EQ, and Penny is my editor. I am most honored!

Barb Vlack cptvdeo@inil.com

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Date: Mon, 17 Feb 2003 18:44:44 -0800 From: "ChrisA" <chrisa@jetlink.net> To: "QHL" <

Another source for quilt patterns that use bias tape just appeared from my own book shelf, much to my surprise. There was a series in the Kansas City Star called "Happy Childhood quilt for Good Children" in 1932.

It consists of 12 toy blocks, 20 Christmas tree blocks and the child's name at the top, to be appliquéd with bias tape or embroidered. The toy blocks include a rag doll, ball, bike, necklace of beads, car, sled, teddy bear, wagon, blocks, train. baby buggy, and a sail boat. Each one uses appliqué and bias tape appliquéd as part of it. The tree uses it for the trunk and stand. They also say to use bias tape over each seam and on the binding.

Kimberly Wulfert, PhD 

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Date: Mon, 17 Feb 2003 22:04:29 EST From: Edwaquilt@aol.com To: QHL@cuenet.com Subject: 

I have a pattern envelope from McCalls (date unknown) that used bias tape in a rainbow design (much like drunkard's path). There was a quilt at Gettysburg last year probably of the same vintage with bias tape as the rainbow arcs. The idea was produced as a pattern by a shop in California in the early 90's.

Holice Turnbow

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Date: Tue, 18 Feb 2003 08:14:04 EST From: ARabara15@aol.com To: sstark@nni.com, QHL@cuenet.com Subject: Re: QHL: Now we've seen it all! Message-ID: 

This doesn't surprise me. This seller has a notorious reputation for deceptive practices. Several other ebay buyers as well as sellers and I have had horrible experiences with her. Her behavior is also very suspect and many have complained of her practices to ebay. She is the same seller who buys new "Amish" quilts and then lists them as "Old" coming directly from an estate sale. When confronted she becomes abusive and threatening. Donald Brokate

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Date: Tue, 18 Feb 2003 15:07:17 +0000 From: "Karen Bush" <karenbush11@hotmail.com> To: 

Hi all. I've come out of 'lurkdom' and taking a few to ask a question. I've just been elected as a board member to our Historical Society (Ray County,Mo), and,..FINALLY I'm going to get those wonderful quilts out of their Climate controlled room that is around the corner, down the hall and OUT of the sight of most tours in our Museum. !!!! There are quilts dating from the late l700's in there!!!!!! I'm going to try to find the time to put all in a data base in the computer, but, I'm trying to get a quilt show ready for the first weekend in May. Now, my question. These quilts do NOT have hanging sleeves, we don't have much $$ to work with, and I'd like to make long/wide portable racks to drape Several quilts on each rack through-out the museum. ??? Could you all give me some ideas as to how I can display these quilts for a TWO day show, put them back in their own room after that weekend, and use the same method for impromptu (sp) shows for groups wanting to come and see on last minute notice?? There are about l20 quilts in this room. They're 'stored' nicely, Pvc covered with muslin and draped over, (((WHO)) could see those!???? ugh.... They might not be so excited I ran for Board member when I'm through! hahahaha...kb

http://www.karenbushquilts.com Hand Quilting Services

 

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Date: Tue, 18 Feb 2003 12:05:58 -0600 From: Xenia Cord <xenia@legacyquilts.net> To: 

For anyone who will be in or near north-central Indiana between now and March 30, you have a treat in store in Kokomo, at the Indiana University Art Gallery there. Beginning Sunday February 23 with an opening reception from 2-5, visitors can experience "America From the Heart: Quilters Remember September 11, 2001."

The 122 piece traveling exhibit includes quilts from across the country and from around the world, made in the weeks that followed the events of September 11 and invited to an impromptu exhibit at the Houston International Quilt Festival in Houston at the end of October 2001. The quilts are a moving, patriotic outpouring of hope and vision.

In conjunction with the exhibit, on Tuesday October 25 at 7:00PM and again on Saturday March 1 at 2:30PM, I will give a power point program called "American Spirit: Patriotism and Quilts 1800-2001." The exhibit and the lectures are free.

Gallery hours are Monday, Tuesday, Thursday 10AM-4PM; Wednesday 10AM-8PM' Saturday, Sunday noon-4PM (closed Friday).

Kokomo is on US 31 between Indianapolis and South Bend. Indiana University is located at 2300 S. Washington (Business 31, on the south side of Kokomo).

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Date: Tue, 18 Feb 2003 11:50:00 -0600 From: Jennifer Perkins <qltrstore@harlannet.com> To: 

On my last trip to the Amish community in Iowa, Kalona, I was looking at all the new quilts for sale and they all had poly batting used in them. I asked the Amish woman at the quilt shop about that and she said they like to quilt poly batting because it quilts easier than cotton (they obviously haven't tried Quilter's Dream Cotton), and they like the puffiness. On Simply Quilts yesterday they showed quilts from an Amish community in PA. Again, they all looked puffy like they contained poly batting. That got me wondering about Amish communities around the US-do all Amish communities now use poly batting exclusively, or just the two that I have seen? What have those of you who live close to the Amish observed? Jennifer in Iowa

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Date: Tue, 18 Feb 2003 13:09:48 -0600 From: Xenia Cord <xenia@legacyquilts.net> To: 

The Amish women I know use poly batting for their own quilts, and sometimes they buy it from the local Amish "store" where it is available on a huge roll. (The store is actually a room in one Amish widow's home, where she sells grocery staples, some fabric, small toys, citrus fruit in the winter, etc.) When they quilt for others they will use what the quilt top owner provides; one of my quilters is a convert to wool batting, because it's what I have always sent her, and she likes the way it quilts and drapes.

Xenia

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Date: Tue, 18 Feb 2003 13:46:46 -0500 From: "Candace Perry" <candace@schwenkfelder.com> 

Sally, it seems to be typical of American buggy or sleigh robes from the late 19th early 20th century...I have several in the collection here that are similar to that one. It appears to be a "printed" design (for lack of a better term) rather than woven. They come in many, many different patterns and are very heavy and dense. Hope this helps. Candace Perry Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center

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Date: Tue, 18 Feb 2003 13:08:57 -0600 From: "Pat Brammer" <pbrammer@iowatelecom.net> To: "Xenia Cord" <xenia@legacyquilts.net>, <vintagefabrics@lyris.quiltropolis.com>, 

Does anyone know if this exhibit will be in Iowa anytime? Pat

-----Original Message----- From: Xenia Cord [mailto:xenia@legacyquilts.net] Sent: Tuesday, February 18, 2003 12:06 PM To: vintagefabrics@lyris.quiltropolis.com; QHL@cuenet.com Subject: QHL: America From the Heart exhibit

For anyone who will be in or near north-central Indiana between now and March 30, you have a treat in store in Kokomo, at the Indiana University Art Gallery there. Beginning Sunday February 23 with an opening reception from 2-5, visitors can experience "America From the Heart: Quilters Remember September 11, 2001."

The 122 piece traveling exhibit includes quilts from across the country and from around the world, made in the weeks that followed the events of September 11 and invited to an impromptu exhibit at the Houston International Quilt Festival in Houston at the end of October 2001. The quilts are a moving, patriotic outpouring of hope and vision.

In conjunction with the exhibit, on Tuesday October 25 at 7:00PM and again on Saturday March 1 at 2:30PM, I will give a power point program called "American Spirit: Patriotism and Quilts 1800-2001." The exhibit and the lectures are free.

Gallery hours are Monday, Tuesday, Thursday 10AM-4PM; Wednesday 10AM-8PM' Saturday, Sunday noon-4PM (closed Friday).

Kokomo is on US 31 between Indianapolis and South Bend. Indiana University is located at 2300 S. Washington (Business 31, on the south side of Kokomo).

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Date: Tue, 18 Feb 2003 14:14:00 -0500 From: "Judy Kelius (judysue)" <judysue@ptd.net> To: 

Here in Lancaster County the Mennonites and Amish use primarily poly batting, often purchased in bulk, for the same reasons you give. They also use poly or poly-cotton fabrics for their clothing, so you see a lot of those in fabrics stores around here. Thank goodness most seem to use all cotton fabrics in their quilts!

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Date: Tue, 18 Feb 2003 15:21:53 -0500 From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett@fast.net> To: 

The Amish and Mennonite made quilts that are for sale in Lancaster County have poly batting in them. One comment I hear over and over is "it puffs nicely and shows off the quilting nicely". I've had 2 quilts quilted locally -- made from feedsacks so used Quilters Dream Cotton -- and both times I was quizzed several times as to "was I sure I didn't want them to use their poly batting -- the quilting stitches would show so much nicer." They did use my batting, and my thread. When I went one day to quilt on my quilt with them they told me they were surprised at how easily the cotton batt quilted -- they said that's one reason they don't like to do cotton -- it quilts hard.

The first weekend of April is the huge Mennonite Central Committee Disaster Relief Sale in Harrisburg PA -- and the highlight is the quilt auction. I haven't been to it in many years as it conflicts with the Lancaster Quilt Show, but from what I've seen of the quilts to be put at auction -- most have poly batt. There is a place near me where Amish and Mennonite ladies spend all year quilting for this and other sales -- and they use poly exclusively on their new quilts. Ladies buy batting by the roll here also, but our shops have grown as the tourist trade has grown. My favorite, Sauders, was just the basement of a small cape cod house when I bought my roll of poly batting about 1970 -- to make crafts, Christmas tree skirts, and crib quilts -- it filled the entire car. Now Sauders is a large fabric store -- still in the basement -- under the warehouse.

Barb in southeastern PA

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""""Date: Tue, 18 Feb 2003 15:29:08 -0500 From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett@fast.net> To: 

I found this listing on ebay and am not familiar with the phrase -- Toilet Quilt. In case the picture disappears quickly, it's a black and white catalog from 1875 and lists for sale in Jamestown, NY, Toilet Quilts -- Plain White, Pink and White, Buff and White, Blue and White, Honey Comb Quilts. Any information will be greatly appreciated.

 

 

http://cgi.aol.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2159178446&category=13986

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Date: Wed, 19 Feb 2003 17:30:04 +0000 From: deedadik@att.net To: QHL@cuenet.com (Quilt 

Hi all, Here is a much belated report on the midwest study group of Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, and Illinois. We met at 11 a.m. at The Daisy Barrel Quilt Shop in Fairborne, Ohio and was hosted by Phyllis Franck. As always our desserts were a wonderful addition to the presentation of the day. Our topic for January was Amish-their history and their quilts presented by two of our members. Xenia Cord started the formal presentation with an overview of the geneology of the Amish from the 16th century to today. It was good to see the branches on the flow chart as it helped to identify some of the names we all have heard in our studies.

Next, Martha Kievits gave us a presentation of the history, colors, sizes and the time line of Amish styles in quilts. We had many slides to illustrate each catagory as well as quilts that we brought to share. It was interesting to note that whatever the Amish did in their style of quilts was one to three decades behind what their "English" neighbors were doing.

Martha went into detail about Lancaster County, Miflin County, the Beachy quilts, Somerset County (all in Penna.) and Holmes County in Ohio and Indiana and Illinois characteristics. Some of the last three catagories were harder to distinguish their differences than those that were made in Pennsylvania.

We really appreciated Martha's and Xenia's presentation(this was our first one) and I for one hope that we continue in this format. The next meeting will be at Xenia's on March 1 with a further focus on Amish from an Amish woman and then a viewing of the traveling show Xenia has told us about, and a lecture from her at the University. Thanks to Phyllis for opening the shop for us-we couldn't leave without a FEW purchases!

Sorry I am not computor literate enough to attach my pictures with this post. We say some beautiful quilts!

-- Dee Dadik

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Date: Wed, 19 Feb 2003 07:07:15 -0800 From: "Rachel Greco" 

From the description you gave I would imagine that what is really meant is Toile quilt--someone just added a "T".

Rachel Greco Grandma's Attic Sewing Emporium, Inc. Dallas, Oregon

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Date: Wed, 19 Feb 2003 04:33:18 -0800 (PST) From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessen@yahoo.com> 

Thought y'all might like to see this article written by Desiree Cooper for the Detroit Free Press: Sewing up facts on slave quilts The debate: Did secret codes guide the flight to freedom? http://www.freep.com/news/metro/des18_20030218.htm 

Kris

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Date: Tue, 18 Feb 2003 15:36:35 CST From: jocelynm@delphiforums.com To: judi@fibush.net Cc: 

RE:Century of Progress quilts

I asked Barbara last night, and she said that they have identifications for a few more quilts that are in the book, but only for about 300- nowhere near the thousands that were entered. Apparently, they're being identified one by one, and there doesn't seem to have been a master list of them. She says it's probably about time to update the book (maybe via an article rather than doing a new edition) but that it still wouldn't come close to listing all the quilts, alas. Jocelyn

 

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