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Quilters Find a way to care

: Sat, 01 Mar 2003 12:08:51 -0500 From: Palampore@aol.com To: QHL@cuenet.com (Quilt 

Must be some confusion. I am the same place I have been for years....the only thing that has changed is my weight, and the gray in my hair. palampore@aol.com If we have discussed this before please forgive me. Is the teal(sort of) blue, brown, white, and often cheddar orange combination of the last quarter of the 19th century a southern thing, an NC thing, or a national thing? I just bought another NC quilt with that combination. (I have had a princess feather in the past that was dated 1865 with those colors, but I was always suspect of the date on it. It was embroidered on with red embroidery floss.) Lynn Lancaster Gorges in New Bern, NC

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Date: Sat, 01 Mar 2003 13:13:36 -0600 From: Mary Waller <mswaller@iw.net> To: 

I just purchased an interesting book, INDIAN STAR QUILTS, by Nancy Tucker, on the history and contemporary making and use of star quilts. Published in 1999, ISBN 0-9671124-0-0.

Dr. Tucker taught Native American Studies at Montana State. She died unexpectedly in 1995.

Copies are available from Jim Doyle <doylej@kingcon.com> for $20, plus $4 shipping.

Mary Waller Vermillion SD USA

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Date: Sat, 1 Mar 2003 19:35:17 -0000 From: "Sally Ward" <sallytatters@ntlworld.com> To: 

Can anyone give me some information about polyester conservation tulle? I went to look at a velvet and silk quilt this week which has been conserved (quite recently, 1998) with a full covering of fine polyester tulle. I was told the brand name, which I recognised, but have forgotten it already (anno domini!).

Two things bothered me: First, although it was not a particularly large quilt there were two seams in the tulle, which had been left with pretty raggy-looking raw edges on the inside of the conservation covering. This is pretty unsightly, but I also wondered whether these raw fibres would be doing the surface of the quilt any harm by abrasion? Second, there are areas where the tulle itelf seems to be deteriorating. Its hard to describe, but its like the fibres have been pulled and distorted as if pulled tight over a corner, although of course it hasn't and is laying flat.

I'm a rank amateur, so I don't know if either of these things are bad news or not, but they bothered me. Any advice would be appreciated.

Sally Ward in Yorkshire, UK

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Date: Sat, 01 Mar 2003 15:32:35 -0500 From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> CC: 

Sally -- I've not heard of using poly tulle. Some conservationists recommend nylon tulle, washed at least 3 times to soften it, but the prevailing thought now is that it's still too abrasive. There is a silk fabric called crepeline, a softer version of organza, that is now recommended and that I've heard many museums and quilters are using for overall preservation and in restored areas. I'm not sure where it is obtained but probably companies which sell archival products like Hollingers and Gaylords stock it.

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Date: Sat, 01 Mar 2003 16:44:16 -0500 From: "Judy Kelius (judysue)" <judysue@ptd.net> 

Looks like the bidder on that "Nazi quilt" must have realized his mistake since it's back! All the email he got about it apparently sunk in, but he has inflated ideas about what it's worth. http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item2512567548&category2221

rwquilt.jpg (42663 bytes)  click on the thumbnail

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Date: Mon, 03 Mar 2003 08:32:38 +0800 From: "Roberta Geanangel" 

WOW!!! I have one of these quilts...anyone want to offer me $2000? Inflated is right! ----- Original Message ----- From: "Judy Kelius (judysue)" <judysue@ptd.net> Date: Sat, 01 Mar 2003 16:44:16 -0500 To: QHL@cuenet.com Subject: QHL: The Nazi Quilt is back!!!

Re: Looks like the bidder on that "Nazi quilt" must have realized his mistake Re: since it's back! All the email he got about it apparently sunk in, but he Re: has inflated ideas about what it's worth. Re: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item2512567548&category2221 Re:

 

Ragamuffins are for loving! >^..^< Blessed Be! Roberta in Florida

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Date: Sat, 01 Mar 2003 19:15:56 -0800 From: Newbie Richardson <pastcrafts@erols.com> To: Sally Ward <sallytatters@ntlworld.com>, qhl@cuenet.com Subject: Re: QHL: 

Sally and list, A superior tulle used by many museums and private conservators both in Europe and in the US, is a low heat set monofilament nylon illusion veiling which is knitted on the original 19th c. machines in England. It has an exceptionally fine hand. If you look at bridal veiling under the scope, you will see hard plactic beads at each thread intersection. This is the product that Winterthur uses on all fabrics and upholstery. The Smithsonian Institution has allowed me to use it on some artifacts in the costume collection at National Museum of American History. It has some nice bias action for any 3D needs. Although it is nylon, it is fairly stable if kept out of direct sunlight. Nothing is perfect - yet. Crepeline is fine for some applications, but it degrades also. Stabletex is also good - but too opaque for most quilt applications. This comes in off white or black. It is 60" wide. Not cheap - about $50 a meter - but that goes along way! Dukeries Textiles & Fancy Goods/ Melbourne Road 15A/ West Bridgeford, Nottingham,/England Tel: +44 115 981 6330 (no internet anything - but does have a fax and takes credit cards) Newbie Richardson in DC where we still have LOTS of snow on the ground! At this time of year I am usually trying to hold Spring back, not this year!

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: "Cinda Cawley" <lrcawley@dmv.com> To: <Palampore@aol.com>, "Quilt Heritage List" 

I don't think that color combination was a national thing. When I see it I do think North Carolina. Does Karen Alexander see it in Shenandoah Valley quilts? Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Date: Sun, 02 Mar 2003 08:35:52 -0500 From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> CC: 

Newbie -- thanx for this information on English veiling. Too bad there is no American distributor to make obtaining a little easier. However, for Sally this is a perfect location on her side of the ocean!

Newbie Richardson wrote:

> Sally and list, > A superior tulle used by many museums and private conservators both > in Europe and in the US, is a low heat set monofilament nylon illusion > veiling which is knitted on the original 19th c. machines in England. > It has an exceptionally fine hand. If you look at bridal veiling > under the scope, you will see hard plactic beads at each thread > intersection.

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Date: Sun, 2 Mar 2003 16:18:54 -0000 From: "Sally Ward" <sallytatters@ntlworld.com> To: <QHL@cuenet.com> Subject: Conservation Tulle Message-ID: 

> Newbie -- thanx for this information on English veiling. Too > bad there is no American distributor to make obtaining a little easier. > However, for Sally this is a perfect location on her side of the ocean!

Two years ago I did make enquiries and get a sample of the Winterthur filament, on behalf of a friend in the US, and it is not as hard for you to obtain as you might think. This is the information I sent to her at the time:

<I phoned the netting manufacturer today. Very nice young man, told me about the machine - which dates from the 19th century, the only one in the world, everyone buys it from them. Its available from stock, scoured heat set and suitable for conservation. The reason the machine is unique is because it makes the stuff 5metres 40cm wide

Which means that per linear metre it costs UKP50. (gulp)

They are quite used to supplying people overseas, and he said that if you were to fax an order they would despatch it with an invoice ('the people who use this stuff are an honest lot', he said <G>) with instructions on how you could pay at a US bank in dollars.>

As you'll see, the 'rub' is that because it is manufactured in the 5.4 metre run, it is very expensive per linear metre (and that's a two-year-old price).

I have no doubt that this is the stuff which should have been used on the quilt I saw recently, because the tulle which has been used does very much obscure the quilt. And my big concern is whether the way the conservation has been done, with the rough seams of tulle on the surface of the quilt, and the deterioration of the tulle itself, are going to damage the quilt. Although made of silks, the deterioration of the silks is not shattering due to weighting, but a shearing, or striation, of the fibres.

Thanks to everyone who has sent me information.

Sally W Yorkshire, UK, where today it feels like spring.

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Date: Sun, 2 Mar 2003 21:16:24 -0500 From: "Teddy Pruett" <aprayzer@hotmail.com> To: "QHL" <QHL@cuenet.com> Subject: Southern quilts, dolls Message-ID: 

In answer to Lynn's question about the quilts she sees that are teal-y  green, brown, white and cheddar - I see these a lot on my appraisal  table, and when they come out of the pillowcases I just automatically  ask the client if their family is from Georgia or the Carolinas. They  always say "yes". Especially if there is a three-piece sashing, usually  3" wide, of a dark/light/dark strips, many times with the nine-patch  cornerstone. These are all solid colors, and many appear to be  home-dyed. Are these the ones to which you refer? If so, then YES they  are southern. There are similar quilts in the Mississippi state  documentation book, too, which sorta ticked me off, because I was  certain I had pegged these things to a more specific area. I even  thought I might have discovered these similarities all by my little  self, and it had even crossed my mind to research them, but I took an  aspirin and rested till that thought went away. 

Even though this is not quilt related, I am posting here in the event  some of you may be doll lovers. Or experts. I am seeking information  about values for three dolls that a friend has. They are hand-made  dolls, "Rosa's Character Dolls" from Clairborne Parish. LA (Gaye? Are  you there?) Made by ROsa Wilder Blackman, they depict slaves named  Uncle Bill Cornelius, Lee Annie, and Southern Mammy. They are small,  about 6" or 7", cloth bodies and carved hands and heads. Painted  features, including hair. My friend has been told they are extremely  valuable, but we have been unable to find info on the normal computer  searches. If anyone has any idea where we can go to verify value, I  would appreciate hearing from you. Thanks - Teddy, whose little nanny  goat had twins last night in the middle of a torrential downpour, and  they are so adorable and I am so happy to be a goat-granny again.

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KareQuilt@aol.com To: QHL@cuenet.com Subject: RE: Gorges & teal blue Message-ID: ontent-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Cinda, I personally have not seen the teal/cheddar/brown combination in the Shenandoah Valley like you all are saying you see in NC, though cheddar itself does seem to have been popular in the last quarter of the 19th century. I have seen it mixed with everything. However, I have been focusing on only three counties in the Valley (Page, Shenandoah and Rockingham), and even at that, I feel my exposure to the vast number of quilts there is still very limited. Oh for more hours in the day and days in the week!

Karen Alexander DC / Virginia where the snow piles are finally beginning to melt!

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Date: Mon, 03 Mar 2003 08:01:14 -0500 From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> CC: QHL 

Teddy -- I am not familiar with these particular dolls but you can pick up doll value guides at most books stores. One is by Jan Foulkes and the other is by Pat whose last name I cannot remember as she changed her name. But these are the only two recognized price guides of their type. Both books feature photos; prices are usually based on auction figures and run around $14 if you buy; free if you browse. Have you also searched Ebay? If dolls are of recent origin, there may not be sufficient data to estimate a value. Hope this helps you. I will check with my doll dealer friends to see if they know anything.

Teddy Pruett wrote:

> Even though this is not quilt related, I am posting here in the event > some of you may be doll lovers. Or experts. I am seeking information > about values for three dolls that a friend has. They are hand-made > dolls, "Rosa's Character Dolls" from Clairborne Parish. LA (Gaye? > Are you there?) Made by ROsa Wilder Blackman, they depict slaves > named Uncle Bill Cornelius, Lee Annie, and Southern Mammy. They are > small, about 6" or 7", cloth bodies and carved hands and heads. > Painted features, including hair. My friend has been told they are > extremely valuable, but we have been unable to find info on the normal > computer searches. If anyone has any idea where we can go to verify > value, I would appreciate hearing from you.

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Date: Mon, 3 Mar 2003 08:25:59 EST From: Midnitelaptop@aol.com To: a

i went to this site and thought you might get some info here... http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/la/claiborne/history/hiscl62.txt

evidently sue hefley is a writer who wrote a book about rosa wilder blackman... Rosa Wilder Blackman, Historian, by Sue Hefley jeanL

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Date: Mon, 03 Mar 2003 08:52:22 -0500 From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> CC: 

Teddy -- author of the other doll book is Pat Moyer; however several doll dealers checked their guides [they are issued about every 18 months] and couldn't locate doll nor have they heard of it. Maybe site below from Jean will be a big help.

Midnitelaptop@aol.com wrote:

>i went to this site and thought you might get some info here... >http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/la/claiborne/history/hiscl62.txt > >evidently sue hefley is a writer who wrote a book about rosa wilder >blackman... >Rosa Wilder Blackman, Historian, by Sue Hefley > jeanL > > > > >

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Date: Mon, 3 Mar 2003 10:32:56 EST From: KareQuilt@aol.com To: QHL@cuenet.com 

If anyone is tracking the HIPV story, here is another siting. Karen Alexander

Secret Codes to Freedom Date: February 8, 2003 to March 29, 2003 Monday,Tuesday,Wednesday,Thursday,Friday,Saturday,Sunday,

Location: Virginia War Museum Address: 9285 Warwick Blvd Newport News VA 23607 More info: (757)247-8523 www.warmuseum.com An exhibit of quilts and textiles by Valeria Hundley. Quilts and textiles contain "hidden" codes and messages used by African Americans in their flight to freedom via the Underground Railroad.

 

Date: Wed, 5 Mar 2003 15:19:25 EST From: ZegrtQuilt@aol.com To: QHL@cuenet.com 

The Alliance for American Quilts has announced a search for their first executive director. The Alliance is a national nonprofit that works to preserve, document, and share the stories of quilts and quilt makers. The Executive Director will work with the Alliance's president and board, and institutional partners, to coordinate and develop resources for a variety of  projects, including The Quilt Index, a comprehensive quilt documentation database; Quilters' S.O.S.-Save Our Stories, a grassroots oral history project; Quilt Treasures, a series of web-based documentaries of important figures of the quilt revival; and Boxes Under the BedAE, an effort to ident ify and preserve quilt documentation and ephemera. You can find further information about The Alliance, its partners, and projects at www.centerforthequilt.org. A full job description and information about how to apply can be found at www.quiltalliance.org/jobvolunteer.html. The job description notes that the ED should have successful experience both in soliciting financial support and in project management in the non-profit sector, and that study or experience in American studies, material culture, folklife, art history, design history, and related subjects is a plus, but not required.

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Date: Thu, 6 Mar 2003 11:07:03 -0500 From: Debby Kratovil <kratovil@his.com> To: 

While not a quilt history buff, I do like to stay inside the lines! I am thinking about an article and series of quilts made of wool. I have many quilt history books that have wool quilts in them, but I thought I'd ask the experts about a good source or sources so that I get my historical facts correct. I am not going to recreate historical quilts, but use today's wool to make quilts using traditional and innovative patterns. I came across a goldmine of wool samples two weeks ago - gorgeous English, Italian, Scottish, and Spanish mohair, goat's hair, and wool/silk blends and I can't stop stroking these good sized samples. I would like to write this article (maybe book of quilts) within the context of wool quilts historically. Any leads or resource recommendations are welcome. Debby -- Debby (with a "y" and not "ie") Kratovil http://www.quilterbydesign.com

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Date: Thu, 06 Mar 2003 11:32:45 -0500 From: Peggy Notestine <notestine.11@osu.edu> To: QHL@cuenet.com Subject: Why you all should visit Columbus, Ohio in June! 

Hello everyone, My name is Peggy Notestine, a long time member of QHL. I wanted to give all my quilting friend the heads up on why you should all come to Columbus, Ohio in June. Actually there are at least 4 reasons!

#1- The 34th Annual National Quilting Association (NQA) Quilt Show is taking place at the Greater Columbus Convention Center in downtown Columbus Ohio from June 19-21st. In addition to many wonderful classes offered, the 80+ vendors coming, and more than 350 quilts, there are some important classes being offered for those of you interested in Quilt Judging, AQS Quilt Appraisers Skills Insurance and Fair Market Value - (taught by Bobbie Aug and Gerald Roy!). I invite you to check out the website for the show. It's www.NQAQuilts.org/columbus 

#2 - For those of you interested in great old quilts - The Ohio Historical Society (5-10 minutes away from the show site) is presenting " A Stitch in Time: 200 Years of Quilts". In recognition of Ohio's Bicentennial, the society is exhibiting 35 significant quilts from their permanent collection of more than 400. Quilts cover the time period from 1800 to 2000 and include applique, pieced and crazy quilts. Info for this show can be found at www.ohiohistory.org 

#3 - For those quilters of all faiths who see their work as a connection to the sacred and an expression of their spiritual journey, "Sacred Threads" is hosting their biennial exhibit in neighboring Reynoldsburg, OH. The exhibit is June 18th to July 1st. 

#4 - The Quilt Surface Design Symposium is also taking place in Columbus from June 7-20. This 2 week class-filled event will have some of the most innovative quilt and fabric artists from around the world at this 14th annual event. Info can be found at www.qsds.com There are actually lots of smaller events planned at the same time too, but I did want to bring to your attention how wonderful Ohio will be for quilters of all kinds in the month of June. Hope you can all come and attend some of these events. Any additional questions you might have, please feel free to contact me and I'll try to find the answers for you. Peggy Notestine

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Date: Fri, 7 Mar 2003 14:46:47 -0500 From: "Kristina Strom" 

I would like to add a fifth reason to Peggy Notestine's list: Quilt National '03 (quilt history in the making?!) in Athens is only a quick and scenic hour an a half's drive from Columbus and well worth the visit. For hours www.dairybarn.org . An added bonus is the Lunn studio on the way.

As for lodging, the University Plaza Hotel and Conference Center phone 614.267.7461 (no affiliation except knowing that it is a great place to stay) still has available rooms. Though I am not a member of NQA, I was pleased to discover that they are extending the group rate to anyone attending the event.

Kristina

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Date: Fri, 7 Mar 2003 21:36:31 -0300 From: "Pilar Donoso" <quiltpd@mi.cl> To: 

Today I received the visit at my Quilting Store in Santiago, Chile, from  a very nice American men, husband of Rachel Cochran. He brought as a  present Rachels book "New Yersey Quilts 1777 to 1950, Contribution to  an American Tradition". I am still shocked. I dont know Rachel, and  I am so far from the rest of the world, that to receive a present like  this, as a Quiltmaker and as a History Teacher it is just INCREDIBLE!!

I hope Rachel that you receive this message because I dont have your  EMail Address. If any one of you knows her EMail please send it to me.

I read your messages every day, but I dont have anything to say, just  listening. There is not a history of Quiltmaking in Chile, we are  starting one. I gave a speech about Quiltmaking History a couple years  ago at the Hyatt in Santiago and I am preparing a couple of new speeches  this year. Nothing fancy, just introducing Quiltmaking to people who  dont know anything about it. I am collecting information for my  first speech in June. Rachels book was what I needed to get new  energy and inspired me to get going.

If you receive this message Rachel: THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU.  For the rest of you, I am listening to everything you have to say,  because I can not see too much. You are my eyes.

Thank you, Pilar Pilar Donoso I. The Quilt Shop Santiago, CHILE

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Date: Sat, 08 Mar 2003 05:54:17 -0800 From: Judi Fibush <judi@fibush.net> To: QHL <QHL@cuenet.com>, vintage <vintagefabrics@lyris.quiltropolis.com> Subject: SOMOR Art 

Does anyone know anything about the company called SOMOR which put out embroidery/applique kits in maybe the 1920's.1930's,1940's? I have 9- 22 inch blocks with sunflowers plus a stem and leaf. It is pattern number 41 with mostly embroidery and the center yellow of the flower is appliquéd.

I have pictures I can send to anyone who might be interested to their direct email to see what this particular pattern is.

I would so like to find out something about SOMOR. The blocks say they are copyrighted but the Library of Congress had nothing on a needlework company by that name. I do believe the company is a German name but the printing is in English.

Judi Fibush

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Date: Sat, 8 Mar 2003 14:46:48 -0500 From: "Peggy O'Connor" <mnoc@brinet.com> To: "QHL" <QHL@cuenet.com> Subject: Re: QHL: Southern quilts Message-ID: 

I'm intrigued; I have a folky applique quilt that has teal, light brown, and cheddar on white. The family history with it (for what that's worth!) when I bought it claimed it was made in 1861. All the teals aren't the same - I thought that they were overdyed greens that had had the yellow washed out, and that the tan was a red that had faded. I thought that this was a "red and green" quilt that had faded, although the teal is very predominant in the design. The 16 applique squares are sashed in 2 1/4 - 2 1/2" wide yellow (not as strong as the cheddar, but similar).

Are the other teal/brown/cheddar quilts generally applique or patchwork? Is one color predominant? Is the brown a light brown like mine (of course maybe it just faded to that color) or a darker richer brown? Perhaps Teddy or Lynn or others could enlighten us on what they have seen. Thanks.

Peggy in NC, though I got the quilt in GA, and heard various stories including its heritage from AL or WV

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Date: Sat, 08 Mar 2003 12:36:08 -0800 From: Judi Fibush <judi@fibush.net> To: "Peggy 

> The tan is probably a green washed or faded out. I am not familiar > with teal that long ago. > > Judi

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Date: Sat, 08 Mar 2003 23:02:41 -0500 From: Palampore@aol.com To: QHL@cuenet.com 

My teal and brown quilts are at my studio and not here, so I cannot be 100%. They are often sashed with the green/blue. I have seen them appliqued and pieced. The patterns I have seen are: Whig Rose, Princess Feather, Baskets. I will try to do digital shots of the click here to order ones I have next week and put them on my website. I think the brown began as a brown, not as a green. I have several quilts that began as green and went to brown, but I don't think these did that. Is there a way to determine if a dye is synthetic or natural? I have several books on dyes,but have never seen this. I have a bio-scope and a microscope if that is useful to determine such. I am reading a good book right now---ENEMY WOMEN. It is about women who were imprisoned during the CW in Missouri. My only qualm at this point is that they say the young girl had a silk and velvet Log Cabin Quilt. The book is set in 1864. This is how those myths evolve. I will let you know if she gets hold of anymore inappropriate textile items along her journey. Off to read, Lynn Lancaster Gorges, New Bern, NC

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Date: Sat, 08 Mar 2003 22:16:25 -0800 From: Judi Fibush <judi@fibush.net> To: 

Love it. Those "wonderful, authentic quilts" of yesteryear.

Judi

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Date: Sun, 9 Mar 2003 17:28:39 -0000 From: "Sally Ward" <sallytatters@ntlworld.com> 

> I am reading a good book right now---ENEMY WOMEN. It is about women who were imprisoned during the CW in Missouri. My only qualm at this point is that they say the young girl had a silk and velvet Log Cabin Quilt. The book is set in 1864.

If she was in the UK at that time she could certainly have had such a quilt. Is it possible that she had one that had travelled?

Sally W In a Very Wuthering Yorkshire

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Date: Sun, 9 Mar 2003 12:39:28 EST From: AmyOKorn@aol.com To: QHL@cuenet.com 

The March 1, 2003 meeting of the textile enthusiasts from Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky and Illinois met at the home of Xenia Cord in Kokomo, Indiana. Sixteen members and two guests braved the snowy, blustery weather for a delightful day in Indiana. To continue our study of Amish quilts, Xenia had invited her Amish friend, Sarah Otto, to attend our meeting and to share some of her family quilts and their stories.

Xenia began by presenting the recognized belief that there are no (or very few) embroidered quilts made by the Amish. Robert Hughes in his book Amish: The Art of the Quilt states that Amish quilts " . . . have no depictive imagery at all; they are not covered with the emblems of day-to-day life one finds on some other American quilts - animals and people and tools and trees and locomotives." We viewed two Amish embroidered quilts (circa 1950) that contained various floral images, names, locations and good luck messages and were perhaps made as friendship quilts. The first was set on point with yellow sashing and a scalloped border, and the second was straight set with pink sashing and quite detailed embroidery. A third quilt, dated 1943, had been given to Xenia and ironically turned out to be made by a relative of Sarah's, who now proudly possesses it. The quilt has seen some hard wear and frequent washings, but the names of Sarah's mother and other relatives are still visible. The Rainbow Block Company in Cleveland, Ohio marketed pre-stamped embroidery blocks during this time and may have been the source for some of the patterns in these quilts. Sarah also shared with us a quilt made by her parents in 1984 in a Nine Patch Variation (perhaps a variation of the Antique Tile Block - Brackman #1617) of vibrant blues, greens, grays and brown. Xenia also shared her "bargain" Amish doll quilt, made perhaps by an Amish child and then brought out three quilts in her collection of Russian Sunflower quilts, the earliest dating from 1840 with rich madder reds and an interesting green overdyed background.

We took a break for our sack lunches and an array of delicious desserts, then traveled to nearby Indiana University Kokomo Art Gallery to view "America: From the Heart - Quilters Remember September 11, 2001." Approximately 100 quilts were on display and as we moved among these emotionally-wrenching quilts, many of us were overcome with tears and painful memories. At 2:30 p.m., Xenia presented a powerpoint lecture open to the public entitled, "The American Spirit: Patriotism and Quilts: 1800-2001" which was informative, insightful and enjoyed by all.

Our next meeting is Sunday, May 18, 2003 at the Ohio Historical Society in Columbus, Ohio to view the exhibit "A Stitch in Time: 200 Year of Ohio Quilts," covering the time period of 1800 to 2000. The July meeting is tentatively scheduled for Saturday, July 19 at the home of Joy Swartz near Indianapolis.

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Date: Sun, 9 Mar 2003 12:48:51 -0500 From: "Cinda Cawley" <lrcawley@dmv.com> To: "

Thursday evening I ventured into the heart of Delmarva to hear Barb Garrett speak to the appropriately named Heartland Quilt Guild. For those of you who've never been to the Eastern Shore, parts of it are so sparsely settled that you would never suspect that you're in the direct line of the Boston-Washington megalopolis. It was a super program. Barb's subject was feedsacks and she had the group fascinated. 

She had so many wonderful things to look at. Starting with the plain sacks (the early ones) which aren't plain at all; many of them have wonderful images printed on them (company logos). Everything was passed around which was a big hit with the audience. When she moved on to the printed bags which started in 1924 we saw everything from "Gone with the Wind" to cowboys, Hawaii, children's motifs, floral, of course, and geometrics, lots of cheater cloth (one of Barb's favorite things). 

There were bags printed to be made into pillowcases and others that could be sewn into dolls. I still can't get over how many examples she had (I'll have to re-think calling myself a collector; I'm certainly not in her league). The items which had been made from feedsacks were really charming: tiny sunsuits and rompers, sunbonnets, tea towels, aprons and pillowcases. There was an exquisitely made drawn work table cover made from a feedsack printed with pastel ducks! 

I got to see in person the bias birds we discussed recently. They are very, very cute in an Art Deco sort of way. Delmarva is the chicken capital of the U.S. Tyson, Allen, Purdue, they're all here (I know Arkansas is into chicken big time, but I don't live there). Many of those present were intimately acquainted with feedsacks. After all they'd grown up on local farms. Some of the ladies brought quilts made of feedsacks by their mothers and grandmothers along with aprons, smocks, blouses etc. One lady told of making a feedsack ballgown in 1944 when there was no other fabric available. She said she used four gold and black paisley sacks to make a very elegant dress for the Christmas cotillion. 

The finale of the program were quilts that Barb made from feedsacks. They are delightful, from the dolls quilts to the full size. Some have backs made of feedsacks which look great. Barb confessed that she has the math teacher's compulsion to bring the wild profusion of so many 1930s quilts under control and she does it beautifully. I think she must be the Queen of Thangles! Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Date: Sun, 9 Mar 2003 10:13:08 -0800 From: "ChrisA" <chrisa@jetlink.net> To: 

This weekend I attended a lecture and dating workshop given by Julie Silber. Needlesstosay it was divine! She showed a variety of quilts from her collection and formerly Esprit's, including one Baltimore Album Quilt, one mid-century album quilt in Baltimore style, and a few Amish quilts, traditional style, including a small size dark colored tumbling block, kind of crib size. This was from the Midwest, where she said the Amish made all sizes of quilts.

Re: teal, a quilt presented at the workshop by a student was a teal and red appliqué block quilt, 9 large scale blocks in an unknown floral pattern, of stems with buds and flower tops, placed on an angle. It was in great condition, clearly a dark teal and a dark red, rich like Turkey Red. It had a border of red, teal and white, narrowish strips and Julie immediately dated it to the 1920s. The background was bleached white cloth, with a low thread count like and thin thread. It was purchased in a shop here in CA, no provenance known.

This is an interesting QHL discussion. I've wondered when the teal is a result of fading and when it is really teal to begin with, when you don't have any variability in the dye on the fabric, but it isn't completely gone either. Karen Alexander's input on NOT seeing Teal in quilts from NC was interesting input- has there been any regional "destination of origin or commonality" mentioned yet?

Kimberly Wulfert, PhD www.antiquequiltdating.com Email: quiltdating@jetlink.net

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Date: Sun, 9 Mar 2003 20:04:01 -0600 From: "Lisa Erlandson" <quilter@cooke.net> To: <QHL@cuenet.net> Subject: Re: Teal Message-ID: 

I have a red and green quilt - Carolina Lily with a large applique border done in teal. The date of the quilt is 1849 - quilted into the quilt and the border is original to the quilt, so teal can be an early fabric.

 

 
 

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