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Quilters Find a way to care

Subject: Wardour Chasuble From: "Dorothy Osler" <do@osler.demon.co.uk> Date: 

There is a section on the Wardour Chasuble in the paper 'A Comparative Study of the 1718 Silk Patchwork Coverlet' by Bridget Long in the Special Issue of Quilt Studies (issue 4/5, pp. 60-63) which includes all the research findings on the silk patchwork coverlet dated 1718. Quilt Studies is the journal of the British Quilt Study Group and is available from the Quilters' Guild office (email: jane@qghalifax.org.uk).

 

The chasuble is now thought to be 18th century and there is a small b/w photograph of it within the paper.

Hope this helps

Dorothy Osler

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Subject: Sanitation Quilt From: "crossland_n_j Crossland" 

I've posted the pictures of the Sanitation Quilt from Vermont to the website. When I reduced the pictures to the size 3.5 by 3.5 required by the site, the details were lost. If you want me to email you the original size, please email me crossland_n_j@msn.com and I'll send them. The detail is much better. Sorry this is so late but I had to locate my CD with the pictures.

Don Beld helped me find the site by telling me to do a search of vintagepictures.eboard.com. That is how I would go to the site. It would be great if the web address was at the bottom of the QHL. Kris, is that possible?

Julie Crossland, from cold Hudson, NH

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Subject: The Dating Club and FVF (long) From: "Cinda Cawley" <lrcawley@dmv.com> 

Maybe those people in Indiana cancel because of bad weather (G), but we in the Mid-Atlantic are made of sterner stuff. It was ugly on Sunday, but we still had a core group of about a dozen at the Fabric Dating Club meeting on signature quilts. Because the group was so much smaller than usual we spent a lot more time looking at each quilt. We talked about the importance of documenting the names on contemporary signature and friendship quilts. Hazel Carter put it very well when she observed that "it doesn't make much sense to wait until everybody who knows anything about the quilt is dead." It occurs to me that the fabulous reproduction of the Samuel Williams quilt made by the Baltimore Applique Society is also a signature quilt since the names of everyone who worked on it are inscribed, by Susan McKelvey, in the glorious triple vine border. By the way, don't forget that this is a raffle quilt. Have you got a ticket? (I'm not even a member of BAS, I just think it's the most amazing raffle quilt ever made!). 

We had better luck Monday with the weather for FVF. A good thing too, because I can't imagine trying to get to Fran's mountain top in a snowstorm. Fran is curating the antique exhibit for Quilt Odyssey in Hershey, PA this summer. She asked us to bring red and white quilts. There will be a redwork sequence from blocks (Quaddie Quilties) to top (my 1905 memorial piece with bible scenes and fraktur letters) to finished quilt (with an unusual set). Also in red and white we saw a really cute Flying Geese crib quilt, a gorgeous Feathered Star with a border of tulips on a fat vine, a pattern Brackman calls Indian Summer (looks like a NY Beauty variation to me), a Storm at Sea. We got a full report on the vexing question of straw mattresses and effete matter (I'm sure we all feel much better now) and on the textile seminar which the Lancaster Heritage Center had the colossally poor judgement to have at the time that many of us were in Dallas at AQSG. I hate schedule conflicts! 

There was a charming quilt top brought back from Michigan, the Trees and Wreath shown in Plate 160 of the Quilt Engagement Calendar Treasury. A great 1880s dress led to many endorsements of "Dressed for the Photographer." We all love the books that make us sound smart. Nursery Rhyme Sue was a doll quilt found in McKinney, TX. Also from the 1930s there was a great collection of String Stars. I brought a Poppy kit quilt (orange flowers with stems and leaves in two shades of brown--Xenia any idea of a date) that I found on the way home from the Dating Club on Sunday. It was so cheap I had to buy it. A New Year's day auction produced a most unusual red and green applique where two different blocks were arranged to produce a medallion effect--very interesting. An exquisite 1830 Peony variation had a huge variety of fabrics, three different kinds of pieced peonies and an amazing use of fabric in the stems. It has cut out corners and a wonderful border that looks very French (my most coveted object of the day). 

A wonderfully quilted Bear's Paw inscribed "Kate Rupp, Jan. 12, 1844" had been cut down by a third. Pennsylvania was represented by two amazing dresser scarves with appliqued Whig Roses in red, orange and green and a Bucks Co. strippy from the 1860s. There were two Rolling Stones both probably circa 1870: one with stamped signatures the other inscribed in fraktur letters. I brought my 1860s Love Apple from Dauphin Co. with machine applique and great hand quilting. The showstopper was a newly discovered Baltimore Album. They do keep popping up. This one was found in a trunk by people settling an estate. The blocks were assembled and quilted in the 1930s, but what blocks they are! Most are signed and many include "Baltimore 1847." There are 25 blocks and among them they represent many of the elements seen at the current BMA exhibit. There's a "bird and book" block of the Mary Simon (designer one) style, blocks with details embroidered in wool, a woven basket, a paper cut block (not a very ambitious one) and a variety of lovely wreaths and bunches of flowers. The quilt was finished by adding plain borders of an Ely Walker-type red calico which probably looked appropriate to the quilter. It was an exciting thing to see. In our heart of hearts we all expect to find something like that at the next auction or estate sale. It's only a matter of time and stopping at every country antique shop I see. Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: Brackman article From: KareQuilt@aol.com Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2004 14:57:33 

Brackman's "Quilting & Finishing Old Tops" is in QNM #183 pg. 20. She also wrote "Old Tops: To Quilt or Not" which is in QNM #182 (May 1986) pg. 26.

Karen B. Alexander Press Secretary - The Quilters Hall of Fame

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Subject: Re: [BQHL] Road to California 2004 Eye Candy From: "ChrisB" 

Sorry forgot the link http://www.road2ca.com/2004winners.html 

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Subject: Second try on this post From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrow@patmedia.net> Date: 

I sent this last night at 10 PM but it hasn't shown up yet. It may still show up, but I'll send it again to be sure. JKG

Studio Study Group met here at the Ringoes hideout where the quilt police can never find us, on Tuesday. Although we didn't have black ice that I know of (there is nothing that could get me on the road at 6:00 AM -- I'd go the day before and sleep over), at 9:30 AM my long uphill driveway was snow and ice covered and the 1 1/2 mile local road was only plowed and cindered. That didn't stop 15 intrepid quilt lovers from making it here for a day of mostly star studded quilts. Altogether we flapped over 50 quilts, large and small (mostly large).

We saw huge stars and little bitty stars, Strip stars, and Lone stars, Bethlehem stars and Expanding stars, Lemoyne stars and Rolling stars, Touching stars and Broken stars.

We saw quilts that were made in New York State, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Ohio, Massachusetts, California, Kentucky, Maryland, Colorado, Texas, and somewhere in New England.

We also saw a couple of Log Cabins, and Irish chain, 9-patch, Devil's claw, Carpenter's Wheel, Hexagons, a piece of untranslated blue work, pin cushions, and a hand-quilted petticoat. We saw a remarkable early two-sided quilt, stars on one side, flying geese in strips on the other.

One late 19th century Ohio Star quilt took the prize for the happiest and silliest quilt of the day. The maker obviously thought hard about her fabric choices and spent good dollars to get the right fabrics -- blocks of double pink and double blue with a madder print paisley, sashing of another double, but looking very pumpkin, corner stones of the double blue and pink -- and then it's as if she despaired of the time it would take to quilt. So she tied it, 9 times in every block, every tie on top of a black felt circle (each perhaps 1 1/4") which was topped by a slightly smaller red felt circle. The ties, too were of a couple of colors of wool, regularly placed in pattern around the quilt. It was the first tied quilt I've ever coveted! You couldn't help but feel happy every time you would look at it.

One of our members travelled over 2 hours to be with us, knowing she would have to leave right after lunch to travel the 2 hours home for an appointment scheduled at 4 PM. We are so glad she went to all that trouble, and would have missed her if she had taken the easy way out.

I wish you all could have been with us.

The gang will meet again at the same hideout, on March 16th. Our subject will be flowers and springtime. If it feels like spring, bring it to show.

In the meantime,

"Happy trails to you........"

Judy "the Ringo Kid " in Ringoes, NJ judygrow@patmedia.net

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Subject: SQSG From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessen@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 22 Jan 

I am a bit behind in updating the photos on the Quilt Study group page, but I promise I will do so soon! You really have to see the Ohio Star Polka Dot quilt:-))

As for those NJ cinders... give me salt and sand any day. I now have a hole in my windshield which I am telling everyone was done by a member of the Judy Ringo gang.

Kris

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Subject: Ebay Quilt From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessen@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 22 

click on the thumbnail to see this up closeThis one caught my attention http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2588908969&category=2221

but is it silk? Is it mid 19th century? I think not, but I would be happy to be wrong. What do y'all think?

Kris, practising her y'alls.

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Subject: Re: Ebay Quilt From: Dana Balsamo <danabalsamo@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 22 Jan 

Hi Kris, I am no expert, but it doesn't look mid 19th Century and at least some if it isn't silk.

Joan from VFF...check out the seller's about me page, and click on her Barkcloth Link...to DIE for...she has lots of the large florals you love...I have to admit, I am partial to the MOD designs.

My best, Dana

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Subject: Ebay Quilt From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2004 22:52:19 

Dana -- I deleted that ebay link to barkcloth. Do you remember seller's name? I can use that as a search word. Re silk quilt -- possibly some of the silk is silk and cotton blends per many of the fabrics to cut down on cost. It looks in remarkably good condition save for several split areas I noticed.

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Subject: Road to California/Skinner Civil War Auction Quilt From: Donald Beld 

Hi, I have the big quilts every year at Road to California and the two appliqued quilts that won best of show and best traditional were, as stated today, stunning. They represented the finest in traditional applique and patterns and quilting. Extraordinary quilts and the very essence of why I don't go applique--I'm not a good enough quilter.

Also, I was looking for a particular 19th Century quilt and looked throught he Wisconsin Quilt book and noticed that the Skinner Civil War Auction Quilt that we have a photo of on vintagepictures.eboard.com is the COVER quilt for the book. I am the only idiot who did not know that? No wonder it sold for $149,000. Don Beld

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Subject: RE: Brackman article From: Margareta.Faust@cec.eu.int Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2004 

Is there a way of getting hold of these articles when you're far far away from a library? Margareta in Luxembourg

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Subject: Re: Ebay Quilt From: Dana Balsamo <danabalsamo@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 23 Jan 

Hi Joan, The quilt is http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2588908969&category=2221

Her Barkcloth Pics are here: http://imageevent.com/vintagetresors/vintagebarkclothstylenames

Hugs, Dana Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> wrote: Dana -- I deleted that ebay link to barkcloth. Do you remember seller's name? I can use that as a search word. Re silk quilt -- possibly some of the silk is silk and cotton blends per many of the fabrics to cut down on cost. It looks in remarkably good condition save for several split areas I noticed.

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: January 22, 2004 From: Beth Donaldson <quilts@museum.msu.edu> 

Check out this quilt to see another Masonic Symbol quilt. http://www.museum.msu.edu/glqc/collections_2001.158.10.html

Beth Donaldson Great Lakes Quilt Center, MSU Museum

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Subject: ebay quilt From: Ark Quilts <quiltarkmv@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2004 07:12:03 

The quilt on ebay with the shiny, solid color fabric looks very similar to polished cottons from the 1930's that were woven & had a slight twill in the weave. It was a heavier woven cotton. I have repaired a few quilts with that fabric in it & it is, of course, impossible to match. A few years ago the fabric stores carried a line of polished solid cottons with a similar weave, but I never saw any of them listed in catalogs or displayed in stores. It's a nice fabric.

Connie Ark where it was 2 degrees this morning.

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Subject: Reversible & printed cotton fabric From: Ark Quilts <quiltarkmv@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 

I hope someone on QHL can help me identify a fabric.

I recently bought an "ugly" 4-patch quilt with lots of scrap fabrics from mid-1800's through about 1920.

The double-pink print (in the design of a linen weave) used for the lattice pieces is also a reversible print. It has a woodcut like floral pattern printed in tan or light brown on the back--nothing like what is on the front in the double-pink. Definitely intentionally different prints on the 2 sides. This fabric is a little heavier than some of the cottons from the same era.

I once saw a quilt in Plain City, Ohio that was made by a Mennonite quilter who had sewn a handwritten note on a linen print double-pink fabric similar to this one : made a dress for ____ in 1840. This fabric was sewn into a finished quilt, so I couldn't see the back.

Does anyone know about when reversible fabrics were printed? If you would like to see a digital photo of the fabric, I will take one this weekend and email it to you if you request it. Thanks--Connie Ark

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Subject: Brackman article From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarlton@att.net> Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2004 

Thanks, Karen, for the QNM information on the articles by Barbara B. Now = to find them to read. I am traveling - could very well have the issues = at my home but won't be there for some time. If I don't find them before = I go home through Lincoln, I think the library there will have them. Thanks again Jean

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Subject: vintage fashion publication From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2004 13:07:13 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

For those who have been wondering about Vintage Fashion magazine, here is an update [also posted to VF list] -- I just called the editorial offices to find out what is going on. The second issues was mailed in December -- I did not get mine so one is being mailed. If you are a subscriber or would like to subscribe there have been some tel. # changes: 800 487-3333 is a customer service agency which will mail you current issue [2nd] if you have not received it. But they cannot help beyond that point. 413 564-7070 replaces the 718 editorial office tel #. Myra Fine is on hand to help with questions and subscribtions. She confirms that the 2nd issue has been mailed and is quite stunning, that a third issue is in the works as well as future ones but that magazine will not be available on newsstands for awhile. Hope this helps those who are interested in this magazine and who are subscribers.

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Subject: Re: vintage fashion publication From: Dana Balsamo <danabalsamo@yahoo.com> 

Joan, Thanks! Finally got through...they are sending the current issue gratis, isn't that nice? Hugs, Dana

Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> wrote: For those who have been wondering about Vintage Fashion magazine, here is an update [also posted to VF list] -- I just called the editorial offices to find out what is going on. The second issues was mailed in December -- I did not get mine so one is being mailed. If you are a subscriber or would like to subscribe there have been some tel. # changes: 800 487-3333 is a customer service agency which will mail you current issue [2nd] if you have not received it. But they cannot help beyond that point. 413 564-7070 replaces the 718 editorial office tel #. Myra Fine is on hand to help with questions and subscribtions. She confirms that the 2nd issue has been mailed and is quite stunning, that a third issue is in the works as well as future ones but that magazine will not be available on newsstands for awhile. Hope this helps those who are interested in this magazine and who are subscribers.

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Subject: eboard quilt & vintage fashion publication From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> 

I've just posted to the eboard for Judy the Ringo Kid :-D a beautiful 2-sided silk Quaker quilt est. 3rd quarter 19thC. The stripes and dark shades are taffeta as probably most of the other silk colors, IMHO. http://vintagepictures.eboard com or http://www.eboard.com/vintagepictures Select quilt tab

Dana -- happy to hear you were able to connect.

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Subject: Re: eboard quilt From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrow@patmedia.net> Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2004 

The silk quilt that Joan posted for me is owned by the Burlington County Historical Society in NJ. We saw it when we had study group there in July. I brought up my photos because of the similarity to the quilt on E-bay that Dana posted about.

The quilt is http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2588908969&category=2221

There is the possiblility that this quilt is also made from silk used in dresses from ladies of the Quaker persuasion.

By the way, I found the quilt on the General tab, not the quilt tab.

Judy "the Ringo kid " in Ringoes, NJ judygrow@patmedia.net

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Subject: QHF Block Contest From: KareQuilt@aol.com Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2004 19:15:48 EST 

The Grand Opening of the Marie Webster House/Quilters Hall of Fame is only 6=  months away! Please let your Guilds know about our block contest to celebrat= e this historic event. Get your entry recorded for posterity!

Theme Title: My Dream House - Real or Imagined9D Prize money donated by Quilter99s Newsletter Magazine. There will be= four categories of judging. First place in each category will receiver $150.00.

General Contest Guidelines

1. The theme: My Dream House - Real or Imagined9D.  2. Deadline: Entries must be postmarked by June 1, 2004.  3. There is NO entry fee. 4. Along with your stitched entry, send (a) the completed Entry Form, (b) a=  color snapshot of your stitched entry and (c) IF you wish to be notified tha= t your entry has been received, enclose a self-addressed stamped postcard also= . 5. Photo: Please note your name, address, title of your entry, and dimensions of your entry on the back of the photo. (We will create a perma= nent binder of this contest for our archives.) 6. All entries must be signed, dated (2004) and two digit letters of State (or Country) noted somewhere on the front of your stitched piece. You may in= k or stitch this information.  7. ALL contest entries become the property of The Quilters Hall of Fame to be used at our discretion. 8. To allow freedom in our using entries in a greater variety of ways, there are two distinctions: finished (quilted and bound) AND unfinished (ne= ed not be quilted or bound). 9. Size specifications: you are given several choices. Print out the entry form at www.quiltershalloffame.org to see your choices. 10. Entry may be pieced, appliqu=C3=A9d, embellished (beads, paint etc.) an= d/or embroidered or any combination thereof. 11. If you enter a "finished" block, it must be hand or machine quilted . 12. Entry must be made by entrant. 13. Entries must be sent to POSTMARKED by June 1, 2004.  14. You may obtain an official entry form at www.quiltershalloffame.org or by writing to: Quilters Hall of Fame QHF Block Contest P.O. Box 681, Marion, IN 46952-0681

Karen B. Alexander Press Secretary - The Quilters Hall of Fame

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Subject: Kris EBAY Silk Quilt From: "crossland_n_j Crossland" <crossland_n_j@msn.com> Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2004 18:14:16 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

> Kris Wrote: > This one caught my attention > http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2588908969&category=2221 > > but is it silk? Is it mid 19th century? I think not, but I would be > happy to be wrong. What do y'all think? > > Kris, practising her y'alls. > > Kris, you are soooo right! Shattered silks gave the date away. If it was > mid 19th century, there wouldn't be any shattering. Julie in not so cold, > it is "Artic" NH.

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Subject: Kudos to Lynne Bassett From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrow@patmedia.net> Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2004 23:55:44 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

"Telltale Textiles: Quilts from the Historic Deerfield Collection"

Lynne Bassett gave a personally guided tour of the show of quilts and other textiles that she curated at Deerfield this summer, and I had the great pleasure of being one of the touristas. Finally, the catalog of the show has been published, and thanks to Barb Garrett mine was personally delivered on Tuesday.

All of 40 pages long, it could be the most concise and informative written and illustrated history of early quilts and textiles in America. Most of the text is in the captions to the glorious photos. And thank goodness Lynne has been making a special study of whole cloth calamanco quilts and putting their designs into line drawings. Photographs of those quilts are never good enough to allow us to savor the sumptious design of their quilting. The catalog includes 3 of Lynne's line drawings, and from them we can see how the undulating reciprocating vine, packed with fantasy flowers are the same motifs used in bed rugs, painted furniture decoration, and stitched samplers.

I have always wondered where the ubiquitous feather quilting motif came from, when it was first used. From studying Lynne's drawings I think the design element that we call "feathers" today started as leaves on vines, with veins delineated. I wonder when the name "feather" was given to the motif. (See especially figure 9 on page 10.) I hope Lynne can get a publisher for her entire collection of drawings! That would be really special.

Too often the study of quilts takes place in a sort of locked room, and the focus stays only on the quilts. In her catalog, Lynne has reminded us that quilts were only one part of a world full of expensive textiles. I especially appreciate that Lynne has included articles of clothing using textiles like the ones used in the quilts. We have often wondered what "that" print looked like in a dress, and Lynne shows us. I also appreciate that design sources and other household uses of the same motifs used by quilters are included.

A wonderful catalog, it belongs in every quilt lover's library, and should be given to every beginning quilt historian as required reading.

It is unfortunate the the museum is charging so much for shipping this small catalog. Priority mail is less than $4.00 with the mailers free from the post office. Yet Deerfield is charging $6.95 for mailing. I hope that policy changes.

Historic Deerfield Museum Store: 413-775-7170 or museumstore@historic-deerfield.org

Judy in Ringoes, NJ judygrow@patmedia.net

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: January 24, 2004 From: Pat Kyser <patkyser@hiwaay.net> Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2004 06:34:06 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

> I was in Mexico for a week and came home to find this list so silent I > wrote Marsha to ask if I'd been dropped. With the meeting in Louisiana > coming up soon, I would expect more traffic. Who is going? Pat Kyser in Alabama

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: January 24, 2004 From: Gail Ingram <gingram@tcainternet.com> Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2004 07:41:51 -0600 X-Message-Number: 3

The Louisiana hostesses are bizy preparing for the onslaught <g> of guests, also a www to which we may refer in p.r. and guild notices.

And besides, with you in Mexico, nobody felt like writing!

On the way to confession and communion, Gail

> From: Pat Kyser <patkyser@hiwaay.net> > Reply-To: "Quilt History List" <qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.com> > Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2004 06:34:06 -0600 > To: "Quilt History List" <qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.com> > Subject: [qhl] Re: qhl digest: January 24, 2004 > > >> I was in Mexico for a week and came home to find this list so silent I >> wrote Marsha to ask if I'd been dropped. With the meeting in Louisiana >> coming up soon, I would expect more traffic. Who is going? > Pat Kyser in Alabama > > > > --- >

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Subject: Thank you, Judy! From: "Lynne Z. Bassett" <lzbassett@comcast.net> Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2004 12:09:27 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Wow! Judy, thank you so much for your generous comments about my catalogue! I deeply appreciate your taking the time to write the review. I hope you don't mind if I pass it along to folks at Historic Deerfield (some of whom really didn't want to publish the catalogue because they thought it would never sell). I have to thank curator of textiles Edward Maeder, not only for asking me to do this project, but for believing in it so strongly that he cajoled and browbeat his colleagues at the museum as necessary until they submitted and published the catalogue.

As for finding a publisher for my larger project on the whole cloth wool quilts, from your lips to God's ears! I have written a couple of grant and fellowship proposals recently that will keep the project going if I get them--and eventually (I hope by 2007) it will actually be done and published! In the meantime, I am grateful to the Dallas Quilters Guild and the Meredith Scholarship of the American Quilt Study Group for giving me money this year for my research. So far, I have added about 30 new quilts to my database and I'm working on doing more drawings.

Thank you again, Judy!

Best wishes, Lynne

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Subject: Re: Silk From: Anne Copeland <anneappraiser1@juno.com> Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2004 08:04:30 -0800 X-Message-Number: 5

Hi Kris, I have seen a lot of very old silk quilts in my years of appraising, and have been puzzled to see that some that had dates sewn on them had absolutely no shattering or shredding. I began to realize that it is possible that 1) not ALL silk merchants were unscrupulous; and 2) silk could have been brought in directly from the Orient or other locations. Therefore, not every single piece of silk may be shatteredor shredded. And I have seen in some quilts where some pieces were shattered and others not a bit, even colors that normally shatter or shred.

This piece, however, leaves me with another question in my own mind. The pattern and the way it is put together and the silk itself, esp. note the piece in the lower right hand corner, and there is something that looks almost like gold lame on the left side, and the light blue in the upper right does not look right for that period either. Even the red is somehow very odd. But the pattern and the way it is put together and quilted does not look at all right for a silk quilt. I would expect more to see wholecloth or a strippy quilt, or something somewhat irregular (not talking crazy pieces). This is too precision pieced, and also the quilting style for silk seems very questionable to me.

Very suspicious. I would think more like something made in the orient. All the silk looks way too new. Just my take on it, but it doesn't look right for a quilt of that time. Peace and blessings, Annie

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Subject: help? From: Gail Ingram <gingram@tcainternet.com> Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2004 16:10:40 -0600 X-Message-Number: 6

I've been trying to access the link to the Study Group reports on www.quilthistory.com and cannot.

Help?

Gail

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Subject: feathers From: "Quiltstuff" <quiltstuff@optusnet.com.au> Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2004 11:56:01 +1000 X-Message-Number: 7

I don't think that is the case. When you look at British crests and decorations , there are definitely pictorial representations of feathers that look like ours. In particular the Prince of Wales feather. These feathers ( I think Ostrich feathers) look more like quilting feathers than other feathers do. I think they then took on a life of their own and quilters and artists started using the form to do borders and turn circles..

Though interestingly when trying to search for a picture for you, I did find out that there is a New Zealand fern called after the feather that must look like it.

Suzy

> I have always wondered where the ubiquitous feather quilting motif came > from, when it was first used. From studying Lynne's drawings I think the > design element that we call "feathers" today started as leaves on vines, > with veins delineated. I wonder when the name "feather" was given to the > motif. (See especially figure 9 on page 10.) I hope Lynne can get a > publisher for her entire collection of drawings! That would be really > special. >

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Subject: Re: feathers From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrow@patmedia.net> Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2004 22:57:28 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

Suzy,

I am not talking about crests and regal decorations. I am speaking about flowering vines sprouting flowers and leaves of all sorts, including shapes that we now call "feathers." These are seen on whole cloth calamanco quilts from 1790 through 1840. And they are also seen by themselves as large space fillers, separate from attached flower shapes.

They are quite different in shape and intent than the three-feathers-on-a-crown insignia of the Prince of Wales as seen here in a fake diamond brooch copied from one owned by the Duchess of Windsor.

http://pages.tias.com/6203/PictPage/1449408.html

To retain the recognition as a symbol belonging to the Prince of Wales I would think that any representation would have to retain that same shape.

I've often wondered what inspired the the circular Prince(ss) Feather design. Certainly it bears no resemblance to the actual insignia of the P.O.W.

My intuition tells me that if it was inspired by any one, it was from the 1848 Hungarian freedom fighter Louis Kossuth (1802-1894) , who visited the US in 1851 and was reknown for wearing a hat decorated with a single feather plume. Here's an image of him praying on his knees in 1849 and the plumed hat is at his feet. http://hungary.ciw.edu/kossuth/images/ima.jpg Here's another print, in color. http://hungary.ciw.edu/kossuth/images/1848%20allegoria.jpg

Just last weekend at an antique show I photographed a print dated 1848 showing him giving a speech to a crowd in front of a church with his plumed hat in his hand. The year 1848 was a year of revolutions which began in Sicily and soon included almost all of Europe except England and Russia. A new sense and spirit of Freedom was felt all over the world, and American especially were eager for news from around the world. When Kossuth visited the US in 1851 he became a celebrity and his plumed hat became an immediately recognizable symbol.

I'd like to know if there are any documented Princ(ess)'s feather circular applique patterns earlier than 1851.

Anybody?

Judy "Ringo" in Ringoes, NJ judygrow@patmedia.net

Original Message ----- From: "Quiltstuff" <quiltstuff@optusnet.com.au> To: "Quilt History List" <qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Sunday, January 25, 2004 8:56 PM Subject: [qhl] feathers

> I don't think that is the case. When you look at British crests and > decorations , there are definitely pictorial representations of feathers > that look like ours. In particular the Prince of Wales feather. These > feathers ( I think Ostrich feathers) look more like quilting feathers than > other feathers do. I think they then took on a life of their own and > quilters and artists started using the form to do borders and turn circles.. > > Though interestingly when trying to search for a picture for you, I did > find out that there is a New Zealand fern called after the feather that must > look like it. > > Suzy >

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Subject: Re: feathers From: "Lynne Z. Bassett" <lzbassett@comcast.net> Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2004 23:34:20 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

The origins of the feathered vines and bizarre flowers are complicated. The designs that we see in the whole cloth quilts are rooted in the Renaissance, which based much of its design on ancient Roman "grotesques," which were curving, stylized floral and foliate forms found during excavations of classical period Roman grottoes. The designs were popularized in the Renaissance because of the development of the moveable type printing press; the new printing industry published design manuals, particularly for lace. Many of the designs that we see not only in the wool quilts, but in furniture, ceramics, silver, etc. of the period are related to early lace designs. I talked about just this subject at Historic Deerfield's quilt symposium last fall and I certainly hope to publish it someday, somewhere!

Best, Lynne

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Subject: Re: feathers From: @aol.com Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2004 23:57:28 EST X-Message-Number: 1

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That's what I always thought...the same design elements show up over and over on domestic furnishings, artwork, stucco, bookbinding, embroidery, lace, and so on and so on. Also, there were a couple of very influential design books, most notably the one by Cesare Ripa.

An excellent book on Renaissance design is Jocelyn Godwin's =The Pagan Dream of the Renaissance,= published by Phanes Press. There's a terrific chapter on the origins of the grotesque style, plus a lovely description of the gardens at the Villa D'Este. Highly recommended.

Karen Evans Easthampton, MA

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Subject: Chintz - long From: Xenia Cord <xenia@legacyquilts.net> Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2004 07:37:21 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

The 18 members of the Midwest Fabric Study Group who were able to make it to Louisville Saturday enjoyed a great day of wandering at our leisure among the chintz quilts on display, reading the descriptions, attempting to see at an angle behind the quilts (the scheduled docent did not appear, and despite our offer of gloves, the attendants refused to even twitch an edge for us <g>!)

The quilts were beautifully displayed, hanging full out with lots of space around each. There were also two glass cases that allowed us to get very close to the examples without exhaling on them (or worse). One case held samples of vintage chintz fabric, and the other an incredible paper pieced hexagon top with units about the size of a quarter - and thousands of them! (I don't think this was the quilt on C&C page 56, but the work was similar). The piece was arrange in the case so both the finished side and the basting, papers, and whipstitched joining could be seen. A similar composition can also be seen on page 72-3. If you have a copy of Calico & Chintz you can follow along; we saw a great many of the quilts illustrated in the book.

Another hexagon set, this one described as a child's quilt, featured coordinated 'flowers' set in fields of white hexagons, with a red 'Indiennes' in hanging diamonds defining each flower. The quilt had a wide chintz border of roses on drab brown, ca. 1830 (see C&C, p. 84-5).

The first piece that confronted us was a wonderful appliquéd top with chintz cutouts on a white linen ground (backed, no quilting). The center focus was a basket created of segmented chintz feather prints, and the arborescent filling included leaves cut from other chintzes and neatly appliquéd. Startling among the fabrics was a dark indigo with large white dots, about the size of an aspirin. The dots were cunningly used as design elements in flowers around the outside of the center design. A swag with trefoil lobes at the intersections bordered the piece. This one is not in the book.

The wholecloth on page 62 is incredibly more vivid than it looks on the page, in part because it is huge and dominated the wall; it is only casually quilted, and we were not treated to the French toile backing fabric, which can be seen on page 63. We saw a sedate, planned Unequal Nine Patch (BB #2020) on point, in brown tones with a single 2-step green arborescent between, showing blue frond palm trees with coconuts. There were several pillar prints, including one in the fabrics case, using the pillars to advantage by setting the top strippie style. The alternate stripes were rather simple block formats on point (see p. 80-81) There was also a Flying Geese strippie from mid-century, set with brown chintz (p. 128-9)

A lovely southern (SC) quilt with a delicate broderie perse clutch of flowers in the center and floral motifs surrounding was set in a series of chintz frames, each successively wider and all floral, and was intensely quilted, supposedly by slaves on the plantation (p.96-70. Another block format, a Nine patch from New England, presented in brown tones and showed tantalizing scraps of a monochrome chintz with an exotic plumed bird on a nest of bizarre fruit; the eye kept jumping, trying to reconnect the images (p.98-9).

Other quilts included a pieced 'Sunflower variation in bold yellow and blue ombre cotton, with an interesting approach to the problem of not enough striped fabric to completely frame the piece (see the corners on p.111). Eight year old Carolyn Miller pieced a small quilt of more than a thousand pieces, using chintzes and other cottons; friends inked, stenciled, or embroidered their names on precise 'Reel and Oak Leaf' blocks in a variety of 2-step greens and turkey red 'Indiennes,' with an incredible moire-print blue border that shimmered just because of the print design (p.119). another border that was equally dramatic blue ombre print in segments, almost like Attic Windows.

For sheer drama, the most vibrant piece in the exhibit was a quilt made of HUGE Nine Patch blocks on point (p.124-5); we estimated that they were between 12-15" square. The blocks were random, incorporating a vivid assortment of red, gold, yellow, brown, pink, and blue calicoes, and the setting fabric was a dramatic vermicular print in brown, shadowed in white, on a brown and blue ombre striped ground overlaid with delicate black fronds like feathers. The pieced frame and floral striped border were subdued enough to keep this piece from jumping right off the wall!

The exhibit continues at the Speed Museum (www.speedmuseum.org) until March 14, and will also have the following schedule:

April 7-June 7, 2004 - Portland Museum of Art (Portland, Maine) Sep. 19-Nov. 21, 2004 - Butler Institute of American Art (Youngstown, Ohio) It's not to be missed!

Xenia

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Subject: Re: feathers From: "Laurette Carroll" <rl.carroll@verizon.net> Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2004 22:38:41 -0800 X-Message-Number: 3

Judy, Brackman in her "Clues in the Calico" shows an early Prince's Feather quilt, dated 1818. A wonderful chintz applique quilt, in a medallion setting. Is this what you were looking for? Laurette Carroll Southern California

> I'd like to know if there are any documented Princ(ess)'s feather circular > applique patterns earlier than 1851. > Anybody? > Judy "Ringo" in Ringoes, NJ

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Subject: Log Cabin/ Hexagon From: Donald Beld <donbeld@pacbell.net> Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2004 07:13:06 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 4

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Okay, let's get those creative juices flowing. I love speculating about how quilt patterns get their names and how one pattern evolves into another. 19th Century pieces patterns frequently are based upon what's familiar to the maker and also have a cubistic or linear image, i.e., Bear Paw, Churn Dash, Dutch Rose, and on and on.

My favorite speculation is SHOOFLY. I couldn't figure that one out; so I looked up Shoofly in the dictionary and guess what--Shoofly is defined as a child's rocker with an animal head!! If you look at the Shoofly pattern and cover up one of the upper triangles, you can see the rockers in the bottom two triangles, the body of the rocker in the center square, and the head in the other upper triangle. At least that is my speculation.

Anyway, I am putting together a special exhibit of Log Cabin quilts for my guild this May (we have a tour of Victorian Homes, hang quilts in our park, and always do something in the Lincoln Shrine that relates to the Lincoln era). Plus I am also going to display the 1820's Hexagon that I have discussed earlier. So far I have 10 Log Cabins, ranging from an 1873 Courthouse Steps that is signed and dated, to a stunning Log Cabin Komono that was at Road to California last week. (IF ANY OF YOU HAVE ANTIQUE OR VINTAGE--ESPECIALLY EARLY 20TH CENTURY, LOG CABINS THAT YOU WOULD BE WILLING TO SHOW, PLEASE CONTACT ME PRIVATELY.)

I know that Hexagon, Honeycomb, etc., dates from 18th Century England, and that Log Cabin came over from England in the 1820's--but was called Barn Raising. (Wonder when the name was consolidated into Log Cabin--1860's?)

But in looking at them, it dawned on me that it was not an outrageous speculation that Hexagon evolved into Log Cabin!!!! Does anyone else see that possibility? Hexagon is very time consuming and a seamstress tour de force. Log Cabin is much easier; and if you look at a Barn Raising, you can see Hexagon squared off. I know we probably will never know for sure, but inquiring minds want to know. What do you think, Don Beld

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Subject: Re: Kudos to Lynne Bassett From: "Cinda Cawley" <lrcawley@dmv.com> Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2004 10:57:59 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

J. G. Row comments re. the Deerfield catalogue, "In her catalog, Lynne has reminded us that quilts were only one part of a world full of expensive textiles. I especially appreciate that Lynne has included articles of clothing using textiles like the ones used in the quilts. We have often wondered what "that" print looked like in a dress, and Lynne shows us." I haven't picked up my copy of Lynne's opus yet; it's waiting for me in PA. Since I'm still hyperventillating from seeing the exhibit last summer I know it will be wonderful! I suggest you check out "What Clothes Reveal" by Linda Baumgarten. It's the catalogue of the recent clothing exhibit at Williamsburg which I saw just before Christmas. It was stunning. I read every word of every label and learned a LOT! Believe me, I had a lot to learn (don't know much about costume). The book, which is available on amazon.com for a lot less than the $65.00 I paid at the Dewitt Wallace Museum, has a color picture of every item in the exhibit and chapters such as: The Myths and Meaning of Clothing, Homespun and Silk, Common Dress, Cradle to Coffin, Tailoring Meaning. It discusses men's, women's and children's clothing in the Colonial Williamsburg collections from the most luxurious formal dress to hunting shirts worn on the frontiers (even Colonial Revival garb worn for fancy dress and reenactments). I was fascinated by the information on underwear. They had stays and shifts and caps and banyans (men's casual robes). This book is a treasure! Cinda on the Eastern Shore startled to discover I had to put on boots to walk to the mailbox. Four inches of snow! Climate change big time!

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Subject: Re: Log Cabin/ Hexagon From: "Maurice Northen" <3forks@highstream.net> Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2003 11:17:04 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

Oh, how interesting. I was told it was "fly swatters ready for aim! Joan of the South ----- Original Message ----- From: "Donald Beld" <donbeld@pacbell.net> To: "Quilt History List" <qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Monday, January 26, 2004 10:13 AM Subject: [qhl] Log Cabin/ Hexagon

> Okay, let's get those creative juices flowing. I love speculating about how quilt patterns get their names and how one pattern evolves into another. 19th Century pieces patterns frequently are based upon what's familiar to the maker and also have a cubistic or linear image, i.e., Bear Paw, Churn Dash, Dutch Rose, and on and on. > > My favorite speculation is SHOOFLY. I couldn't figure that one out; so I looked up Shoofly in the dictionary and guess what-- > > > --- >

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Subject: Re: Log Cabin From: "Sally Ward" <sallytatters@ntlworld.com> Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2004 17:54:07 -0000 X-Message-Number: 8

> Log Cabin came over from England in the 1820's--but was called Barn Raising.

Do you mean called Barn Raising in the US? We didn't 'raise' our barns, we built them out of stone or wood to a very different specification and method to yours, so that's not a familiar term and I think the pattern name came back to us from you. In 'Patchwork Quilts', Averil Colby illustrates a Log Cabin and calls it 'Barn Raising' but notes 'In England, the name Log Cabin has been the name given to all arrangements.'

Of course, we don't really have 'Log Cabins' either, but huts or cottages (and I believe that in the Isle of Man it was called 'Roof Tile')...so who knows where that name came from, and when...

Sally W

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Subject: On block names... From: "Sally Ward" <sallytatters@ntlworld.com> Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2004 17:58:55 -0000 X-Message-Number: 9

You just reminded me, Don, of the day the penny dropped for me on 'Puss in the Corner' -f ourpatch with a large centre square and smaller squares in each corner. I was leafing through a copy of Kate Greenaway's 'Childrens Games' and found a game of that name where four children stand as if at the corner of a square, and one in the centre throws a ball to them in turn.

Sally W

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Subject: PA German Patriotism From: "Cinda Cawley" <lrcawley@dmv.com> Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2004 13:05:26 -0500 X-Message-Number: 10

I was at the Schwenkfelder Library and Heritage Center on Sat. and Candace Perry has done it again: a wonderful small exhibit with a patriotic theme. There are two quilts: one a red, white and blue strippy, the white strip is the Civil War era fabric with the soldier, canon and canon balls; the other is an amazing Irish Chain variation made about 1930 in Lehigh County, PA from scraps from the Zionsville Flag Factory. This is literally a quilt made from pieces of flags and beautifully organized. There are delightful water colors of eagles with brilliantly colored feathers by members of the Kriebel family (a large tribe among the Schwenkfelders) and buttermolds in eagle designs (wouldn't that be fun to have on the table). There are many watercolor portraits by Abrrham Heebner of historical figures: Washington, Franklin, Jefferson, Zebulon Pike. I'm interested in anything to do with the Centennial Exhibition so it was fun to see a complete set of exhibition medals in their original box. Not only really famous people are commemmorated. There a snuff box (1815-1830) with a portrait on enamel of Gen. Samuel Smith who commanded the American forces at the Battle of Baltimore (think Star Spangled Banner). My favorite item in the exhibit (because next to quilts I love fraktur) was a Vorschrift from 1822. Vorschrit are writing samples given by a teacher to a pupil sometimes as a reward for good work, sometimes as an example to imitate. They usually include some motto or religious exhortation. In this one the initial "J" in Jesus is decorated with an eagle and the word "liberty" even though the rest of the text is in German. Thanks Candace. Cinda on the Eatern Shore

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Subject: log cabin From: "Brenda & Roger Applegate" <rbappleg1@comcast.net> Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2004 13:55:15 -0500 X-Message-Number: 11

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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Could you please site the source that the Log Cabin came from England in = the 1820's. For some reason I recall that the Log Cabin block did not = exist during the Underground Railroad period when I was reading about = the infamous "code". Brenda Applegate ------=_NextPart_000_0025_01C3E414.068F2870--

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Subject: Re: Log Cabin From: "Laurette Carroll" <rl.carroll@verizon.net> Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2004 11:24:07 -0800 X-Message-Number: 12

Hello, I have the 1882 English publication, Dictionary of Needlework, Caulfeild and Saward (not the facsimile), with an illustration of the Log Cabin design, calling it "American Patchwork", and stating in part.... "a work well known in Canada under the name of 'Loghouse Quilting' but only lately introduced into England."

Under the section on "Patchwork" the Log Cabin illustration is named "Canadian Patchwork".

The author notes that this patchwork design is made of different colored ribbons, instead of the usual silks and cretonnes. The author then goes on with directions to make the block using a foundation of plain fabric on which to sew the ribbons in the usual balanced design of even width sized "logs" rotating around a light colored center square, balancing the colors so that the square is divided with the lights and darks arranged on two adjoining sides of the square.

Laurette Carroll Southern California

Look to the Future With Hope

> I know that Hexagon, Honeycomb, etc., dates from 18th Century England, and that Log Cabin came over from England in the 1820's--but was called Barn Raising. (Wonder when the name was consolidated into Log Cabin--1860's?) >

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Subject: Re: log cabin From: "Sally Ward" <sallytatters@ntlworld.com> Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2004 19:39:45 -0000 X-Message-Number: 13

<Could you please site the source that the Log Cabin came from England in the 1820's.

According to Janet Rae in 'Quilts of the British Isles' (1987) the earliest extant British quilts featuring the pattern date to the first half of the 19th Century. She in turn quotes Averil Colby in her book 'Patchwork' (written in 1958) in which she mentions an unspecified Stirlingshire woman whose family had handed down this pattern from those used in quilts during the 'Forty-Five' - meaning the Jacobite Rebellion of 1745. However, Colby gave no reference or annotation.

Rae mentions that Log Cabin was also called 'straight patchwork' and described as an 'old pattern of the West Country' in Gifford's 'Needlework', believed to have been published at the turn of the century (the last one<G>) in London. Also that it was described as the 'true Manx pattern' of the Isle of Man (Garrad 'Quilting and Patchwork in the Isle of Man' in Folk Life Vol 17 1979). But no dates.

Rae also found a reference to the pattern appearing on a square English perfume bag worked in silk and dated 1650, (Seligman and Hughes, 'Domestic Needlework', London: Country Life 1926 plate 58).

Sally W

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Subject: The Alliance announces Bob Shaw's appointment as Executive Director From: ZegrtQuilt@aol.com Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2004 15:30:10 EST X-Message-Number: 14

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:  CONTACT: Shelly Zegart President The Alliance For American Quilts (502) 897-3819 Zegrtquilt@aol.com  http://www.centerforthequilt.org  ALLIANCE FOR AMERICAN QUILTS NAMES NEW DIRECTOR  Robert Shaw, one of the country99s leading authorities on the history= , cultural importance and artistry of the quilt, has been named Executive Dire= ctor of The Alliance for American Quilts.  In announcing Robert Shaw99s appointment, Alliance for American Quilt= s President Shelly Zegart said, Bob brings a unique combination of ta= lents and experience to this new position. He has been an important advocate for quilt= s for many years, and the ideas he has presented through his writings, exhibitions= , and lectures are broad, deep, and inclusive. We are confident that the vision an= d focus he brings to The Alliance for American Quilts will make him a superb Executive Director, and we look forward to working with him on The Alliance= 99s many exciting projects.9D  Robert Shaw is a curator and art historian who has written and lectured extensively on quilts and other American folk arts. His 1997 book The Art Qu= ilt was the first comprehensive treatment of the subject. His other critically acclaimed books include Quilts: A Living Tradition; America's Traditional Cr= afts; Hawaiian Quilt Masterpieces; Call to the Sky: The Decoy Collection of James= M. McCleery, MD; Great Guitars; and American Baskets. He has curated exhibition= s at major museums and expositions in the United States, Europe, and Japan, contributed to many books and exhibition catalogs, served as a consultant to=  museums, private collectors, and Sotheby99s, and written articles for= The Magazine Antiques, Quilter99s Newsletter Magazine, Fiber Arts, and other perio= dicals. He has also been a juror of both Quilt National and Quilt Visions and is on the=  board of Studio Art Quilt Associates. A graduate of Middlebury College, he w= as curator at the Shelburne Museum from 1981-94 and served as curator of specia= l exhibits for Quilts, Inc. in Houston from 1998 until his appointment by The Alliance.  The Alliance for American Quilts is a national non-profit 501(c)(3) organization that brings together quilt makers and designers, the quilt indu= stry, quilt scholars and teachers, and quilt collectors in the cause of documenting, preserving, and sharing America's great quilt heritage. The Alliance is comm= itted to collecting the rich stories that historic and contemporary quilts tell about our nation's diverse people and communities.  Since its founding in 1993, The Alliance for American Quilts has developed a=  series of projects to gather and coordinate the great body of information about quilts, make it accessible to a variety of users, and facilitate its interpretation through programs that tap the full potential of quilts to inf= orm the study and understanding of American history, arts, and culture.  Members of The Alliance's Board include nationally-recognized scholars, quil= t industry business leaders, prominent quiltmakers, and educators. They join with partnering cultural institutions, universities, and a dedicated volunte= er corps to develop innovative projects to enhance recognition of quilts and quiltmakers in American culture94past, present, and future.  The Alliance implements its projects in partnership with institutions and organizations nationally, including three regional centers94 the Cent= er for American Material Culture Studies at the University of Delaware, the Great= Lakes Quilt Center at the Michigan State University Museum, and the Center for American History at the University of Texas. Other Alliance partners include= the Library of Congress American Folklife Center and MATRIX, the Center for Huma= ne Arts, Letters and Social Sciences Online.

The Alliance99s current projects include Quilters' S.O.S.-Save Our St= ories, a grassroots oral history project; Boxes Under the Bed=84=A2, an effort to= identify and preserve quilt documentation; The Quilt Index, a comprehensive, web-base= d database of quilts and related information in public and private collections= ; and Quilt Treasures, a special oral history project to document the lives, work, and influence of the leaders of the American quilt revival of the 1960= s and 70s and to develop multimedia presentations about them for The Center For Th= e Quilt Online (www.centerforthequilt.org).  Commenting on his appointment, Robert Shaw said, The Alliance for A= merican Quilts serves a critically important role as a catalyst to the advance of qu= ilt appreciation, scholarship and documentation. Quilts have always brought people together. The Alliance for American Quilts has built on that traditio= n, uniting people interested in quilts from inside and outside the quilt world= around a shared vision and bringing their talents together in collaborative ventures. The Alliance has made enormous strides in its first decade. I look= forward to working with the Board as we continue to further recognition of quilts an= d preserve the history of American quilts and quiltmakers.9D  For more information, contact: Shelly Zegart  President The Alliance For American Quilts  (502) 897-3819  Zegrtquilt@aol.com  http://www.centerforthequilt.org   -30-      

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Subject: Copake Textile Auction From: danabalsamo@yahoo.com Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2004 

Hello all, Copake Auctions in Copake, NY is having their annual Textile Auction February 14th. Their preview is online and there are 20 pages of superb quilts, paisley shawls, linens, samplers, coverlets, rugs, and more...mostly quilts, though.

Their site is http://www.copakeauction.com/index.html

I purchased from them last year by phone bidding. They are very professional and if you call them ahead of time, will go through the items you are interested in and describe any damage or history they have on the item. Very customer oriented and a pleasure to do business with. I dealt with Seth last year in case you have a choice.

I had wanted to get there in person this year, but don't think we will make it. Although I can't think of a better Valentine's getaway than a bed and breakfast surrounded by snow capped mountains and a quilt auction!

Not affiliated, just a very satisfied customer.

We've been talking about log cabins and Prince(ess) Feathers, and there are a few listed as well as crazy quilts, appliqued quilts, embroidered quilts, a stencilled quilt and this rare beauty expected to hit $14k

http://www.copakeauction.com/2004-02-14/pics/051.jpg

Grab a cup of coffee and put a movie on for the kids...you're going to be awhile.

My best, Dana, NJ 

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Subject: 19th century quilt poetry and prose (Flora McFlimsey revisited) From: 

It seems that by 1865, Miss Flora McFlimsey grew-up! This change was precipitated by the purchase of a Willcox and Gibbs sewing machine. Here is the poem. Enjoy!

Harper's Weekly March 4, 1865 pg. 144

What it was that changed Miss Flora McFlimsey from a frivolous girl into a sensible woman.

"Oh, May!" said Miss Flora McFlimsey one day, "We must buy no more goods of importers, they say; "We must study economy __ saving must try; "So a sewing machine I'm determined to buy. "Now which is the best? Pray tell, for you know "You have tried every kind: you do nothing but sew. "Which is your favorite? Mind, don't tell fibs." May answered, instanter, "Why -- Willcox & Gibbs.

"Tis a dear little beauty, a bright busy bee; "The shape is exactly a capital G. "You can learn all its ways in a single half hour, "And feel that you've gained an all-conquering power. "Tis so noiseless and neat! 'tis a sweet little elf: "To the rich it brings ease; for the poor it makes pelf. "I never have now that sharp pain in the ribs, "And I owe this great comfort to Willcox & Gibbs."

Miss Flora, entranced, not a moment would wait, But drove down Broadway to five hundred and eight. In she flounced, in she flourished, but through all her prinking, A look in her face showed that she had been thinking. She bought a machine, then homeward she hied; A little child's apron for practice she tried; And would you believe it? two nice little bibs She made in two hours on Willcox & Gibbs.

Absorbed and delighted, no note did she take Of time, or the lover who came in its wake; For lover he was, that great muff, Master Willie, With mustache all wax and expression all silly. In vain did he scold her, and swear like a Turk 'Gainst the dignity, beauty, and goodness of work. She's all changed! What has done it? I never tell fibs? 'Tis that magical letter of Willcox & Gibbs.

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Subject: html/plain text From: Judy White <jawhite@infionline.net> Date: Mon, 26 

Help!! All of a sudden I'm getting my messages in a mish-mash of html/plain text. What happened and how do I stop it. I must have done something to cause it but I don't know what. The reason I say that is because it's happening with all my messages and not just those I receive on QHL. Any ideas how I can end this? My browser is Netscape 7.1 and I'm just getting used to it. I don't like it as well as the old version.

Judy White waiting for the snow in Connecticut

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Subject: Puss in the Corner From: "Quiltstuff" <quiltstuff@optusnet.com.au> Date: 

There must also be a variation. In Laura Ingalls Wilder book , one of the Little House on the prairie series, there is a blizzard, so Ma gets them to play a game with something that sounds like musical chairs where she says ' Pussy wants a corner" and the children go to a corner of the cabin. I remember reading it recently and thinking ' ah-hah!"

Speaking of her books, although she mentions piecing quilt blocks , she never mentions quilting them either at a bee or on a frame but they did get quilted. Pity really as she gives such other detail of the domestic how tos of that time. Suzy

> You just reminded me, Don, of the day the penny dropped for me on 'Puss in > the Corner' -f ourpatch with a large centre square and smaller squares in > each corner. I was leafing through a copy of Kate Greenaway's 'Childrens > Games' and found a game of that name where four children stand as if at the > corner of a square, and one in the centre throws a ball to them in turn. > > Sally W

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Subject: Re: Copake Textile Auction From: "Quiltstuff" 

Thanks for posting that link. I was very interested on the second page ( No 28) to see the Little Woman" quilt. The detail shows the picnic scene form the book and I can just make out enough detail to see Beth at her piano, the trunk in the attic and what is obviously a wedding. How wonderful. I do adore that book Viewing the quilts raised another question with me. There were at least three quilts described as English medallion quilts. Is there are history of these being imported into America recently. Or would these more likely to have arrived in the 19th century. I know you may not be able to answer that very broad question. VBG But I was struck the other day when looking at a New Zealand quilt history book that many of their early quilts also came from Britain as did ours.

I am concerned that with the number of American quilts now being imported into Australia ( including by me) that eventually no one will know where they originated and our quilt history will be globalised. Just a thread of thought.

Suzy Atkins Brisbane

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Subject: Re: Copake Textile Auction and English Medallion From: Dana Balsamo 

Hi Suzy, Email Seth Fallon at Copake (his email addy should be on the website) and ask him your questions about the specific Medallion Quilts. If he know he will tell you, or he might be able to find out from the person who has put them up for auction. He may take a few days to get back to you, but he is very generous with info if he knows the answer. If he doesn't, he'll be honest about that, too. This auction does bring international attention. Correct me if I am wrong, but English Medallion may not necessarily come from England...it is a style of quilt that uses a Medallion center, and then several borders surrounding them of a specific pattern, that were common from the pieces from England. Maybe I am not phrasing this right...is Bettina on this list? I can drag out my notes if anyone is interested. My best, Dana

 

Beth at her piano, the trunk in the attic and what is obviously a wedding. How wonderful. I do adore that book Viewing the quilts raised another question with me. There were at least three quilts described as English medallion quilts. Is there are history of these being imported into America recently. Or would these more likely to have arrived in the 19th century. I know you may not be able to answer that very broad question. VBG But I was struck the other day when looking at a New Zealand quilt history book that many of their early quilts also came from Britain as did ours.

I am concerned that with the number of American quilts now being imported into Australia ( including by me) that eventually no one will know where they originated and our quilt history will be globalised. Just a thread of thought.

Suzy Atkins Brisbane

> Hello all, > Copake Auctions in Copake, NY is having their annual Textile Auction > February 14th. Their preview is online and there are 20 pages of superb > quilts, paisley shawls, linens, samplers, coverlets, rugs, and > more...mostly quilts, though. > > Their site is http://www.copakeauction.com/index.html >

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Subject: Re: Copake Textile Auction and English Medallion From: Xenia Cord 

The "Little Women" quilt design was designed by Marion Cheever Whiteside Newton; see Nada Treadway Patterson, "Marion Cheever Whiteside Newton: Designer of Story Book Quilts, 1940-1965," Uncoverings 1995, volume 16 of the Research Papers of the American Quilt Study Group. 67-94. "Little Women" (pattern 2652) was sold through Ladies Home Journal in October 1950, pp.140-141. There were 15 blocks in the set, illustrating the story.

Xenia

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Subject: DSQSG From: patkyser@hiwaay.net Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2004 21:19:24 -0600 

If someone posted info on motels, etc. re:the upcoming DSQSG meeting, I am unable to find it. Would appreciate mYBE HAVING it just posted on this list as an email. Many thanks, Pat in AlaBAMMY



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