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Quilters Find a way to care

: HIPV Spy Museum From: "Jan Drechsler" <quiltdocsover.net> Date: Sat, 07 Feb 

Judy, You weren't the only one to write to Mr. I Spy Earnest re their quilts and UGRR program in February. Perhaps you wrote more eloquently, as I believe my response was shorter.

Interesting correlation between the museum's research and the new Presidential appointed committee investigating Irac pre-war CIA intelligence. <G>

When I wrote, I included websites reccommended by this group giving excellent alternative viewpoints. Now I believe that quilts, quilt history and African American history were of lesser interest to Mr. Earnest. His interest is codes and quilt blocks were a potential new code for him. And could bring folks into the museum!

Regards, Jan

-- Jan Drechsler in Vermont Quilt Restoration; Quilting teacher www.sover.net/~bobmills

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Subject: HIPV Education From: "Jan Drechsler" <quiltdocsover.net> Date: Sat, 07 

A quilter and local 5th grade teacher told me she had just read HIPV. She would do a project with her students involving geometry and UGRR based on the book. When I carefully explained that the book was very controversial, she exclaimed 'great!' She wanted her students to learn good research techniques and critical thinking.

Every website mentioned here I e-mail to her. I send her newspaper articles in which I have been interviewed and practically ignored after hours of e-mails with the journalist or misquoted. Her students can read many newspaper articles on the web which support HIPV. I wish every teacher would have their students explore all these questions and possibilities.

Perhaps we should collectively make up a packet listing websites or other sources that we could print and hand deliver or e-mail to our local schools. A very carefully written cover letter would need to be written, perhaps by an educator, in educator language, regarding the skills that could be learned in delving into this subject from several directions. We would also need to write one or two sentences describing the contents of each website.

Would anyone truly bring this to their local school or call the pricipal and then mail it to him/her? If there is enough interest, I'll work on it with QHL group assistance. If there is any one willing to take on the educator writing part alone or with someone else, let me know.

Regards,

Jan

-- Jan Drechsler in Vermont Quilt Restoration; Quilting teacher www.sover.net/~bobmills

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Subject: Re: HIPV Education From: aol.com Date: Sat, 7 Feb 2004 

That is a *terrific* idea, Jan. And it should help to educate the teachers as well as the students.

Karen Evans

--part1_157.2d2e4681.2d567f98_boundary--

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Subject: Re: HIPV Education From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrowpatmedia.net> Date: 

Gail Ingram is occupied with the first meeting of her DSQSG this weekend, but I can't think of anyone better to tackle the educator part. She writes so eloquently and is passionate about honest research .

It sounds like a great idea to me. I would be willing to print from my printer and then invest postage to send such an envelope to the heads of history departments of all our local schools systems, Mercer and Hunterdon Counties in NJ and Bucks in Pa.

Judy "Ringo" in Ringoes, NJ judygrowpatmedia.net

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Subject: Re: HIPV Education From: Jccullencrewaol.com Date: Sat, 7 Feb 2004 

Dear Jan, I was just thinking last night that it would be a good idea to put together a packet of some sort, or a list of pros and cons on the issue, web sites, books, etc. and make it available to the public. What caught my eye was a play that will be put on at our local college that is about the relationship of slavery and quilts. After all this discussion about the UGRR, it peaked my interest and I'll be going to see it in a couple of weeks (barring SNOW of course). I personally think it is futile to do this on a bit by bit basis with individual people. Some people already think it to be true and it's becoming an urban legend, and probably none of us non-educators have enough information to make a good argument or case to change anyone's mind. However, with good, solid background FACTS to go on, there is hope of making a dent. You could go to the schools--I would go to the schools, probably about 4th or 5th grade, and make the presentation when they're studying the Civil War. We'd also need examples of quilts from back then, photos if nothing else, or patterns for the kids to make a Civil War quilt themselves. Then you can bring in the oral history portion and whether it's true about all quilts at that time, or just in certain cases where this message system worked. It would be a wonderful project to work on. I don't know if it would be too sensitive in today's world to discuss, but it excites the heck out of me just typing this up as a proposal. Anyway, I've got to get some banking stuff done or something will bounce, so I'm off. I'd be glad to help you with this project editing or whatever if you decide to go ahead with it. I'm in a bit of a rush now so if you need to clarify any of my writings, do get back to me. This sounds like a super idea to me, so go for it. Carol Grace

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Subject: 19th century quilt poetry and prose (Lincoln, the last episode.) From: 

"I then left the house and went to tell my father, who was at his store. It was a nasty day. As I opened the door I saw that it was drizzling, cloudy and dark. There was a guard around the house, and also one stationed on each of the corners, above and below. I gave the first announcement of the death to them and through them to the outside world. I got father, and when I came back the president was all black about the eye and forehead. I put my hand on his eye and forehead. I put my hand on his face, and it was cold as a stone. "Soon after the Mr. Lincoln was taken from the house. His body was wrapped up in a couple of blankets and carried to the embalmer's. It was then laid out in state in the East Room of the White House." "You do not own the house in which President Lincoln died, Mr. Peterson?" "No; all is changed now, and these relics which I have are the last practical evidences of the president's last sufferings. The room in which he died has been changed, and we have sold the house to its present owner, Mr. Louis Shade. We got $4,000 for it, and the buyer took it because he thought the government would use it as a museum, and he asked, some time ago, $12,000 for it. These pictures and these pillow cases are all that is left of the furniture. We sold the bed upon which the president died for $80, and I think it is now in Syracuse, N.Y. No one had ever slept under this coverlid since that night, and we would not think of using it. I do not think it should be sold to any one. It should be preserved for a museum. We could have sold it time and again." "It is wonderful the desire people have for collecting relics of Lincoln. They came for days after the president's death to see the room in which he died, and they stole everything they could get their hands on. They snipped pieces out of the curtains, pulled paper off of the walls, and even carried away the mustard plasters we used that night. When the president was carried over from the theatre to the house that night, some drops of blood fell upon our doorstop, and the next day men and boys dipped little pieces of paper into his blood, and carries them away as mementoes. "The day after the assassination was Sunday, and Washington was draped in black, and all the preachers preached funeral sermons over him. "I don't like to think of it," concluded Mr. Peterson, as he folded up the blood stained pillow cases and quilt. "The scenes of it sometimes haunt me like a nightmare, and I almost wish that I had not been a part of them." Thomas A. Todd

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Subject: Thank you, Judy From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> 

Pat,

No wonder you are receiving such kudo's on your article and web site. Your information is correct, well presented, and well written, as are all your posts to QHL. It is obvious that you are to be taken seriously as a scholar. We are all doing what we can to dispell the myths and educate the public. It is good to have you out in the front leading the way.

My hearty congratulations.

Judy "Ringo" in Ringoes, NJ

Thank you, Judy Kaman Grow. I know you to be a serious scholar, as well. I've very much enjoyed the fact that you seem to love books and historically correct information as much as I do. The graduate level class, "History of Quilts" that we took together at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln, in 2001, was just wonderful and was our first point of connection. Learning is a lifelong venture for both of us, isn't it?

The man or woman who thinks they know it all becomes their own fool, easily held up to ridicule. There is always more to learn, and there are always ways to grow.

I appreciate your very kind words. Often, people may admire someone but it is rare that they share that sentiment, particularly in such an open way. While I do not do the things that I do to seek recognition, it is always a good feeling to think that one has gained the respect of one's peers.

So, I offer my thanks to you for being such a kind-hearted soul.

Pat Cummings

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Subject: Is Ady in Israel still on QHL? From: "Christine Thresh" 

A few years ago (1999) I posted some pictures of an Egyptian Applique = piece that I bought on EBay: http://www.winnowing.com/egypt.html

Several people from QHL responded and gave some information about the = panel. One of the responders with the most knowledge was Ady in Israel.

I just received an e-mail from someone named Sandy who found a pair of panels in her library's basement. They had been stored down there for 50 years. Sandy asked me if I could give her the e-mail address of Ady. I = no longer have it. Sandy wanted to ask Ady some questions.

Thanks, Christine Thresh

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Subject: Question about a quilt at IQSC From: "J. G. Row" 

Browsing the quilts at www.quiltstudy.org I was intrigued by #1997.007.0821, an applique quilt in the James collection that is listed as circa 1885, probably Mennonite made in Lancaster County, Pa, machine applique, cotton brocade and damask, with multiple signatures.

If I had seen this quilt with no legend, I would have said it was 1920 or later, probably from a commercial pattern. The predominant applique color is pink (I can't tell what the dark color is, but think it might be green) and is flowers in 4 baskets, cornered, with flowers in the border with and a scalloped edge. Is it possible that this quilt is mis-labeled? If it isn't, I am stunned by the image and will have to relearn all I know about late 19th century and 20th century quilt history.

You can search the collection by the accession number to see this puzzling quilt.

I'd love to have your opinions.

Judy "Ringo" in Ringoes, NJ judygrowpatmedia.net

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Subject: UGRR trivia ? From: "Judy Anne" <anne_jworldnet.att.net> Date: Sat, 7 

Go to http://www.funtrivia.com/playquiz.cfm?qid=142044&origin= for a little questionnaire and see how you do. When you get your score you also get the % of people who got each question right. You will find the percentage for the UGRR question interesting.

Judy Anne

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Subject: Interesting Connections: Slavery and the Mill Girls From: Patricia L 

In the January 2004 issue of The Quilter magazine, there is an article called 'The Mill Girls of Spindle City" that Jim and I prepared for publication. After researching the topic, and after having found many sources of information, I have found yet an excellent book, post publication. The Belles of New England by William Moran is a terrific account in which I have already found several answers to questions that have been posed by readers.

First of all, there is a description of the history of the "pew rent" which the mill girls were initially required to pay at St. Anne's Episcopal Church.

Secondly, on page 24, the author speaks of slavery as being the "most important public issue for the women, as for the rest of the country". He goes on to point out that the mill workers were forced to weave "negro cloth", a coarse material that was used to make clothing for slaves. (There are examples of this cloth at the Boott's Mill Museum).

The mill girls loved the poetry of abolitionist John Greenleaf Whittier. The first two lines of one of his stanzas is:

Speed on the light to those who dwell In Slavery's land of woe and sin,

Needless to say, I am really enjoying this book tremendously. I recommend it. The only thing lacking in its presentation are the wonderful color photos that Jim took. However, there are some great black and white ones included in the book's special photo section.

As a shameless plug for Kris, might I remind you that if you order the book by clicking through from her site, you will be helping to support her continuing efforts to provide this list that we all enjoy so much. Thanks, Kris.

Pat Cummings

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Subject: Re: UGRR trivia ? From: "Judy Kelius (judysue)" <judysueptd.net> Date: 

Some of the questions are strange! I didn't know what they meant by "odd man out" but guessed correctly.

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Subject: Re: Question about a quilt at IQSC From: "Judy Kelius (judysue)" 

I agree - it looks like a Marie Webster pattern or a variation on one of her patterns published by a different company. Actually, I think the photo and the description are mismatched - the description refers to an album quilt, and the photo is not of an album quilt and I really doubt that the quilt shown has multiple signatures. Did you write the webmaster? I bet it is a simple mistake of mixing up photos.

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Subject: Re: UGRR trivia ? From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Sun, 8 Feb 2004 06:56:35 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 6

I got the one about the odd man out wrong. The reference to Colonial America also threw me, but I got the rest right. I wonder if she is a member of this list? Another of her quizes (http://www.funtrivia.com/quizlistgold.cfm?player=natsim) is on shape singing.

Kris

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Subject: Re: Question about a quilt at IQSC From: Xenia Cord 

Judy Kelius is absolutely correct about the IQSC quilt that J. G. Row questioned; it is a Marie Webster: Pink Dogwood in Baskets (designed 1927, appeared in Ladies Home Journal, September 1927). So J. G. Row also has a good eye! For color illustrations of that quilt see Perry, Rosalind Webster, and Marty Frolli, Marie Webster's Garden of Quilts (Santa Barbara, CA: Practical Patchwork, 2001)108-109.

In her Encyclopedia of Appliqué, Brackman illustrates this as #80.44 Webster, Pink Dogwood in Baskets.

Xenia

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Subject: 19th century quilt poetry and prose (President Washington's lady) From: 

This poem is not about our other President who is honored this month but about his wife. I found it in a book that was printed nearly one hundred years ago in 1906, "Patriotic Poems of New Jersey" by the New Jersey Society of the Sons of the Revolution. The poem was actually written in 1896 by Charles D. Platt for "Ballads of New Jersey in the Revolution."

A CALL ON LADY WASHINGTON. January, 1780

"O Lady Martha Washington Has come to Morristown, And we must go and quickly so, Each in her finest gown, And call at Colonel Ford's to see The dame of high renown."

So spake the dames of Hanover And put on their array Of silks to wit, and all that's fit To grace a gala day, And called on Lady Washington In raiment bright and gay.

Those were the days of scarcity In all our strickin land, When hardships tried the country-side; Want was on every hand, When they called on Lady Washington In fine attire so grand.

"And don't you think! we found her with A speckled homespun apron on; With knitting in hand - that lady so grand- That stately Lady Washington! When we came to Morristown that day With all our finest fixin's on!

She welcomed us right graciously and then, quite at her ease, She makes the glancing needles fly As nimbly as you please; And so we found that courtly dame As busy as two bees."

"For while our gallant soldiers bear The brunt of war," quoth she, "It is not right that we delight In costly finery." So spake good Martha Washington, Still smiling graciously.

"But let us do our part," quoth she, "And speedily begin To clothe our armies on the field And independence win"- "Good-bye! Good-bye!" we all did cry- "We're going home to spin!" Charles D. Platt

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Subject: Re: Question about a quilt at IQSC From: FuzzWampaol.com Date: Sun, 

Hi Judy, What a lovely quilt. I believe the dark color to be green but could not be sure. Thanks for sharing. Linda

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Subject: slavery book From: <chrisajetlink.net> Date: Sun, 8 Feb 2004 10:44:23 

While at B&N yesterday I saw a book titled- "American Slavery : 1619-1877" by Peter Kolchin (10th-Anniversary Edition, with a new Preface and Afterword) It was about 200 pages long, paperback. Using the index, Underground Railroad is listed on 1 page, pg. 168. It is mentioned in reference to Harriet Tubman being a conductor. I would have expected more than that.

I think your idea to reach the school kids is a very good one Jan. When it's possible, doing so in person would be more effective, as someone else mentioned. It would probably draw more teachers to discuss it over lunch and in their lounge, since a speaker coming in, is a more unusual event than receiving written info. The discussion would then include this other perspective and educators would be talking to educators about the topic rather than the book. In either case, I hope an educator volunteers to write this letter. I will make it known on my K-12 Teacher's Exchange section of my website. If you have a link where they can get the info from you, make sure to give it to me.

Kim Wulfert www.antiquequiltdating.com/tours.html

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Subject: Re: slavery book From: aol.com Date: Sun, 8 Feb 2004 13:56:03 

Only one page? That's not very much. I wonder why?

Interesting fact: the old family farm in Venango County, Pennsylvania, was reportedly a stop on the UGRR. It's about an hour south of Erie by car, and of course the Erie/Buffalo region would have the perfect place to cross the border into Canada. The hiding place was possibly in the barn, or in a small bedroom over the kitchen, but no one knew for sure by the time I was born; my family didn't buy the property until the 1920s and was passing along information received from the sellers.

Of course, I thought that meant there was a train station in the cellar. I kept pestering my mother to see it when I was very young, which must have driven her absolutely crazy....

Karen Evans

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Subject: Re: slavery book From: "Judy Kelius (judysue)" <judysueptd.net> Date: 

The Underground Railroad seems to have many myths associated with it. For 20 years I worked in public relations for Friends Hospital, a Quaker psychiatric hospital in Philadelphia. Because 1) the hospital opened in 1817 before the URR began, 2) Quakers were very involved in antislavery activities, and 3) the hospital had an elaborate series of underground tunnels connecting its buildings, many people ASSUMED it had been a stop on the Underground Railroad but we found absolutely no indication of that.

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Subject: fabric on eboard From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Sun, 08 Feb 

Need some help with dating a fabric and thought some you may have seen something similar in old quilts you've come across or have in your collection. I've posted to eboard on the fabrics tab a section of doll dress for which I would love to get a date range for this fabric. Reminds me of late teens to just barely 30s. From a doll collectors'/ costumers' point of view, it is an interesting dress as it has a side pocket, not often found on doll clothes. This dress is plainswoman style suitable for an 1880s china head but made later. I've also posted this to VF list. Any help would be appreciated. I want to add a swatch to my binder so a date or date range would be helpful. Dress is quite damaged but will serve as pattern for new dress. http://vintagepictures.eboard.com

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Subject: RE: UGGR acknowledgment From: "Jocelyn" <jocelynmdelphiforums.com> 

> > Here is an email I just received from the reporter at the Topeka > Capitol Journal re the article which appeared several days ago,

One might think that the Topeka Capitol Journal might be able to spare a reporter for an afternoon to drive over to Lawrence and interview Barbara Brackman, or Terry Clothier Thompson, or even a curator at the Spencer Art Museum...

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Subject: RE: Tear up the Tracks From: "Jocelyn" <jocelynmdelphiforums.com> 

> establishing truth. I've encountered a number of quilters who are > altogether too willing to accept their relatives' versions of a > family quilt's history and who, in those cases, express no

Yesterday, I was at a charitable quilt show that usually attracts entries by those who want to support the charity, rather than by quilters. This year, the majority of quilts seemed to be family quilts being shown by non-quilters.

One aroused the indignation of a woman who was touring the exhibit just ahead of me: it stated that the quilt dated to 1920, when the family left Indiana for Kansas in a covered wagon.

'I was 5 years old in 1920, and we had automobiles, not covered wagons!' she exclaimed. :)

My suggestion that perhaps the owner meant 'horse and wagon' was met with a 'maybe...but not a COVERED wagon!' FWIW, the date of 1920 appeared to be right for the quilt.

In a few more generations, though, when someone notices the improbability of a covered wagon in 1920, do you want to guess which fact will be 'corrected'? For that matter, it may have been a wagon with a cover on it...just not the Conestoga that's commonly known around here as a 'covered wagon'.

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Subject: Subject: Re: UGRR trivia ? From: "Judy Anne" <anne_jworldnet.att.net> 

Odd man out is the one I missed too.

I had the same thought wondering if someone on this list might have written it. If so I hope they will fess up. :) It would be fun to know who it is. It has to be someone who knows a great deal about quilt history.

Judy Anne

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Subject: Quakers and quilts From: "Quiltstuff" <quiltstuffoptusnet.com.au> Date: 

I have a quilter friend here in Australia who asked whether the Quaker communities had any quilt styles specific to them. her friends who are Quakers have just had a new child.

I seem to remember they do not ( nor do Shakers) but I thought I better check here on the list. Does anyone have any more info?

Thank you very much

Suzy

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Subject: another UGRR article From: "Judy Anne" <anne_jworldnet.att.net> Date: 

I just found another one. http://www.black-collegian.com/african/quilts999.shtml 

and another http://www.sevenquilts.com/sevenquiltssong.htm

What I find so frustrating is that African American's have such a wonderful rich history in quilting and it's being ignored. I think in our campaign to get teachers and others to stop teaching the UGRR info as fact rather than myth we also need to give alternatives. Here are some articles I have on my site that might help. They are just introductory articles but they have links and book suggestions so teachers could go on and learn more.

African American Quilts http://www.womenfolk.com/historyofquilts/afam.htm 

Harriet Powers http://www.historyofquilts.com/hpowers.html 

Elizabeth Hobbs Keckly http://www.historyofquilts.com/keckly.html

I'm sure people here could think of many other resources.

Judy Anne

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Subject: Re: Quakers and quilts From: "Judy Kelius (judysue)" <judysueptd.net> 

There were some definable styles in the 19th century for Quaker quilts, especially here in Pennsylvania. In the 1840s-1850s, they often made elaborate friendship quilts, applique or pieced, with signatures. Also, many pieced Quaker quilts made around the time of the Civil War were silk. There weren't particular patterns that they used but other characteristics are recognizable. Trish Herr has written several articles on Quaker quilts, one in the Quilt Digest from 1985 and the other in one of Jeannette Lasansky's books with articles from symposiums, either In the Heart of PA or Made by Mother. Both of these are out of print, but if can find a copy, you might use one of the quilts pictured as a model.

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Subject: Re: Subject: Re: UGRR trivia ? From: "Judy Kelius (judysue)" 

The person who made up the quilt is in Australia so I wonder if "odd man out" is a phrase they use down under?

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Subject: Re: HIPV Education From: Jccullencrewaol.com Date: Mon, 9 Feb 2004 

Dear Jan, I was just thinking last night that it would be a good idea to put together a packet of some sort, or a list of pros and cons on the issue, web sites, books, etc. and make it available to the public. What caught my eye was a play that will be put on at our local college that is about the relationship of slavery and quilts. After all this discussion about the UGRR, it peaked my interest and I'll be going to see it in a couple of weeks (barring SNOW of course). I personally think it is futile to do this on a bit by bit basis with individual people. Some people already think it to be true and it's becoming an urban legend, and probably none of us non-educators have enough information to make a good argument or case to change anyone's mind. However, with good, solid background FACTS to go on, there is hope of making a dent. You could go to the schools--I would go to the schools, probably about 4th or 5th grade, and make the presentation when they're studying the Civil War. We'd also need examples of quilts from back then, photos if nothing else, or patterns for the kids to make a Civil War quilt themselves. Then you can bring in the oral history portion and whether it's true about all quilts at that time, or just in certain cases where this message system worked. It would be a wonderful project to work on. I don't know if it would be too sensitive in today's world to discuss, but it excites the heck out of me just typing this up as a proposal. Anyway, I've got to get some banking stuff done or something will bounce, so I'm off. I'd be glad to help you with this project editing or whatever if you decide to go ahead with it. I'm in a bit of a rush now so if you need to clarify any of my writings, do get back to me. This sounds like a super idea to me, so go for it. Carol Grace PS If this was posted before, I apologize. You'll all think you're seeing "double" since AOL is sending the mail twice now. Gotta figure out why.

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Subject: Re: Subject: Re: UGRR trivia ? From: RAGLADYaol.com Date: Mon, 9 Feb 

Google.com turned up the following: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/odd%20man%20out **Noun 1. odd man out - someone regarded as eccentric or crazy and standing out from a group kook, odd fellow, odd fish, queer bird, queer duck unusual person, anomaly - a person who is unusual

Gloria ragladyaol.com ======== 

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Subject: Re: Subject: Re: UGRR trivia ? From: Margareta.Faustcec.eu.int Date: 

Oxford Dictionary gives the following for 'odd man out': 'a person or thing differing from all others in a group in some respect' - so maybe the phrase is more British (hence Australian?) than American? Margareta (in Europe)

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Subject: odd man out From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Mon, 09 Feb 

Re odd man out -- this a prevalent phrase in our country at least to 1940s when I was a child and is still a common term in Northeast Ohio. It is used in the same context as Margareta and others have defined it. Possibly it may be one of those buzz words whose day has passed and is only recognized and used by oldsters like me. :-D

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Subject: RE: hexagon log cabin pattern From: "Carol's Quilt Closet" 

Laura,

After the show could you possibly post on eboard for those of us who cannot attend

Thanks, Carol

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Subject: Re: Interesting Connections: Slavery and the Mill Girls From: "Maurice 

Pat and Jim, I read the Mill Girls article in my friend's copy, and bought the Quilter Magazine, with the Harrison Block history. Since we had discussed both articles on the list, wanted to have copies. Thanks. Joan of the South ----- Original Message ----- From: "Patricia L Cummings" <quiltersmusecomcast.net> To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Sunday, February 08, 2004 4:06 AM Subject: [qhl] Interesting Connections: Slavery and the Mill Girls

> In the January 2004 issue of The Quilter magazine, there is an article > called 'The Mill Girls of Spindle City" that Jim and I prepared for > publication. > >

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Subject: Re: odd man out From: "Judy Kelius (judysue)" <judysueptd.net> Date: 

I still don't understand what it has to do with the Cathredal Window pattern! I guessed correctly, but it would be nice to understand.

 

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Subject: Odd Man Out From: "Sally Ward" <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Mon, 9 

Don't you say 'odd man out'? Its common usage in the UK (probably explaining the Australian connection). My Brewer's Dictionary says 'the one of a group who fails to get selected or included when numbers are made up; more generally a person who does not fit into a group or gathering for some reason'. Think of childrens elimination counting games, or those awful times in PE when two people choose their teams one at a time and some poor soul is the last one left unchosen.

I didn't like the question, though, because I didn't know what parameters we were supposed to use to decide who was 'odd man out'. I made a lucky guess <G>

Sally W

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Subject: Re: odd man out From: "Sally Ward" <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: 

> I still don't understand what it has to do with the Cathredal Window > pattern! I guessed correctly, but it would be nice to understand.

Maybe that Cathedral Window is a one-patch of a unique technique, not a pieced block?

Sally W

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Subject: Re: odd man out From: Dana Balsamo <danabalsamoyahoo.com> Date: 

Just a guess, maybe because the other blocks were such straight forward pieced blocks and the Cathedral Window is so complex with folds. Dana

"Judy Kelius (judysue)" <judysueptd.net> wrote: I still don't understand what it has to do with the Cathredal Window pattern! I guessed correctly, but it would be nice to understand.

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Subject: wagons From: "Charlotte Bull" <charloumo-net.com> Date: Mon, 9 Feb 

Hi, the info about the "covered wagon" in the 1920s reminded me of a local event. I heard this from the man involved and from others who saw it. In the 1940's, due to gas rationing, a family moved to this area in SW Missouri in a farm wagon! Really did. The only way they could afford to move from one farm in one area to another. Wagon full of chickens and small stock was drawn by horses and driven by a woman. The husband and the sons herded cattle on horseback! What little they owned was in the wagon.They did have a car to carry what little clothing, bed linens and dishes they owned, but this was the only way they could afford to move the livestock. They could not afford more trucks to carry cattle/horses or have enough gas stamps except for one car. They were looking for a cheap bit of land where they could start all over again. A poor, but decent and hardworking religious family.

The man was an Elder in our Church. He was a Farmer. He was one of the sons. I also heard the story from a woman who watched it. She was wife of another Elder. He was a Banker!She was snobbish about the entire family because of what had happened 40 years before. The wagon and cattle moving down Main Street really got a lot of attention!!! She said her family was glad that the "poor folk" moved to another town. I think it bothered her that eventually the son attended "her" church! I did not let her know that I'd heard it from other side too. She said the woman was chewing tobacco. I checked. She was!!! So I guess there were reasons for developing the "Hillbilly Tales" of the Ozarks.

I suppose we have to be ready to accept some tales, just as we need to question the obvious possibility of exaggerated memories. Oddly enough, the poor folks became respected members of their community. They were not rich or educated, but they were honest and hard working. The man had risen above the first impressions his parents made, but he was not ashamed. AND, BOTH FAMILIES SHOWED THEIR QUILTS TO ME. You learn interesting thinks while looking at quilts. They do bring back Memories!

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Subject: Re: Quakers and quilts From: "Julia D. Zgliniec" <rzglini1san.rr.com> 

Dear QHL, The best resource that I know about for Quaker quilt is: Keller,Patricia J (1996).Of The Best Sort But Plain: Quaker Quilts From the Deleware Valley 1760 - 1890.Brandywine River Museum. Chadds Ford, PA.

It is the publication from the exhibit by that name.

There are also good references to Quaker quilts in: Allen, Gloria Seaman, and Nancy G. Tuckhorn (1995). A Maryland Album: Quiltmaking Traditions, 16-34-1934. Rutledge Hill Press, Nashville, TN.

Regards, Julia Zgliniec, CA I don't get to see many quilts with Quaker provenance here in CA so I must rely on books.

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Subject: IQSG mixup From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltonatt.net> Date: Mon, 9 Feb 

Hi all, About the mystery quilt - I typed in the number given in the post (in the search on the IQSG site) and came up with a block album - all solids in green, red, gold with pink sash. I didn't see a scalloped edge - I enlarged as much as I could in Photoshop. It is NOT a Marie Webster Dogwood so check the reference number you are using. It has a visible white rectangle in most blocks which I cannot see closer but assume is the place for a signature. 1997.007.0821

Jean Carlton

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Subject: Re: IQSG mixup From: "Sally Ward" <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: 

> About the mystery quilt - I typed in the number given in the post (in the > search on the IQSG site) and came up with a block album -

Someone's been listening to our conversation...I copied and pasted the same number as last time from the original post, and got a different quilt <G>

Sally W

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Subject: update on IQSC quilt From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com

I am sending this along from Marin Hanson, Curator of Collections at the IQSC:

Thanks so much to the QHL members for spotting the error on our online database. The record for quilt #1997.007.0821 had the wrong photograph attached to it -- it was actually the photo for quilt #1997.007.0824 (a Marie Webster pattern, as so correctly noted by many). We've now corrected the mis-labeling and you'll now be able to see the actual Mennonite album quilt that is described in the record. You may have to hit the "refresh" button to get the proper photo.

Please continue to peruse our database and let us know when you see any other discrepancies -- as Judy Schwender mentioned, it is definitely still a work in progress. Please feel free to e-mail me directly (mhanson4unl.edu) with any questions or comments about the database. Thanks again, Marin Hanson, IQSC Curator of Collections

Marin F. Hanson Curator of Collections International Quilt Study Center University of Nebraska-Lincoln, HE 234 Lincoln, Nebraska 68583-0838 USA (402) 472-6301 http://quiltstudy.unl.edu

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Subject: Re: HIPV Education From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> 

I think we could get something out in our local school districts...Montgomery Co. and Lehigh, PA specifically. Candace Perry

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Subject: Underground Railroad workshop in Albany NY From: Kris Driessen 

It absolutely kills me that I can't go to this on Feb 28 since it is so close to home for me:

http://ugrworkshop.com/ Conference info: http://www.ugrworkshop.com/conference/index.html

But I am already booked that day in Maryland. However, if anyone wants to go, I will gladly pay your tuition (all $15 of it) and offer you a place to stay! Don't worry, someone will be home, it just won't be me:-))

Kris

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Subject: need email please! From: "Pepper Cory" <pepcorymail.clis.com> Date: Mon, 9 Feb 2004 16:40:44 -0500 X-Message-Number: 25

Can anyone email me off-list ( pepcoryclis.com) with Julie Silber's = email? Thanks. Pepper Cory

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Subject: education From: "Brenda & Roger Applegate" <rbappleg1comcast.net> 

I will forward it to the Beaver County Schools in Western Pa. Brenda = Applegate 

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Subject: UGGR literature From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Mon, 09 Feb 

Please include me on list to distribute UGGR literature. We have a still-functioning tavern with its original name -- Riders Tavern built in 1812 &1822, which has retained its original tunnel that sheltered slaves on their escape route. The restaurant/bed & breakfast would be a perfect distribution outlet for UGGR information, as well as schools and historical society in our area.

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Subject: Re: UGGR literature From: Dana Balsamo <danabalsamoyahoo.com> 

What about quilt guilds. Maybe a packet could be sent to major state quilt guilds?

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Subject: A forwarded note from Shelly Zegart From: Kris Driessen 

Shelly Zegart will speak on March 16 at 6 p.m. in the auditorium of the Art Institute. Her topic is "American Quilts: A Patchwork of Meanings, Purposes and Origins." The lecture is open to the public. The opening of the exhibit (see press release, below), following the lecture, is by invitation only.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE January 14, 2004 MEDIA CONTACTS: Eileen Harakal <eharakalartic.edu> Chai Lee <clee4artic.edu> (312) 443-3625

ART INSTITUTE EXPLORES THE ART, HISTORY, AND CRAFTSMANSHIP OF QUILTS IN NEW EXHIBITION Remarkable Pieces from the Museum’s Shelly Zegart Collection, and Other New Additions to the Permanent Collection to be Shown

A collection of beautiful, fascinating 19th- and 20th-century American handmade quilts from the permanent collection of The Art Institute of Chicago are featured in a new exhibition, Exploring Quilts: Art, History,and Craftsmanship. With approximately 35 bedcoverings, ranging over more than 150 years, the exhibition, on view March 17– September 12, 2004, in the Elizabeth F. Cheney and Agnes Allerton Textile Galleries (G. 57–59), features some of the prime examples of this American folk art that the Art Institute has recently acquired. Exploring Quilts includes the museum’s important Shelly Zegart Collection; quilts purchased from the Dr. and Mrs. Fred Epstein Collection through a bequest from the Margaret Cavigga Trust; gifts from Margaret McCurry, Mr. and Mrs. John W. Power, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph W. Fell; and quilts from an anonymous donor.

The Shelly Zegart Collection

The Art Institute of Chicago acquired a group of splendid 19th- and 20th-century American quilts from Kentucky collector Shelly Zegart in

late 2001. This acquisition—partially as gifts and partially as purchases––fills a major place in the museum's renowned textile collection, not only enhancing the present collection of 155 such pieces, but decisively moving the Art Institute into the front ranks of American museums with similarholdings.

The Zegart pieces represent some of the best examples of this classic tradition made between 1820 and 1982. Among the outstanding quilts in the acquisition are: Celebrity Ties (1980-1982) by Mrs. Grace C. Wagner,a crazy quilt made of 44 pieces of neckties from well-known public figures, ranging from Johnny Carson to Kermit the Frog to former Illinois Governor Jim Thompson; Album of Inventors (1933), a piece that features a pictorial narrative of American history from the presidencies of Andrew Jackson to Franklin Roosevelt, and images of roads leading to the modern world as represented by the Sears Roebuck Pavilion at the 1933 Century of Progress Chicago World's Fair; and Sunday School Picnic (1932) by Jennie C. Trein, an award-winning piece created to represent the quilter's admiration of her friends and family.

Shelly Zegart is a well-known expert on American quilts. She co-founded The Kentucky Quilt Project—the first state quilt documentation process—that culminated in a publication and an exhibition that traveled with the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES). She has since gone on to collect, curate, lecture, and write about quilts over the past 25 years. Most recently, Zegart co-founded The Alliance for American Quilts, a national nonprofit organization, in which she currently serves as the President of the Board. Articles by and about Shelly Zegart have appeared in major newspapers and magazines. The Shelly Zegart quilt collection was acquired through the Robert Allerton and the Christa C. Mayer Thurman Endowments.

Gee’s Bend Quilts Three quilts by the women of Gee's Bend, Alabama were acquired by the Department of Textiles of The Art Institute of Chicago in the spring of 2003. These pieces suggest both the diversity and continuing importance of traditional, vernacular craft, one associated with the domestic realm of women. Gee’s Bend quilts have become well-known in the past few years due to critically acclaimed exhibitions. A poor and geographically isolated African American community in rural Alabama, Gee’s Bend is renowned for producing generation after generation of extraordinary quilters. This tradition in Gee’s Bend is firmly rooted in utility: poor families need quilts—layers of them—to stay warm while sleeping in drafty houses. Often making use of worn work clothes, for both economic and personal reasons, Gee’s Bend quilters refrain from the intricately patterned, overall stitching displayed in the album quilt. Instead, their work is characterized by boldly patterned, speedily completed designs, sharing the Modernist’s penchant for abstraction.

The Dr. and Mrs. Fred Epstein Collection In 2003, the Cavigga Trust, set up by the late Margaret Cavigga, was identified for the Art Institute and its Department of Textiles. Part of the trust was allocated for acquisition of quilts—which resulted in the purchase of three outstanding quilts from the Dr. and Mrs. Fred Epstein Collection: The John L. Sullivan Quilt (1888), depicting the rise and fall of the heavyweight boxing champion John L. Sullivan; Crazy Quilt with Animals (1886) by Florence Elizabeth Marvin, a whimsical piece that features more than 40 different kinds of creatures; and Figurative Crazy Quilt (c.1929/41), an embroidered silk album quilt that includes Santa Claus, Joan of Arc, Pope Pius XII, Aunt Jemima, the Clermont (the first Steamboat), the Liberty Bell from 1753, and the text of a Western Union telegram sent on Valentine’s Day.

Finally, a number of pieces from the Margaret McCurry collection were recently accepted as gifts and added to the textile collection, and the generosity of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph W. Fell, and Mr. and Mrs. John W. Power, resulted in yet more pieces included in the exhibition.

The Art Institute of Chicago houses the most comprehensive textile collection in the Midwest, and one of the most important assemblages of textiles in the world. The holdings span 20 centuries and include woven, embroidered, and printed fabrics; a fine lace collection; and rapidly growing contemporary holdings. At present, the Department of Textiles houses around 13,000 items, as well as some 66,000 swatch-size pieces. Mrs. Christa Thurman, who occupies the Christa C. Mayer Thurman Curator of Textiles, joined the museum in 1967. Since that time, the department's holdings have been significantly strengthened and expanded. Mrs. Thurman's many publications and more than 70 exhibitions for the Art Institute have established the importance of the collection nationally and internationally.

####

The Art Institute of Chicago is a museum in Chicago's Grant Park. Museum Hours: 10:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday; 10:30 a.m.-8:00 p.m. Tuesday; 10:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Saturday, Sunday. Closed Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day. Regular suggested admission: Adults, $10.00; children, students, and seniors, $6.00; members always free. Visitors may pay what they wish, but they must pay something. Ford Free Tuesdays free to all, except for certain special exhibitions which may require full or extra admission fee. City of Chicago residents with Chicago Public Library cards can borrow a "Check Us Out" card from any branch library for free general admission to the nine members of Museums in the Park, including The Art Institute of Chicago. To reach the Art Institute on the World Wide Web, contact us at: <http://www.artic.edu>

_

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Subject: A really good UGRR article From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> 

I have to admit, this article really opened my eyes. The Underground Railroad Quilt "Code": Betsy Ross redux at http://www.hartcottagequilts.com/railroad.htm It is an exhaustive review of the book Hidden in Plain View, in which an elderly black woman, Ozella Williams, related the story of a quilt code to a white women's studies instructor. I was not aware that, at the time, Ozella Williams was the owner of a thriving quilt store nor that she and her family had so much invested in the successful acceptance of this story.

But was it a story? One of the links in it (http://www.beavton.k12.or.us/greenway/leahy/ugrr/quiltsdebate.htm) is the text of an E-mail message in which Jacqueline Tobin rebuts some of the criticism leveled at Hidden in Plain View. The opening paragraph reads, "There has been much said about this story that we certainly never stated or wrote. For example, the term "Underground Railroad quilts" is a misnomer. No quilts per se were used on the escape; no quilts were taken on the journey, no quilts hung outside safe houses, etc according to Ozella's story. In her code the quilt pattern names were appropriated by the slaves on the plantation to be used as mnemonic devices; to trigger memory of clues they could remember as they journeyed north. All of it was in their mind; as Ozella stated so many times, "its a mind thing!" The only quilts were on the plantation themselves. How they were displayed or used is still conjecture except that Ozella stated they would be hung, one at a time, until the clue represented by the particular pattern was memorized. Yes, there are many stories about quilts and the URR; do not confuse them with this story."

Could it be that this whole "quilt code" thing was simply a misunderstanding?

Kris

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Subject: UGRR/ quilts/ schools From: "Jan Drechsler" <quiltdocsover.net> Date: 

Thanks for the kind words Kim. You could put a link to my website, but why not put the info on your website also!

Anyway, I have received just only a few words of interest. Give me a week or so to get over my cold and think straight. I can't make another huge project for myself, but can do something.

Pat, I really appreciated reading your article because it wasn't so one-sided and it had interesting resources for more research. Thank you for being so thorough.

Jan -- Jan Drechsler in Guilford, Vermont Quilt Restoration; Quilting teacher www.sover.net/~bobmills

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Subject: RE: Quakers and quilts From: "marcia Clough" 

The Quakers put a lot of color into their quilts, but there was no specific pattern that they used more thzn any other. Their clothes were not allowed to be very bright. Marcia

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Subject: Re: HIPV Education From: Jccullencrewaol.com Date: Tue, 10 Feb 2004 

Dear Jan, (Did you get this already? My computer is acting crazy and I can't tell. Some I see posted twice, some not at all.) I was just thinking last night that it would be a good idea to put together a packet of some sort, or a list of pros and cons on the issue, web sites, books, etc. and make it available to the public. What caught my eye was a play that will be put on at our local college that is about the relationship of slavery and quilts. After all this discussion about the UGRR, it peaked my interest and I'll be going to see it in a couple of weeks (barring SNOW of course). I personally think it is futile to do this on a bit by bit basis with individual people. Some people already think it to be true and it's becoming an urban legend, and probably none of us non-educators have enough information to make a good argument or case to change anyone's mind. However, with good, solid background FACTS to go on, there is hope of making a dent. You could go to the schools--I would go to the schools, probably about 4th or 5th grade, and make the presentation when they're studying the Civil War. We'd also need examples of quilts from back then, photos if nothing else, or patterns for the kids to make a Civil War quilt themselves. Then you can bring in the oral history portion and whether it's true about all quilts at that time, or just in certain cases where this message system worked. It would be a wonderful project to work on. I don't know if it would be too sensitive in today's world to discuss, but it excites the heck out of me just typing this up as a proposal. Anyway, I've got to get some banking stuff done or something will bounce, so I'm off. I'd be glad to help you with this project editing or whatever if you decide to go ahead with it. I'm in a bit of a rush now so if you need to clarify any of my writings, do get back to me. This sounds like a super idea to me, so go for it. Carol Grace

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Subject: Re: UGGR literature From: "Sally Ward" <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: 

If someone could let me have any UGGR references I will try to find suitable placements in the UK.

Sally W

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Subject: 19th century quilt poetry and prose (Two more Presidents) From: 

These two, short pieces make reference to two Presidents who are not commonly associated with President's Month. They are William Harrison, our ninth President and Grover Cleveland, our twenty-second President. sue reich

Ohio Repository Canton, Ohio January 1, 1840

'Log Cabin Candidate.' - It is said that the people are of the opinion the Gen. Harrison has lived in a "Log Cabin," long enough, and intend, on the 4th of March, 1841, to give free rent their great White House in Washington city. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- - The Indiana Messenger Indiana, Pennsylvania September 17, 1890

The statement that a woman in West Virginia was so joyfully surprised at receiving a piece for her crazy quilt and an autograph letter from Grover Cleveland that she knocked a revolver onto the floor, discharging it, shot herself in the leg and was cured of long standing paralysis, at the same time recovering her speech, is worth remembering.

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Subject: IIQSG From: Litwinowaol.com Date: Tue, 10 Feb 2004 11:06:48 EST 

Second Meeting of the IA/IL Quilt Study Group met in Kalona, IA. Feb 7,2004. Quilt Historians found a warm welcome in the Kalona Quilt and Textile Museum (a part of the Kalona Historical Village). Marilyn Woodin greeted the scholars with the history of the village, donut holes from the bakery and a goodie bag with fat quarters from Willow Creek and coupons for other stores! What treasures were pulled from suitcases and pillowcases. Donna Furrow started show and tell with her $2. 98 Lee Ward's Lamb Kit quilt (45 cents for thread) made in 1964-65 for her son The applique was done using her first zigzag sewing machine. A quilt from Miles, IA in stripy embroidered panels was set with a fleshy/yellow fabric of 2 different dye lots. It was thought that the quilt was of the architectural prairie school design of the 1920's. The finish edge had turned in edges with a hand buttonhole edging. An embroidered chin guard finished the piece. An auction quilt with a six pointed star-some blocks set on feed sacks was quilted with utility red quilting from a Manchester,IA estate. Barb Eckoff shared a stripy palm trees and flying geese- some ghost blocks (color has evaporated) Lafayette blue helped to date the 1840 quilt. The second quilt she shared (block was titled Montana) was from "Hearth and Home" magazine which published The United States Patchwork Pattern Book in the 1890s (reprinted in 1970 by Dover). The quilt had a wonderful plaid backing. Barb also shared a a lovely-embroidered basket quilt, pink and yellow Japanese Lantern, and a Joseph's Coat quilts with patterns designed either by Hubert Ver Mehren or Nancy Cabot . 

 Susan Price Miller showed a stuffed Barn Raising Log Cabin-the strips were stuffed, folded and then stitched down on a foundation made a wonderful study. Her second quilt was one that she saw ten years ago wrapped around furniture-she followed the truck and got the name- a sister of the movee later gave the quilt to Susan since the family was going to throw away this 4 block Carlie Sexton Rose of Sharon. The center of the blocks was almost a Caesar's Crown ring with the ring repeated in the center. Linda and Erin Carlson came with Pat Huff bringing "Great Aunt Crazy Katie's Grandmother's Flower Garden set with Institutional Green. Their other quilt was a white airplane set with vivid pink and blue 9-patch setting squares and pink and blue sashing. The wings of the planes were shorten from the original pattern. Marilyn Woodin shared an 1820 Brodere Perse Medallion- only the quilting held some the fabrics to the surface. A wonderful silk Tumbling Blocks-in good condition had pom-poms on the border, the name Edie embroidered on the quilt and a unique chenille strip was made into a flower in the center. Cathy Grafton brought Martha and George Washington wall hanging replicating a watercolor found in the Abbey Rockefeller Museum in Williamsburg, VA. Catherine Litwinow displayed an Eveline Foland Memory Quilt Bouquet quilt whose pattern was published in the Kansas City Star in 1930. A discussion of how many newspapers printed these patterns followed.

 Belle and Ann Hinkhouse wowed the group with their family treasures Belle Embroidered a quilt for her son using iron on transfer that were purchased for 10-15 cents and a 3 cent stamp. Mrs. Hinkhouse brought her Pine Tree Wedding quilt that was made by mother-in law Eva in Cedar County, IA in 1939. Christina Crowskey Copeland's (1804-1888 from Harrison Co. OH moving to IA in 1854) Check Board quilt still had its vibrant Cheddar. Elizabeth Bell Jennings Walton in 1936 purchased Peter Pan fabric at Wilton, IA store for her Lone Star all made from solids except for 2 prints. The Friend's Church of West Branch expertly quilted the quilt for 1 cent a yard. The what a quilt of the day went to the Hinkhouse's 1957 quilt that was copied from a quilt purchased at the Merchandise Mart in Chicago. Triangle biscuits were whipped stitched together. The edge is completed with green piping from which falls a double ruffle of the same polished fabric. The inner ruffle is gathered and reaches the floor. The outer layer droops from the piping one foot and is quilted in a diamond pattern. The bottom of this section is cut to form a gentle waving line and is hand hemmed. 

A history of the quilting by the Methodist Church of West Liberty written by Marjorie Marsteller (age 98) would fill another page. Marilyn Galley shared a multi-generation quilt with wonderful madders and orange paisley. Several pieces only contained warp fabrics. An 1880's multi-colored Sunburst had damaged brown fabrics; bridal tulle held the center down. A Poppy kit quilt with wood burn started the discussion of quilt care with "Vintage Soak" mentioned as a possible remedy. Following lunch the group toured the Quilt Museum's one woman display of quilts made by Pennie Horras, author of Sewing in Circles: Easy Machine Applique Quilts. The meeting ended with viewing signature quilts - circle of names-possible fundraiser. Family and friends quilt from NE, a wonderful mid 1800's Fleur de Lis madder quilt with stamped or inked names two Sunbonnet Sues and sit and sew group friendship quilts. Next meeting will be August 7, 2004 with antique quilt show and share in the morning and more signature quilt documentation in PM.

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Subject: RE: A really good UGRR article From: "Candace Perry" 

All I can say is, it just is all SO complex. I feel I have new questions constantly...can anybody tell me if there are ANY extant quilts from the south in the appropriate time period that seem to reflect some aspect of the story? Knowing enough to be dangerous about the development of PA German quilting, I want to know how common pieced quilts were prior to 1860 in the south, whether by black or white quilters. Did quilting spread out from the urban centers? Did the relative wealth of the "plantation mistress" mean that quilting would have existed in rural areas earlier on -- also, because most were Anglo in descent (or French)and may have had a quilting tradition? Was quilting then picked up by the slave women from the white owners? Or did it somehow start with the slaves? I had only a very short stint in the south quilt-wise and my memories of the collection I worked with seemed to be applique-heavy from that period. Like Sergeant Schultz, though, I KNOW NOTHING! I'm okay with the oral tradition -- I mean, that we must sometimes look to the oral tradition, for heaven sakes, in any culture. A material culture record, though, could go a long way for me in supporting this ongoing argument. I apologize if I'm asking dumb questions or making assumptions...please correct me and fill me in. Of course I want everything to fall neatly into a time line. Ha! Candace Perry (dazed and confused)

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Subject: Re: 19th century quilt poetry and prose (Lincoln continued) From: "Cinda 

The details in the account agree with other descriptions I've read of Lincoln's hours in the Petersen house which is open to the public. Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: Re: wagons From: JBQUILTOKaol.com Date: Tue, 10 Feb 2004 19:20:37 

Not everyone in the US met progress at the same pace. My grandfather was killed in a horse & wagon accident in the 1940's. We heated the farm house with wood stoves until Mom sold it in 1992. Upstate NY! Didn't even have many quilts as Mother found them heavy, dirty & old fashioned.

Janet

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Subject: wagons and stories From: Gloria Hanrahan <gloriaak.net> Date: Tue, 10 

Family stories with dates can also be correct when on the face of things they appear wrong.

When Alaska had the quilt documentation days, I took in my great-grandmothers quilt. The "experts" were adament in that it was a pre-civil war red and green applique. I was more upset that my family story was incorrect, than in having such an old quilt. Going back to my mother, there was no indication it would have been made by an earlier generation. We have nothing from them, hardly even names and birthdates.

This sent me on my quilt history quest many years ago. Happily, my quilt is very much in the later red and green applique style of 1880, which fits the time period my great-grandmother would have been working on it. She also lived in a very rural area and I wouldn't have been suprised if she didn't do things later than style would indicate.

I think my family story is correct, but now this quilt is documented as being pre-civil war whereever the Alaska documentation is kept.

Gloria

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Subject: Re: wagons From: "Jocelyn" <jocelynmdelphiforums.com> Date: Tue, 10 

> Not everyone in the US met progress at the same pace. My grandfather was > killed in a horse & wagon accident in the 1940's.

And my father had a contract with the US Postal Service to break the roads using draft horses, so the postmen could drive through in automobiles, after he came back from the war. But he didn't use a 'covered wagon'. :) >

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Subject: Re: 19th century quilt poetry and prose (Two more Presidents) From: 

I think the news report below that posted earlier is one of the funniest things I have ever read. the mental pictures of a woman being overcome with joy and shooting herself are funny enough. But the fact that the shot cured her of paralysis?? And she finally got to talk??

Well, you wouldn't read about it.... ( another aussie saying)

Suzy

> The Indiana Messenger > Indiana, Pennsylvania > September 17, 1890 > > The statement that a woman in West Virginia was so joyfully surprised at > receiving a piece for her crazy quilt and an autograph letter from Grover > Cleveland that she knocked a revolver onto the floor, discharging it, shot > herself in the leg and was cured of long standing paralysis, at the same > time recovering her speech, is worth remembering. > >

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Subject: Iowa Study group From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltonatt.net> Date: Wed, 

Thanks for the report on the Iowa study group meeting .....I marked my calendar for your August date....I may have to drive down from Minneapolis you made it sound so intriguing. I hope you will be posting photos on the QHL study group site soon. Your post served as a remiinder for me to say that the MN quilt study group (LLQSG) met in December for a showing of red and green quilts and also met in March for a block study. Those photos were recently posted on the QHL quilt study site. If anyone has not visited this site I think you'll enjoy it: http://www.quilthistory.com/study/Default.htm

Jean Carlton

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Subject: Organza From: "crossland_n_j Crossland" <crossland_n_jmsn.com> Date: 

Conservators, I have been looking into silk organza to offer at NH Quilt Documentation Days for people wanting to do their own repairs/stabilization. I've noticed there is silk gauze organza that is much cheaper. I found that the silk at Dharma was pretty reasonable. It is of course, prepared for dying. Is this acceptable for conservation? Does anyone have a better source for what we need? Is the silk gauze acceptable? Thank you, Julie Crossland, Chairman, NH Quilt Doc Project

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Subject: RE: Organza From: "Margaret E. Geiss-Mooney" 

Good morning, QHL'ers - The short answer is yup! And usually much better colour selection too if you buy it at a retail source. Thai Silks in California (www.thaisilks.com) has 54" wide 100% silk organza for $5.00/yard in 14 colours.

But remember to rinse any fabric that will be in close intimate contact with the original surface, even if it's pfd. To rinse, I use my washing machine (excellent water quality) on the gentle cycle, usually two times and then air dry. You can also use the weft/warp pulled out as your sewing thread (usually 2 strands in fragile areas).

Regards, Margaret (Meg) Geiss-Mooney Textile/Costume Conservator in sunny and getting warm Sonoma County mgmooneymoonware.net

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Subject: Sights to see? From: "Sally Ward" <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Wed, 

If a quilter had the opportunity to visit the US, virtually any part of and for the once only, where would she 'have' to go and when? Suggestions privately please.

Sally W

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Subject: Vintage Fashion magazine From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: 

I just posted this to VF list so excuse the crossover if you are on that list. In today's mail was the second copy of Vintage Fashion magazine -- this is the second and third issues combined. Lots of great reading here but I notice the photo quality with new printer still hasn't been resolved. I felt honored to have an article in this on the batiste family -- batiste, jaconet, lawn, nainsook. Two informative articles are Thistle Hill reproduction cloth and Switzerland's Abegg Foundation Museum's workshop on Dyes in History and Archaeology featuring textiles dating back 2,000 years. Is anyone familiar with Red Lion Mill in Red Lion PA?? Firm had a full page back cover ad. Sounds like an interesting place to visit as there is a museum. Specialty appears to be historical costumes and fabrics, with yardage available for shirtings, broadcloths, kersey, jean cloths, satinets, blankets, linsey woolsey, Holland and trim tapes. Has anyone else received their copy??

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Subject: coming soon: Deep South Study Group From: Gail Ingram 

I've had a number of private inquiries from list members regarding the report of Deep South Quilt Study Group, which met last weekend.

This is just to assure all that we will indeed post a report. We're just a little less organized on the report front than we were on the meeting front.

But the Texans are at work on the details, and I will put it all together and post as soon as they have dotted their last "i."

I will say this right now, however: we had a fine time and saw some wonderful quilts and probably most of us are still seeing red-and-green, in consequence of Carolyn Miller's stunning presentation on Red and Green Quilts, illustrated from her collection. We're also seeing fan quilting, I imagine.

We will have some new AQSG and QHL members as a result of the weekend.

On behalf of all present, I want to acknowledge and thank the people on this list from whose example and generosity this new study group grew---- especially Cinda Cawley, whose reports from the Dating Club first made me aware of what a study group could be; Kris Driessen, whose list made those reports possible and created a community of friends and students whose generosity still humbles me; J. G. Row, whose remarkable presentation at LA Tech brought Martha Gilbert, Ladye Harveston, and me together as a local "team" and who spurred us on by sending an animated, singing, lasso-wielding stuffed cowboy Hamster to cheer us on when times were confused; Xenia Cord, whose suggestions for organization provided our model and who sent neatly cut pieces of vintage fabric for insertion in plastic name tags; Teddy Pruett, Judysue Kelius, Sue Reich, and Judy G who sent us "door prizes," an essential of every southern meeting.

Finally, I personally owe Sally Ambrose, who gave me the metaphor that made light work of occasional frustration.: Sally noted that pulling the group together sounded like "herding cats." Every time organizing the weekend became onerous, I thought of that metaphor and laughed. A lifesaver.

Now that the cats have gathered and bonded, they will tell you about what they saw------asap, which sometimes is a little slower down here than in colder climes.

From rainy, dark North Louisiana where visions of bright quilts brighten the day, Gail

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Subject: 19th century quilt poetry and prose ( The Presidents) From: 

A final tribute to our Presidents. This article describes a quilt made by a veteran of the Civil War so well that we could probably reproduce it today. sue reich

New Oxford Item Gettysburg, Pennsylvania April 11, 1902

Novel Piece of Patchwork John Billingsley, an inmate of the Soldier's Home has completed a unique patchwork quilt, upon which he has been working for the two years past. The quilt is made entirely of satin and sateen, and is designed to depict the glories of the Union as they appear to an old soldier. There are 984 distinct pieces and 1,132,755 stitches in the article. The spread is a little over five feet square. In the centre is a large star, made up of small diamond-shaped pieces. In this star are set portraits of Washington, Lincoln, Grant, Garfield and McKinley photographed upon silk. The star is surrounded by 24 badges of the army corps of the civil war and by 45 national flags, representing each state. Then there are the flags of eight foreign nations with which the United States at some time or other has been engaged in war. The quilt is bordered with parallel stripes of red, white and blue and edged with a fine gold fringe. The whole is artistically put together and reflects credit upon the workmanship of the maker. Billingsley was a member of the Eighty-first Pennsylvania when the civil war began, but later entered the service of the regular army. Washington Post.

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Subject: Re: UGRR/ quilts/ schools From: <chrisajetlink.net> Date: Wed, 11 Feb 

Of course Jan- I'm happy to put any information for teachers on my website. I just didn't want to steal your thunder or anything like that. Send everything- it has a home here. This goes to anyone out there. I have several links for teachers of K-12 on my site. In searching for web-based UGRR teacher's information I was struck by how many sites included the misinformation as part of their recommended curriculum. It is such a shame to have to throw the baby out with the bathwater, but I opted to not link to those sites.

On the other side of the coin is this dilemma. I received an email from a quilter who commented on the children's book list that is on my K-12 Teacher's pages shortly after is was put up in 2001. She felt strongly that I should take out the two books that talk about quilts used on the UGRR. I completely understood her stance, but at the same time, my policy is not to police free speech if I accept an article on to my website. it was presented as a whole program, with good ideas and information and many other book suggestions on children, quilts and reading. However, it still haunts me to this day, that these books are on the list, on my website! What should I do? It's the "Clara" book and "Freedom Quilt" if I recall right.

Kim

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Subject: the children's book From: <chrisajetlink.net> Date: Wed, 11 Feb 2004 

Regarding what I asked in the last post - I have taken "Sweet Clara" off my "Storybook Quilts" website article. Fortunately there were no other offenders on the list.

Kim Wulfert

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Subject: UGRR/quilts From: "Jan Drechsler" <quiltdocsover.net> Date: Wed, 11 Feb 

Carol Grace, Sally Ward, J. G. Row and everyone who is interested in helping the local schools do a little research in their history classes: this is what I am able to do.

I'll gather and post a list of relevant & well written web-sites that I've saved. First I need to make sure they still exist. Then I'll do some Google searches for newer sites, newspaper reviews or quilt magazine articles.

After I post it to QHL, if you have other web-sites to add to the list, send it to me directly, not the entire list, so we don't jam up QHL. I'll update the list and re-post it after a week. Let's assume that all the web-sites listed in Pat Cumming's recent article will be on that list. (Thanks Pat.)

For magazine articles or references that are not on the web, such as Brackman's in QNL, I'll need special help. Be sure and send complete reference to any excellent articles you have read.

Carol Grace, today's school schedules seem very tight and I think a presentation and a Q & A session is great. If one has a collection of Civil War quilts to bring in to a classroom, that is fun, but proves nothing except these are the quilts you found and bought. Is it representative of all quilts of that era? Pictures in a book are also fine.

With school time crunches, having kids make a Civil War quilt is probably impractical. And what is a Civil War quilt? I don't even want to go there. Depends where and with what means you lived, I guess.

Finally, is it sensitive? You bet, but a good teacher will help make this a thoughtful research project, creating interactive learning opportunities and always respectful of others.

After the websites and article lists are posted, I can help keep it updated and I'll also talk to Kris about this. Still searching for one or two teachers to write a generic cover letter to principals or teachers introducing the website and article list...

Jan -- Jan Drechsler in Vermont Quilt Restoration; Quilting teacher www.sover.net/~bobmills

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Subject: Re: UGRR/quilts From: Jccullencrewaol.com Date: Wed, 11 Feb 2004 

Hi Jan, This is quite an endeavor and I'll be glad to follow through on whatever the "experts" put together. I know that the kids in 4th grade have art classes, and it's not unusual for the teachers to incorporate history with art classes. They already made a quilt following 9-11 which was quite impressive. I'll wait to see what you put together and then present it to the teachers to see what kind of response we get. I may have to get involved again with the school, but my kids went there and now my grandkids go there. The principal was a HS teacher that we know so that's an "in" to start with. I'll wait to hear from you about your progress. Best wishes. Carol Grace

 



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