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Quilters Find a way to care

Subject: pattern query From: Gail Ingram <gingramtcainternet.com> Date: Wed, 25 Feb 

Does anyone on this list know pattern source for quilt listed "Funky Forties Basket" in DSQSG meeting report?

Before my fall Outlook Express crash, a member had identified the source as a pattern that appeared in newspaper in 1940. Quilt was made in Briston, TN.

This quilt is around #30-35 in list of our photos from meeting.

Will appreciate any information.

From dark, gray, rainy North Louisiana, Gail

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Subject: UGRR lecture in Connecticut last night From: <mreichattglobal.net> Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2004 13:14:40 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Did anyone attend last night's lecture at the New Britain Library on the UGRR? I am just curious about how it was received. Could you email me privately? Thanks, sue reich

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Subject: Log Cabin small quilt From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Wed, 25 

Hi everyone, I am posting to the photo site (vintagepictures.eboard.com) a small, 22 x 22 inches, Log Cabin quilt I made for my entry into my guild's (Citrus Belt Quilters, Redlands, California) annual small quilt challenge, which this year is entitled "Log Cabins Through the Ages".

It is made entirely by hand--both pieced and quilted by me; using genuine 1860-1880's fabrics. I thought you all might enjoy seeing what can be done today with period fabrics. (yes, the back has a label saying I made it this year.) Don Beld

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Subject: Re: UGRR lecture in Connecticut last night From: <gingramtcainternet.com> 

Suebaby,

I'm at school and haven't time for a long disquisition, but I wanted to ask you, a nurse, this:

do you people SLEEP under a quilt of CONDOMS?

Would sleep seem to come easy with such covering, do you think?

I cant help it: there are idiots in every endeavor, and some of these "nontrad" things have left me howling.

Think I'll asked my hormone-nuts jrs/sr iF they could sleep under such.

gi

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Subject: Re: UGRR lecture in Connecticut last night From: <mreichattglobal.net> Date: 

What! sue ----- 

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Subject: Australian patchwork From: "Cinda Cawley" <lrcawleydmv.com> Date: Wed, 25 

I spend a lot of time alone in my car and am addicted to recorded books. I just finished listening (it is such a different experience from reading, don't you think?) to The Idea of Perfection by Kate Grenville. It's described as "winner of the 2001 Orange Prize for fiction." The central female character is a middle aged museum curator who is also a well known (the P.M owns one of her quilts) patchwork artist. There is much discussion of quiltmaking in a tiny town in New South Wales. I think it's rare that a real novel (as opposed to those silly-IMHO- mysteries) discusses quilts/quilting seriously and at some length. I liked the book. The readers Australian accent was a bonus; I love the sound. Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: Sunbonnet Sue "1820" date From: "ChrisA" <chrisajetlink.net> Date: Wed, 25 

Leigh Fellner asked me to post this to QHL since the article she refers to was recently discussed on QHL.

"I asked Ms. Campbell if she'd mind if I passed this on to a QHL member for publication, and she said she'd appreciate it. So I'm shooting it off to you folks in the hope one of you'll do just that.

On February 17 Jan Dreschler posted to the Quilt History List that... This [Emmittsburg Dispatch] is a small time paper, but here is one amusing article. The author indicates she has researched the claims made by those dismissing the blocks as the wrong era. She discovered the pre-cursor to Sunbonnet Sue. How could we have missed that? The part of the article Ms. Dreschler is referring to is this: Reference had been made to a "bonnet girl" quilt, but quilt historians say that "Sunbonnet Sue" did not exist until the '20s. In my research I found that there were quilts of such a pattern in the early 1800s called "Sue Bonnet." Instead of being a little girl like Sunbonnet Sue, the figure was what we now know as a colonial lady with a hoop skirt and bonnet.

I decided to drop a line to Mary Ellen Campbell, the author of the article, and ask her for the source for that info about "Sue". She kindly phoned me this afternoon. What a genuinely nice woman!

It turns out that the article she submitted to the paper did indeed cite the source: an article by Serena Wilson (niece of Hidden in Plain View's Ozella McDaniel) published in Traditional Quiltworks magazine in May 2002 - as far as I know, the first insertion of "Sue" into the "quilt code". (My article disputing Ms. Wilson's claims was published in the same magazine in March 2003; an expanded version appears on my site at www.hartcottagequilts.railroad.)

Unfortunately, in the editing process what originated as merely a quote of Ms. Wilson was transmogrified into Ms. Campbell's own "research". Ms. Campbell says this was not her intention at all, and in her words the whole thing turned into "a mess." The newspaper's collective ears have been burning ever since, and according to Ms. Campbell the editor has pretty much decided to delete that article from the paper's archives."

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Subject: Re: UGRR lecture in Connecticut last night From: Kris Driessen 

Boy, you never really know what's going to come up at these quilt conferences, do you?

No pun intended, of course:-))

Kris, who is trying to figure out how you would get them all to stick together. Hot glue?

--- gingramtcainternet.com wrote: > Suebaby, > > I'm at school and haven't time for a long disquisition, but I > wanted to ask you, a nurse, this: > > do you people SLEEP under a quilt of CONDOMS? > >

 

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Subject: condoms From: "Quiltstuff" <quiltstuffoptusnet.com.au> Date: Thu, 26 Feb 

I , too , am intrigued. Was it condoms.. or condom wrappers. If it was the former, I guess they would have to use all the different colours and textures to make it visibly pleasing. You could use a thread to stitch latex together.... after all it wouldn't really matter if there was a hole in it... VBG

Suzy> > Kris, who is trying to figure out how you would get them all to stick > together. Hot glue? > >> > > > do you people SLEEP under a quilt of CONDOMS? > >

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Subject: Re: Australian patchwork From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrowpatmedia.net> Date: 

Cinda,

I read and enjoyed "The Idea of Perfection" also.. I found it on remainder tables and bought 4 to give to other members of our local Historic Preservation Committee. I liked the quilting stuff, but all the other things were so pertinent to our little community at the time. We've bought an old house and its 15 acres in Ringoes and are planning to turn it into a small park and local museum. I loved the descriptions of the local museum and the things that went into it; unimportant things in the flow of history, but so important to the daily lives of the local inhabitants.

We were/are also in continuing battle with the county highway department who want to turn all the one-lane 19th century stone-arch bridges and pony truss bridges over culverts and streams into standard flat, wide spans with no weight or speed limits. The "hero" of the book was a bridge engineer who also wanted to preserve the bridge he was sent to remove.

A few years ago my husband and I did a photographic inventory of all the historic bridges in our township. That meant sliding down embankments into icy water in early spring before any leaves came out. I've gotten to know the construction and the undersides of all our local bridges intimately. For some the interest from the County Historical Commission came too late, and they'd already been turned into concrete monstrosities over corrugated metal tubes. For others our interest may be just enough and just in time to save them.

Historic view-sheds are as important as historic buildings in defining a town, and all the old bridges are an important part of the view- sheds.

Judy "the Ringo Kid" in Ringoes, NJ judygrowpatmedia.net

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Subject: gold in cloth From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 25 Feb 

Someone recently asked about gold in cloth. I came across these web links, maybe they will be helpful. Judy Schwender

When Silk Was Gold: Central Asian and Chinese Textiles in The Cleveland and Metropolitan Museums of Art. The exhibition opened October 26, 1997: http://www.clemusart.com/exhibit/silk/index.html description of the accompanying catalog: http://www.clemusart.com/exhibit/silk/catalog.html

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Subject: correction From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2004 

Leigh Fellner asked that I post this regarding the UGRR story ....She meant to say Mary Ellen CUMMINGS, not Campbell, who wrote the "Sue" article.

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Subject: re: Leigh Fellner's forwarded post From: Patricia L Cummings 

A big thank you to Leigh for forwarding that information. It is so easy to lose track of all of the details of this very involved discussion with all who have chirped in with various pieces of the puzzle.

In this political year, it is appropriate to share a short story with you that seems to loosely fit this situation. When I was growing up in a small town, my Dad was quite active in town affairs. On one occasion, he was to pick some document or other at the home of the matriarch of three men (who also held various offices in town). Upon arriving, he heard the woman calling "Man-Who". She explained to Dad that that was the name given to her cat, named in another political year..."The Man-Who"..., named after having heard those words repeatedly as part of campaign strategies. This lovely lady always brought joy wherever she went because of her keen sense of humor and perceptive wisdom.

Well, we have a lot of "man-whos" and "woman-whos" in the field of art/quilt history, all with thoughts, reflections, and opinions of their own. Sometimes we "get it right" and sometimes not, a clear example of how history can begin to become distorted, even in our own time, and even with our concerted attempts to report events accurately and without creative embellishment.

So, it is with a cheerful spirit that I personally accept and value any corrections sent my way, whether it be to remind me that reindeer have hoof prints, not paw prints; or whether someone writes to me to tell me that the lady in my Victorian Trade Card article for Willimantic was holding old-fashioned ice skates, not ice-grappling hooks, as I had thought.

In any event, I try to be clear, concise, and correct in all of my writings, so I welcome any and all improvements and suggestions. It's good to step back every now and then and just have a good belly laugh at one's own expense. Life is too short not to include a measure of mirth and a dose of levity.

In this case, Leigh reminds me that Ozella's niece, not she, was the first to mention the theory of "Sue Bonnet", (which Leigh disputed). I'd love to see exact, documented published examples of this pattern. I'm familiar with 1930s Colonial Lady patterns such as the one we photographed in front of the Sheafe Warehouse at Prescott Park in Portsmouth, NH for my article about coverlets in The Quilter magazine.

At any rate, thanks, Leigh.

Pat Cummings www.quiltersmuse.com

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Subject: Talking Quilts From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltonatt.net> Date: Thu, 26 Feb 

Interesting review of the Talking Quilts exhibit at the American Folk Art Museum (through Aug 1) ( forgive me if this has been posted already)

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9C04E3DB103AF930A25751C0A9629C8B63

Jean Carlton

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Subject: Re: Talking Quilts From: <chrisajetlink.net> Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2004 13:01:53 

http://www.historyofquilts.com/talking.html

This article is about the same exhibit and has pictures of two of the quilts. What a fabulous exhibit this appear to be. I'm hoping there will be a catalogue for sale.

Kim Wulfert www.antiquequiltdating.com/tours.html

Interesting review of the Talking Quilts exhibit at the American Folk Art Museum (through Aug 1) ( forgive me if this has been posted already)

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9C04E3DB103AF930A25751C0A9629 C8B63

Jean Carlton

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Subject: study groups From: "Charlotte Bull" <charloumo-net.com> Date: Thu, 26 Feb 

Please excuse this joint letter, but at this moment I am working on a imminent deadline! So, THANKS, many thanks, to the 5 different friends who have responded to me in regards to my question about forming a Quilt Study Group. I even met a lady on QHL who will be there too! Anyway, I have received much good info which has been very helpful. I shall be able to make better decisions and comments because I have your experience. By the way, the majority suggested KISS - Keep It Simple & Stressfree!

Now back to work! cb

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Subject: Re: Article in the Sydney Morning Herald From: Annette Gero 

>Hi All,

>I was absolutely horrified by this article in our local newspaper. >What a silly thing to write. All it does is let everyone know what >to steal..But we really should learn from this and that is NOT to >give reporters information which they can use (like here) which puts >one at risk. One should never tell reporters the values of quilts or >where they are stored or how many you own..Being Vague is the best >safety. Reporters love to ask "OHhhh... How many quilt are in your >exhibition and (worse) what are they worth!!"

Annette Gero Shocked in Sydney Australia

>This was posted to another group - I thought y'all would find it >interesting. You can read it on line at http://snipurl.com/4p98 > >LEAVE THE JEWELS, GRAB THE QUILTS. >There's a new international crime pattern, and quilters are nervous. >Deborah Cameron investigates. >

--

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Subject: Re: thread question From: Marthapatches36aol.com Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2004 

The thread question us interesting. But why don't you join some of those new younger quilters in a weekly bee?

 

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Subject: double wedding rings From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltonatt.net> Date: Thu, 26 

Hi I posted this elsewhere so you are not seeing double if you are on several lists. Does anyone know for sure if there was a dwr pattern which resulted in a 'squared' ring? I have always assumed those were the result of seam allowance/accuracy issues but another quilt enthusiast was SURE that the pattern was a variation of the round version and was meant to be that way. Anyone with documentation of any sort on this? Jean c

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Subject: STRANGE COINCIDENCE From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrowpatmedia.net> Date: 

Quotations from one page of last week's Sunday New York Times Book Review.

..........."a masterpiece of insinuation and supposition, employing all the techniques of pseudo-history to symphonic effect, justifying this slight of hand as an innovative scholarly technique... "

............."the authors maintain that 'only by such synthesis can one discern the underlying continuity, the unified and coherent fabric, which lies at the core of any historical problem.' To do so, one must realize that 'it is not sufficient to confine oneself exclusively to facts."

............"Thus liberated, [the authors] concoct an argument that is not so much factual as factish. Dozens of credible details are heaped up in order to provide a legitimizing cushion for rank nonsense. Unremarkable legends..........are characterized as suggestive clues of puzzles demanding solution. .........Highly contested interpretations.......are presented as established truth."

".....the authors spin one gossamer strand of conjecture over another, forming a web dense enough to create the illusion of solidity."

What book do you think she is writing about? Hmmmmmm?

Gotcha!

These sentences were by Laura Miller from "The Last Word", the final column in last weeks New York Times Book Review, titled "The Da Vinci Con."

In the review Ms Miller debunks the fiction that is presented as "fact" at the beginning of "The Da Vinci Code" by Dan Brown. She cites the 1980's book, "Holy Blood, Holy Grail" by Michael Baigent, Richard Leigh and Henry Lincoln as the source of Brown's non-fiction material. And the three authors of that book stated that their material came from "a cache of clippings and pseudonymous documents that ........were planted in the Bilbiotheque Nationale" before 1970. This hoax was found out and published in 1996, but "the set of shocking revelations hasn't proved as popular as the fantasia......"

She ends the review with the sentence, "The only thing more powerful than a worldwide conspiracy, it seems, is our desire to believe in one."

You can read the entire review at http://www.cesnur.org/2004/davinci_nyt.htm

Judy "the Ringo Kid" in Ringoes, NJ judygrowpatmedia.net

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Subject: Re: double wedding rings From: Ark Quilts <quiltarkmvyahoo.com> Date: Fri, 27 

Dear Jean-- There is a "square" pattern (made of 25 squares/triangle squares) called the Antique Wedding Ring or Wedding Ring or Wishing Well. It is listed in most quilt block encyclopedias. Sometimes you will find it in Amish quilts. Connie Ark 

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Subject: Re: double wedding rings From: VILLAGMERCaol.com Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2004 

There is also a pattern called Chains of Love which looks like a squared off double wedding ring. Betty The Village Mercantile Boonville, IN

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Subject: Re: Article in the Sydney Morning Herald From: "colleen archbold" 

Hi. I'm new to this group...well I've been here a while, but very silent, sorry. I live in Australia, and wanted to respond to Annette's post. There is to be an article in the "Sunday Mail" (Adelaide) this weekend, following on from this, apparently. I teach in a shop in Adelaide, and my quilts are on the walls, along with many others. Recently 7 quilts were stolen (not mine, but devastating)., It is our opinion that quilts were in fact not the target of the break-in, but having found no cash in the shop, the thieves grabbed the quilts on the way out. Correct me if I'm wrong, but where is the market for these quilts? Now reporters have been snooping for a story like the one quoted. They got word of the stolen quilts, and I think they are being very irresponsible with the kinds of questions they are asking. It is horrifying. Have to be soooo careful what we say. It will be interesting to see what is printed, because I know the general thrust of what's been told to the reporter. Now that the Sydney Morning Herald has printed this, it's a difficult task to right it. It has many implications for security and insurance. A good reason for the international quilting community to be aware, protect our quilts. I'll introduce myself more soon :o)

Colleen Archbold "Piecefully Patched", quilt designer, teacher.

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Subject: Re: double wedding rings From: aol.com Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2004 

And there's a nine-patch pattern called Golden Wedding Ring that predates the Double Wedding Ring as far as I know; it's in the Yvonne Khin pattern encyclopedia, and I believe it's in Maggie Malone as well.

Karen Evans

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Subject: Re: Square DWR From: "Charlotte Bull" <charloumo-net.com> Date: Fri, 27 Feb 

Subject: square double wedding ring

Check Brackman # 2686. There is a square DWR. From Old Chelsea Station under name Laura Wheeler. The 4 arcs came together, 2 per corner, at a triangle rather than a square. So 4 blocks together would create a simple 4 X look in the corner. When pieced together 2 blocks would form each small inner "melon slice". The Big center shape was the center of each square block. Made piecing a block at a time possible. Think about it as a Glorified or Improved Nine Patch block. They are also pieced as squares.

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Subject: Re: textile museums in Europe From: Margareta.Faustcec.eu.int Date: Fri, 27 

-----Original Message----- From: Ady Hirsch [mailto:adamroninetvision.net.il]=20 Sent: Sunday, February 15, 2004 8:51 AM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] Re: qhl digest: February 14, 2004

>I beg to correct the following: > And the Musee de l'Impressions sur Ettofes, Mulhouse, France (10 = minutes by train from Strasbourg) - a babulous textile museum that held the French boutis exhibition a few years ago.

Mulhouse is actually about an hour's train ride form Strasbourg. = Anyway, BOTH cities are worth visiting! Here's the website of the Printed = textiles museum - in English: http://www.musee-impression.com/gb/default.html

When in Strasbourg, do visit the Mus=E9e Alsacien: http://www.musees-strasbourg.org/F/alsacien.html

They have excellent displays of folk costumes and ethnic embroidery, = apart from lots of other things.

I also have a question to the person who mentioned the Augustinermuseum = in Frankfurt: are you sure it was Frankfurt? I can only find an Augustinermuseum in Freiburg.

And if you're in Germany, there's a wonderful museum of samplers ALL = 200 on display!!! It's in Celle near Hamburg (Go to 'Museums at a glance' on = your right): http://www.celle.de/index.phtml?La=3D2&start=3D1

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Subject: Re: Double Wedding Ring quilts From: Anne Copeland 

Hi Jean, I have a very large collection of Double Wedding Rings, and through studying them carefully (I bought all eccentrics, so they offer lots of variations). Yes, there are squared versions, and whether there was an actual pattern or not, i am not certain, for often it seems to have more to do with the number and size of the pieces in the rings than an actual intentional thing. Also, solid rings are never squared, another reason I tend to believe that.

I found a number of interesting things about DWRs when I started collecting. I believe the DWR goes back before the 20s, to the early teens or perhaps even earlier, and that the orginal DWRs had solid rings. I have one that is definitely turkey red and two step green, and it is quilted in a style that seems more prevalent to me at the turn of the century than later on. Also, I have others that were clearly from that period in the early teens. Very turn of the century style and colors and the not so great quilting and thick battings. I had more that were stolen from my home in 1998.

I have also found DWRs appliqued on top of a wholecloth backing, and like I said, very eccentric DWRs in terms of design layout and coloring. I have a pretty decent collection that goes all the way from the turn of the century to the present. I even have a kit DWR that I am certain was made by the Mickey Company ca. 1930. Whole DWR sections in two print colors - that peachy pink and a soft green (not Nile green).

It's funny because my taste never ran along the lines of DWRs but a friend got me started collecting them and now I love the graphic ones I have. I have one that is made like a dresden plate with colored (printed) melons, and it is absolutely to die for. It is just a top, but probably one of my best ones. Peace and blessings, Annie

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Subject: re thread From: "Charlotte Bull" <charloumo-net.com> Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2004 

Was the "thread comment" directed to me when one of you asked why I didn't join the quilters in a bee? If you were asking me, I'll share that I founded a quilt guild in my new home town 17 years ago and we meet regularly twice a month to learn and share. At one time I was also active in 5 or 6 other guilds plus my state guild and the AQSG. I also traveled and taught! Meeting at a Senior Center 5 times a week to quilt for others and eat lunch did not fit into my schedule!

They are sweet ladies who quilt for friendship and to raise money to keep the almost free meals available as well as to make people who cannot quilt happy by finishing their inherited tops! They are the same ladies who were there quilting when I moved here and all were friends of my mother and aunt. However, at this point, I am fully occupied with research and restoration and don't do much quilting since I have some physical problems bending over a big frame. I know I could not come up to their expectations! : ))) I do prefer to work at home and not drive back and forth!

But I did not mean to sound critical of them. They simply have no interest in doing research or serious study. And, I have to smile when I say this, I still think of them as being as old as my mother! Not my generation! So I'll stick to my local guild where I am one of the "old ladies". I'll let the young ones offer to carry my stuff in & out of the meeting hall. I enjoy having them ask serious questions about block history or dating fabric. At every meeting there's bound to be at least one gal with antique blocks or top who has questions. Now that is my kind of fun. So I'll let these women do the quilting for others. I prefer a Quilt History Bee!

But I don't mind your question. It is an aspect of quilt history, isn't it? Quilt Bees were probably more about fellowship and getting a top quilted than about designing and sewing the quilts. cb

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Subject: RE: STRANGE COINCIDENCE From: "Candace Perry" 

We are having a program on the legend of the Holy Grail on Friday, March 12. A young scholar from our area who attends Vassar is going to present on the various legends (Parsifal, etc.)(he's recently won an award from Vassar for his work on the subject) and then in keeping with the furor over the DaVinci Code, we will be encouraging audience discussion of the book afterward. This article is most helpful, as it will aid in dispelling some of the ideas that Brown puts forth as "fact." So we'll be doing our part to set things right in the world. Candace Perry (who still enjoyed the book, and also watches reality TV and reads gossip columns) Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center

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Subject: Re: Double Wedding Ring quilts From: Margareta.Faustcec.eu.int Date: Fri, 27 

-----Original Message----- From: Anne Copeland [mailto:anneappraiser1juno.com] Sent: Friday, February 27, 2004 4:45 PM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] Re: Double Wedding Ring quilts

"I have also found DWRs appliqued on top of a wholecloth backing"

Now this is interesting. I wonder how frequent it was in the 1930s to applique DWRs and, similarly, GFGs? My question is not entirely academic... I have some DWR arches (or whatever you call them), and it seems much more logical to me that you should applique them in order to avoid the bulging in the middle (which happened with the one completed block that came with the arches!) Also, I bought some GFG blocks and started adding the outer white hexagons - what a tedious task...!!!after a few I told my daughter I would applique them instead. Daughter (25), who has seen countless pictures of quilts in books and been dragged to lots of exhibits and fairs, said: IT'S NOT DONE. Since I'd like to make up my vintage blocks in a 'vintage' manner.. it would be 'liberating' to know there were instances of appliqueing DWR and GFG.

Happy quilting weekend, everyone, Margareta

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Subject: Re: Double Wedding Ring quilts From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> 

Virginia Snow Studios (Collingbourne Mills/Dexter Threads, Elgin, Illinois) sold squares of white fabric stamped for the placement of Double Wedding Ring block components. Apparently one pieced the arcs, then appliquéd them to the stamped block.

These were marketed as blocks, with information in fine print about what else was required to make them useful; imagine the disappointment of the buyer when she discovered she would have to collect and piece the colored bits of fabric herself! I had a collection of these and other blocks stamped for different designs, all from Virginia Snow Studios (before i got flooded last summer).

Xenia

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Subject: Re: Double Wedding Ring quilts From: "barbara sullivan ;o\)" 

your collection sound beautiful. do you have photos? i would love to see them! i love those quilts. they are my favorite but i am not skilled enough to make one. i am currently working on cross stitching a dwr. it is so cute. a friend mailed me the kit because i was looking for quilt designs in cross stitch. but im sorry to hear you had some stolen. someone just broke into your home and took them? or they broke in for something and happened to take those as well? that is so sad.

barbara

Anne Copeland <anneappraiser1juno.com> wrote: Hi Jean, I have a very large collection of Double Wedding Rings, and through studying them carefully (I bought all eccentrics, so they offer lots of variations). Yes, there are squared versions, and whether there was an actual pattern or not, i am not certain, for often it seems to have more to do with the number and size of the pieces in the rings than an actual intentional thing. Also, solid rings are never squared, another reason I tend to believe that.

I found a number of interesting things about DWRs when I started collecting. I believe the DWR goes back before the 20s, to the early teens or perhaps even earlier, and that the orginal DWRs had solid rings. I have one that is definitely turkey red and two step green, and it is quilted in a style that seems more prevalent to me at the turn of the century than later on. Also, I have others that were clearly from that period in the early teens. Very turn of the century style and colors and the not so great quilting and thick battings. I had more that were stolen from my home in 1998.

I have also found DWRs appliqued on top of a wholecloth backing, and like I said, very eccentric DWRs in terms of design layout and coloring. I have a pretty decent collection that goes all the way from the turn of the century to the present. I even have a kit DWR that I am certain was made by the Mickey Company ca. 1930. Whole DWR sections in two print colors - that peachy pink and a soft green (not Nile green).

It's funny because my taste never ran along the lines of DWRs but a friend got me started collecting them and now I love the graphic ones I have. I have one that is made like a dresden plate with colored (printed) melons, and it is absolutely to die for. It is just a top, but probably one of my best ones. Peace and blessings, Annie

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: quilt collections, shops From: "Laura Fisher" <laurafishernetlink1.net> Date: Fri, 

Hi I - I need an up to date list of locations throughout the U.S. where = someone can see many quilts, i.e. museums, historic associations, etc. I = know several museums recently acquired collections of quilts and I have = info on those; I want to make sure I include significant places to see = quilts.

Also, there used to be a directory of quilt shops across the country; = does that still exist and how can I get an current copy?

Lastly, quilter's magazines -- I have info on the principal ones, just = want to make sure I don't miss any.

Is this info already compiled somewhere on the net?

Thanks for your help. Please email me privately if you like.

Laura Fisher ------=

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Subject: repro quilts From: "Laura Fisher" <laurafishernetlink1.net> Date: Fri, 27 Feb 

Someone just informed me there are quilts by Laura Fisher in the = Sundance Catalog.

These have nothing to do with me !! I am not manufacturing quilts.=20

Someone is either using my name without authorization because of my = relationship to quilts, or else there is yet another Laura Fisher in the = U.S. related to textiles (I know only of me selling antique quilts, and = Laura Fisher the textile artist/designer in Katonah NY).

So, caveat emptor. ------=_Nex

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Subject: 19th century quilt poetry and prose From: <mreichattglobal.net> Date: Fri, 27 

With March just around the corner, this little descriptive might be of interest. Its author forgot girls born in the month of March! For those of us born in the remaining eleven months, did the descriptive for your month seal your fate? And, yes, inconsistant was spelled with an "a." sue reich The Kellogg Enterprise Kellogg, Iowa November 9, 1888

Depends When the Girl Is Born. If a girl is born in January she will be a prudent housewife, given to melancholy, but good temper. If in February, a humane and affectionate wife, and tender mother. If in April, inconsistant, not very intelligent, but likely to be good looking. If in May, handsome, amiable, and likely to be happy. If in June, impetuous, will marry early and will be frivolous. If in July, passably handsome, but with a sulky temper. If in August, amiable mad practical, and likely to marry rich. If in September, discreet, affable, and much liked. If in October, coquettish, and likely to be unhappy. If in November, liberal, kind and of a mild disposition. If in December, well proportioned, fond of novelty, and extravagant. St Louis Republic.

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Subject: Talking Quilts at AFAM From: "Laura Fisher" <laurafishernetlink1.net> Date: Fri, 

Hi - anyone visiting NYC must stop in to see the exhibit Talking Quilts = at the American Folk Art Museum, 45 West 53rd Street. It is intriguing.

There is no catalog for the exhibit, but.......there will be a book on = the subject. My latest book project is TEXT ON TEXTILES: Words as Design = in Antique Quilts. It includes most of the 18 quilts that are = coincidentally in the exhibit, plus many many more -- some well known, = some never before seen.=20

I've been compiling information and examples for the past year or more, = and I am at the stage now where I want to reach out to the quilt = community to make sure I have images of any great ones that may not be = in museums or with private sources I have contacted.

If you have or know of a quilt with considerable words or writing that = you think should be included, I would appreciate it if you would email = or mail photos.=20

My address is 1050 Second Avenue, Gallery # 84, NY NY 10022.

Thanks for your input.

Laura Fisher

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Subject: Double Wedding Ring quilts From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Fri, 27 

The Handcrafts Div. of Farmers Wife featured in a 1920s catalog a DWR quilt and pillow kit. Quilt had scalloped borders; squares of either two solids or a solid and white with segments of 6 small figured prints and center piece and melon of white or unbleached. Block forms its own scalloped border with points of color between. Quilt measures 74x88 when finished and pillow with colored back and boxing measures 19" across. A quilting design is shown between which I'll post to eboard later. . Prices were : Material ready cut for complete top $3.98 Material, ready cut for ocmplete pillow .75 Perforated quilting pattern including both for center and segments .50 Cutting pattern for DWR .15 Special -- free Rose Stamping Powder when quilt and perforated stamping patter are ordered together for the special price of 4.25 Pure white Cloth of Gold backing, 36" wide .25/yd

Xenia Cord wrote:

>Virginia Snow Studios (Collingbourne Mills/Dexter Threads, Elgin, >Illinois) sold squares of white fabric stamped for the placement of >Double Wedding Ring block components. Apparently one pieced the arcs, >then appliquéd them to the stamped block. > > > >

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Subject: DWR on eboard From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2004 

Farmers Wife DWR kit is now on eboard. http://vintagepictures.eboard.com or http://www.eboard.com/vintagepictures [enter vintagepictures in box] Select quilt tab.

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Subject: Re: Prose for months From: "Leah Zeiber" <leah.zieberverizon.net> Date: Fri, 

What a laugh, I checked the months for both me and my three daughters and boy oh boy they are pretty accurate! Particularly the "sulky temper" for me :)

Sulky Tempered Leah

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Subject: Re: Prose for months From: Gail Ingram <gingramtcainternet.com> Date: Fri, 

This is the forecase for the month of March, omitted in Sue's earlier report from the midwestern paper:

"Girls who are born in March will be gifted intellecutally, socially, and artistically. Their sense of humor will brighten their lives. Their passion will enrich the world. They will be good ceo's, mothers, wives, friends, mistresses of pets both ill- and good-dispositioned. They will make good teachers, gardeners, needlewomen, and artists, and they will suffer fools gladly because they will cherish the stories to be found thereby. They will not need to marry rich, for they will bring their richness with them. Their price will be greater than rubies. They will make good cowgirls and they will love quilts and quilters."

gi

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Subject: 1868 Courthouse Steps From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Fri, 27 

Hi, well my Log Cabin Quilt that I posted on vintagepictures.eboard.com generated no comments from you guys--don't know if you didn't like it or didn't notice my note the day I sent it; BUT, today I posted an 1868 (Is that early or what) Courthouse Steps quilt that is signed and dated on the eboard sight that you really MUSTN'T MISS!! It is a beauty--with a poison green center and brown, yellow, and white strips in what I think is Penns. Dutch fabric. It has been in the maker's family since it was made.

I also posted a sewing sampler made by the quilt maker's mother in 1831 that shows the back of the quilt behind it when I took the photo. Both items are going to be in the special "Log Cabin Through the Ages" exhibit I am putting together for my guild's May 9th show at the Lincoln Shrine in Redlands.

I also just confirmed an 1900 silk tie Log Cabin quilt for the show as well.

Hope you enjoy seeing the Courthouse Steps. E-mail me privately what you think. Thanks, Don Beld

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Subject: Re: Prose for months From: "Cinda Cawley" <lrcawleydmv.com> Date: Fri, 27 

Thanks Gail. March fits me with my St. Patrick's Day birthday to a T (G), except for the bits about pets and gardening. Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: Re: DWR on eboard From: "Lucille greene" <vernongreenemsn.com> Date: Fri, 

Those quilts are breath taking. Very beautiful. Wished I could see them = with eye contact. Again they are beautiful Lucille in Ky 

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Subject: Re: Prose for months From: Gail Ingram <gingramtcainternet.com> Date: Fri, 

> From: "Cinda Cawley" <lrcawleydmv.com> > Subject: [qhl] Re: Prose for months > > Thanks Gail. March fits me with my St. Patrick's Day birthday to a T (G), > except for the bits about pets and gardening. > Cinda on the Eastern Shore >

Well, Cinda, you're not dead yet. Maybe the pets and gardening will come. Let's see, that makes 4.

gi

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Subject: antique quilts in southern california From: <quiltcomplexstarband.net> Date: 

HI, I just realized that some of you in Southern California might be interested in a new antique show which will debut in Los Angeles tomorrow (Friday) and Saturday. This promoter does a great show in Northern California twice a year and is starting this one in Hollywood this year. There are always lots of antique quilts for sale along with other high qulaity American antiques and folk art. I know at least two dealers in the show who specialize in quilts and will have dozens for sale. You can check for details at www.californiacountryshow.com Hope to see some of you there! Julie Silber

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Subject: Re: Thank you, Xenia From: "Hope" <hseidertacnet.missouri.org> Date: Fri, 27 

I am a lurker who subscribed to quilt history list for a number of years, unsubscribed, and recently re-subscribed.

I read your remarks, Pat, with interest. I am an elementary teacher, a quilter, and an amateur genealogist and historian who wrote the sesquicentennial history of our little town several years ago. I have a masters' degree, am a reading specialist, and have a number of hours above the masters, with annual professional development. I have two daughters who were raised in our school system with superb thinking skills -- one is a registered dietetian working on her masters in counseling, and the other is a speech pathologist also working on her masters degree in that field.

I'm not too happy with your depiction of teachers and teacher education. I don't know where you live or which teachers you are talking about, but teachers today do a darn good job with what we are handed. I don't know of any who "lack critical thinking skills." We are working very hard to get our students to analyze and question literature, history, and science. Beginning with the very youngest!

The teachers I know make every effort to be accurate because we know that what we teach is so important to the lives of our children. There may be teachers who allow themselves to be carelessly misled, but I don't know any of them. If they were misled, they would correct it immediately if the truth were shared with them. I'm often invited to share my quilt- and history-related experiences with other classes, and they often invite local experts to spin wool, quilt, etc.

You talk about having to try to correct what the teachers have so mistakenly imparted. Let me tell you, Hollywood has a much more insidious and far-reaching stranglehold on the teaching of accurate history than a teacher's mistelling of a historical event.

Try correcting, for example, every year, the mistaken idea that Pocahontas and John Smith were close to the same age and in love with each other. We work hard to counteract that, as well as they idea that Columbus' contemporaries thought the world was flat, etc., etc. I could go on and on but I won't. I hope I've done a little educating of my own.

Hope in SW Missouri

Pat said:

"Perhaps part of the problem in education today is the lack of good teaching training and/or ongoing education. "Critical thinking skills" cannot be imparted to children, if teachers themselves do not have them. Sorting out fact from fiction may seem simple to those of us who know the difference. We cannot assume that children can separate fanciful tales from what is real.

"Children are children and we don't worry very much if they believe in myths. However, the teaching of history based of fictional tales is wrong, simply wrong. History is difficult enough to teach. Written history reflects the opinions of whomever is writing it, subject to his/her biases, (perhaps) limited information, and by necessity, limited presentation of facts. For example, if one fact is given, maybe ten are not.... It is always a judgement call in what to include and/or exclude in a piece of writing."

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Subject: Teachers and the UGRR From: "Judy Anne" <anne_jworldnet.att.net> Date: Sat, 

Hope, As a recovering primary teacher (and I mean this literally, I got seriously ill and am lucky to be alive) I know the grueling stress of teaching kids today. Yet teachers are still eager to find new ways to bring kids exciting educational material instead of just teaching inside the box. I personally think it's wonderful that teachers are integrating quilting into the curriculum. It has so many possibilities in terms of math, history and just plain creativity. If I weren't aware of quilt history research I'm sure I would have been one of the first to jump on the bandwagon and do something with the UGRR idea as it is most appealing the way it mixes adventure & quilting with Black History.

Like you, I'm certain that teachers aren't teaching the UGRR blocks myth as truth because they lack skills or are just too lazy. The problem is they have no idea that it is a myth, and how could they when even major government sites publish it as truth. As those of us here who are or have been teachers know there is no way each single teacher can thoroughly research something like this on her own. They are lucky to get any time for their own families and to sleep at night. That is why we need to get the word out there to everyone including teachers, newspapers and websites. Not an easy task but at least some UGRR articles by members of this list seem to be showing up pretty high on Google searches, so hopefully more and more teachers will find this information. Since my site is an introductory type site on quilt history a lot of teachers use it and have parents and kids use it for homework. The information from people on this list has been a great help to me in getting out accurate historical information. I think we are on the right track doing what we can to get the facts out there. We just have to keep working at it.

Judy Anne

America's Quilting History http://womenfolk.com/historyofquilts/

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Subject: Re: 1868 Courthouse Steps From: "Judy Kelius (judysue)" <judysueptd.net> 

Hi Don . . . the quilt is beautiful. I am learning more every day about Pennsylvania quilts. Without the date, I would think it is late 19th century, not Civil War era. It seems that Pennsylvania quilters used similar or even the same fabrics for nearly a century, making dating a challenge. We have a dated 1852 quilt in the museum with fabrics that don't look that much different from those used in the early 20th century . . . double blue, chrome yellow, turkey red, and green calico.

At 07:51 PM 2/27/2004, you wrote: >Hi, well my Log Cabin Quilt that I posted on vintagepictures.eboard.com >generated no comments from you guys--don't know if you didn't like it or >didn't notice my note the day I sent it; BUT, today I posted an 1868 (Is >that early or what) Courthouse Steps quilt that is signed and dated on the >eboard sight that you really MUSTN'T MISS!! It is a beauty--with a poison >green center and brown, yellow, and white strips in what I think is Penns. >Dutch fabric. It has been in the maker's family since it was made. > >I also posted a sewing sampler made by the quilt maker's mother in 1831 >that shows the back of the quilt behind it when I took the photo. Both >items are going to be in the special "Log Cabin Through the Ages" exhibit >I am putting together for my guild's May 9th show at the Lincoln Shrine in >Redlands. > >I also just confirmed an 1900 silk tie Log Cabin quilt for the show as well. > >Hope you enjoy seeing the Courthouse Steps. E-mail me privately what you >think. >Thanks, Don Beld > > >--- >

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Subject: re: Judy Anne's site From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> 

Judy Anne wrote:

Since my site is an introductory type site on quilt history a lot of teachers use it and have parents and kids use it for homework. The information from people on this list has been a great help to me in getting out accurate historical information. I think we are on the right track doing what we can to get the facts out there. We just have to keep working at it.

Dear Judy Anne:

Your site is a great resource and I am happy that parents, teachers, and children are finding it. Having a website that is educational is a great deal of work. I can see that you are always updating information and adding new "chapters", as topics present themselves or as the need arises. There is an innate need among teachers to want to share, long after they have left formal classroom settings. I can think of a number of people on this list, including myself, who are or were teachers in schools, and who are now centering on "quilt" education.

It is to your credit that you put so much time into developing these units of study for quilting. We all have important information to contribute and we all do so, to the best of our current knowledge and level of understanding. Learning is an ongoing task at any age. I am happy to be a small part of your site via the Bible Blocks article that you asked me to contribute. I thoroughly enjoyed making the quilt blocks that are shown in the article, especially the two examples of the "Rose of Sharon" appliqué blocks. In re-creating some of the more complex quilt blocks that were made in the nineteenth century, one gains a new appreciation for quilters of that era. Their work is exceptional, especially considering the fact that the majority probably did not have ready access to the fine needles and sharp tools that we have today.

Each of the quilt history sites online have a different approach but we all have vital messages to impart. First and foremost, the predominant theme that underlies any of our words has to be the written or unwritten appreciation that we have for all quilts, yesterday, today, and tomorrow.

Thank you to my fellow historians, particularly Judy Anne, Kris, and Kim, who work so hard to provide good resources for all who would approach the Internet as a learning tool. I would also like to thank the many people on this list who share so freely, and in so many ways. The one common goal we have in mind is to seek the truth about quilt history and to record those findings accurately.

Patricia L.Cummings owner, Quilter's Muse Publications www.quiltersmuse.com

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: February 27, 2004 From: patkyser <patkyserhiwaay.net> Date: 

Re: Left out March girls Ah Gay, thanks for the inclusion of those of us who are blessed with March birthdays. I celebrate two: my "real one" on the 26th and my "special one" on St. Pat's Day which my Irish Dad insisted SHOULD have been my birthday. He was in an automobile accident on that day and my sweet mother held off on delivering me until he was out of the woods and deemed going to survive. You are a delight! Pat Flynn Kyser in Alabama

> "Girls who are born in March will be gifted intellecutally, socially, > and > artistically. Their sense of humor will brighten their lives. Their > passion > will enrich the world. They will be good ceo's, mothers, wives, > friends, > mistresses of pets both ill- and good-dispositioned. They will make > good > teachers, gardeners, needlewomen, and artists, and they will suffer > fools > gladly because they will cherish the stories to be found thereby. They > will > not need to marry rich, for they will bring their richness with them. > Their > price will be greater than rubies. They will make good cowgirls and > they > will love quilts and quilters." >

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Subject: What's in a name? From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> 

Someone just wrote to me to say that she is very confused about names. She wonders if Mary Ellen Cummings is the same as Pat Cummings, and who Mary Ellen Campbell is.

For those who are wondering the same thing, Mary Ellen Cummings is an octogenarian and a quilt columnist for the Emmitsburg Dispatch whom Jan Dreschler had mentioned and provided us with a link to her online columns.

The name "Mary Ellen Campbell" was a misprint from someone who posted who was actually referring to Mary Ellen Cummings.

Ms. Cummings and I are not the same person, nor are even related. We simply share a last name in common. I hope that this clarifies the situation, (very big grin).

Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings, "Pat" to my friends, "Patti" to my relatives (old habits are hard to shake). I also answer to "Mom" and "Auntie", but never to "Hey, You!"

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Subject: DWR's From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltonatt.net> Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2004 

All helpful information coming forth. I am not at home and miss all my reference books. I'd forgotten I'd found a copy of Khin's pattern dictionary while traveling - - and I do see it on page 240 drawn 'squarish'. I'm a bit surprised about the comment under it - first says Needlecraft Magazine, June 1931 - but then says " A popular pattern after the Civil War". I wonder...does she mean just not BEFORE the war - or that it starts to be seen fairly soon after the war? I wondered too about the size of the segment making up the arc. Seems the squarish rings have more rectangular segments; more like dominos. To make this design is there 'end of segment' template and separate segment templates? Is the shape of the 4 patch yet another ? I can see appliqueing it instead of insetting into those melon and sharp pointy things-though I have not seen this in person in the many such quilts I've seen....Don't assume by that comment that I'm thinking of doing either. Amazing to me that so many DWR (and GFG's) were made...pretty challenging compared to today's quick rotary techniques! Jean

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Subject: quilt study group From: "Charlotte Bull" <charloumo-net.com> Date: Sat, 28 

Hi,,,I just got home from the new Quilt Study Group - M.O.K.A. - I live closer than many, which is a blessing! But, like others, I'd drive 6 hours and stay at a motel if I had to!

It was excellent. 38 ladies. Some fascinating quilts & stories. Lots of enthusiasm for forming regular meetings. Nancy Hornback gave very good talk and shared some quilts and we played a game of examining 4 quilts as though we were appraisers or historians. Very good training. So I want to thank Charlotte Enfield and Edie Idleman and several others involved with AQSG for their work. A lady volunteered to write it up and another took pictures. I'll let them do their thing. But I wanted to say thanks to the 6 list members who encouraged me to attend! I enjoyed the "like-minded" new friends! (Hi Louise!) And the restaurant food was good. But 4 hours was way too short! cb

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Subject: Philadelphia Inquirer From: "Jan Drechsler" <quiltdocsover.net> Date: Sat, 28 

Teri Klassen sent me a note saying 'there is a brief article in the Philadelphia Inquirer reporting doubts about the UGRR quilt code' The Inquirer is Philadelphia's largest newspaper. There were UGRR programs in town so this was another slant on the subject.

Philadelphia Inquirer Feb 22, 2004

Quilts' role with slaves disputed

Anastasia Ustinova is a member of the Inquirer national staff

A popular book that asserts that escaped and freed slaves used quilts as message pads to guide themselves north on the Underground Railroad is under attack by scholars, who say its basic thesis is unproven.

Go to the website for rest of article!!!! You may have to copy it into Google and follow it through that way.

http://www.philly.com/mld/philly/8009126.htm 

Jan Drechsler in Vermont Quilt Restoration; Quilting teacher www.sover.net/~bobmills

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Subject: in the amish style From: ikwltcox.net Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2004 22:08:32 -0800 

my quilt guild is currently working on our opportunity quilt for next year, and an "amish inspired" quilt is in progress. we didn't really pay attention to regional colors, just asked for members to use solid colored fabrics that looked amish and furnished a black background fabric. it is set in a somewhat "square in a square" design, the stars make up the two squares. it is further modernized by stars in the borders of two of the opposite corners. we are using a quilting design book based on antique amish quilts for our patterns, and i am looking for a bit of guidance from anyone who might have made a replica, or is familiar with true amish quilts.

we would like to know what type of batting would be appropriate -- several are insisting that it must be black because of the background fabric and site bearding as a concern to do this. cost is somewhat of a consideration, wool has been mentioned but now some are frantically looking for black wool batt. i volunteered the collective wisdom of this group to guide us to a workable solution so that we can move this project along. also, the question of thread color has become an issue. this quilt will be hand quilted by various members of the guild and we need to have the thread pass along with the quilt. some swear that it has to be black to be true amish (but of course the quilt itself defies that!), and others say that red is a very traditional color to be used so that the quilting stitches show. i'm hoping to be able to come to them with some concensus of those in the know so that we can continue on.

thank you for any input you might have to guide us along. patti

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Subject: RE: Talking Quilts From: "Judy Anne" <anne_jworldnet.att.net> Date: Sun, 29 

Laura, That's wonderful that you will be publishing a book on talking quilts! I'll be watching this list to see when it comes out. There is something about these quilts that I love, they have so much personality.

For those of you who live too far away to see the exhibit go to http://www.folkartmuseum.org Then click on 'Talking Quilts' in the upper left are some thumbnails. Click on those to see some interesting talking quilts. Of course they will only make you wish you could actually see the exhibit all the more.

Judy Anne

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Subject: Query: Data on Quilts and Charities From: macdowelmsu.edu Date: Sun, 29 Feb 

Dear List subscribers,

For an article I am working on I am interested in getting contemporary and historical data on numbers of quilts made as well as the amount of money raised for specific causes through quilt raffles, auctions, donations, sales. Any information or references to documents listing this data would be appreciated. Thank you.

Marsha MacDowell

[PS: This morning I also posted this query on H-Quilts and I am including below what Xenia has already so kindly sent. This is EXACTLY what I am looking for! What an impressive project and the numbers are amazing. I'm hoping other list subscribers will have such data.-- Marsha ]

Date: Sun, 29 Feb 2004 12:13:11 -0600 From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net>

Hi, Marsha - I don't know if this is the sort of information you are looking for, but from 1990 to 2000 I helped to operate the "Yes Mam!" Mammogram project, which was (and is) the longest running quilters' effort to use quilts to provide mammogram funding for underinsured women. In 2001 we (Annette Baker and I) sold the parent show, Quilt America, and the Yes Mam! project, to Rita Barber. She has moved the project from Indianapolis to Lancaster, PA, and continues to operate it as a function of her Quilters' Heritage Celebration.

The project worked like this: quilters were challenged to buy specialty fabric printed by us, and to make quilts that could be used to raise funds for free mammograms in their home communities. The quilts could also be entered in a special competition at Quilt America, where they were judged like other quilts (1st, 2nd, 3rd based on technical merit), and the quilt that had earned the highest total for its home community in that year received an award matching up to $2000 of the raised amount. Quilters who won the regular awards most often donated that amount ($500, 250, 100) to their project as well.

In addition, we held a raffle quilt and a charity auction each year at Quilt America, with the auctioned items having been donated by quilters and vendors in attendance, and others in support of the project. Funds raised locally (Indianapolis) through the auction, raffle, and sale of the fabric and a special Yes Mam pin were donated by Quilt America to local imaging facilities.

I can provide you with the following data, compiled in 2000. The entries in each line are as follows (except for 1990): The auction total; the match QA provided to the top fundraiser; the technical merit award total; the reported totals raised by the quilts in competition in that year; the gross total for the year. Yes Mam Records

1990 QA donation $3000 (project introduced at show) = $3000.00 1991 QA donation $2432.87, match $1335, award $850, quilts total $5053.50 = $9671.37 1992 QA donation $3285.00, match $2166, award $850, quilts total $7276.00 = $13,577.00 1993 QA donation $2934.00, match $2500, award $850, quilts total $15,934.00 = $22,218.00 1994 QA donation $4000.00, match $2242, award $850, quilts total $ 2242.00 = $9334.00 1995 QA donation $6000.00, match $2000, award $850, quilts total $9269.00 = $18,119.00 1996 QA donation $10,786.56, match $2000, award $850, quilts total $5443.41 = $22,079.97 1997 QA donation $10.000, match $2000, award $850, quilts total $13,209.48 = $26,059.48 1998 QA donation $8700, match $2000, award $850, quilts total $11,825.35 = $23,375.35 1999 QA donation $12,267.71, match $1000, award $850, quilts total $2072 = $16,189.71 2000 QA donation $15,535.44, match $2000, award $850, quilts total $19.204.99 = $37,626.43

TOTAL DONATIONS FROM ALL SOURCES: $201, 250.31 (end of July, 2000)

Notes: These are just the quilts we were aware of because they were sent to QA for exhibit. QA donation totals come from the auction, raffle quilt, sale of kits and pins, and have gone to several area imaging facilities.. We are aware that most winners donate their awards to the projects they have created in their home towns.

Xenia Cord

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Subject: Re: Query: Data on Quilts and Charities From: Jccullencrewaol.com Date: Sun, 

In a message dated 2/29/2004 6:33:59 PM Eastern Standard Time, macdowelmsu.edu writes: TOTAL DONATIONS FROM ALL SOURCES: $201, 250.31 (end of July, 2000) Xenia, What a successful project idea. I had never heard of it before. I have friends still afraid to have a mameo. Is there a place to get the Yes mam info or pins that I get a hold of and give to them? Congratulations on a wonderful idea that really took off. Carol Grace

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Subject: Re: Query: Data on Quilts and Charities From: Xenia Cord 

As I said in the review of the "Yes Mam!" mammogram project, I am no longer associated with the project. You would have to be in touch with Rita Barber of Carlinville, IL, who owns the project now and operates it through her Lancaster, PA, show, Quilters Heritage Celebration.

Xenia



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