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Quilters Find a way to care

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Subject: Calico and chintz at Portland From: "colleen archbold" <colleenarchboldoptusnet.com.au> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 00:19:08 +0930 X-Message-Number: 2

Margaret mentioned this exhibition currently at Portland. If anyone is planning to attend could you please contact me ? Thanks.

I'm a keen lurker here, feel quite intimidated by all you people with vast knowledge of quilt history. I'm learning. Thanks for all the valuable info. warm regards Colleen Archbold, Adelaide, Australia

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Subject: Looking for copy of Calico and Chintz catalogue From: Trishherraol.com Date: Sat, 10 Apr 2004 14:46:14 EDT X-Message-Number: 3

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Does anyone who has visited the Portland Museum of Art have an extra copy of the Calico and Chintz catalogue? I called the gift shop to order it and they said they would not ship it and are only selling them on site.

Thanks, Trish Herr

Trish Herr 717.569.2268 2363 Henbird Lane Lancaster, PA 17601

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Subject: Re: Looking for copy of Calico and Chintz catalogue From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrowpatmedia.net> Date: Sat, 10 Apr 2004 15:10:43 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

Like Trish, I'd love a copy of the Calico and Chintz catalog as well. Perhaps someone (Kris?) could buy a bunch that we could then buy from her? Just a thought. I'd be willing to pay double postage if need be.

Judy " Ringo" in Ringoes, NJ judygrowpatmedia.net

----- Original Message ----- From: <Trishherraol.com> To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Saturday, April 10, 2004 2:46 PM Subject: [qhl] Looking for copy of Calico and Chintz catalogue

> Does anyone who has visited the Portland Museum of Art have an extra copy of > the Calico and Chintz catalogue? I called the gift shop to order it and they > said they would not ship it and are only selling them on site. > > Thanks, Trish Herr > > Trish Herr > 717.569.2268 > 2363 Henbird Lane > Lancaster, PA 17601 > > > --- >

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Subject: A Memorial Quilt From: <mreichattglobal.net> Date: Sat, 10 Apr 2004 15:04:45 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

I have a twentieth-century memorial quilt with this saying on it. "Breathes there a man with soul so dead, Who never to himself hath said, This is my own, my native land!"

Can anyone identify this saying or direct me a place that might know its origin? Many thanks, sue reich

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Subject: RE: A Memorial Quilt From: "Karan Flanscha" <SadieRosecfu.net> Date: Sat, 10 Apr 2004 14:36:29 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

Sue, Here is what I found (www.askjeeves.com)

The Oxford Book of English Verse: 1250–1900.

Sir Walter Scott. 1771–1832

547. Patriotism 1. Innominatus

BREATHES there the man with soul so dead, Who never to himself hath said, 'This is my own, my native land!' Whose heart hath ne'er within him burn'd As home his footsteps he hath turn'd From wandering on a foreign strand? If such there breathe, go, mark him well; For him no Minstrel raptures swell; High though his titles, proud his name, Boundless his wealth as wish can claim; Despite those titles, power, and pelf, The wretch, concentred all in self, Living, shall forfeit fair renown, And, doubly dying, shall go down To the vile dust from whence he sprung, Unwept, unhonour'd, and unsung.

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Subject: RE: A Memorial Quilt From: Dana Balsamo <danabalsamoyahoo.com> Date: Sat, 10 Apr 2004 12:38:34 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 7

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That is beautiful...I had to read it twice, aloud. Beautiful, and so appropriate in this day and age. Timeless.

Dana

Karan Flanscha <SadieRosecfu.net> wrote: Sue, Here is what I found (www.askjeeves.com)

The Oxford Book of English Verse: 1250–1900.

Sir Walter Scott. 1771–1832

547. Patriotism 1. Innominatus

BREATHES there the man with soul so dead, Who never to himself hath said, 'This is my own, my native land!' Whose heart hath ne'er within him burn'd As home his footsteps he hath turn'd From wandering on a foreign strand? If such there breathe, go, mark him well; For him no Minstrel raptures swell; High though his titles, proud his name, Boundless his wealth as wish can claim; Despite those titles, power, and pelf, The wretch, concentred all in self, Living, shall forfeit fair renown, And, doubly dying, shall go down To the vile dust from whence he sprung, Unwept, unhonour'd, and unsung.

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Subject: A Memorial Quilt From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Sat, 10 Apr 2004 15:40:29 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

Sue -- Lay of the Last Minstral by Sir Walter Scott.

mreichattglobal.net wrote:

>I have a twentieth-century memorial quilt with this saying on it. >"Breathes there a man > with soul so dead, >Who never to himself hath said, >This is my own, my native land!" > >Can anyone identify this saying or direct me a place that might know its >origin? Many thanks, sue reich > > >

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Subject: re: Calico and Chintz exhibit catalogue From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> Date: Sat, 10 Apr 2004 16:44:38 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

Hi Judy and Trish:

I was there on opening day. The gift shop had approximately ten each of both hardcover and paperback books. I was told that that is the total number they will ever have. Consequently, they are selling them only to people who attend the exhibit in person. Perhaps by the end of this weekend, the book will be sold out. They were divided between the venues, none of whom were allowed to take phone orders. I guess they want to have the catalogues available for patrons of the museum, i.e. those who pay an admission to get in.

Other options?

Right now, the book is selling on amazon for between $132., and $800. (for a signed copy). The only other one I know about that is listed for sale is the one on Kim's site for $175. plus shipping, for one with a slightly damaged cover- don't know if it is a hardcover book, or not.

At the museum, the price is $75. for a hard cover, and $55. for a paperback, up from the initial prices of $39.99 and $19.99.

This is a book you would all love to own, but perhaps you can at least get a glimpse of it by borrowing it through your local library's reference desk, via Interlibrary Loan.

I can see the traffic jam on I-95 now, as anxious quilt enthusiasts form a bumper to bumper line to Maine on Easter Sunday.

Pat

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Subject: The memorial phrase. From: <mreichattglobal.net> Date: Sat, 10 Apr 2004 19:30:39 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

Thanks to all of you for your speedy response. Yes, it is very touching. sue

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Subject: The memorial quilt From: <mreichattglobal.net> Date: Sat, 10 Apr 2004 19:42:16 -0400 X-Message-Number: 11

It seems unfair for me to request that you all identify this poem without telling you about the quilt top that it is written on. I believe it is WWII. It has a center medallion painting on white cotton of an eagle holding multiple American flags in its talons and a banner with the first four lines of the Sir Walter Scott poem. The center panel is surrounded by multiple borders of red, white and blue fabric. Unfortunately, I do not have any provenance on the quilt top. It looks very new and used. At first, I thought that it may have been used to cover a coffin but the overall size and shape is off for that. It troubles me to think that it might have been made for a soldier who lost his life in battle. I would be happy to share a photo with any of you who would email me privately. Thanks again for the help. sue

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Subject: Egyptian applique hangins From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Sat, 10 Apr 2004 16:43:01 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 12

Hello, all! I have been on the road with the QuiltBus so I haven't kept up on happenings. Looks like I have some interesting digests to go through when I get home Wednesday.

I received this E-mail which I thought I would forward to the list in case there are any collectors on it. PLEASE respond to her, I don't know when I will have net access again so I don't want to have to forward E-mail.

Hi Kris, > I have a client who needs to raise money and has some Egyptian > Applique hangings (early 1900's) he'd like to sell. Do you have > any > clients that might be interested or know where I might send him? > > Thanks for any thoughts, Tracy Jamar, NYC tjamaroptonline.net

__________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Tax Center - File online by April 15th http://taxes.yahoo.com/filing.html

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Subject: Pat's "News" From: "Kathy Moore" <KathyMooreneb.rr.com> Date: Sat, 10 Apr 2004 19:32:44 -0500 X-Message-Number: 13

"Ready for the news? Seems as though Ms. Tobin is currently at work on a book about the Underground Railroad from the Canadian side of the fence. This information is from a reliable source. Food for thought.

Pat"

My reply: Good grief! Somebody stop her before she hurts herself.

Kathy Moore Lincoln, NE

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Subject: Suzy's questions From: "Kathy Moore" <KathyMooreneb.rr.com> Date: Sat, 10 Apr 2004 19:47:48 -0500 X-Message-Number: 14

But I was wondering why it would be extra special even if it was owned by a black slave owner. I was thinking that given slavery existed until the Civil War and a large number of quilts that did survive from that period would have been more likely to be the 'good ones' and perhaps from well off people, .. wouldn't half the quilts come from the south and from slave owners.

Or is there a widely disparate amount of Northern quilts compared with southern quilts that survived the war.

Just curious?? or am I missing the point?? Suzy

In answer to your questions, which are good ones: One reason I was curious was that the mention of "black slave owners" would make a quilt extremely exceptional. You don't hear of black slave owners. There may have been a few in the Carribean. I haven't researched it. But that would certainly be a factor to consider in establishing date and provenance, wouldn't it?

As for Northern vs Southern quilt survival. I believe it has been established that more quilts survived from the North than from the South during this era because of the relatively successful blockade of Southern ports. That plus the difficulty of getting goods over land during the war. New fabric was extremely hard to come by and expensive in the South during that terrible time. The "scorched earth" tactics of General Sherman as he cut a long and wide swath though the heart of the deep South and the success of the blockades meant that for many years after the war any commodities that survived were used up. There wasn't any money to buy anything. There wasn't much of anything to buy. And it took many years to replant, rebuild, and reestablish an economy.

Lessons about which I wish we didn't have to keep being reminded!

Have a beautiful Easter morning, Kathy Moore Lincoln, NE

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Subject: Re: A Memorial Quilt From: Carol Bikofsky <bikorcn.com> Date: Sat, 10 Apr 2004 21:34:28 -0400 X-Message-Number: 15

The author is Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832). The quotation is part of a poem entitled "The Lay of the Last Minstrel".

carol

 

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Subject: Re: Suzy's questions From: "Quiltstuff" <quiltstuffoptusnet.com.au> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 13:52:35 +1000 X-Message-Number: 1

Oh, I see... are they talking about a black person who owned slaves?? as opposed to a person who owned black slaves. ( BTW sorry if these are not politically correct terms for this day and age.. I would not like to offend anyone )

If so, I would think that would in itself being highly rare.

Suzy > > In answer to your questions, which are good ones: One reason I was curious > was that the mention of "black slave owners" would make a quilt extremely > exceptional. You don't hear of black slave owners. There may have been a few > in the Carribean. I haven't researched it. But that would certainly be a > factor to consider in establishing date and provenance, wouldn't it?

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Subject: Antique Roadshow quilt/ Black Slave Owner From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Sat, 10 Apr 2004 21:39:00 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

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Regarding the issue of black slave owners--there were a few in Louisiana pre Civil War, believe it or not. And I think in Texas as well. But the quilt on Antique Roadshow was supposedly made by a slave--which is also a rarity. Although it is claimed that slaves made many quilts, few surviving quilts are documented to actual slaves as opposed to former slaves (like Harriet Powers--my favorite 19th Century quilter)

Also, no one has written in with why they think the Antique Roadshop was a Pine Burr pattern. I still would like to know--it really isn't Double Pineapple as I stated it was close to. Double Pineapple has a nine patch center and the one on Antique Roadshow had a Crossroads center; so it may be a untique pattern.

Please write in with your Pine Burr source--pattern sources are of great interest to me.

Thanks, Don Beld

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Subject: Book Recommendation From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 08:45:12 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Don Beld wrote:

/Although it is claimed that slaves made many quilts, few surviving quilts are documented to actual slaves as opposed to former slaves (like Harriet Powers--my favorite 19th Century quilter)./

Dear Don:

Let me recommend the book, Stitched from the Soul: Slave Quilts from the Antebellum South by Gladys-Marie Fry. I think that you will find it to be an eye-opening experience. There are many quilts and other textiles that have clear links to having been slave-made in the pre-Civil War era, as proven by the number of color photos and information in this beautiful book.

The author is "Professor Emerita of Folklore and English at the University of Maryland at College Park". She has curated "more than a dozen" exhibitions, and has written other books and show catalogues.

The book is a wonderful tribute to the African American tradition of quiltmaking and came about when the author wanted to learn more about her great-great grandmother who was a slave and a seamstress. It is well worth the look.

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Subject: My Native Land From: "Sondra Biacchi" <quiltepix.net> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 08:22:33 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

Sue...Lovely poem by Sir Walter Scott follows- My Native Land Poem lyrics of My Native Land by Sir Walter Scott.

Breathes there the man, with soul so dead, Who never to himself hath said, This is my own, my native land! Whose heart hath ne'er within him burn'd, As home his footsteps he hath turn'd From wandering on a foreign strand! If such there breathe, go, mark him well; For him no Minstrel raptures swell; High though his titles, proud his name, Boundless his wealth as wish can claim; Despite those titles, power, and pelf, The wretch, concentred all in self, Living, shall forfeit fair renown, And, doubly dying, shall go down To the vile dust, from whence he sprung, Unwept, unhonour'd, and unsung

Sandra Biacchi

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Subject: Pine Burr Pattern References From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 11:36:13 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Dear Don:

I looked through just a few of my pattern indexes this morning, trying to find a match between any pattern with a published name of "Pine Burr" and the tiny image of a portion of the quilt in question (the image of which I printed from the Antiques Roadshow website). I have not found an exact duplicate.

You are right. The center is very unusual. This may be a one-of-a-kind "Pine Burr" variation.

In this instance, the largest obstacle to researchers is the lack of a "paper trail", that is, printed sources from the era that we could turn to for reference. The appraiser probably mentioned the name "Pine Burr" because it was the closest configuration she could find. The common factors of many of the blocks called "Pine Burr" that I found in print center (on point) areas, with a square included within the square. The four corners have varying configurations.

For example, in the Carrie Hall Blocks book, a large triangle in each corner is surrounded by sets of half-square triangles, in light and dark colors. The Encyclopedia of Pieced Patterns, #2440, shows the same design. Note that Hall was a twentieth century block collector. The other "Pine Burr" pattern in that book was published by Clara Stone, also an early twentieth century entity in the quilt world (designer).

Page 85 of the Illustrated Index to Traditional American Quilt Patterns shows the same configuration. The recent pattern index, The Quilter's Block Bible, does not list the pattern at all. Yvonne Khin's index presents a variation called "The Pine Burr" and published by the Kansas City Star. It features the same idea of half-square triangles. The center has "corners" added. It is still not at all like the image of the Roadshow quilt block.

Of course, the preoccupation with naming quilt blocks is a late nineteenth/early twentieth century phenomenon. It is anyone's guess, really, what the block or quilt was called by its maker, or if it was given a specific name at all.

I guess if you would like to make it, you may end up drafting your own pattern.

I will let you know if I find out anything more definitive.

Pat Cummings www.quiltersmuse.com

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Subject: Clarification From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 11:49:37 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Dear friends:

Sometimes my writing amazes even me.... I should say the typos. I will try again with the following sentence:

Stupid Sentence:

/The common factors of many of the blocks called "Pine Burr" that I found in print center (on point) areas, with a square included within the square. The four corners have varying configurations./

Improved Information:

Please read: In many of the print sources, I found that blocks called "Pine Burr" have center (on point) areas, featuring a square within a square. In some instances, instead of half-square triangles and a large center triangle extending to each corner, that entire configuration has been replaced with isoceles trapezoids and fewer triangles. (Please don't ask which book I saw that in...I don't remember!!).

Hope you are all having a great Easter!! In between e-mails, I am quilting up a storm. :)

Pat

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Subject: Quote from historian Catherine Clinton From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 12:56:44 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

/Don wrote: Regarding the issue of black slave owners--there were a few in Louisiana pre Civil War, believe it or not. And I think in Texas as well.

/Dear friends,/

/In the book: /Harriet Tubman: The Road to Freedom/ (Little, Brown & Company, 2004), the author states the following on page 7:/

The children of the earliest Africans in the North American colonies were not always born into bondage. Some blacks came as sailors and explorers. Others came as indentured laborers later granted their freedom. A few of these went on to own slaves themselves. But free blacks continued in the minority.....

/Catherine Clinton holds an undergraduate degree in Afro-American Studies from Harvard and a Ph.D.in history from Princeton. Her book is excellent!/ /

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Subject: Re: Quote from historian Catherine Clinton From: aol.com Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 13:10:32 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

I recall that there was an article on black slave owners in American Heritage about ten years ago. I don't remember much about it, but it confirmed that some free blacks owned slaves, and didn't treat them much differently from the white slave owners when it came to breaking up families, discipline, and so on. Some of the black slave owners fought on the Confederate side in the Civil War, too.

An interesting but ultimately sad footnote in history....

Karen Evans

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Subject: assorted topics From: "Charlotte Bull" <charloumo-net.com> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 14:50:13 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

Hi...by the time I get the Digest most questions have been answered. But I wanted to share a thought re the quote from Sir Walter Scott. I have found Bartlett's book of Familiar Quotations a very fine asset to looking up various quotes! I used it years ago as a lit major and I've never stopped using it! A marvelous all inclusive source. It included a full page of verses from "The Lay of the Last Minstrel" - a very lengthy bit of poetic writing! I'm glad I looked it up although I told myself that I bet there'd be at least 3 0R 4 correct answers. And there were!

And for the new friend who said she was intimidated. Don't be hesitant! We are ALL in the LEARNING process. Every one who answers a question helps us all, but those who ask questions also help us as we are often eager to know something and are pleased to find it answered just a few letters down in the digest! And sometimes even those with answers need to learn more about an aspect that is not in their normal bailiwick. So speak up...it does let the "experts" know that they are needed!!! : )))

I recall a 3 day seminar I attended almost 20 years ago for those interested in antique quilts from a museum curator's point of view or for those eager to understand their own collections. One guest speaker was an experienced scholarly southern lady. She told us that the exceptional, involved heirloom quilts were made by the ladies of the plantation. They did teach their slaves to quilt, but their efforts were mostly for the utility quilts of the children and family or for the slaves themselves. She told us that an exceptionally talented slave would be brought in to work on the fancy heirlooms, but that the wife of their owner probably did the planning and designing since she was the one who bought the good fabrics for it and had learned needlecraft from her youth.

Somehow the speaker seemed to make sense. If I were teaching 3 children to quilt, I would not start them out on a Baltimore Album Applique or a chintz Tree of Life done in Broiderie Perse. I'd do what my own grandmother did - teach her 9 year old girl to make a Nine Patch quilt from scraps left from making of shirts and dresses. And this is the "provence" of one of my own family quilts. Not heirloom quality but definitely heirloom memories!!! My mother made a Nine Patch when she turned 9! So my quilt is 102 years old but the fabrics are older. While my mother was learning, my grandmother set together blocks made prior to 1871 by her husband's mother! Quilt stories are precious. SAVE THEM as well as the quilts! These are the quilts my daughters can hardly wait to get - not mine! Those will (I hope) be valued more by my own great grand babies!

And yesterday I started an adult beginner on her first efforts: a 4 Patch made from 3" squares with alternate blocks. She'll be ready for fancy blocks soon but she needed to start out simple as she has no books or magazines or stash --- yet! : )))

Have a Happy Easter! cb

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Subject: Road Show quilt From: "Pepper Cory" <pepcorymail.clis.com> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 16:22:12 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

For Don and all others interested in my remark that the Road Show quilt was a Pine Burr pattern. My writing on QHL was the day after the Road Show and before I'd seen any posted digital pictures that might 'remind' me of the quilt's pattern. And Don's right--the nine-patch in the center of the Double Pineapple is similar to the cross that was in the Road Show quilt. Pine Burr is an old Southern pattern and is listed on the same page as Double Pineapple in the Brackman book. I was looking mainly at the "spikey" legs of the star and they're the same for Pine Burr and Double Pineapple. Both Pine Burr (which means Pine Cone in southern dialect) and Double Pineapple are four-legged variations on Feathered Star. Brackman lists the date for Double Pineapple as 1931 and the Clara Stone source for Pine Burr is 1906. I'll never argue quilt names with anyone because naming patterns is an inexact science and folks changed them all the time! Have a happy Easter- Pepper

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Subject: Rare but not impossible. From: "Pepper Cory" <pepcorymail.clis.com> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 16:30:58 -0400 X-Message-Number: 11

On the subject of slave owners who were themselves black: when I was a teenager in South Carolina in the 1960's, my Dad was an Episcopalian minister. He had both a white and a black church in Sumter, SC and was a circuit rider for smaller churches who could not afford to hire a minister on a full-time basis. He sometimes preached and held services at an all-black Episcopal church way out in the country. Almost every member of the congregation had the last name of Prince Edward. Dad was told that their mutual ancestor had been a slave who had bought his own freedom and then migrated away from Charleston into the deep piney woods. He had named himself Prince Edward and owned slaves himself. Seeing as how some slaves would have come from parts of Africa where slave owning was common for any man of property, I can understand how a black slave owner, though rare, was a possibility. I know this is oral history, as opposed to anything that has a paper trail, but I myself attended the Prince Edward church with my father. Cheers from the Carolina coast- Pepper

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Subject: re: Slave Ownership in Africa From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 16:58:23 -0400 X-Message-Number: 12

Thanks, Pepper for posting the remembrances of your family's experiences in the south, and for the knowledge that "pine cone" is called "pine burr" there. Oral tradition, based on personal witnessing, can be as valid a part of history as any other.

Also, thanks for the following thought:

/Seeing as how some slaves would have come from parts of Africa where slave owning was common for any man of property, I can understand how a black slave owner, though rare, was a possibility/.

You are also 110% correct about the naming of quilt blocks. There is no point in being didactic about the subject, as quiltmakers are and were free to name their quilt any which name. I couldn't remember exactly, but seemed to think that the appraiser had tagged the block in question with the name, "Pine Burr".

I would be interested to see what items are serving as written provenance for this quilt and how detailed the descriptions are. It certainly does seem rare if the quilt was both slave-made and later owned by a black slave-owner, but I suppose not outside the realm of possibility.

Thanks, Pepper.

Pat Cummings

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Subject: Calico and Chintz Catalog From: "Kathy Moore" <KathyMooreneb.rr.com> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 16:43:46 -0500 X-Message-Number: 13

I'd love to have a copy of the catalog. Count me in if someone will buy and send. Just let me know!

Kathy Moore Lincoln, NE

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Subject: Addendum to Calico and Chintz Catalog From: "Kathy Moore" <KathyMooreneb.rr.com> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 16:49:28 -0500 X-Message-Number: 14

Whoa, Nellie. Did you say it's selling for $75?

This is a reprint of a book that originally sold for about $25 at the Smithsonian and at venues the quilts were originally exhibited. It's a fabulous book and worth having, but the one now available is a reprint. I'd be willing to bet you can contact the Smithsonian Book Store and get a copy.

I'll do a little research and let ya'll know.

Kathy Moore Lincoln, NE

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Subject: slave quilts From: Gail Ingram <gingramtcainternet.com> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 11:44:34 -0500 X-Message-Number: 15

May I second the recommendation of the Gladys Marie Fry book? Frankly, I've never sought out the writer's credentials, but the work is documented as well as works involving slaves can be, it seems. And it is valuable for the way it makes the world of slavery real. There is one photo in there that is iconic: it could represent the entire institution. Alexander Pope's words always spring to my mind: "man's inhumanity to man."

And on the subject of black slaveholders (just to push Pope a little further), Louisiana had a good many, considering the general population. Most originated in New Orleans area. Most probably came from French colonies in the Gulf of Mexico, a number grew out of the octaroon tradition in New Orleans. My understanding is that most had more "white blood" than black. They were race apart.

Some moved north into Central Louisiana, along the Red River just south of Shreveport. One of the unique populations, even today, is Isle Brevelle, near Natchitouches (Nack-i-tosh), LA (where "Steel Magnolias" was filmed). Near there is the plantation Melrose, where the folk artist Clementine Hunter lived and worked under the auspices of Ms. Cammie Henry. It has one of the only--possibly the only--documented nad extant African-origin buildings in American.

Melrose was built and owned by a free Creole (read: legally black) family, the Metoyers, who were from New Orleans. They were highly cultivated, wealthy, and were also major slaveholders. Looking at the paintings of the early family, one can scarcely detect African features. They did not appear to socialize with the white population, but they were highly respected, as their progeny still are, and they worked cooperatively with white plantation owners on issues of slave uprisings or agricultural issues.

Gary Mills' book, "The Forgotten People," is a fine and easy-read introduction to this settlement. LSU Press, which happily sends brochures of is listings, has several other good books on the general subject.

While it was not exactly rare for white slaveholders to mate with their slaves, I think Louisiana might stand slightly apart in the tradition. Actual cohabitation occurred and children were acknowledged both legally and within the community in a number of cases. The French appear to have been much more relaxed in this than other groups, particularly the "Anglos."

I once was stunned to have a friend who was white state officer in the Education Dept, from South Louisiana, sit at my table and say quite casually, "Of course, all our grandfathers had black mistresses of longstanding"---the way one would say, "Of course, August is always hot in Louisiana.. Someone of English origin would not have said that---probably could not have said that truthfully---in this state. I was amused later when he was made Supt of Schools in a 90% African-American school district along River Road near Baton Rouge to see that despite that tradition, he ha had to survive amost 9 months of protest by the local population because of his color.

I think in the South it is sometimes hard to tell when a quilt was made by a slave (even Frye raises some questions in my mind) because so much fine sewing was cooperative. The tradition of making a top and having it quilted by someone else is still very much alive here---and usually, only the maker of the top is acknowledged.

Gail

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Subject: Black slave owners From: QuiltsRIaol.com Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 22:21:01 -0400 X-Message-Number: 16

Concerning the recent questions about black slave owners, my book club recently read "The Known World" by Edward P. Jones. It is a novel set in Manchester County VA 20 years before the Civil War about a former slave who becomes proprietor of his own plantation with 33 slaves of his own. I assumed it was based on a fact that there were black slave owners in the ante bellum South.

Perhaps I should do some research and not make assumptions. Cathy Smith

 

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Subject: Pine Burr again From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 21:46:14 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

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Hey Pat, thanks for your posts--I have indeed read Stitches in Time and agree with you that it is a fine book--However, documented quilts made by slaves in pre Civil War South are unusual and are treasures.

Regarding the Pine Burr--thanks for agreeing with me that the Antique Roadshow quilt is not exactly a Pine Burr, but something slightly different.

I still lean towards it having sometime of UGGR significance--the center Crossroads pattern appears on a number of pre Civil War quilts and was a favorite of Harriet Powers. I also think that the Pine Burr in the Antique Roadshow could also be seen as Cross Canoes and the entire quilt have some hidden meaning. MMMM!! Perhaps there is a book there--Perhaps I could call it Hidden in Plain Canoes (smile) Well Off to England to see the REAL Log Cabin quilts--called Roof Pattern over there. TaTa as the British would say. Don Beld

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Subject: memorial quilt poem From: Laura Robins-Morris <lrobinsfhcrc.org> Date: Mon, 12 Apr 2004 08:03:02 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

Am I the only one who had to look up the word "pelf" ? This list is great -- we learn not only history of quilts, social history, etc, etc, but also interesting vocabulary. I'm still waiting to sneak "bedizened" (from a few months ago) into a normal conversation <g>. Now pelf as well.

"I will bedizen myself with silks and jewels, displays of the pelf of my iniquitous ancestors." Now there's the start of a good bodice-ripper!

Laura in Seattle

The Oxford Book of English Verse: 1250–1900.

Sir Walter Scott. 1771–1832

547. Patriotism 1. Innominatus

BREATHES there the man with soul so dead, Who never to himself hath said, 'This is my own, my native land!' Whose heart hath ne'er within him burn'd As home his footsteps he hath turn'd From wandering on a foreign strand? If such there breathe, go, mark him well; For him no Minstrel raptures swell; High though his titles, proud his name, Boundless his wealth as wish can claim; Despite those titles, power, and pelf, The wretch, concentred all in self, Living, shall forfeit fair renown, And, doubly dying, shall go down To the vile dust from whence he sprung, Unwept, unhonour'd, and unsung.

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Subject: Re: memorial quilt poem From: "Sally Ward" <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Mon, 12 Apr 2004 16:27:51 +0100 X-Message-Number: 3

> Am I the only one who had to look up the word "pelf" ?

I'll put my hand up <G>. And since I like connections I was intrigued to be pointed from there in the direction of 'pilfer', a word still in common use.

Sally W

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Subject: Exhibition Catalog Availability Issues- Calico & Chintz From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> Date: Mon, 12 Apr 2004 11:47:08 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

/I'd love to have a copy of the catalog. Count me in if someone will buy and send. Just let me know!/

Kathy Moore Lincoln, NE

This morning, I checked the online store of the Smithsonian Art Museum. There are no copies of the /Calico & Chintz/ book in sight.

In writing to the museum directly, I was told that the final two venues for the exhibit will be:

June 26 - August 29, 2004: The Hermitage, Nashville, TN

Sept. 19 - Nov. 21, 2004 Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, OH

These apparently are the only remaining chances to purchase a catalogue of the exhibition without paying a higher price on the secondary market.

Pat Cummings

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Subject: SQ & Barb Garrett From: <chrisajetlink.net> Date: Mon, 12 Apr 2004 09:40:51 -0700 X-Message-Number: 5

Barb Garret will be on SQ on Wed. in case you haven't seen her episode before. It's good! We see many of the mini-quilts she has made to reproduce Mennonite styles, as well as learn about their history.

"Mennonite vs. Amish Quilts Host Alex Anderson is joined in the studio by quilt expert Barbara Garrett to discuss the varying styles of Mennonite quilts vs. Amish quilts. Garrett has examples of both quilt types on hand. Afterward, Garrett shows how to make a traditional Mennonite pattern, Joseph's Coat of Many Colors. Learn which kinds of fabric to use, the dimensions to cut, and how to assemble the quilt top. Garrett discusses batting and border options, and talks about what quilt designs to use."

Today's SQ show was very interesting. IMHO. A woman quilter from Guatemala, Pricilla Bianchi, showed costumes from the region and how they have influenced her quilts. She has helped bring quiltmaking to her region. She uses many different ethnic fabrics together with the beautiful woven fabrics native to Guat. to make her quilts. They are very bright, often in simple repetitive blocks, but the variety of fabrics she uses, with many large scale motifs, make stunning quilts unlike others that may use the same design principles. She made a version of the lone star (my words, not hers) that was made complex and undulating by the fabrics and stripes she used.

Kim Wulfert www.antiquequiltdating.com

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Subject: Pricilla Bianchi From: <chrisajetlink.net> Date: Mon, 12 Apr 2004 09:50:17 -0700 X-Message-Number: 6

Her quilts can be seen on the HGTV site and she has her own website, patterns and a book too. The star quilt can be seen if you scroll down near the end of HGTV's site.

http://www.hgtv.com/hgtv/cr_quilting/article/0,1789,HGTV_3298_2754629,00.htm l

Quilt patterns - Reflections, Stretched Diamond Star, Rain Forest Book - Easy to Make Art Quilts by Priscilla Bianchi

www.priscillabianchi.com

Kim

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Subject: Kind of off topic but interesting From: Mary Persyn <Mary.Persynvalpo.edu> Date: Mon, 12 Apr 2004 14:50:12 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

One of my farmer cousins sent me an Easter Bonnet - a gimme cap with "Quilt TM Fungicide" embroidered on it.

Several interesting possibilities relating to old quilts stored in damp locations crossed my mind, but since Del raises vegetables and grass seed for a living, I decided those possibilities were probably inaccurate.

A little web surfing turned up the following:

http://www.dealerandapplicator.com/home/pressrelease/press_quilt.asp

FWIW,

Mary

-- Mary G. Persyn 219-465-7830 Associate Dean for Library Services School of Law Library Valparaiso University 656 S. Greenwich St. Valparaiso, IN 46383 Mary.Persynvalpo.edu Fax: 219-465-7917

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Subject: roadshow quilt From: "Laurette Carroll" <rl.carrollverizon.net> Date: Mon, 12 Apr 2004 13:44:40 -0700 X-Message-Number: 8

> I would be interested to see what items are serving as written > provenance for this quilt and how detailed the descriptions are. It > certainly does seem rare if the quilt was both slave-made and later > owned by a black slave-owner, but I suppose not outside the realm of > possibility. > Pat Cummings

Hello, I too, would be interested in more information about this quilts provenance. Does anyone know to which exhibit held at the Smithsonian the article on the PBS site refers. To all appearances this quilt looks like it was made later in the 19th C, rather than 1840's - 50's. Also, the PBS article, states that the owner of the quilt gives the information that it was made by slaves, not that the slave owner was Black. Am I missing something? Where did the Black slave owner information come from?

Laurette Carroll Southern California

Look to the Future With Hope

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Subject: Slavery From: KareQuiltaol.com Date: Mon, 12 Apr 2004 17:12:18 EDT X-Message-Number: 9

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Alas, 150 boxes of books are already packed for the move to Washington State, among them a number of books on this subject written by both African American and Caucasian historians. The story of the first blacks (free and not free) that came to the shores of America before slavery "officially" began is very fascinating. But I am afraid I won't have access to that part of my library again until mind-June! If I recall some of the titles, I will post those later. (No, I must confess, my quilt history books are not yet packed. Those will be the last items I pack!

Karen Alexander

PS: Has anyone on this list entered The Quilters Hall of Fame Grand Opening Block Contest yet? There are less than two months left to enter! :=} I would love to see QHL well represented in this contest!! You can access a pdf version of the entry form at http://www.quiltershalloffame.org/

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Subject: Re: Kind of off topic but interesting From: Laura Syler <texas_quilt.coairmail.net> Date: Mon, 12 Apr 2004 17:18:00 -0500 X-Message-Number: 10

Mary, this makes me wonder ...They have trademarked the word "Quilt" according to the article on the website.......So,.in the grand scheme of things, with "The Donald" facing a law suite if he went ahead with trademarking the phrase "You're Fired".....where does that leave the rest of us using the word Quilt in business names, or titles? May be nothing, but in this lawsuit happy world, it is an interesting thought. Do we still have any attorneys on QHL? Laura Syler Texas "Quilt" Co. Certified "Quilt" appraiser in Chilly N. Texas..

Mary Persyn wrote:

> One of my farmer cousins sent me an Easter Bonnet - a gimme cap with > "Quilt TM Fungicide" embroidered on it. > > Several interesting possibilities relating to old quilts stored in damp > locations crossed my mind, but since Del raises vegetables and grass > seed for a living, I decided those possibilities were probably inaccurate. > > A little web surfing turned up the following: > > http://www.dealerandapplicator.com/home/pressrelease/press_quilt.asp > > FWIW, > > Mary > > -- > Mary G. Persyn 219-465-7830 > Associate Dean for Library Services > School of Law Library > Valparaiso University > 656 S. Greenwich St. > Valparaiso, IN 46383 > Mary.Persynvalpo.edu > Fax: 219-465-7917 > > --- > You are currently subscribed to qhl as: texas_quilt.coairmail.net. > To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1514145Nlyris.quiltropolis.com

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Subject: re: more info. needed on roadshow quilt From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> Date: Mon, 12 Apr 2004 19:13:34 -0400 X-Message-Number: 11

Laurette Carroll wrote:

...To all appearances this quilt looks like it was made later in the 19th C, rather than 1840's - 50's. Also, the PBS article, states that the owner of the quilt gives the information that it was made by slaves, not that the slave owner was Black. Am I missing something? Where did the Black slave owner information come from?

Laurette Carroll Southern California

Dear Laurette:

Below are contact links for the Smithsonian. We might be able to find out more information directly from them about the slave made quilt that was on the Antiques Roadshow. Someone on this list mentioned that it was slave-owned. I did not catch that directly from the show itself. In fact, "black" used as an adjective is getting mighty confusing. Witness the recent incident where "black historian" did not mean a person of color, but rather any historian of black history.

I have ordered the Jubilee book, as mentioned on this list, that is reported to have the quilt pictured on the cover. Perhaps there is even a tiny bit of information about the quilt there. Failing that, we could see if the Smithsonian has any catalogues still available from their exhibit, and which exhibit featured the quilt. If only we knew who to contact, more questions could be asked about provenance documentation. In the meantime, I hope the following information is useful to all who are interested.

Pat Cummings

Smithsonian:

The exhibit schedule can be viewed at:

http://americanart.si.edu/highlights/itinerary.cfm?id=CC and information on books can be viewed at: http://americanart.si.edu/museum_info/onlineshop/index.cfm If you have any further questions, please direct them to the "contact" source at our website: http://americanart.si.edu/index3.cfm

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Subject: re: Guatemalan woven fabrics From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> Date: Mon, 12 Apr 2004 21:27:07 -0400 X-Message-Number: 12

Dear Kim:

Thanks for the nice links. Isn't Guatemalan fabric grand? It is so bright and colorful!

I would like to recommend a book called The Textiles of Guatemala by Regis Bertrand and Danielle Magne (London: Studio Editions, 1991). This volume has some very interesting information about how weaving was developed by the ancient Mayas, and historic notes about Guatemala's heritage and people. There are extensive, large color photos including the landscape, the people, and lots of close-ups of the woven cloth.

Knowing of my interest in Guatemalan textiles, my sister found some in her travels. I used a piece that she sent me to fashion a doll's dress for small, black doll that needed better attire. I love the end result.

It is great that we now know of an online source for this kind of cloth, thanks to you, Kim. Wish I hadn't missed that episode of Simply Quilts. Now that it only is shown on TV here, early in the morning when I am usually busy with other things, I hardly ever see it again. Good thing I already saw Barb--that was a great show!

Thanks for the post, Kim.

Pat Cummings

 

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Subject: quilt to be auctioned 4/20 From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Tue, 13 Apr 2004 09:41:44 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

There's a major auction of an antique dealer's stock coming up at William H. Bunch Auctions, 11 a.m. at the Bunch gallery in Chadds Ford, PA. Included is a "betrothal quilt" from NJ, plus others. Website www.williambunchauctions.com -- you can see all the quilts (fraktur and other goodies too) to be sold if you click through to the 4/20 auction and scroll down. Candace Perry

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Subject: Trade marked word quilt From: Mary Persyn <Mary.Persynvalpo.edu> Date: Tue, 13 Apr 2004 09:25:18 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Dear Laura & QHLers,

I'm no expert in trademark law (and our expert isn't here today), but I think the company would have a problem trying to keep others from using the word "quilt." For one thing, it's been in common usage for hundreds of years, for another, we don't use it in referring to agricultural chemicals.

I just looked up a book we have from Nolo Press, Patent, Copyright & Trademark: An Intellectual Property Desk Reference 6th ed., which says that generics, which describe an entire group or class of goods or services such as computer, eyeglasses and eBook, cannot be trademarked.

Their use of Quilt seems to be a combination of two products

> Tilt® and Quadris® fungicides

which I can see them being able to tradmark for their particular purpose. What I can't see is them giving anybody else any trouble.

My $.02. I'm sure we have some QHL members with more knowledge than I.

Mary

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Subject: Re: quilt to be auctioned 4/20 From: "Judy Kelius (judysue)" 

Thanks Candace! I was surprised to see a quilt which I think is one I lusted for when it was at one of the local antiques malls near me in Lancaster County - the Carolina Lily, #207 - I wasn't allowed to take a photo when I saw it so I've saved these photos to my computer!! I love the unusual use of scrap print fabrics and the setting.

 



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