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Quilters Find a way to care

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Subject: re Everyday Use From: Gail Ingram <gingramtcainternet.com> Date: 

This story embodies the importance of quilts and family and tradition better than any I know.

And they're southern quilts, probably not "bought goods" but it's the love that went into them and the time that preserved the maker. And Mama finally does the right thing.

That the educated but ignorant sister would dispaarage "everyday use" tells all.

Gail

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Subject: RE: oral history From: "Jocelyn Martin" <jocelynmdelphiforums.com> Date: Tue, 13 Apr 2004 23:30:33 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

>I know this is oral history, as opposed to anything that has a paper trail,

Not that oral history is without value. :)The catch is, memory is transient. Any one of us can be presenting a 'fact' with good intent, but still be dead wrong. :) If you want an interesting exercise sometime, try interviewing a sibling who is several years older/younger than yourself, about events that happened in your family. It's fascinating, what you 'know' that they don't. I've gone back and read journal entries that described events that are not at all as I remember them. Memory in our heads, as well as on our computers, is constantly being re-written.

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Subject: sorry to bother everyone... From: "Jocelyn Martin" <jocelynmdelphiforums.com> Date: Tue, 13 Apr 2004 23:43:10 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

But will the Karen who was offering her 1930s fabric for sale please contact me? Every time I try to email you, it bounces back.

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Subject: special request From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Wed, 14 Apr 2004 07:29:30 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

Hi everyone! I am fairly new to this digest and really don't have allot to contribute, as I am here to learn from people who I perceive to be "experts". My knowledge doesn't hold a candle to most of you. Yet, I try, and I am "getting there" in terms of learning about older quilts. As I can't really afford to buy lots of antique quilts, what I like to do is research and reproduce them. I read and appreciate what you all have to say, and have to admit that some of it is over my head. But, I will "get there". My reason for writing you today is personal. Collectively, you more than likely possess a very large concentration of old quilts, and have seen many more. Long before I ever became a quilter, myself, and took an interest in older quilts and really appreciated things, my mother had a yard sale. She sold the quilts that my grandmother made. Though she offered them to my sister and I, we both didn't want them (what fools!) at that time. We were both young (in our early 20s) and old quilts just weren't our "thing". It would mean so much to me to even SEE (in person or by photo) just one of those quilts. I would love to make a reproduction of one of her quilts, if I could actually FIND one. It would be wonderful to know that it still existed and that someone was caring for them and appreciating them. I was wondering if any of you have come across a quilt, or quilts, made (she may not even have ever signed her quilts) by a woman named Helen Jacobs (her maiden name) or Helen Derry or Helen Jacobs Derry. Her middle name was Louise as well. Helen's quilts were made in Massachusetts, specifically Hyde Park MA and were sold at a yard sale in Randolph MA, probably about 25+ years ago. They could have changed hands several times since then, and could be just about anywhere. Her quilts would have dated from about 1920 though about the late 1950s, when I think she stopped quilting and went "on" to rug hooking. Helen belonged to the Baptist Church in Hyde Park MA and worked with a quilting group there and I believe they made group project quilts to benefit the church as well, her name might have beeon on a signature type of quilt from that church? I do own one doll quilt that she made from old "housedresses" for me in about 1960 and even have fond memories of putting this quilt over my dolls and wheeling them around in my doll carriage. I also do own my grandmother's old quilting hoop as well, which has been broken and mended. But, to actually see one of her quilts and know it still exists would be something I would value for a lifetime. So, if her name jogs one of your memories, I would love to hear about it and perhaps get a photo if one of you has a quilt of hers. Thanks if you can help, Linda Heminway (maiden name Linda Helen Derry, named for HER) Plaistow NH

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Subject: Re: special request From: Midnitelaptopaol.com Date: Wed, 14 Apr 2004 07:47:34 EDT X-Message-Number: 5

linda please post and tell us if you ever get any info about your grandmother's quilts... jeanL

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Subject: Re: special request From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Wed, 14 Apr 2004 08:19:44 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Jean said: linda please post and tell us if you ever get any info about your grandmother's quilts... jeanL

I will gladly post, if I do hear anything. Hey, you never know! It would be so wonderful to have one or more of her quilts made known to our family, somehow, even if in the form of a photo. As I make reproductions, it would be really cool to try to reproduce one of hers. I really believe in the power of coincidences! My post was a "long shot", but you never know! I've heard bizarre stories of twins separated at birth being reunited through some chance meeting, or a chance mutual friend. So, if things like that can happen, one of Helen Derry's quilts might actually be known to someone on this digest! It's entirely possible that my grandmother did sign her quilts, or at least a few signature squares somewhere along the line (I sure have!) and someone right on this digest might very well have one of these quilts tucked away or displayed! Displayed and loved would be MY choice, of course! Incidentally, just some "trivia". My grandmother, was actually the great granddaughter of Edwin Booth (owner, actor and manager of The Booth Theater) and brother of John Wilkes Booth, who killed Abraham Lincoln. The family was so embarrassed and kept this a secret until well after my grandmother was dead. We find it "interesting" nowadays, that's all. But, a quilt made by her was from a "historic" family! : ) Thanks for your interest! Linda Heminway

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Subject: Re: special request From: NewmanQuiltShopaol.com Date: Wed, 14 Apr 2004 08:41:27 EDT X-Message-Number: 7

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Hello, Just read your note and was thinking about my Grandmother's quilts that are out in my building. I did reproduce one for my daughter's wedding and sent another to one of my daughters. I have reproduced several antique quilts and in fact nearly all the quilt I have made for books that I have in print are reproductions of some time period. You might want to reproduce some from AQAS books that I have done. They are string pieced quilts with style, vertical quilts with style, charm quilts with style and quilts from nine blocks. YOu could also study a lot of quilts in Vintage Quilts a price guide for quilts.

I do a wonderful two day class on detecing the date and I also do a lecture on 200 years of quiltmaking. If I can answer any questions please contact me at NewmanQuiltShopa0l.com

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Subject: Re: special request From: Gail Ingram <gingramtcainternet.com> Date: Wed, 14 Apr 2004 07:57:15 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

Linda,

I'd hang in there. See if your local paper will do a feature and if not, take out a small add. Make posters and place them wherever your town permits.

After decades (DECADES!!!) of searching for a special quilt top made by a great grandmother, I discovered it on eBay (see Study Group, DSQSG on Kris' site).

Hope floats!

Gail

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: April 13, 2004 From: "Charlotte Bull" <charloumo-net.com> Date: Wed, 14 Apr 2004 08:47:04 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

I know nothing legal...but I have common sense and a sense of humor. I think Mary is right in her assessment of copyright on "quilt" as a product name and how the name was formulated, but I can imagine the uproar if the entire quilt world learns of this. Just think of the stink that went up over the bad ad on the "quilted TT" - remember, they were at quilting frame quilting with knitting needles, or was it crochet hooks? Anyway we gave them a rough time until they corrected the ad and now they are a big contributor money-wise to certain quilt shows!!! They'll never live it down. I think it's a tad funny that not one of the brilliant guys at the ag company caught the possibilities. Why QUILT magazine could take them to court? How in the world did it pass the copyright authorities. It is generic word but it is also a long time name of that magazine and as title for books. What is relationship of book titles as far as copyright laws? Any info?

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: April 13, 2004 From: Mary Persyn <Mary.Persynvalpo.edu> Date: Wed, 14 Apr 2004 09:31:29 -0500 X-Message-Number: 10

Book titles are not copyright-able.

Charlotte Bull wrote:

> What is relationship of >book titles as far as copyright laws? Any info? > > >--- > >

-- Mary G. Persyn 219-465-7830 Associate Dean for Library Services School of Law Library Valparaiso University 656 S. Greenwich St. Valparaiso, IN 46383 Mary.Persynvalpo.edu Fax: 219-465-7917

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Subject: chintz and calico From: "Crandall Associates" <rcrandalmaine.rr.com> Date: Wed, 14 Apr 2004 10:46:45 -0400 X-Message-Number: 11

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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Here's the scoop from the Portland Museum of Art. I was there  yesterday, bought a book for myself. They will sell one person 5  copies. They will not divulge how many copies they have....but there  were probably 10 of each (soft/hard) on the counter yesterday. I WILL  go back and get one for you. Trish...you are all set I believe. Kathy  Moore, I have your order for a soft cover. Prices are 55.00/75.00. I  ran in and out of the museum shop, did not view the exhibit yet. I will  need your snail mails and I will email each with the total cost  including posting. I will send priority and insure. Book rate takes  forever. It is a great book. By the way Trish, they were just  unpacking your book "Amish Quilts" so if anyone does not have that yet I  can pick it up also. Not sure of the price. I bought mine in Lancaster  last week. It is a great one also. Waiting to jump in my car if the orders roll in! It is a rainy  day..beats housecleaning! Carole in Maine

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Subject: chintz and calico From: "Crandall Associates" <rcrandalmaine.rr.com> Date: Wed, 14 Apr 2004 10:50:44 -0400 X-Message-Number: 12

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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My phone number is 207-641-2401 or 207-408-8926 but I will keep checking  my email. Carole

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Subject: Calico and Chintz From: DDBSTUFFaol.com Date: Wed, 14 Apr 2004 12:08:36 EDT X-Message-Number: 13

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Well, I guess the link didn't work so here is the address. Just copy and paste it into your browser. Sorry for the problem. Anyone know how to email a working link to QHL? I'm all ears. (Not really!)

http://www.antiquesandthearts.com/GalleryHopping.asp?aGalleryHopping-2004-04- 06-10-58-52p1.htm&nl1

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Subject: Out of date stuff From: "Teddy Pruett" <aprayzerhotmail.com> Date: Wed, 14 Apr 2004 12:11:10 -0400 X-Message-Number: 14

Does anyone know of a use for the early versions of EQ3 or Blockbase or "Too Much Fun" by Barb Vlack? My sweet husband bought me so much of this stuff when we got our first computer, but I didnt know how to use it. Now it is too out of date for my computer. It seems a sin to throw this away, and I'm not even sure it was ever used the first time. Must I accept that it is a dinosaur and just toss it?

Teddy Pruett

_________________________________________________________________ Get rid of annoying pop-up ads with the new MSN Toolbar – FREE! http://toolbar.msn.com/go/onm00200414ave/direct/01/

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Subject: Quilts to be auctioned 4/20 From: DDBSTUFFaol.com Date: Wed, 14 Apr 2004 12:21:52 EDT X-Message-Number: 15

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This auction is the inventory of fairly well known antique dealers, "Raccoon Creek"

Not sure if they are going out of biz or just cleaning house. They have an interesting Stenciled Spread.

Here is an article from the Maine Antiques Digest (hope the link works) Click here: Events in Philadelphia: Bunch Auction of Raccoon Creek Shop Adds Another Event to Antiques Week in Philadelphia:

Darwin

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Subject: Priscilla Bianchi, Guatemalan quilt artist From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> Date: Wed, 14 Apr 2004 13:26:33 -0400 X-Message-Number: 16

The American Quilter magazine, Summer 2004 edition, just arrived and I was pleasantly surprised to see an article written by Priscilla Bianchi, the Guatemalan quilt artist discussed here earlier this week.

Entitled, "Put an End to UFOs! How to Finish What You Start" includes three large photo images of her very colorful quilts and lots of tips that will make your quilts "practically finish themselves". This article would be of interest primarily to quilters. If you have not visited there yet, Priscilla's website is: www.priscillabianchi.com

This lovely magazine is distributed four times per year to members of the American Quilter's Society: www.AQSquilt.com.

Pat Cummings

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: April 13, 2004 From: "jocelynmdelphiforums.com" <jocelynmdelphiforums.com> Date: Wed, 14 Apr 2004 18:25:52 +0000 X-Message-Number: 17

On April 14, 2004, Charlotte Bull wrote:

What is relationship of > book titles as far as copyright laws? Any info?

IIRC, book titles are not copyrighted. Authors are not eager to use a title that will be easily confused with someone else's work, though. :) IIRC, there are two recently-published quilt books with the same title. I'm sure both authors were horrified when they saw each other's work- and that many people have gotten the wrong book by mistake.

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Subject: link to Calico & Chintz exhibit review From: Patricia L Cummings 

http://www.antiquesandthearts.com/

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Subject: Technical question From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrowpatmedia.net> Date: Wed, 14 Apr 2004 19:55:11 -0400 X-Message-Number: 22

Folks,

I am sewing together all the blocks that Studio Quilt Study Group made for the quilt we will be donating to the Burlington County Historical Society as a fund raiser. It is a repro of one of the quilts in their collection. As in the original, this quilt has 169 (4") Economy Blocks, set on point with plain muslin alternate blocks, set 13 x 13.

I am trying to make the diagonal rows of blocks lie flat, but of course they don't want to. The seam allowances of the pieced blocks want to spread out, so I am getting a natural SA turn at every other block. When I press and force the SA to one side the entire length of the seam there is definitely distortion.

I am thinking of snipping the seam allowances so that all the pieced blocks can spread out and their seam allowances don't have to be pressed back on themselves.

Have any of you done that? If I am very, very careful it will keep the top nice and flat, but I am worried that I am hurting the integrity of the quilt and there may be damage down the road. Even pressing the seams open causes some distortion. My thinking is that the quilting will keep the seams from pulling open.

I'll probably do this seam allowance snipping; I just need someone to pat me on the back and tell me it will be ok.

Judy " Ringo" in Ringoes, NJ judygrowpatmedia.net

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: April 13, 2004 From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrowpatmedia.net> Date: Wed, 14 Apr 2004 21:22:57 -0400 X-Message-Number: 23

If I Remember Correctly  IIRC

I didn't know that -- I Googled the initials and learned something too.

Judy " Ringo" in Ringoes, NJ judygrowpatmedia.net

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Subject: new exhibit review From: Patricia L Cummings 

The following link will bring you to an expanded review of what I posted previously about the Calico and Chintz exhibit. At the end of my article, I have also added the link that DDBSTUFF had so kindly provided, as both of us who reviewed the exhibit have provided different information.

http://www.quiltersmuse.com/

Hope you enjoy!

Pat

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Subject: response From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Thu, 15 Apr 2004 07:07:57 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Hi! First, I'd like to thank all of you for your kind remarks and a few private e-mails about my search for my grandmother's quilts. I will always search.

One member of this digest suggested that if I couldn't find any of my grandmother's original quilts that to make a quilt in honor of her might be nice. I do think I will do that, unless I happen to find one of her quilts along the way.

Two other thoughts. I have that EQ3 program as well and may as well toss it in the trash as far as I am concerned, I never could figure out how to use it. I felt it was the least "user friendly" program I'd ever attempted in. I "wasted" money on books, went through tutorials, even joined their mail list for awhile and gave up in total frustration. Yet, I have a quilter friend who I consider to be a "master" at it and she totally understands it. I do think that I am a "visual" vs. manual and book type of learner and no matter what I do, I'll just never "get it"! So, Teddy, if you figure out what to do with your versions, do let me know. I never bothered to upgrade to the newer versions, I do wonder if they are any better at all? However, the Blockbase program is great, as far as I am concerned. As a person who does like to reproduce antique quilts, I can look through the Brackman encyclopedia and "call up" any block, print it out and get templates and often even foundation piecing in any size I want. I don't use it often, but I think it's great. And to Jocelyn, you remarks about oral history are really correct. My son and I witnessed a crime last fall. When the police interviewed both of us, we kind of saw two seperate incidences! These interviews with police happen VERY promptly afterwards as well.

Linda Heminway Plaistow NH

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Subject: Re: new exhibit review From: Jo Horsey <jhorseymail.newnanutilities.org> Date: Thu, 15 Apr 2004 08:53:41 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

At 09:59 PM 4/14/2004 -0400, you wrote: >The following link will bring you to an expanded review of what I posted >previously about the Calico and Chintz exhibit.

Pat, this is a wonderful article, and it gives all of us an inkling of how great it would be to view the exhibit ourselves. Thanks very much for sharing it! Jo, in Newnan Ga

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Subject: EQ3 stuff From: cptvdeoinil.com Date: Thu, 15 Apr 2004 09:43:53 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Teddy asked: <<Does anyone know of a use for the early versions of EQ3 or Blockbase or "Too Much Fun" by Barb Vlack? My sweet husband bought me so much of this stuff when we got our first computer, but I didnt know how to use it. Now it is too out of date for my computer. It seems a sin to throw this away, and I'm not even sure it was ever used the first time. Must I accept that it is a dinosaur and just toss it?>>

RESPONSE: Welllllllllll, if your BlockBase is the original one, it's DOS based and is a dinosaur. The BlockBase 2 that is currently available is infinitely better, is Windows based, has more blocks, has a fantastic search capability, and lots more features. I believe you can use your registration for BB1 to get a discount on BB2. I would highly recommend going for the BB2. BlockBase is Barbara Brackman's "Encyclopedia of Pieced Quilt Patterns" on a CD. It has nearly all the blocks (4000 of them) from Brackman's book.

EQ3 is definitely a dinosaur and doesn't hold a candle to what EQ5 can do. EQ3 is DOS based and EQ5 is Windows based. Need I say more?

As for "Too Much Fun!", there's some good stuff in there, if I do say so myself. It's my first book, and it was written to offer ideas for using EQ3 at the request of the EQ Company, who also published it. You would have to translate the drawing and quilt tools to EQ5, but there are ideas there that I did not duplicate in books I wrote for EQ4 and EQ5. You could take a look and see if there is anything there that you might like to do. I still refer back to TMF occasionally to refresh my memory about drawing certain kinds of blocks.

Teddy, if you think you may ever be interested in learning to use EQ5 and actually use it for quilt designing (personally, I wouldn't dream of making a quilt without first producing or re-producing it in EQ5 to check things out for fit, variations, coloring, etc.), I know for sure you could use the registration of EQ3 to get a discounted price for EQ5. Call the EQ Company at 1-800-356-4219 to discuss that possibility.

As an aside giggle, I have to appreciate my husband's wry sense of humor when answering someone's inquiry about whether an old computer could be updated and/or fixed. What to do with an old piece of computer junk? His answer, "You got a boat?" In other words, it might make a good anchor.

Barb Vlack cptvdeosbcglobal.net ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: seam allowance snipping From: Judy White <jawhiteinfionline.net> Date: Thu, 15 Apr 2004 09:42:52 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

Judy, I have snipped seam allowances when they wouldn't lay flat. I imagine the quilts that you are reproducing are not going to be handled much so I don't think it would cause a problem. I don't think I would do it if I were making a quilt that I was going to use on my bed. Consider this a pat on the back and and okay to do it. Sometimes you just have to follow your best judgement.

Judy White Quiltmaker and Quilt Restorer in Connecticut

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Subject: Winner in first Alliance quilt print drawing From: Bob Shaw <shaw.bobverizon.net> Date: Thu, 15 Apr 2004 11:50:33 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

The Alliance for American Quilts held its first drawing for an "Aliiance Star" quilt print by Judy Severson yesterday. We are pleased to announce that the winner is Carol Butzke of Slinger, WI, who is a subscriber to this list.

Congratulations Carol!

We will hold another drawing as soon as 100 new people have signed up, so if you haven't entered yet, now is the time. Like Carol, you will have a 1-in-100 chance of winning, far better odds than in any lottery I can think of.

You can enter the drawing at www.centerforthequilt.org. Sign up now; your chances are good!

All best wishes,

Bob

Robert Shaw Executive Director The Alliance for American Quilts Tel//fax: 802/985-0737 shaw.bobverizon.net www.centerforthequilt.org

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Subject: Calico & Chintz From: ctquiltingverizon.net Date: Thu, 15 Apr 2004 14:36:19 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Yes, many thanks to those who know & have shared info on this exhibit. I checked at the Smithsonian online & found this same exhibit will be in my area this fall! It's a wait but will be worth a trip over to Youngstown to view these great quilts. Again, many thanks! Susan W., usually just a lurker who enjoys your knowledge ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: trademarks From: Edwaquiltaol.com Date: Thu, 15 Apr 2004 16:56:34 EDT X-Message-Number: 7

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My feeling about this is that if the word quilt has been trademarked, then we all should write the trademark office and protest. I remember back in the early 70s when a well known quilter got a patent on traupunto, i called the copyright office and ask why and was told that the folks reviewing didn't know any thing about needlework and didn't question that it had been a technique in use for 100's of years. I see nothing wrong with protesting an action like this to help educate those making these kind of legal decisions.

Holice

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Subject: Re: trademarks From: aol.com Date: Thu, 15 Apr 2004 17:15:02 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

This reminds me of the time that a game company tried to trademark "Nazi" in connection with their Indiana Jones roleplaying game....

Karen Evans

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Subject: J. G. Row's technical question From: "Kathy Moore" 

Judy, I've snipped the seam allowance a few times when I had the same problem. I believe I even saw someone on a television program suggest it.

I have been pleased with the results and have seen no unpleasant consequences. But, you have to know, my quilts haven't been around long enough to be a good test case.

Good luck.

Kathy Moore Lincoln, NE

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Subject: Re: trademarks From: "jocelynmdelphiforums.com" 

On April 15, 2004, Edwaquiltaol.com wrote:

> My feeling about this is that if the word quilt has been trademarked, the n we > all should write the trademark office and protest.

Trademarks and copyright are two different things. A copyright prevents anyone else from using an author's work (copy) without permission. A trademark prevents another BUSINESS from using a business's  name, logo, slogan etc. to compete with them.

A trademark doesn't mean that people can't use the word at all- indeed, mos t businesses are thrilled to have people refer to their product by their tr ademark, such as Coke, Kleenex, Xerox. It just means that I can't go into b usiness as 'Coke Quilts- They're the Real Thing'. :)I can't copy another bu siness's trademark for the purpose of benefitting from the good name they'r e established.

A quilt-related example is that I couldn't develop a one-day workshop and m arket it as Quilt In a Day- because I would be relying on Eleanor's reputat ion, and hoping that people would enroll thinking she was going to be teach ing, or that she had designed the workshop.

Copyrwight protects the intellectual work of an individual (or company); tr ademark protects the good reputation of a business.

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Subject: Another quilt-related item from American Profile From: "Anne Datko" 

As you may remember, the insert "American Profile" had a really nice  article on List Mom Kris Driessen and the Quilt Bus a few weeks ago. The  issue today features author John Grisham and his love of Little League  baseball in an article written by Beverly Keel. Grisham grew up in small  Southern towns and baseball was the center of his universe, according to  the article. And, in an exact quote from the article, with quotation  marks to indicate that these are his exact words, "The ladies would be  off in the bleachers watching, shelling peas, knitting quilts and  talking about all the social activities...."

Now, I grew up in a small Southern town also but we didn't knit quilts.  Did anyone else????

AnneD ----

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Subject: re: Influence of Northern Tissue Co. From: Patricia L Cummings 

Ah, the influence of the Northern tissue Quilting Ladies who quilt with knitting needles rides again!

Pat

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Subject: Knitting quilts From: "Eileen Trestain" <ejtrestaincomcast.net> Date: Sat, 17 Apr 

Many of the old needlework books from the 1800's refer to and give = directions for "knitting quilts". In today's vernacular, we might call = those afghans, maybe, but many people still refer ot them as quilts. ------=_NextPart_000_006E_01C4245F.2C5B23C0--

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Subject: Re: knitting quilts! From: SEHinzmanaol.com Date: Sat, 17 Apr 2004 23:17:05 EDT 

Ah, the influence of the Northern tissue Quilting Ladies who quilt with knitting needles rides again!

And I did a small social commentary quilt about just that..with knitting needles on it..!

Susan Hinzman

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Subject: Re: World War II From: Gail Ingram <gingramtcainternet.com> Date: Sat, 17 Apr 

I remember WWII, was a wee child and my father worked as head of civilian personnel in section of huge army base, Camp Livingston. Some of my most vivid memories are of that period.

I still want a 2-person jeep.

I still know what war is like because of that period---recall going to sleep watching unending line of lighted vehicles on highway about a mile away from our home---my mother was so sad as we looked through the dark night. A group was going to Alexandria to catch train to ship out for battle.

gi

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Subject: Jubilee book and update on Roadshow Quilt From: Patricia L Cummings 

Yesterday, the book /Jubilee: The Emergence of African-American Culture/ arrived. I have not had but just barely a chance to crack open its covers, but I want to report that the description of the quilt, as featured, in part, on the cover (the same one that we saw on the Antiques Roadshow), is identified as the "Shango quilt, circa 1830", made in Arkansas. It is thought to have been inspired by the African deity, Shango. The block configuration can be clearly seen on the front cover. There is no mention of the quilt as having been owned by a black slave-owner, just simply as one having been made by a captive slavewoman.

This book was written by Howard Dodson, in collaboration with a number of well-known authorities on Afro-American history. and published by National Geographic in conjunction with the Schomburg Center For Research In Black Culture. The extensive photos, the layout of the book, and the information presented look very inviting and I can't wait to read it.

Thank you, Laurie, for mentioning the title of this terrific book. People like you who are so sharing and caring are part of the reason I continue to want to be a part of this list. :)

Pat Cummings

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Subject: Snipping seam allowances From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrowpatmedia.net> Date: Sun, 

Thanks to all who "gave me permission" to snip the seam allowances on this quilt with 4" blocks. What a difference this has made in the look of the quilt. It is flat and not distorted at all. What I like best about this technique is that in all the plain alternate blocks all 4 sides have a shadow of the seam, not just 2 or 3 sides. When quilted this will add almost a trapunto feeling without having to add extra stuffing.

Thanks again

Judy " Ringo" in Ringoes, NJ judygrowpatmedia.net

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Subject: re: Influence of Northern Tissue Co. From: "Sally Ward" <sallytattersntlworld.com> 

> Now, I grew up in a small Southern town also but we didn't knit quilts. Did anyone else????

<G> On ebay UK there seem to be quite a lot of people who 'crochet' quilts !!! (but then there are also a lot of machine-made quilts from a factory in Scotland adopting the title 'Durham' :-O )

Sally W

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Subject: Re: Bunch Auction in PA - report From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net> 

Thanks to wonderful Candace, I had a great time today at the preview for the auction she told us about. Since I love studying quilt construction, and spent a "good bit of time" with each quilt. That's what is so wonderful about auction previews -- if you dress like everyone else, people think you can really afford to buy the stuff you are studying so closely <grin>. Anyway, here are some notes I made to help you visualize the quilts a bit better. His pictures are wonderful, so hope you enjoy the notes. This is the list of quilt items -- be sure to click on each quilt to get a nice size blow up of the quilt --

http://www.williambunchauctions.com/content/images/040420/HighSpeedCat/InvCat_0086.htm

#127 - machine appliqued and machine quilted -- typical tiny machine stitches. Baskets hand pieced, blocks machine joined. Binding is only on the top -- stitched wrong side to right side of back, brought around to front, and machine appliqued onto the front.

#193 - very heavily stuffed -- thick stuffing. The pompom type berries the birds are hold in their beaks are interesting. Unfortunately, this was mounted above their showcases and you couldn't get close <frown>.

#195 - Crude hand applique -- black thread on the red and green pieces, white thread on the gold pieces.

#204 - The signatures are done in back stitch embroidery. The brownish colors flowers, etc, might be repairs. Again, this was mounted on the wall above an 8 foot talk glass case, so I couldn't get close enough. I kept peering through the glass case and only saw the bottom row close up.

#208 - A great PA quilt!!!! Binding is front to back, back is a nice brown print. But the coolest thing is the construction of the lily flowers. The flower blossoms are pieced, and then the flowers, stems and leaves are appliqued on a blue shirting background fabric. No piecing to set in the flowers -- I hope you understand what I'm saying -- these blocks are not constructed the "usual" way, but only the flower is pieced, not the background fabric.

#209 - Another great quilt. The shop owner says it's "definitely NJ" -- based on where he bought it. What makes it great to me is it's machine appliqued -- all the stuff in the corner squares and setting triangles -- wonderful, neat, tiny stitches, sewn very close to the turned under edges -- excellent control of her machine. The zig zag border is also machine appliqued -- started as a white strip and then red and green dog teeth are strips of fabric appliqued down. Super cool construction. The girds in the triangle blocks have seed beads for eyes. And if you look in the top left square of the background, you can see a cross quilted into the block. There's only one cross I think, and it definitely was "included" in the quilting design, as it doesn't follow the pattern of the other corner.

#210 - This is definitely the most elegant quilt there -- and no surprise, it comes from New England. It reminds me of what I saw in Deerfield this summer. In the center all the vines and flowers are crewel embroidery -- tiny and perfectly done. The first border, with the flowers in the goldish background, is a printed stripe -- the prints next to the goldish center strip are part of the same fabric -- no seams. Beautiful construction and beautiful early fabrics.

You also need to go to this page, as a quilt is listed with the samplers - http://www.williambunchauctions.com/content/images/040420/HighSpeedCat/InvCat_0060.htm

#121 - All solids except the yellow has a small brownish square every once in a while, and the blue in the birds and bell flowers is a print.

But #23 -- PA German Show Towel -- is my favorite piece -- that's the one I'd love to own. The amount of documentation on it is incredible. What a beautiful piece.

I love previews -- It's a wonderful way to see and study quilts. Thank you Candace for alerting me to this opportunity.

Barb in warm southeastern PA

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Subject: re slavery/slaveholding/etc From: Gail Ingram <gingramtcainternet.com> Date: 

Several books have been mentioned on this list that shed light on the Several books have been mentioned on this list that shed light on the relationship between slaves and slaveholders, North and South.

Two I have not noticed are among the most noted authorities in this area of scholarship, Eugene Genovese and Elizabeth Fox-Genovese. They have written many, many excellent books that detail everything from who sewed what to the fabrics used and the cost of those fabrics. Such items, of course, come within larger frameworks. The footnotes alone are worth the cost of the books.

Both are superior, recognized scholars and continue to labor to establish the facts of history and to make sense of those for contemporary readers. E. G is now retired from Emory University, but continues to write.

Be aware that neither is particularly p.c. since rather late in their lives they joined the Roman Catholic Church and became a little more conservative. Yet, I've found their scholarship immaculate and their footnotes the sort that lead you to explore new ideas and aspects of hisory. Their extensive work opens a world forthe reader.

I don't think anyone has mentioned the excellent "Mothers of Invention" either.

Gail

south.

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Subject: Re - Bunch Auction report correction From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net> 

Thank you Judy for catching my number problem -- that's what happens when I type too late at night <grin>. The quilt I labeled 208 is really 207, and the one I called 209 is 208. I'm sorry for the confusion -- here is the corrected commentary --

#207 - A great PA quilt!!!! Binding is front to back, back is a nice brown print. But the coolest thing is the construction of the lily flowers. The flower blossoms are pieced, and then the flowers, stems and leaves are appliqued on a blue shirting background fabric. No piecing to set in the flowers -- I hope you understand what I'm saying -- these blocks are not constructed the "usual" way, but only the flower is pieced, not the background fabric.

#208 - Another great quilt. The shop owner says it's "definitely NJ" -- based on where he bought it. What makes it great to me is it's machine appliqued -- all the stuff in the corner squares and setting triangles -- wonderful, neat, tiny stitches, sewn very close to the turned under edges -- excellent control of her machine. The zig zag border is also machine appliqued -- started as a white strip and then red and green dog teeth are strips of fabric appliqued down. Super cool construction. The girds in the triangle blocks have seed beads for eyes. And if you look in the top left square of the background, you can see a cross quilted into the block. There's only one cross I think, and it definitely was "included" in the quilting design, as it doesn't follow the pattern of the other corner.

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Subject: storage - pine From: Margareta.Faustcec.eu.int Date: Mon, 19 Apr 2004 17:00:59 

Hello everyone, I'm sure one of you experts out there can tell me if it's safe to store quilts in a (newly made) pine cabinet. The wood is waxed but not = sealed. Should I perhaps cover the shelves with something before putting my = quilts on them? I'm quite excited about this piece so I'll describe it- bought from a company specializing in replicating traditional European furniture = (sorry, no website). It's a copy of a French "meuble =E0 farines" - maybe = staple goods such as flour were stored on the shelves, but then, on one side, there = are drawers for storing jam pots - and when mother turned the key and = locked the door to the shelf part, the drawers were partly inside the door too, so noone could steal the jam! Anyway - happy to hear advice about storing quilts there. Margareta

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Subject: Re: storage - pine From: "Judy Kelius (judysue)" <judysueptd.net> Date: Mon, 19 

Hi Margareta - I would certainly suggest that you put something between the= =20 wood and the fabric to be safe. How about a heavy piece of plastic? That=20 way you could still see the wood but would protect the fabrics from the=20 acid in the wood. This sounds lovely! - Judy

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Subject: Re: storage - pine From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Mon, 

There is an excellent product called Marvelseal that is a barrier film used for lining in museums -- wood should always be lined, IMHO. You could also use Tyvek, which is wonderful for many applications. Both are availabel through Gaylord (www.gaylord.com ) Candace Perry

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Subject: Re: storage - pine From: "Sally Ward" <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Mon, 19 

The problem we have had with pine furniture is seepage of resin from the knots even when waxed.... one on my bedhead grabbed my hair every night for years ( I resolved it by swopping sides with DH) so I would never put fabric straight on it.

I wondered about using freezer paper, shiny side down?

Sally W

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Subject: Log Cabins and Hexagons From: Trimble4aol.com Date: Mon, 19 Apr 2004 15:51:14 

Did I dream this discussion or did we really hash out whether or not log cabins were somehow related (in shape and form) to hexagon patterns? It seems to me that Don Beld was the proponent for the connection?

I just happened to think of it today when I was browsing Stella Rubin's website...she has, lo and behold, a hexagon log cabin here: http://www.stellarubinantiques.com/catalog/Antiques:Decorative_Art.html

Forgive me if I've somehow dreamt this, but I thought it was interesting. I couldn't quite "see" the connection at the time but now I can!

Off to Paducah! Lori East 

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Subject: Storage of quilts on pine From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> 

When storing quilts, the more barriers between wood and cloth, the better. One place that I store quilts is in a large closet with wide, built-in shelves. We painted them white and then covered them with acid-free paper. It is important to change the paper frequently because the ph of the paper will change over time and though acid-free to begin with, will start to degrade and will resume some of its former acidity. Paper is made from wood, and wood is an acidic product.

One of the best bets is to use a folded, white, 100% cotton sheet that has not been washed in detergent. Detergents or perfumed soaps attract chewing insects, something you don't want in the storage area.

Plastic of any kind will encourage the growth of mold and mildew so it is not a good choice.

In addition, I usually grow a plant called Artemisia. This is a natural repellent to bugs. I dry shoots of the plant, tie it together, and hang it in this particular closet. Of course, pieces of cedar will have the same effect and are often sold in "cute" shapes and hung with a piece of leather cord.

Hope this information is helpful.

Pat Cummings

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Subject: inscribed Log Cabin quilts From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> Date: 

Hello- Here at the International Quilt Study Center we have a Log Cabin quilt that is inscribed with the maker's name, "Mary Groff," and a date, "1871." Do any list members know of any inscribed Log Cabin quilts that predate this quilt? If so, I would appreciate knowing the particulars. Please email me off-list at sister3603yahoo.com. Thanks so much- Judy Schwender Graduate Research Assistant International Quilt Study Center Lincoln, Nebraska

--------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Photos: High-quality 4x6 digital prints for 25¢ --0-1735622100-1082410411=:46748--

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Subject: storage of quilts From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> Date: Mon, 

Forgot to mention that polyacrylic can be applied over wood, either bare or painted, and makes a good sealant.

Avoid using polyurethane as it will emit fumes that are damaging to quilts.

Pat Cummings

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Subject: Re: storage of quilts on wood From: "mgmooney" <mgmooneymoonware.net> Date: 

Good afternoon, all - My favorite to recommend in this situation (storing quilts on pine) is to cover the shelves/wall with heavy duty aluminium foil (pinched together if you need to "seam" it). Think Costco or the like if you have a lot of shelves to cover and get one of the "food service" packages (a huge amount for a very reasonable price). You can just lay the foil on the wood first and then cover that with a piece of muslin/sheeting so your family and friends don't think you have absolutely and completely lost it! When you first tear the sheet off the roll, hold it up to a light to verify that there aren't any little/large pinholes in it. And of course the first sheet will always be too small! Avoid the use of tapes, tacks, etc. to attach to the wood surfaces. I just fold an excess amount to run up the back of the wall and/or sides to keep the textiles/quilts isolated from those surfaces, too. MarvelSeal would be my second choice - it should be applied with a hot tacking iron. Regards, Margaret (Meg) Geiss-Mooney Textile/Costume Conservator Professional Associate, AIC mgmooneymoonware.net in rainy Sonoma County



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