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Quilters Find a way to care

: Re: qhl digest: April 23, 2004 From: patkyser <patkyserhiwaay.net> Date: Sat, 

Re: Dry cleaning quilts Kim, I received a finished kit quilt, Morning Glory, as a wedding gift in 1955. Don't know the manufacturer, etc. Anyway, the lady who gave the quilt to me told me ALWAYS to "find the best French cleaner in town" and have the quilt dry cleaned, never to wash it. I followed her instructions for years and the lovely white back ground of the quilt got sort of yellowish and the whole quilt got a little stiff. Then one day one of my children marked it with a red ball point pen and in horror, I tossed it in the washing machine. The marks came right out, but better still, the quilt was white and soft and fluffy. It never got dry cleaned again. I am wondering if the original instructions that came with the kit (which I never had) suggested dry cleaning, since the maker passed that admonition on to me. Pat Kyser in Alabama

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Subject: books From: "Crandall Associates" <rcrandalmaine.rr.com> Date: Sat, 24 

Hi All-I seem to be in the book business lately. I hope anyone who wanted the "Calico and Chintz" book was able to = contact me for their copy. Those who ordered should have them by now. =20 Today I visited a local rare/used bookstore that I scope out from time = to time. I found "Quilting" by Averil Colby hardcover c 1971 printed in Great Britain = hardcover $55.00

"America's Quilts & Coverlets" Safford & Bishop hardcover $40.00

"American Patchwork Quilts" by Lenice Ingram Bacon (signed by author = dated 1976) soft cover $5.00

"Needlework" The Smithsonian Library of Antiques prepared by the = Cooper-Hewitt Adolph S. Carrllo $12.50 Should I buy these?

If anyone can advise me on the prices etc. could you email me privately. Thanks in advance. Carole in Maine

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Subject: Re: books From: <chrisajetlink.net> Date: Sat, 24 Apr 2004 08:45:39 

Hi Carol-

You can find "America's Quilts & Coverlets" Safford & Bishop hardcover $40.00 for 10.00. even &.7.00 I have seen. The Colby book is available in paperback for very little $, like 10.00 and there are lots of them. I think the needlework book is one of a set of volumes on the Museum's collections. That book doesn't have much on quilts.

Hope this helps. I have books for sale from my hunts on my website, priced well to sell. www.antiquequiltdating.com if you get the desire to buy.

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Subject: Re: books From: aol.com Date: Sat, 24 Apr 2004 15:54:16 

At the very least buy the Colby. It's indispensable if you're interested in early quilting. The Bishop & Safford book is also a classic, and was the first one that interested me in quilting.

Karen Evans

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Subject: Gwen Marston's new book on Mary Schafer From: louise-b 

Picked up this book yesterday at Barnes and Noble and have had a good time reading it. Have read various articles by Gwen Marston over the years in LCPQ about her but haven't collected the various books. Guess I will be looking for them now!

"Mary Schafer, American Quilt Maker" is published by the Univ. of Michigan Press. Extensive lists are available as well as chronological timelines. All in all, a good read.

Of course, one of the added features is the information about Betty Harriman who lived near Columbia, MO (my area) in Bunceton for many years. Several of her quilts belong to guild members as well as several more in a nearby area.

Louise Bequette -- in mid-Missouri

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Subject: quilts for sale in Southeastern Ohio? From: Victoria Maki <vmaki2001yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 24 Apr 2004 16:22:58 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 7

I will be in Southeastern Ohio in May and would like to get in touch with anyone in that area who has 1930s, 1940s or pre-1900 quilts for sale. Please email me off-list.

Thanks, and I enjoy the list very much, Viki Maki -quilter and collector--

 

__________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Photos: High-quality 4x6 digital prints for 25¢ http://photos.yahoo.com/ph/print_splash

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Subject: re: Dagge Quilt From: "Jocelyn Martin" <jocelynmdelphiforums.com> Date: Sat, 24 Apr 2004 19:33:46 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

>>>A visitor to the exhibit turned to me and asked why old quilts seem to have lasted so much longer than the ones today.

Pat, I know I'm late in replying, but I had another idea on this. It may be a matter of quality of construction- that poorly made old quilts just didn't survive. So the comparison may be between well-constructed old quilts and modern quilts of the 'All sizes $39.95' variety (that is, cheaper fabrics, huge quilting stitches, attention to speed rather than to craftsmanship). It seems to me that of the cases where I've heard of anyone 'wearing out' a top-quality modern quilt, it was either a child's quilt that got a lot of wrassling and washing, or a poly batting that abraded the quilt fabric (both washing-related, as you noted). I've never heard of anyone wearing out a modern quilt that was all-cotton and of top-quality materials.

 

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Subject: Wagon Train quilt? From: "Melissa L Devin" <atypicalquilterthedevins.com> Date: Sat, 24 Apr 2004 21:18:03 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

In interest of the thread of quilting along the covered wagon trail, I = came upon this website when I was reading the layers of meaning blog, which referenced a collection of Pacific Northwest Coast Indian art. http://www.150.si.edu/150trav/remember/celeb.htm =20

http://www.150.si.edu/150trav/remember/r522.htm Noted along with the = quilt image: "Mary Carpenter Pickering (1831-1900) worked on this quilt while = her friend John Bruce Bell accompanied a wagon train to the Oregon = Territory. In American culture, quilts are often passed down through the generations, becoming treasures commemorating their makers. Mary Pickering's quilt = has been cherished by 3 generations of her family."

I found Nancy's comment interesting regarding nothing in the Holmes = diaries about quilting on the trail (not that it may have never happened, I understand). And I wonder if this particular quilt has been documented correctly, as the notation does not state any familial connection with = John Bruce Bell, yet the quilt has been "cherished by 3 generations of her family.", all those credited by National Museum of American History as = being a part of this quilt are Bells.

My question regarding this... Would this then mean that Mary Pickering = also accompanied her friend John Bruce Bell on the wagon train, and if she didn't... Why even bother mentioning this extra bit of information?

Melissa in Washington state ><> ><> ><> ><> ><> ><> ><> ><> http://solje.thedevins.com/ <>< <>< <>< <>< <>< <>< <>< <><=20

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Subject: Covered wagon trips From: "Patchwork Secrets" <patchworksecrets2earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 2004 01:33:55 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Just a quick interjection here. I have taken week long wagon trains across parts of NC (Uncle is actually a wagon master). It IS possible to hand sew while riding and there are long noontime breaks for the horses to rest and meals to be served. Wagons are not as bumpy as you would image. There is a rhythm to their swaying so you can adapt. We usually stop long before dark so there is time to settle the animals and prepare for the on coming night. I can easily see how a lady traveling across the country for days/weeks/months on end could piece an entire top.

Sharon in NC

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Subject: re: longevity of quilts From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 2004 04:38:19 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Jocelyn wrote:

It seems to me that of the cases where I've heard of anyone 'wearing out' a top-quality modern quilt, it was either a child's quilt that got a lot of wrassling and washing, or a poly batting that abraded the quilt fabric (both washing-related, as you noted). I've never heard of anyone wearing out a modern quilt that was all-cotton and of top-quality materials.

Dear Jocelyn:

Thanks for your thoughts.

There are a number of factors that have influenced why some old quilts had longevity and others became part of the landfill.

In the past, a quilt represented the hard work and vision of its maker. There were more personal connections between source and object. The quilt was not whipped together in some foreign sweat factory, by an unnamed worker, and in the most shoddy way possible, and sold on the American market for $39.95. In this society, if you don't pay much for something, it isn't considered to be worth much. The mass marketing of quilts may have put a "quilt" on more beds, but something has gotten lost in the translation. That "something" may seem intangible, yet we all know what I mean by that statement.

There are a number of problems with fabrics today. Some fabric dyes are unstable. They particularly do not react well to chemical baths (read "detergents"). Some fade terribly, even if not subjected to direct sunlight. I have had poor experiences with navy blue (not indigo). Blacks are awful. Over time, they fade like crazy or "crock" off. Many quilters chose to buy their fabrics that are priced lower. They find that after washing them, preliminary to using them in a quilt, the fabric just flop. The crispness of them in the store was dependent on the amount of sizing added to them. Even after washing, they are stiff and do not have a good "hand" for hand quilting, although that factor may not be of any consequence to many quilters who machine stitch their quilts or farm them out to long-arm quilters.

In the past, many quilts were more heavily quilted. As you well know, quilting stitches secure the batting in place and prevent shifting. When one puts together the factors of home washing, little quilting, and polyester battings that lump and shift, one can see a disaster just waiting to happen when that quilt is put into a home machine with a central agitator. We won't even mention the damage done by home dryers. Shudder to think.....

But, then again, who cares? You and I care about old quilts, but the general public sees quilts, in general, as commonplace and expendable. We are a throw away society. In a sense, putting these cheap imports on the market has trivialized the whole process of quilting and in a way, has demeaned it. Why should the public buy a more highly priced but better made quilt that is of heirloom quality from an individual maker? Why should they learn to make their own quilt? The cost of supplies alone would far exceed the price of a store bought quilt.

Much more went into the making of a quilt in the past. The bed size quilts in my collection mostly have wool battings from wool that was grown on the farm, cleaned and carded, and placed between cheesecloth type netting to hold it in place, secured by quilting stitches. With this much of a time investment and with that much of an emotional investment, in having collected just the right color scraps to make a pattern work, the quilt was prized by the family and passed along in good condition. The very weight of wet wool (and its smell) would have deterred washing of these quilts.

I personally wish that Americans could get away from the idea that quick is better. Quick is quicker, but not necessarily better.

Much more education needs to happen. As individuals, we can help by telling others about what quilts and quilting mean to us.

Just a few thoughts.

Call me "Sleepless in NH".

Pat Cummings www.quiltersmuse.com

 

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Subject: Re: Longevity of Quilts (long) From: Babette Moorleghen <happyquilterqsbcglobal.net> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 2004 12:55:58 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

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Hi, my name is Babette. I am new on this list and real excited about finding it!! Where have you been all my life?? LOL Okay, now to serious business. I just read Patricia Cummings e-mail regarding why some quilts last and some don't. I must say that I totally agree with her! I would not buy a "quilt" that you find in Penny's, Sears or any other store that sells them, nor would I recommend them to anyone! However, most people do not want to pay what it is worth to have a real handquilted heirloom! Can I share my story? My mother said I had a needle in my hand from the time I was 3 or 4 years old. I can remember doing embroidery bibs for my brother who is 4.5 years younger than me. I was making my own clothes from the time I was 8 or 9 years old and made my first quilt (a bed size) when I was between the ages of 10 and 11. I can remember this since my youngest brother was born the day after I turned 11 and the quilt was finished the year he was born! I still h! ave that quilt. Is is usable? No, not really. In fact, I didn't think it even existed until about 8 years or so ago when my DM asked me if I would like to have it! Imagine my surprise and, of course, I said YES! Knowing my dad I thought it had made it to a landfill (another long story)! I will be 55 years old this year, so now you know just how "old" that quilt is!! I was raised in a small town in Nebraska and had a wonderful grandmother who taught me how to quilt (again, long story there) and it was under her tutiledge that I made this quilt, as well as 2 others which were twin size. Those are also still existing. Now to the interesting part... what type of fabrics were used? As I examine the blocks, which are a Sunflower, or Dresden Plate, pattern, I see a lot of feedsack fabrics that were available in the late '50 and early '60's. How do I know they are "feedsack"? Well, since we lived in a rural area I can remember my uncles bringing mom flour and sugar in bags, or! sacks that were 100% cotton prints. I'm not sure how many pounds were in some of the sacks, but I remember the flour being close to 25 pounds. If the sack had cowboys on it, or plaids in browns, blues, etc. my brothers were the recipients of shirts. If the sacks had flowers, tiny prints, etc. then my sisters and I had dresses or blouses and skirts. My first 4-H project, which was a simple skirt I made when I was 9 or so was made from one of these "sacks". Please note that these feedsacks differed quite a bit from the feedsacks of the '20 and '30's and you can easily distinquish between the two eras. Now, back to my quilt. The blocks were all hand pieced and then attached by hand to the block which meaures approx. 16 inches and has 2" wide sashing around the blocks. I now know I "appliqued" them to the block. The back "appears" to be a white cotton that has been pieced down the middle, so I know it's not a sheet! Fabric was approximately 36" wide, which was the norm. ! What was in the middle? Well, that is an interesting subject in itself. Batting was not used in this quilt! Instead, there is a mix of teatowels and diapers!! Yes, that's correct. When I really began to examine the quilt and take apart some of the layers so I could know more that is what I found! They were evenly spaced but not sewn together so there were no seams to contend with when quilting. Yes, I hand quilted the entire quilt and when I look at it I find the stitches to be pretty evenly spaced, which is probably why the quilt survived to the degree it did. I have been studying quilt restoration and plan on restoring this quilt so it can be displayed and used again. You might be asking about the other 2 quilts. They were the same pattern, as far as I can tell, cause somewhere along the line I used them as the "middle" of patchwork quilts, oh sometime in the late '70's, when I took up quilting once again!! Some of the appliqued pieces have fallen off on these quilts ! due to heavy use and prior to being "re-made". When you are from a family of 6 kids and everything is hand-me-down, you can imagine the wear and tear all these quilts went through. Wringer washing machine which my mom used until the middle 1970's when my dad bought her her first automatic machine! Gosh, seems like I am talking about the dark ages here, however, I can assure you this is no exaggeration! Over the last 10 or so years I have begun collecting quilts and have a variety of age ranging from the Civil War era through the 1950's. I was blessed to have both of my grandmother's to be quilters, as well as my beloved MIL who was also a quilter. In fact, from her I inherited a mass of fabrics dating back to the early 1900's. Neither she, nor her mother, threw anything away!! I have a lot of fun going through the bins and finding feedsacks from the 1920's and 30's as well as recognizing fabrics from the 1940's on up. I did throw away all the polyester fabrics!! I also ! found original quilt patterns that she designed, patterns from the Kansas City Star and Ruby McKim and other items to numerous to mention. MIL made all of her quilting templates and someday I would love to take and trace them onto paper and perhaps make a book. Some of the templates I believe to be original to her as I have yet to come across any like them. I was able to give all her grandchildren, as well as all of her surviving children (my DH's sibs) a quilt which she had made, stored away not having quilted after her death almost 4 years ago. I am STILL finding quilt blocks she experimented with and even some whole tops. Why she didn't quilt them I will never know, except that perhaps her eyesight was going long before she would admit to it! I was also priviledged, prior to her death, to have her give me a hand pieced Ocean's Wave quilt top that HER mother had pieced together, but had never been quilted. I am now in process of handquilting this top. What to do with ! all of this? Right now I share a lot with others who are doing restoration or would like to make their own "original" antique quilt. Yes, I also have a lot of muslin from her estate. As I said, she didn't throw anything away!! LOL I had best shut up here as I don't want you all mad at me on the first outing! Thanks for "listening" to me. Can you tell I'm excited about finding you? Hugs, Babette in Illinois

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Subject: NQR Entirely: Books Available From: "Maureen Flanagan" <flanaganbooksandoldlace.com> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 2004 13:11:51 -0700 X-Message-Number: 5

Hi all:

I am weeding my personal collection, and if anyone would like one or two of the books below, please let me know. Postage is about $2.

Best,

Maureen Battistella PO Box 1081 Ashland, OR 97520

Better Homes and Gardens applique Happy Easter! [sweatshirt pattern] Mother Wilkes Studley Duds, Antioch, IL 1993 Grosskopf, Susan. Kitchen Christmas Pattern C-8. That Patchwork Place, 1984 Hein, Gisela. Printing fabric by hand: beginning techniques (xlibrary) Kliot, Kaethe. Bobbin lace: form by the twisting of cords (xlibrary) Hall, Eliza. A Quilters wisdom: conversations with Aunt Jane (hard cover, new) Four seasons cross-stitch (hard cover, new) Savage, George. A concise history of interior decoration (hard cover) Tod, Osma Galliger. Joy of handweaving (xlibrary) Kroncke, Grete. Mounting handicraft: ideas and instructions for assembling and finishing (hard cover, fine)

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Subject: quilting on the westward trail From: "Judy Anne" <anne_jworldnet.att.net> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 2004 14:44:01 -0700 X-Message-Number: 6

I have a short article on this but it does reference some other resources. It's at http://www.womenfolk.com/historyofquilts/pioneer.htm

My sense is that there wasn't much quilting done while traveling west but for protection in Indian attacks.

In her 1992 Uncoverings article, Quiltmaking on the Overland Trails: Evidence from Women's Writing", Barbara Brackman pretty much concludes that when women did have time to pick up the needle it was to mend clothing.

Somewhere I have it in my head that some knitting was done. Would that make sense. I'd think it would be easier to knit in the poor evening light when women most likely finally had time to do such things. I can't remember the resource on that though.

Judy Anne

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Subject: Re: Log Cabin quilts From: "Judy Anne" <anne_jworldnet.att.net> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 2004 15:29:07 -0700 X-Message-Number: 7

Judy,

I have been wondering about the earliest dated Manx Quilt. It appears they could have been made earlier than what we have documented here. Although they weren't made exactly like we think of making a log cabin today they are basically a log cabin in design. I believe they were called 'roof' quilts as well. I wrote to the Manx National Heritage at Douglas on the Isle of Man but they didn't have a date on one. since they were utilitarian quilts apparently there isn't any recorded information from the early quilts. There is an article written by a Dr. Larch Garrad about the older quilts in that collection which I hope to obtain. Perhaps someone over on that side of the pond could find out more.

I am very interested in what you find in your research. Be sure to update us here on this list.

Judy Anne

> > Subject: Log Cabin quilts > From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> > Date: Wed, 21 Apr 2004 13:34:27 -0700 (PDT) > X-Message-Number: 10 > > --0-212088057-1082579667=:47438 > Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii > > Hello- > I have received several replies to my inquiry with regard to date and name inscribed Log Cabin quilts. Barbara Brackman's 1869 listing was mentioned. The Minnesota Historical Society has a Pineapple quilt made by Lucy Lee Lamson dated 1865. You can see it and a detail at: > http://www.mnhs.org/collections/museum/8297.html > Thank you to Linda McShannock, curator, for this information. > If you know of friends, family, fellow guild members, or local museums that have signed and/or dated Log Cabin quilts I would very much appreciate any information about them. > I realize this is my second shot at this so thanks very much! > Judy Schwender > International Quilt Study Center > Lincoln, Nebraska

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Subject: Re: Treadle Machines From: JBQUILTOKaol.com Date: Sun, 25 Apr 2004 19:44:21 EDT X-Message-Number: 8

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I bought a treadle about 6 months ago. Went to treadlon.com and subscribe for a while, hoping to get some info on using my new toy. Found more off-topic &/or challenge messages than usable info so I dropped the list. I was able to find a site that had the manual I needed (I mailed a check - it wasn't a freebee.) Spending some time trying to figure out how to make it tick is on my list of things to do while DH is away this spring. It's not quite as intuitive as setting up this new computer was - 1/2 hr from box to on-line!

Janet

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Subject: RE: Covered Wagon Women From: Babette Moorleghen <happyquilterqsbcglobal.net> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 2004 21:28:08 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

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I will have to do some searching to see where I read this but I think it was from a diary of a young girl who was going West in a covered wagon. She told how her friends gave her a "gift" of fabric squares/scraps in a basket to be used to make a quilt for her hope chest (not sure if that was what it was called). Anyway, several entries mentioned how she had this basket of fabric and she would take a piece and sew it to another piece as she walked next to her wagon. There were no "quilting bees" as those were reserved for the settling down time when families would come to help with raising a barn or in the fields. IF I remember correctly, the quilt top was finished by the time their destination was reached. I'll do some digging and see if I can find the source. Hugs, Babette in Illinois

Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> wrote:< Not one mentions quilting on the trails.

Does this mean that they didn't quilt, or at least piece, or that it was so ordinary that they didn't bother mentioning it? If piecing a bit of fabric was, to them, as everyday as flipping through a magazine to us - would they record it?

The curator at a museum of Roman artefacts here in the UK once described trying to reproduce a particular dish from a recipe found at the excavation site. They had no success until they realised that it required yeast to work. They concluded that the writer had presumably not included that in the recipe because it was just 'so obvious' that it should be there. So..did the diaries generally record just the interesting bits, or the mundane as well?

Sally W

--- You are cu

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Subject: Re: quilting on the westward trail From: "Judy Anne" <anne_jworldnet.att.net> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 2004 21:49:09 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

> My sense is that there wasn't much quilting done while traveling west but > for protection in Indian attacks.

Nothing like getting the digest in the evening and realizing you wrote a sentence that makes absolutely no sense. I think I must have accidentally deleted the middle line. It was something about quilts were used for warmth, burials and protection in Indian attacks. The idea was to show quilts were an important part of the westward trip even if few were made while traveling.

Judy Anne

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Subject: re: longevity of quilts From: "Jocelyn Martin" <jocelynmdelphiforums.com> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2004 01:00:39 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

>>> Why should the public buy a more highly priced but better made quilt that is of heirloom quality from an individual maker? Why should they learn to make their own quilt? The cost of supplies alone would far exceed the price of a store bought quilt.

Pat, When I was in college, I had a similar conversation with my roommate. My mother was of the 'buy the best quality clothing, and you'll wear them for years' school. My roommate shopped at K-Mart. She explained it, 'Sure, you can wear one good-quality shirt for 5 or 6 years, and I pay a third as much and wear the shirt I buy for 2 years. But in the end, it costs me about as much as it costs you- AND I get to have more variety!' Well, she had a point. <G> And K-Mart doesn't seem to have done much damage to the high-quality clothing lines, either.

My sister is not a quilter. She has one beautiful quilt, pieced by her husband's grandmother and quilted by our mother. She also has had several of those $39.95 quilts. I know she knows which is 'best'. But the cheap quilts provide her with two things the top-quality quilts can't: variety, and not-to-worry. :) She doesn't have to tell her children (and now, grandchildren) to not 'wallow' (as our mother called it) on the cheap quilt.

I once met a young quilter who treated quilts as something between museum art and holy scripture: she was horrified to learn that I USED my quilts on my bed. :)

I think there's plenty of room for us all- from the people who see the beauty in quilt design but who don't want to learn to make them, to those who want to use them without having to worry about destroying a piece of art, to those who want to finish UFOs to those who want to preserve their authenticity without contaminating the timeline.

After all...I still want to have pictures in my home, even though I don't want to learn to paint them myself. :)

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Subject: Re: Longevity of Quilts (long) From: "Jocelyn Martin" <jocelynmdelphiforums.com> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2004 01:00:42 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

>>> I would not buy a "quilt" that you find in Penny's, Sears or any other store that sells them, nor would I recommend them to anyone! However, most people do not want to pay what it is worth to have a real handquilted heirloom!

I suspect the majority of people buying the quilts from Penney's, etc., aren't wanting to buy an heirloom...just something to cover their beds. If you check out the Penney's catalog, it's about 80-90% quilts and only 10-20% bedspreads; in other words, by the time you find something that suits your decor and tastes, it's virtually certain that it will be a quilt, not a bedspread. That's just the way home decor is these days. And not everyone who owns a real handquilted heirloom wants to use it on their bed every day...so what are they going to buy for everyday use? :) I think there's plenty of space for the inexpensive bedcovering (for those who like to change their 'look' frequently, or who want something durable and carefree) in the bed-covering repetoire. The only problem, IMO, is when people buy it thinking they're buying quality. But then, if anyone is so foolish as to assume there's only one quality of quilts, and a $39.95 quilt is just as good as a $700 one, then they're probably buying Hyundais and thinking they've really pulled off a deal over those fools who drive a Lexus or a Jaguar. <G>

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Subject: RE: Wagon Train quilt? From: "Jocelyn Martin" <jocelynmdelphiforums.com> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2004 01:00:41 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

>>>My question regarding this... Would this then mean that Mary Pickering also accompanied her friend John Bruce Bell on the wagon train, and if she didn't... Why even bother mentioning this extra bit of information?

Melissa, I'd read this that Mary was waiting for John to come home and marry her, and used the time while he was gone to make a quilt. :) I've seen similar references to quilts made by women when their menfolk were away at war. That may not be what the curator intended, but I don't think it necessarily follows, from what was written, that she went on the wagon train with him. Sounds scandalous to me, Miss Pickering traveling with Mr. Bell! <G>

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Subject: Black figures "antique" crib quilt on eBay for $600+! From: "Judy Kelius (judysue)" <judysueptd.net> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2004 07:04:56 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

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Do the rest of you agree with me that this is a fairly new piece made to look old with tea dying? I was just browsing closed auctions in eBay and found it, too late to notify the seller. Look at the price!!! Plus you can't see who bought it to let them know.

Is there any possibility this really is old?

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=357&item=3717682142

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Subject: Re: Mary Carpenter Pickering Quilt From: Ady Hirsch <adamroninetvision.net.il> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2004 14:39:22 +0000 X-Message-Number: 7

>"Mary Carpenter Pickering (1831-1900) worked on this quilt while = >her >friend John Bruce Bell accompanied a wagon train to the Oregon = >Territory. In >American culture, quilts are often passed down through the generations, >becoming treasures commemorating their makers. Mary Pickering's quilt = >has >been cherished by 3 generations of her family." > >I found Nancy's comment interesting regarding nothing in the Holmes = >diaries >about quilting on the trail (not that it may have never happened, I >understand). And I wonder if this particular quilt has been documented >correctly, as the notation does not state any familial connection with = >John >Bruce Bell, yet the quilt has been "cherished by 3 generations of her >family.", all those credited by National Museum of American History as = >being >a part of this quilt are Bells. > >My question regarding this... Would this then mean that Mary Pickering = >also >accompanied her friend John Bruce Bell on the wagon train, and if she >didn't... Why even bother mentioning this extra bit of information? > >Melissa in Washington state

Mary Carpenter Pickering Bell made this quilt in Ohio, while waiting for the return of her friend John Bruce Bell from Oregon. According to family documentation, 19 year old Mary started the quilt "to make the time go more quickly." John, however, only returned eight years later and they were married on September 3, 1861. Mary Bywater Clark, "Treasures in the Trunk," pp. 123-4

Ady in Israel

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Subject: Re: Black figures "antique" crib quilt on eBay for $600+! From: "Wanda" <fattyoldkidhouston.rr.com> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2004 08:08:01 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

After looking at it I tend to agree...some of that black fabric does NOT look 1920 era..but I'm not an expert...hopefully one one else on the list has a better opinion....as for finding the seller...just look at the feedback and see who posted a reply for a private auction...should be easy to figure it out. Just my thought, I hate to think someone got took because they didn't know. Wanda

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Subject: Re: Longevity of Quilts (long) From: Dana at Material Pleasures <danabalsamoyahoo.com> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2004 05:26:57 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 9

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Hello all, I have a neighbor friend who from the day she learned I quilted has bombarded me with sewing alternations, split seams, and for the past 2 years a request to make a quilt for her King Sized Bed. I try to polite...you see...she has a huge chocolate labrador that she and her husband share the bed with...she is looking for something to protect her comforter. I had to eventually tell her she cannot afford me to make her a quilt...fabric alone will be $300-$400 and the time involved is huge and I charge more that a few dollars an hours. I told her to go to Macy's or Penneys for the $40 ones...it would serve her purpose...she whined they don't have what she wants...all well...she is not getting one from me...I was very insulted that she expected me to make a quilt only to have her dog lay all over it...I also do not make quilts for known smokers. Once you give a gift it is up to the person receiving it as to how it will be used...that doesn't mean I have to give one to someone who I know may misuse it. So my mother has not gotten one, nor has my mother in law. And my husband's 90 year old aunt, who he promised a quilt to, and which I made one for, will not get it, either...my last visit to their family made me realize that once his aunt passes away, it would be used as a moving blanket most likely. Let my husband make her the quilt! Maybe that is why today's quilts last...we are so careful with them because we know what have gone into them. Careful planning, financial investment, loving stitches.... I have given away several quilts...many to new babies in the family (2 to a set of twins that I never even received a thank you for!), and one to my grandmother, so I don't think I am a hoarder...well...maybe a little. My best, Dana

Material Pleasures Affordable Vintage Linens, Lace, Textiles, Buttons & More! www.material-pleasures.com

April 27th to May 2nd Auction Event at BondedSale.com Bid with Confidence My auctions at http://www.bondedsale.com/auctions.asp?74392,0,1

 

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Subject: Re: Black figures "antique" crib quilt on eBay for $600+! From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2004 05:29:05 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 10

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The first question I have is: how does the seller know it was sewn on a treadle machine? There's been a lot about treadle machines posted lately, but I don't remember seeing anything that indicated the stitch was so distinctive that it could be identified as treadle work. There are a lot of reproduction fabrics on the market now. Some of these look like Marcus Bros repros. But maybe that's where Marcus got their designs, from pieces like this one. If anyone is familiar with the thousands of patterns marketed over the past 20 years, could they tell us if this was such a pattern? Judy in Lincoln

"Judy Kelius (judysue)" <judysueptd.net> wrote: Do the rest of you agree with me that this is a fairly new piece made to look old with tea dying? I was just browsing closed auctions in eBay and found it, too late to notify the seller. Look at the price!!! Plus you can't see who bought it to let them know.

Is there any possibility this really is old?

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=357&item=3717682142

--------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Photos: High-quality 4x6 digital prints for 25¢ --0-1871676756-1082982545=:72107--

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Subject: quilt on ebay From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2004 10:11:48 -0400 X-Message-Number: 11

Judy Schwender wrote:

The first question I have is: how does the seller know it was sewn on a treadle machine? There's been a lot about treadle machines posted lately, but I don't remember seeing anything that indicated the stitch was so distinctive that it could be identified as treadle work.

This is a good question. Seems that I've heard that some of the treadles created a chain stitch. Perhaps some treadle machine expert has a good answer for this question.

Judy also wrote:

There are a lot of reproduction fabrics on the market now. Some of these look like Marcus Bros repros.

I am pretty familiar with what is available for repro. fabrics. Most of these fabrics I do not recognize as being available.

She says: But maybe that's where Marcus got their designs, from pieces like this one.

That may be exactly true.

Judy states: If anyone is familiar with the thousands of patterns marketed over the past 20 years, could they tell us if this was such a pattern?

I know that I have seen this pattern configuration before. I cannot remember where. I'll continue to look through my print resources.

All in all, the quilt looks "believeable" to me. One of the edges is raveled. Things are not quite in alignment, and the edges are wavy. The time period seems within the realm of possibility, and the tiny calicoes "add up". It seems that if this is a fake, someone would have had to go to a lot of trouble to try to make this look like authentic folk art.

I hope that others will offer their opinions, too.

Pat Cummings

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Subject: antique crib quilt From: Judy White <jawhiteinfionline.net> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2004 10:26:00 -0400 X-Message-Number: 12

The "brown-ness" looks pretty regular to me. But I want to know how someone can tell the quilt was made by a treadle machine?

Judy White

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Subject: Re: Black figures "antique" crib quilt on eBay for $600+! From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2004 10:28:40 -0400 X-Message-Number: 13

This looks to me like one of those 1980s "country look" quilts -- tea or coffee dyed. The wicking along the seam lines in the close ups just doesn't ring true for "real" aging. While I can't see all of the shirt fabrics clearly on my monitor, the first close up is identical to fabric I bought at SoFro during that time to make the country crafts I made for sale --- name on the selvage was Kessler -- she had many nice "country look" fabrics. While the "Uncle Sam" design looks very familiar, I can't identify it "for sure" as something I've seen before. It just looks like it's from the 1980s -- my opinion only -- and that if I saved everything, and kept it organized, I'd have a picture of it, snipped from a magazine ad. .

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=357&item=3717682142

Barb in rainy southeastern PA

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Subject: Re: quilt on ebay From: "Christine Thresh" <christinewinnowing.com> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2004 08:01:53 -0700 X-Message-Number: 14

Treadle machines sewed lovely straight stitches. Some machines (both hand crank and treadles) sewed a chain stitch but they were not popular for everyday sewing. Toy machines often sew chain stitches because these little machines do not need bobbins.

Christine Thresh http://www.winnowing.com

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Subject: Web address for Spring House Farm From: DDBSTUFFaol.com Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2004 11:31:26 EDT X-Message-Number: 15

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http://www.springhousefarm.com/

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Subject: Re: "sewn on a treadle machine"? From: Midnitelaptopaol.com Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2004 12:41:44 EDT X-Message-Number: 16

why would saying it was "sewn on a treadle machine" necessarily imply that the quilt was "old"?...people own treadle machines today and are able to sew on them if they choose to do that..... it's like saying something sewn by hand would make it old..maybe not...

have many of you purchased "stuff" from ebay? have you been satisfied with it/them?.... jeanL

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Subject: Identifying treadle stitches From: "Judy Kelius (judysue)" <judysueptd.net> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2004 12:43:33 -0400 X-Message-Number: 17

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I don't think there is any way to identify treadle stitches from those sewn on an electric machine. After all, sometimes the machines were identical and around here our sewing machine shops still sell treadle machines for the Amish or Mennonites who don't want to use public electricity.

If I have a machine-stitched top dating to the 19th century, I will sometimes say it was stitched on a treadle (or handcrank) but that is an assumption based on dating the piece, not by looking at the stitches. According to ISMACS, although electric machines were patented by the end of the 19th century, they weren't sold domestically until the early 20th century. Electric machines didn't catch on until the 1920s and treadles and handcranks still outsold electric machines until the end of World War II.

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Subject: Re: Black figures "antique" crib quilt on eBay for $600+! From: "Laura Syler" <texas_quilt.coairmail.net> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2004 11:55:52 -0500 X-Message-Number: 18

Barb, That fabric would be a Concord, from the 1980's....sold a TON of it in my shop. Joan Kessler was the designer. She is also the one responsible for Concord's line of Micro Dots 1980-85ish that we started using as "solid prints". Last selvage that I saw with her name on if had both her and her daughter's names, though I can't remember if she was still designing for Concord. Once THE premium 100% cotton line, I seem to find them in JoAnn's and Wal-Mart now.

To Pat's comments, it does seem to "add up" though....but still feels a little off.........at least to my eye.

Laura Syler ----- Original Message ----- From: "Barb Garrett" <bgarrett421comcast.net> To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Monday, April 26, 2004 9:28 AM Subject: [qhl] Re: Black figures "antique" crib quilt on eBay for $600+!

> This looks to me like one of those 1980s "country look" quilts -- tea or > coffee dyed. The wicking along the seam lines in the close ups just > doesn't ring true for "real" aging. While I can't see all of the shirt > fabrics clearly on my monitor, the first close up is identical to fabric > I bought at SoFro during that time to make the country crafts I made for > sale --- name on the selvage was Kessler -- she had many nice "country > look" fabrics. While the "Uncle Sam" design looks very familiar, I > can't identify it "for sure" as something I've seen before. It just > looks like it's from the 1980s -- my opinion only -- and that if I saved > everything, and kept it organized, I'd have a picture of it, snipped > from a magazine ad. . > > http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=357&item=3717682142 > > Barb in rainy southeastern PA > > > --- > You are currently subscribed to qhl as: texas_quilt.coairmail.net. > To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1514145Nlyris.quiltropolis.com

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Subject: Re: "sewn on a treadle machine"? From: Dana at Material Pleasures <danabalsamoyahoo.com> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2004 10:03:48 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 19

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Hi Jean,

I have bought and sold on ebay and am 95% satisfied. As a seller you have to be as descriptive as possible, as honest as possible, and answer all questions that come up. As a buyer, you HAVE to ask questions, many sellers are not knowledgeable about what they are selling so it may not be big deal to them if that quilt top doesn't lie flat, or the binding is starting to fray. Ask about shipping costs or payment options. You have to look at all aspects of the transaction, not just what you are buying. And always check a seller's feedback rating.

Good luck, Dana

 

Material Pleasures Affordable Vintage Linens, Lace, Textiles, Buttons & More! www.material-pleasures.com

April 27th to May 2nd Auction Event at BondedSale.com Bid with Confidence My auctions at http://www.bondedsale.com/auctions.asp?74392,0,1

 

--0-431950851-1082999028=:74724--

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Subject: Re: Longevity of Quilts (long) From: alanalankelchner.com Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2004 10:05:43 -0700 X-Message-Number: 20

I've been asked many times to make someone a quilt for the bed. And my immediate response is to determine the intentions of the asker, after one or two nearly fainted at the cost. Do you want an heirloom or a bedspread ? At this point, *all* inquiries wanted a bedspread, so I've automatically suggested Penney's. They're inexpensive, easy to acquire - and about the time you're ready to change the bedroom decor, it's time to replace the thing anyway.

I remember being absolutely shocked that people would buy commercially made quilts. No longer. I would much rather have these people use a quilt made for their purposes, then expect that they would all have my sensibilities for fine workmanship.

Besides, I then have a better chance of acquiring the good stuff !

Alan

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Subject: Re: Identifying treadle stitches From: Sylvia Adair <piecethepastwi.rr.com> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2004 12:12:26 -0500 X-Message-Number: 21

As a sewing machine collector and user, I had to chime in on this discussion. As many of you have said, there is absolutely no way to tell stitches made on a treadle or a hand crank from stitches made on an electric machine. Even chain stitch machines were electrified in the 1920s and sold as electrics for at least another 20 years. Most people aren't fanatics (like me!) about these old machines, and they may think that machine stitching on a quilt means a newer quilt. I make all my quilts on treadles and hand cranks, and when I tell people that, they look closely at the stitches. They're often surprised to find no difference. Occasionally I've seen a seller on ebay identify stitching as made on a treadle because the stitches look bad (poor tension, etc.) but we all know that can happen on any machine. Treadles are often exactly the same as electric machines, it's just the power that's different. Some Amish women actually use modern fancy machines (with lots of built-in stitches) but make them work with treadle or battery power instead of electricity. Well, I'll climb back down off my soapbox now. Have a lovely day, all. Sylvia Adair Germantown, Wisconsin

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Subject: And the name of the block is.............. From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2004 13:52:18 -0400 X-Message-Number: 22

Hi there:

This has been driving me nuts all day so I am jubilant to have tracked down the name of the block. It is Oklahoma Boomer, entry #218.2, Encyclopedia of Pieced Patterns, by Barbara Brackman. The block was published by the Ladies Art Company, 1898.

Many of the prints used in the ebay version look to be scrap bag retrievals from before the turn of the (20th) century.

Pat Cummings

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Subject: Re: And the name of the block is.............. From: "Judy Kelius (judysue)" <judysueptd.net> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2004 15:01:40 -0400 X-Message-Number: 23

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The block is very similar to the Oklahoma Boomer, but not exactly - the LAC block has a pointed hat (like a tin man) but the one on eBay had an Uncle Sam type top hat.

It is still my opinion that the quilt on eBay is of recent vintage. The ties are also another characteristic of similar quilts sold in countryish gift shops. Plus I still have some of that star and whirl indigo fabric (1980s or 90s) in my stash. You could probably make a quilt like this in half a day or less.

At 01:52 PM 4/26/2004, you wrote: >Hi there: > >This has been driving me nuts all day so I am jubilant to have tracked >down the name of the block. It is Oklahoma Boomer, entry #218.2, >Encyclopedia of Pieced Patterns, by Barbara Brackman. The block was >published by the Ladies Art Company, 1898. > >Many of the prints used in the ebay version look to be scrap bag >retrievals from before the turn of the (20th) century. > >Pat Cummings

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Subject: Re: "sewn on a treadle machine"? From: "jocelynmdelphiforums.com" <jocelynmdelphiforums.com> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2004 20:07:55 +0000 X-Message-Number: 24

> have many of you purchased "stuff" from ebay? have you been satisfied wit= h=20 > it/them?.... =20 Jean, Keep a list of sellers. Some are scrupulously honest, and you can rely abso= lutely on their estimates of age, and descriptions of damage. OLDQUILTS and= FRENCH72 come to mind here. Others don't give a hoot, so long as they can find a gullible buyer. They'l= l label something with hot pink and lime green fabric in it as '1930s'- bec= ause 1930s sells better than 1960s. Still others don't know anything, so they post any old description that see= ms alluring....including copying them from another quilt's description.

Spend some time looking at the descriptions and making notes of whom seems = honest and knowledgeable, and don't deal with the others, unless you WANT a= 1960s acid-trip quilt. <G>

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Subject: Oklahomer Boomer variation From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2004 16:25:24 -0400 X-Message-Number: 25

Judy Sue Kelius wrote:

The block is very similar to the Oklahoma Boomer, but not exactly - the LAC block has a pointed hat (like a tin man) but the one on eBay had an Uncle Sam type top hat.

It is still my opinion that the quilt on eBay is of recent vintage. The ties are also another characteristic of similar quilts sold in countryish gift shops. Plus I still have some of that star and whirl indigo fabric (1980s or 90s) in my stash. You could probably make a quilt like this in half a day or less.

Hello again on this rainy day:

Okay, the hat is different. Let's call the block "Oklahoma Boomer" variation!

I don't see anyone else stepping forward with an exact pattern match from an antique source. At least, finding this block places the date of 1920 within the realm of possiblity. From a construction viewpoint, it would be easier to make a square hat. This block looks like a good candidate for paper piecing and fairly simple to do, however I would estimate more than one afternoon to make it. :)

As far as tying, I have quilts in my antique collection that date from both before and after the time period stated on the quilt (1920s), so I think that the act of tying a quilt, in and of itself, is not a good indicator of time period. Ties only demonstrate the individual quilter's preference or in some cases, their lack of skill in hand quilting, or a deficit of time or ambition. Certain quilts, particularly small quilts, lend themselves well to tyeing as a finishing treatment.

Judy Sue, you asked our opinions. Several of us have given our thoughts, based on our own experience, knowledge, and observations. If you are looking for a universal consensus of opinion, you probably will not find it here. It seems that, among other things, you are questioning the integrity of the seller, and this, based on low-resolution digital images on the internet? Somehow it just doesn't seem very fair. I do not know the seller or the buyer.

I enjoyed seeing the ebay auction and I thank you for posting it. I will not, now or ever, be a part of a witch hunt that seeks to discredit someone or to alert the buyer that he/she may have bought a "fake", especially when there seems to be lack of compelling evidence that definitively proves this. In fact, I would bet that anyone bringing false accusations of this type could be sued for libel. Just a word of caution.

I have shared what I know, to be the best of my knowledge. I seek the truth at all times. I hope that others will do the same.

Pat Cummings

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Subject: Alliance for American Quilts posts first DAR interview From: Bob Shaw <shaw.bobverizon.net> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2004 16:46:02 -0400 X-Message-Number: 26

I am pleased to announce that the The Alliance for American Quilts' first National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution (NSDAR) interview has been posted on The Alliance's website (www.centerforthequilt.org). The interview is the result of a unique partnership between The Alliance for American Quilts and the NSDAR to record the stories of living quiltmakers around the United States through Quilters' S.O.S. - Save Our Stories, a project of The Alliance for American Quilts.

The interview of Betty Ellen Hathaway Madry was conducted by Frances Price of the NSDAR's Samuel Johnston Chapter in Raleigh, North Carolina. Betty, who is 75, has produced 58 quilts, and her humor is evident. When asked if she was a native North Carolinian, she replied, "No but I tell people I got here as quickly as I could." Betty took up quilting after her granddaughter came to live with them.

I'm sure you will enjoy reading this interview or any of the other 235 interviews with American quiltmakers that have been posted to The Alliance's Center for the Quilt Online to date. The interview with Betty can be accessed directly at: http://www.centerforthequilt.org/qsos/show_interview.php?pbd=qsos- a0a2y7-a

Be sure to paste in the entire url.

Robert Shaw Executive Director The Alliance for American Quilts Tel//fax: 802/985-0737 shaw.bobverizon.net www.centerforthequilt.org

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Subject: Re: Purchased "stuff" on Ebay? From: "Ilene Brown" <ilene3earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2004 16:52:48 -0400 X-Message-Number: 27

Yes, I have bought too much from Ebay. It is addicting. I am 99% happy with everything I have received. I have bought Sewing Machines, fabric, books, quilt tops, quilts (unfinished), sewing assessories, thread, and art prints (sewing related). Only 2 times out of over 100 have I been disappointed. And one of those the seller let me send back. I am planning on selling soon. Ilene of Raleigh, NC

> [Original Message] > From: <Midnitelaptopaol.com> > To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> > Date: 4/26/2004 12:44:05 PM > Subject: [qhl] Re: "sewn on a treadle machine"? > > why would saying it was "sewn on a treadle machine" necessarily imply that > the quilt was "old"?...people own treadle machines today and are able to sew on > them if they choose to do that..... > it's like saying something sewn by hand would make it old..maybe not... > > have many of you purchased "stuff" from ebay? have you been satisfied with > it/them?.... > jeanL > > > --- >

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Subject: Treadles From: "crossland_n_j Crossland" <crossland_n_jmsn.com> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2004 16:51:47 -0400 X-Message-Number: 28

I put off saying anything about treadles as they are one of my addictions. I used to have 13 of them but I have pared down to five. They are so much fun. When I would bring one home, the first thing I would do is clean and oil. Be careful of the decals as they can be removed with cleaners. I then put on a new belt. I get my treadle belts from my local sew & vac. There is a large type staple on one end. The other end is cut the length needed and a hole is placed to put the other end of the staple into. I use an awl or an ice pick to put a hole in my belts. Of course, a new needle and you cannot get a better stitch. I've seen redwork embroidery done on the chain stitch machines. That's fun too. Julie from Hudson, NH

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Subject: QHL: Purchased stuff on Ebay From: Laurajbraol.com Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2004 17:35:45 EDT X-Message-Number: 29

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I too have spent lots of time (and money) on Ebay and have always been satisfied with my purchases. I'm careful to purchase from sellers with good reputations and good feedback. I bought the most fabulous quilt on Ebay a few years ago--one that was brought to my attention by this group: a red and green berry quilt from the mid 1800's. I paid more than I have ever paid for a quilt in my life and was very nervous until it arrived. It was even more spectacular than I could have imagined.

Right now I am redecorating a mountain cabin and was using some of my old Laura Ashley bedding. I needed more and found everything I needed, and more, on Ebay, even though the pattern was discontinued years ago.

The thing to do is to check out the seller carefully, read the comments from other buyers in the feedback section, and ask questions before you bid. Read the descritption of the item also--looks alone can be deceiving. Try not to get caught up in the last minute bidding frenzy. Put what you want to pay for the item as your highest bid. If you are desperate to win the auction, hold off on your final bid till the very end of the auction--and hope your computer is in its high-speed mode.

It also helps when you have a friend like Yvonne, who calls my attention to every red and green appliqued quilt that shows up for sale. Thank goodness she's been too busy to do that lately.

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Subject: Re: And the name of the block is.............. From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2004 18:11:24 -0400 X-Message-Number: 30

I just had a chance to check Brackman's book, and I would have to disagree with you Pat -- I don't think the ebay quilt is Oklahoma Boomer, entry #218.2. The hats are different -- one is made of 3 triangles, the other 4 rectangles. Boomer doesn't have any hands, which the other one does, and the proportions of the torso and legs are very different. I think whoever designed the ebay quilt may have been inspired by boomer, but they are different blocks to me. Keep in mind I'm a retired geometry teacher, so I look at blocks differently than some people <grin>.

I was able to find my piece of the sashing fabric -- it says MARCUS BROS. TEXTILES INC. on the selvage, and is from my "early 80s" accumulation. My husband and I held it up to an enlargement on the computer, and the orientations of the star points and crescents match this fabric. When I discovered how to "double enlarge" the pictures, I was able to identify 3 other fabrics that look like stuff I used for crafts back then. These are more indicators to me that the quilt has a 1980s creation date -- again, just my opinion, based on many indicators.

The method of joining the front to back is also indicative of the crafts era -- it was called pillowcase construction and described and taught as a "quick way to finish a quilt without having to put on a binding". The lack of batting and the location of the ties are also "gut indicators" to me of it's age.

Just my thoughts, since Judy asked. This is a quilt I'd have to feel the texture of the fabric before I could say it's 1920s or 1980s -- which of course we can't do on computer.

Barb in still raining southeastern PA

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Subject: Re: Black figures "antique" crib quilt on eBay for $600+! From: Jo Horsey <jhorseymail.newnanutilities.org> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2004 18:28:37 -0400 X-Message-Number: 31

I am not an expert either. However this is similar to a new quilt I bought in a gift shop about 15 years ago. Mine also has black figures (mine are women with aprons) and the placement and number of the blocks and unusually elongated piecing of the figures looks a lot like mine, but that doesn't mean anything. Mine is not tied or quilted at all. I saw one identical to mine that was offered on ebay, and went for a price that didn't seem even "imagineable", but I didn't know whether I should contact the seller about the age or not. While I dithered, the auction ended. In this case, since the seller guarantees the item to be authentic as described, they must intend to stand behind it, or perhaps it was represented to them as authentic before *they* bought it, and they believe it to be so. We all see and learn interesting things *every* day on this list! thanks, Jo, in Newnan

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Subject: baby quilt on ebay From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2004 18:39:20 -0400 X-Message-Number: 32

I have written to the seller with a request for more information. I will let you know if I get any answers.

Pat

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Subject: re: And the name of the block is..... From: Gail Ingram <gingramtcainternet.com> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2004 18:18:34 -0500 X-Message-Number: 33

Here I am, down South where spring has come and is on its way out, just shocked as anyone could possibly be that Barbara Garrett, girl geometrician, is old enough to have fabrics on hand from the '80's! Let alone can double and triple-zoom in on them I thought all the Ringo Gang members were still in pinafores and rompers then. Barb, you get to be the dorm mom.

<g> Gail

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Subject: Seller's response From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2004 20:15:06 -0400 X-Message-Number: 34

I asked the seller if she knew when, where, or at what time, specifically, the quilt was made. She replied that with doubts as serious as mine, she would be happy if I passed on bidding on the auction. Since the auction had already ended, I found this remark to be a little bit odd. She also stated that the quilt was from a San Francisco estate.

With no further information forthcoming, it seems that we are left with nothing more than our own guesses, suppositions, and observations.

I thought that it couldn't hurt to at least ask for more clarification.

Pat

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Subject: re: And the name of the block is..... From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2004 22:33:59 -0400 X-Message-Number: 35

Actually, Gail, the 80s fabrics aren't the "furthest ones back in the stash" -- I have piles of 70s fabrics -- those bright crayon colored cotton and poly/cotton small florals. That's all I could find when I first started quilting -- plus a nice pile of 36" wide Ely & Walkers <grin>. My pinafore and rompers days are a bit before the 80s <grin>. Then there's the stacks of 90s repros. Now, if I really was as organized as the above sounds <grin> -- then I'd be able to find things <grin>.

Barb in spring/summer southeastern PA



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