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Quilters Find a way to care

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Subject: late 20th century quilting & double knits From: "Judy Anne" <anne_j@worldnet.att.net> Date: Wed, 28 Apr 2004 22:20:33 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

>>Along those same lines, a quilt made in the late 20th century quilting revival should be recognized as a valuable part of quilt history in its own right - as much as a 1930's. <<

I've been thinking about this too. Has there been a book out yet on this period? I haven't seen one. What about all those quilts made for centennial celebrations?

While I've always considered the quilts my grandmother and great grandmother made as something really special it's dawning on me that those doubleknit quilts my mother in law made with her church group are a part of history as well. I have a quilt that was made for her by her church group when she had a stroke that was simple squares and tied. Nothing fancy but a part of history none the less. My kids each have a pillow she made for them that is a doubleknit crazy quilt with fancy stitches done in yarn.

I am beginning to rethink those lowly doubleknits.

Judy Anne

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Subject: Redwork query From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrow@patmedia.net> Date: Thu, 29 Apr 2004 02:21:03 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

The block directly above the central initialed and dated block in a redwork quilt I own is a redwork portrait of a woman in profile about 8 inches square.

Is the redwork block a portrait of Caroline Lavinia Scott Harrison?

I found a photo of Mrs. Harrison on-line and it sure looks to me as though the quilter copied the pose, the hairdo, and even the ruffled high neckline from this photo. The quilt is dated big as life in the block below this portrait "1891" and Harrison was president then.

Caroline died in 1892, so it makes sense that she might have been memorialized in a quilt block. My thought is that the maker probably made the date block before Mrs. Harrison died, and then did the portrait as a memorial after she died.

I'd like to know if this was a published design or if my maker did the drawing herself. Have any of you also seen a profile redwork portrait of a woman with bags under her eyes, frizzy bangs and a chignon, little earrings, and a high ruffled neckline? She is facing to the right.

thanks.

Judy " Ringo" in Ringoes, NJ judygrow@patmedia.net

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Subject: Hexagons into log cabins? From: "Sally Ward" <sallytatters@ntlworld.com> Date: Thu, 29 Apr 2004 10:01:53 +0100 X-Message-Number: 3

< Our British chat line folks NEED to do some research in this area--a fascinating subject for a dissertation perhaps? Don Beld

I didn't really understand what you were getting at with this 'hexagons into log cabins' idea. Could you explain it again? What time period are you considering, what fabrics, and what type of construction? The first stumbling block to me is that our hexagons were pieced over papers, our log cabins on fabric foundation, and I don't quite see how the one might have crossed over into the other. I don't recall seeing anything like log cabin incorporated in early hexagon quilts, or frame quilts. We don't have any very early log cabins that I have been able to track down (people have asked before), and the vast majority of those we do have from the turn of the century seem to be heavy fabrics - wools, velvets etc - whose use was made possible by the foundation piecing method, whereas hexagons over papers require a lightweight fabric (unless you are working with huge hexagons as people did in the 'funky' 60s <G>).

Was it something you saw in a quilt that gave you this idea?

Sally W

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Subject: Re: late 20th century quilting & double knits From: "Marcia Kaylakie" <marciark@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 29 Apr 2004 05:00:32 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Yes, there is a book coming out about quilting and quiltmakers from 1970-2000 (dates may be slightly off). the woman was on faculty with me at AQS this year. Marcia ----- Original Message ----- From: "Judy Anne" <anne_j@worldnet.att.net> To: "Quilt History List" <qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Thursday, April 29, 2004 12:20 AM Subject: [qhl] late 20th century quilting & double knits

> >>Along those same lines, a quilt made in the late 20th century quilting > revival should be recognized as a valuable part of quilt history in its own > right - > as much as a 1930's. << > > I've been thinking about this too. Has there been a book out yet on this > period? I haven't seen one. What about all those quilts made for > centennial celebrations? > > While I've always considered the quilts my grandmother and great grandmother > made as something really special it's dawning on me that those doubleknit > quilts my mother in law made with her church group are a part of history as > well. I have a quilt that was made for her by her church group when she had > a stroke that was simple squares and tied. Nothing fancy but a part of > history none the less. My kids each have a pillow she made for them that is > a doubleknit crazy quilt with fancy stitches done in yarn. > > I am beginning to rethink those lowly doubleknits. > > Judy Anne > > > --- >

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Subject: Re: Summary- ebay quilt From: "Wanda" <fattyoldkid@houston.rr.com> Date: Thu, 29 Apr 2004 08:05:46 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

I have to comment...I HAVE LEARNED SO MUCH from this conversation on this little quilt! PLEASE keep us learning. Thanks to all who had some information on it....I hope someone sends this email to the seller....It's a shame that she (the seller) is going to make quilters look bad by her misrep (if that is the case)...Or maybe someone should just contact ebay...I know they would like to hear all this. Wanda in Sunny warm Texas

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Subject: That eBay crib quilt From: "Barbara Vlack" <cptvdeo@sbcglobal.net> Date: Thu, 29 Apr 2004 08:19:14 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

I recently viewed an eBay site where the seller was selling pirated software. I know the high bidder was warned by another source that this software he/she was about to win was illegally copied software. Suddenly the auctions by the seller (he was running several with the same item) had the statement for the high bidder: "User ID kept private."

I strongly suspect this is not for privacy reasons to protect the bidder but rather to protect the scam of the seller so the bidder does not get alerted by outside sources.

It may sound good "on paper" but the reality is not altruism toward the bidder.

Quite a coincidence how this "User ID kept private" showed up for this crib quilt auction.

I don't know if alerting eBay about misinformation will bring forth any effort to protect the bidders. I would hope so, since I also hope that eBay would want to protect a reputation. They can't possibly police all the sellers, but if there is an alert about one, would they take some action????

For this crib quilt in question, I, too, recognize some of the 80s vintage fabrics and have some (or I did). I also know about the knife edge finish for an imported quilt that quickly distinguishes it from a traditional American quilt, even if it is supposed to look like an Afro-American quilt. The seller puts himself into great question with a few statements, such as dating the quilt to be c 1920s; declaring aniline dyes were used (a cute phrase that tends to lend some authority, albeit questionable) and that it was made with a treadle machine (how does he know that, too?).

The next thing is, buyer beware. Any authoritative collector of this type of quilt would know that it's a fake. I'm sorry that anyone else who thought this was a "rare find" (another seller statement), was taken.

Barb Vlack cptvdeo@sbcglobal.net

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Subject: Re: That eBay crib quilt From: "Judy Kelius (judysue)" <judysue@ptd.net> Date: Thu, 29 Apr 2004 10:01:44 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

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>I don't know if alerting eBay about misinformation will bring forth >any effort to protect the bidders. I would hope so, since I also >hope that eBay would want to protect a reputation. They can't >possibly police all the sellers, but if there is an alert about one, >would they take some action????

eBay will not usually take any action unless the complaint comes from the auction buyer. One of the worst examples I ever saw was someone buying a new "Amish" Double Wedding Ring crib quilt on eBay for less than $50 - it was advertised as such with a dated label with the maker's signature. Someone bought it and relisted it using the same eBay ID they bought it with, removed the label and advertised it as a vintage Lancaster CountyAmish DWR crib quilt, where it brought $500+! (Anyone familiar with Amish quilts would also know that the DWR pattern was not one used by Lancaster County Amish.) It was easy to look up the old auction, compare the two, and see what had happened. I and several other people wrote eBay about this obvious case of deception, but they would not do anything unless the buyer complained, and of course in that case I believe the buyers' IDs were hidden too. And if you do write a note to a buyer warning them about something like this, eBay might censure YOU for "auction interference"! So "buyer beware" is the best advice for buying on eBay, especially if you are buying something expensive. Ask questions, check feedback, and look at the seller's other auctions (including those which have ended) to see if they have sold similar items. Don't be afraid to ask a seller for his/her credentials and source of information in the description. And ask about return policies before you bid . . . a creditable seller will guarantee his/her items as described.

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Subject: Detectives From: "Rachel Greco" <grandmasattic@compuserve.com> Date: Thu, 29 Apr 2004 08:15:46 -0700 X-Message-Number: 8

I have thoroughly enjoyed the discussion about the "Rare Black Figurative Baby Quilt, circa 1920", ebay auction 3717682142, that was held on the list recently.

What impressed me the most was the way all of you shared your ideas and opinions about various aspects of this quilt and nobody went crazy and started beating others over the head about their opinions. (Big Grin!)

This could truly have been a great show on television. Imagine it: a group of quilt detectives take on a project, various members analyze the quilt from different standpoints (dyes, stitches, bindings, fabrics, etc.), and a final conclusion is determined and made. Viewers get to learn about dyes, treadles, bindings, when the term "reproduction fabric" came into use, and more. It would educate the public and perhaps even save a few historic quilts from destruction. Call me nuts but this is exciting stuff!

I for one loved this. Thanks Pat for summing it all up afterwards. This was wonderful.

Rachel Greco Grandma's Attic Sewing Emporium, Inc. Dallas, Oregon

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Subject: Alliance for American Quilts launches streaming video from important quilt films From: Bob Shaw <shaw.bob@verizon.net> Date: Thu, 29 Apr 2004 13:46:37 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

--Apple-Mail-6--273100724 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset=WINDOWS-1252; format=flowed

I am pleased to let you know that The Alliance for American Quilts has=20=

just launched streaming video from three of the most important=20 documentary films about quilts ever made:

=95 The Quilts of Gee's Bend, created to accompany the current traveling=20=

exhibition of the same name =95 Two influential films by Pat Ferrero: Hearts and Hands and Quilts in=20=

Women's Lives

The films can be accessed at=20 www.centerforthequilt.org/specialfeatures.html

The Alliance for American Quilts is dedicated to making high quality=20 quilt research and information available to everyone. As part of that=20 effort, The Alliance is working with scholars, curators, film makers,=20 collectors, and institutions to bring important contributions to quilt=20=

study to the internet. The Alliance=92s Special Features pages present a=20=

variety of resources that significantly enhance understanding of the=20 quilt's central place in American history, art, and society.

The Quilts of Gee's Bend The Gee's Bend film takes viewers inside the isolated African-American=20=

community of Gee's Bend, Alabama, and introduces them to a remarkable=20 group of quiltmakers whose work is taking the museum world by storm.=20 Viewers see the women quilting together, and hear them singing gospel=20 songs and talking about what quiltmaking means to them. What they say=20 cuts to the heart of what quilts are all about=97family, community,=20 beauty, creativity, and artistic expression.

The Alliance is grateful to the Tinwood Alliance, organizers of the=20 Quilts of Gee's Bend exhibition, for permitting use of their video on=20=

the Web.

Films by Pat Ferrero Pat Ferrero's two classic quilt films, made in the 1980s, are still=20 relevant today, and should be seen by everyone who cares about quilts.

Hearts and Hands describes the roles women and quilts played in the=20 great movements and events of the 19th-century=97from the Civil War and=20=

the abolition of slavery to Temperance and Suffrage.

Quilts in Women's Lives was the first film to document living=20 quiltmakers and what quilts mean to them.

The Alliance thanks Pat Ferrero for sharing clips from her=20 award-winning films, and BERNINA=AE of America for sponsoring Quilts in=20=

Women's Lives.

The Alliance for American Quilts, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization=20 since 1993, brings together scholars, teachers, and collectors; quilt=20 makers and designers; and the quilt industry in the cause of=20 documenting, preserving and sharing our great American quilt heritage.=20=

The Alliance is committed to collecting the rich stories that historic=20=

and contemporary quilts tell about our nation=92s diverse people and=20 communities.

I hope you will enjoy the films. Please tell your friends!,

Bob Shaw

Robert Shaw Executive Director The Alliance for American Quilts Tel//fax: 802/985-0737 shaw.bob@verizon.net www.centerforthequilt.org

--Apple-Mail-6--273100724 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/enriched; charset=WINDOWS-1252

<fontfamily><param>Palatino</param><x-tad-smaller>I am pleased to let you know that The Alliance for American Quilts has just launched streaming video from three of the most important documentary films about quilts ever made:=20

</x-tad-smaller></fontfamily><fontfamily><param>Palatino</param><bigger>=20=

=95 </bigger><italic><x-tad-smaller>The Quilts of Gee's Bend</x-tad-smaller></italic><x-tad-smaller>, created to accompany the current traveling exhibition of the same name=20

= </x-tad-smaller></fontfamily><fontfamily><param>Palatino</param><bigger>=95=

</bigger><x-tad-smaller>Two influential films by Pat Ferrero: </x-tad-smaller><italic><x-tad-smaller>Hearts and Hands</x-tad-smaller></italic><x-tad-smaller> and </x-tad-smaller><italic><x-tad-smaller>Quilts in Women's Lives</x-tad-smaller></italic><x-tad-smaller>=20

</x-tad-smaller><bold><x-tad-smaller>

</x-tad-smaller></bold><x-tad-smaller>The films can be accessed at www.centerforthequilt.org/specialfeatures.html

The Alliance for American Quilts is dedicated to making high quality quilt research and information available to everyone. As part of that effort, The Alliance is working with scholars, curators, film makers, collectors, and institutions to bring important contributions to quilt study to the internet. The Alliance=92s Special Features pages present a variety of resources that significantly enhance understanding of the quilt's central place in American history, art, and = society.</x-tad-smaller></fontfamily><fontfamily><param>Palatino</param><b= igger>=20

</bigger><bold><x-tad-smaller>The Quilts of Gee's = Bend</x-tad-smaller></bold></fontfamily><fontfamily><param>Palatino</param= ><bigger>=20

</bigger><x-tad-smaller>The Gee's Bend film takes viewers inside the isolated African-American community of Gee's Bend, Alabama, and introduces them to a remarkable group of quiltmakers whose work is taking the museum world by storm. Viewers see the women quilting together, and hear them singing gospel songs and talking about what quiltmaking means to them. What they say cuts to the heart of what quilts are all about=97family, community, beauty, creativity, and artistic = expression.</x-tad-smaller></fontfamily><fontfamily><param>Palatino</param= ><bigger>=20

</bigger><x-tad-smaller>The Alliance is grateful to the Tinwood Alliance, organizers of the Quilts of Gee's Bend exhibition, for permitting use of their video on the Web.

</x-tad-smaller><bold><x-tad-smaller>Films by Pat Ferrero

</x-tad-smaller></bold><x-tad-smaller>Pat Ferrero's two classic quilt films, made in the 1980s, are still relevant today, and should be seen by everyone who cares about quilts.

</x-tad-smaller><bold><italic><x-tad-smaller>Hearts and Hands</x-tad-smaller></italic></bold><x-tad-smaller> describes the roles women and quilts played in the great movements and events of the 19th-century=97from the Civil War and the abolition of slavery to Temperance and Suffrage.

</x-tad-smaller><bold><italic><x-tad-smaller>Quilts in Women's Lives</x-tad-smaller></italic></bold><x-tad-smaller> was the first film to document living quiltmakers and what quilts mean to them.

The Alliance thanks Pat Ferrero for sharing clips from her award-winning films, and BERNINA=AE of America for sponsoring </x-tad-smaller><italic><x-tad-smaller>Quilts in Women's Lives</x-tad-smaller></italic><x-tad-smaller>.

The Alliance for American Quilts, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization since 1993, brings together scholars, teachers, and collectors; quilt makers and designers; and the quilt industry in the cause of documenting, preserving and sharing our great American quilt heritage. The Alliance is committed to collecting the rich stories that historic and contemporary quilts tell about our nation=92s diverse people and communities.

I hope you will enjoy the films. Please tell your friends!,

Bob Shaw

Robert Shaw

Executive Director

The Alliance for American Quilts=20

Tel//fax: 802/985-0737

shaw.bob@verizon.net

www.centerforthequilt.org </x-tad-smaller>

</fontfamily>=

--Apple-Mail-6--273100724--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Alliance for American Quilts launches streaming video from important quilt films From: Bob Shaw <shaw.bob@verizon.net> Date: Thu, 29 Apr 2004 13:54:39 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

I am pleased to let you know that The Alliance for American Quilts has=20=

just launched streaming video from three of the most important=20 documentary films about quilts ever made:

=95 The Quilts of Gee's Bend, created to accompany the current traveling=20=

exhibition of the same name =95 Two influential films by Pat Ferrero: Hearts and Hands and Quilts in=20=

Women's Lives

The films can be accessed at=20 www.centerforthequilt.org/specialfeatures.html

The Alliance for American Quilts is dedicated to making high quality=20 quilt research and information available to everyone. As part of that=20 effort, The Alliance is working with scholars, curators, film makers,=20 collectors, and institutions to bring important contributions to quilt=20=

study to the internet. The Alliance=92s Special Features pages present a=20=

variety of resources that significantly enhance understanding of the=20 quilt's central place in American history, art, and society.

The Quilts of Gee's Bend The Gee's Bend film takes viewers inside the isolated African-American=20=

community of Gee's Bend, Alabama, and introduces them to a remarkable=20 group of quiltmakers whose work is taking the museum world by storm.=20 Viewers see the women quilting together, and hear them singing gospel=20 songs and talking about what quiltmaking means to them. What they say=20 cuts to the heart of what quilts are all about=97family, community,=20 beauty, creativity, and artistic expression.

The Alliance is grateful to the Tinwood Alliance, organizers of the=20 Quilts of Gee's Bend exhibition, for permitting use of their video on=20=

the Web.

Films by Pat Ferrero Pat Ferrero's two classic quilt films, made in the 1980s, are still=20 relevant today, and should be seen by everyone who cares about quilts.

Hearts and Hands describes the roles women and quilts played in the=20 great movements and events of the 19th-century=97from the Civil War and=20=

the abolition of slavery to Temperance and Suffrage.

Quilts in Women's Lives was the first film to document living=20 quiltmakers and what quilts mean to them.

The Alliance thanks Pat Ferrero for sharing clips from her=20 award-winning films, and BERNINA=AE of America for sponsoring Quilts in=20=

Women's Lives.

The Alliance for American Quilts, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization=20 since 1993, brings together scholars, teachers, and collectors; quilt=20 makers and designers; and the quilt industry in the cause of=20 documenting, preserving and sharing our great American quilt heritage.=20=

The Alliance is committed to collecting the rich stories that historic=20=

and contemporary quilts tell about our nation=92s diverse people and=20 communities.

I hope you will enjoy the films. Please tell your friends!,

Bob Shaw

Robert Shaw Executive Director The Alliance for American Quilts Tel//fax: 802/985-0737 shaw.bob@verizon.net www.centerforthequilt.org

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Corrected link From: Bob Shaw <shaw.bob@verizon.net> Date: Thu, 29 Apr 2004 15:09:36 -0400 X-Message-Number: 11

My apologies. The correct link to our new Special Features page is

http://www.centerforthequilt.org/specialfeatures/index.html

All best wishes,

Bob

Robert Shaw Executive Director The Alliance for American Quilts Tel//fax: 802/985-0737 shaw.bob@verizon.net www.centerforthequilt.org

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Subject: signed log cabin quilts From: "Laura Fisher" <laurafisher@netlink1.net> Date: Thu, 29 Apr 2004 10:32:09 -0700 X-Message-Number: 12

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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I have a most interesting one that served as a fund raising quilt. It is = fashioned to look like a Log Cabin quilt, with mini Barn Raising = sections EMBROIDERED in red thread on a white linen cloth to indicate = the seams of the "strips" on which the names of donors were written in = ink. In addition to the many names are the amounts they contributed from = 5 cents to several dollars, which I have not seen before on a = fundraising quilt. Every so often there is a central element indicating = the total amount of donations gathered by a particular signer.

A couple of years ago, I had an actual Log Cabin quilt done in red and = white in which each strip had a name embroidered on it. Probably this = was made for the same purpose.

In both cases, there was no town, state or any organization indicated, = so what we history minded folk are left with are hundreds of names, but = no other clues as to where or why they were made.

Is it possible to send pictures to this site, or do we have to do that = link thing, which I have yet to learn on the computer!

Laura Fisher

------=_NextPart_000_0129_01C42DD5.39D57170 Content-Type: text/html; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3DContent-Type content=3D"text/html; = charset=3Diso-8859-1"> <META content=3D"MSHTML 6.00.2800.1400" name=3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>I have a most interesting one that = served as a fund=20 raising quilt. It is fashioned to look like a Log Cabin quilt, = with&nbsp;mini=20 Barn Raising sections EMBROIDERED in red thread&nbsp;on a white linen = cloth=20 to&nbsp;indicate the seams of&nbsp;&nbsp;the "strips" on which the names = of=20 donors were written in ink. In addition to the many names&nbsp;are the = amounts=20 they contributed from 5 cents to several dollars, which I have not seen = before=20 on a fundraising quilt. Every so often there is a central=20 element&nbsp;indicating the total amount of&nbsp;donations gathered by a =

particular&nbsp;signer.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>A couple of years ago, I had an actual = Log Cabin=20 quilt done in red and white in which each strip had a name embroidered = on it.=20 Probably this was made for the same purpose.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>In both cases, there was no town, state = or any=20 organization indicated, so what we history minded folk are left with are =

hundreds of names, but no other clues as to where or why they were=20 made.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>Is it possible to send pictures to this = site, or do=20 we have to do that link thing, which I have yet to learn on the=20 computer!</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>Laura Fisher</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV></BODY></HTML>

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Subject: Re: signed log cabin quilts From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421@comcast.net> Date: Thu, 29 Apr 2004 23:08:49 -0400 X-Message-Number: 13

Oh, Laura, I love the concept of embroidering the logs on a log cabin block for signatures -- conjures up a wonderful image.

As to amounts donated being on the quilt -- I know of 2 examples down here in southeastern PA.

1. In the York Documentation we had a crazy style quilt, made to raise funds to put a fence around a cemetary -- that fact is embroidered around the border. The name and amount of donation are embroidered in each of the pieces in the crazy blocks. I think it's pictured in the York Documentation book (Quilts The Fabric of Friendship), but I'm not positive.

2. Today I saw a red and white fundraising quilt at the Adams County Historical Society in Gettysburg -- each block is 2 isosceles right triangles -- one red, one white -- joined along their hypotenuse edges, forming a square. Row after row of triangles. Inked in each white triangle is a name and amount. I think the signage said 900 names with amounts from 5 cents to $5. All the inking that showed -- it was not displayed full open -- appeared to be done by the same hand. The signage said it was sponsored by a United Brethren Church, but didn't say for what purpose.

Barb in sunny southeastern PA Where I'm blessed with wonderful quilt exhibits to see.

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Subject: Re: late 20th century quilting & double knits From: "Beth Davis" <bethdan533@eznet.net> Date: Fri, 30 Apr 2004 05:48:11 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Regarding the new book mentioned by Marcia responding to Judy Anne: "Yes, there is a book coming out about quilting and quiltmakers from 1970-2000 (dates may be slightly off). the woman was on faculty with me at AQS this year. Marcia"

The book’s title is” American Quiltmaking 1970-200” and the author is Eleanor Levie.

I bought a book from her while waiting in line at the airport in Paducah on Sunday!!! Eleanor was happy to sell one more book-but it was HARD to fit even one more item in the luggage!

Beth ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Baltimore Album Quilt on eBay From: "Judy Kelius (judysue)" <judysue@ptd.net> Date: Fri, 30 Apr 2004 06:53:53 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

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Just calling to your attention an important quilt on eBay - http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3720820812.

I remember that this was on eBay some time ago as well and we had an interesting discussion about the block with the cross, deciding that the unusual design shows the scourges used to beat Christ.

A someone later quilt by the same maker is in the Smithsonian, and the seller suggests that someone might want to buy this one and donate it to the Smithsonian as well. Any takers?

Tip: if you want to save this to your computer for future reference, right click anywhere on the photo and choose "Save As" - then select a location and give it a name. Internet Explorer will create a folder for the images and a HTML (*.htm) for the description. I do this with anything I see on eBay that I want to save for future reference.

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Subject: Baltimore Album Quilt on eBay From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip@ncweb.com> Date: Fri, 30 Apr 2004 07:11:29 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Judy -- good idea about saving for future reference. I do the same but save to my scanner's desktop; those who have scanners with Paperport or similar software have this capability and might want to consider your good suggestion.

Judy Kelius (judysue) wrote:

> Tip: if you want to save this to your computer for future reference, > right click anywhere on the photo and choose "Save As" - then select a > location and give it a name. Internet Explorer will create a folder > for the images and a HTML (*.htm) for the description. I do this with > anything I see on eBay that I want to save for future reference. > > >

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Subject: newman & binding From: Palampore@aol.com Date: Fri, 30 Apr 2004 07:57:50 EDT X-Message-Number: 4

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Hi, first of all, Sharon Newman would you please email me? Thanks, Lynn (palampore@aol.com)

Next thing is what does old thin woven tape used as a binding tell you about a quilt? I have only seen it on pre-Civil War quilts? Is it also seen on quilts after 1870. Is it considered a regional thing? I recently bought a quilt with a very thin batting, all silk squares, and a brown polished cotton backing on it. It has the thin woven tape as a binding. Was made in NJ. Silk is very hard for me to date when there is lots and lots of it. Any screaming at you hints with silk? I began to collect women's clothing of the mid-1800's period so that I could identify silk and cotton time periods better, but this one is stumping me. "The more we know the less we know" type of thing... Am working on our schedule for the trip to Australia/New Zealand. If there are things I just shouldn't miss, please email me privately. Pepper and I are still talking about putting together a Southeast QHL Quilt Day/maybe weekend. She and I just need to stay put long enough to get it organized. Right now the fall is looking like the time. Off and running... Lynn Lancaster Gorges Historic Textiles Studio New Bern, NC

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Subject: Info on determining book value From: "Anne Datko" <datkoa@erols.com> Date: Fri, 30 Apr 2004 11:25:21 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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I have a friend who wishes to sell some older quilt books. They include = how-to books as she began teaching quilting in the early days (certainly = early 80s, maybe late 70s). Suggestions as to how to find out if any = are of special value? Thanks and you can reply off-line to me at = datkoa@erols.com. AnneD ------=_NextPart_000_00F7_01C42EA5.D319A010--

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Subject: Re: books From: "Sally Ward" <sallytatters@ntlworld.com> Date: Sat, 24 Apr 2004 17:51:00 +0100 X-Message-Number: 6

<"Quilting" by Averil Colby hardcover c 1971 printed in Great Britain hardcover $55.00

In the UK this is much harder to find than her 'Patchwork'. Most textile book dealers would ask UK£ 20 - £30, but with diligence you might find a softback copy for less in a general secondhand bookshop.

It is a standard work of reference if you are interested in the UK quilting tradition.

Sally W

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Subject: hexagon/log cabin theory From: Donald Beld <donbeld@pacbell.net> Date: Fri, 30 Apr 2004 18:00:25 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 7

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Hi, I am fascinated by the evolution of 19th Century quilt patterns. Unfortunately, it often the the "which came first--the chicken or the egg" debate. Rarely do we have documented evidence of the line of thought that quilt pattern designers had when patterns evolved into one another.

For example--Pickle Dish--a 19th Century pattern, clearly became Double Wedding Rings--a 20th Century Pattern. Everyone agreeds that Log Cabin became Courthouse Steps which became Garfield's Monument (although I don't think there is any proof as to which came first, second and third).

As we know that Hexagon was an English pattern from either Devonshire or the Isle of Man from the mid to late 1700's, and that Log Cabin--by another name developed during that same time period--but probably a little bit later--I found speculated that perhaps they were an evolution. Sure enough, if you look at a Hexagon (which, of course, evolved later in the 20th Century into Grandma's Flower Garden) "block", if there is such a thing and then look at a Log Cabin Block, I think you can see a "squaring off--actually a rectangling off--of the hexagon pieces into the Log Cabin Block--probably by someone with a lot of imagination, but limited sewing skills, as Log Cabin is a lot easier ot make than Hexagon.

I also think you can see it clearly if you look at a Barn Raising quilt--that has that basic Hexagon feel to it.

Can I prove any of this? Of course, not! But I bet I am right.

By the way, I also think Trip Around the World is another evoluation of Barn Raising!

The only way we will ever prove some of these theories to to find period letters, diaries, etc. that substantiate the ideas. Food for thought. Don Beld

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Subject: Virus alert From: KareQuilt@aol.com Date: Fri, 30 Apr 2004 21:37:36 EDT X-Message-Number: 8

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Dear QHL:

I took my computer in yesterday to a Mac specialist and had him check it=20 because the Quilters Hall of Fame office told me that they had received thre= e=20 emails from me saying a file was attached, but I never sent them an email wi= th an=20 attachment this week. When they opened it, there was nothing there but I bet= =20 there was a virus attached.=A0 Now someone from this list has just written m= e=20 that they too have received an attachment from me and that their system warn= ed=20 them that it was infected with the Bagle virus. The specialist ran upgraded=20 Virus Protection software on my system and said there was no virus on my Mac= . He=20 said that what had probably happened is that someone with a PC probably has=20= my=20 address in their Address Book, and a virus has infected that PC and is sendi= ng=20 emails from that Address Book to everyone on that person's list. Since my=20 name is in their address book, people think they are getting an email from m= e but=20 it is not actually coming from me. Since two people from the quilt world hav= e=20 now contacted me to say they have received an email from me saying there is=20 an attachment, this virus must come from one of my quilt friend's list. I wa= nt=20 to assure you, my computer is not sending a virus out. I can only hope that=20 everyone keeps their Virus Protection software updated.

Karen Alexander

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Subject: Re: Virus alert From: "Karen" <@charter.net> Date: Fri, 30 Apr 2004 21:47:10 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

I received one from someone else and deleted it when it turned out to be blank. I NEVER NEVER EVER open an attachment from someone I don't know or that I wasn't expecting.

Thanks for the warning. I've had one computer die on my this spring and I don't fancy repeating the experience. Now, do any of you have any idea of how to get rid of the small black ants that have begun to infest my bathroom, kitchen, and computer desk????

[and yes, I'm serious. They don't seem to be bothered by ant traps, and of course I don't want to use poison in the kitchen or bathroom. Help???]

Karen Evans ----- Original Message ----- From: <KareQuilt@aol.com> To: "Quilt History List" <qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Friday, April 30, 2004 9:37 PM Subject: [qhl] Virus alert

Dear QHL:

I took my computer in yesterday to a Mac specialist and had him check it because the Quilters Hall of Fame office told me that they had received three emails from me saying a file was attached, but I never sent them an email with an attachment this week. When they opened it, there was nothing there but I bet there was a virus attached. Now someone from this list has just written me that they too have received an attachment from me and that their system warned them that it was infected with the Bagle virus. The specialist ran upgraded Virus Protection software on my system and said there was no virus on my Mac. He said that what had probably happened is that someone with a PC probably has my address in their Address Book, and a virus has infected that PC and is sending emails from that Address Book to everyone on that person's list. Since my name is in their address book, people think they are getting an email from me but it is not actually coming from me. Since two people from the quilt world have now contacted me to say they have received an email from me saying there is an attachment, this virus must come from one of my quilt friend's list. I want to assure you, my computer is not sending a virus out. I can only hope that everyone keeps their Virus Protection software updated.

Karen Alexander

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Subject: Re: "sewn on a treadle machine"? From: "Velia Lauerman" <velialive@hotmail.com> Date: Sat, 01 May 2004 02:20:20 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

well said JeanL teaching younger students on treadle is sew rewarding. learning to chew gum and sew isn't as bad as it sounds. fun fun fun. try the treadle for piecing we can achieve the accuracy & control.velia

_________________________________________________________________ FREE pop-up blocking with the new MSN Toolbar – get it now! http://toolbar.msn.com/go/onm00200415ave/direct/01/

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Subject: RE: Treadles From: "Velia Lauerman" <velialive@hotmail.com> Date: Sat, 01 May 2004 02:41:49 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

Alex Anderson's Simply Quilts show about treadles was one of the best. Who is the lady who showed us her stuff on the treadle? Applause applause applause ! Velia

_________________________________________________________________ Check out the coupons and bargains on MSN Offers! http://youroffers.msn.com

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Subject: Re: hexagon/log cabin theory From: "Sally Ward" <sallytatters@ntlworld.com> Date: Sat, 1 May 2004 10:37:22 +0100 X-Message-Number: 5

Hi Don

> As we know that Hexagon was an English pattern from either Devonshire or the Isle of Man from the mid to late 1700's,

It has been said that Log cabin has a strong Isle of Man tradition, but I haven't heard English historians pin the hexagon pattern to a particular county. I always understood that the hexagon was found pretty well across the UK. You have to bear in mind what a small country this is...its only very rarely that you can sometimes locate strong and unusual traditions to an offshore island or very isolated community. Hexagons were everywhere....

< Hexagon (which, of course, evolved later in the 20th Century into Grandma's Flower Garden)

Isn't it the name that evolved, rather than the pattern? I've seen plenty of hexagon quilts pre-20th century that use what we now would call a Grandmother's Flower Garden layout.

In Averil Colby's 'Patchwork Quilts',pub1965, she illustrates a cotton coverlet dated 1780 - 1790 where what she calls hexagons 'rosettes' appear to have been appliqued to larger plain hexagons which are separated by a honecomb lattice (I can't quite make out whether these are hexagons or diamonds).

In 'Quilt Treasures', the book of the Quilters Guild of the British Isles heritage search, pub. 1995, they record seeing 'a curious frame coverlet with ...a large centre of hexagons laid out as white rosettes in a Grandmother's Flower Garden pattern. Because of the date of the fabrics it is believed that the centre was perhaps pieced in about 1829 (although one fabric used dated back to 1790)

And EKarenbeth Hake (writing in 1937) illustrates a 'Patchwork in coloured silks' from Cornwall dated 1837 which is quite clearly a full-blown GFG construction. Even at that time she didn't give it that name. Mostly we would just call them 'honecomb patterns'.

A GFG by any other name.....

<Log Cabin is a lot easier ot make than Hexagon.

I'd debate that one with you <G>. I come back to the fact that we were making our hexagons over papers and our log cabins on a foundation. My experience of teaching beginners, some of whom are basic skills students, is that (assuming they have the correct paper pattern of course) using the over papers method anyone can make hexagons (and other geometric shapes) that match, and anyone can stitch and flip onto a foundation. I'd put them on a par. Using 'your' pieced method for hexagons is more tricky because of getting all the angles right, and piecing log cabin cab cause problems because its quite easy to end up with the 'doiley' effect (rippled edges) if you cut off your strips too long, or at an angle.

What might be a motivation for log cabin over hexagon, though, is speed of construction and economy of fabric. When we pieced hexagons over papers there was often as much fabric on the back in the seam allowance as there was on the front.

> The only way we will ever prove some of these theories to to find period letters, diaries, etc. that substantiate the ideas.

In our dreams <G>

Sally W

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Subject: Re: Virus alert From: "Judy Kelius (judysue)" <judysue@ptd.net> Date: Sat, 01 May 2004 07:19:54 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

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It is called "spoofing" when someone uses your email address to send spam or virus emails to someone else. My email address is also being spoofed, and I frequently get "unsubscribe" messages from QHL as a result. It is difficult to prevent these . . . just make sure your virus program is up to date. But as Karen pointed out, the problem begins on someone else's computer that has a virus (actually technically, a "worm"), and the worm uses addresses in that person's address book and sends itself to other addresses - the subjects are usually general like "hey," or "hi". These worms are usually not destructive, but definitely annoying! Many internet service providers will suspect a problem when the "from" address is not the same as the address it is being sent from and will quarantine or tag the message even if they do not detect the contaminated attachment.

You can read more about spoofing at http://www.sarc.com/avcenter/venc/data/w32.klez.gen@mm.html

About the ant problem . . . here's a web site with some nonpoisonous ways to attack them: http://pages.tipking.com/pests/tip_148.shtml. I was having lots of those tiny ants in my kitchen for a couple of years - I tried pepper and several sprays until I found one that actually worked . . . if you want to know the name, I can get it from my kitchen and let you know. I sprayed once in the spring two years ago along the baseboards and never had an ant problem after that. And so far this year, no ants either! (And I haven't sprayed since.)

At 09:47 PM 4/30/2004, you wrote: >I received one from someone else and deleted it when it turned out to be >blank. I NEVER NEVER EVER open an attachment from someone I don't know or >that I wasn't expecting. > >Thanks for the warning. I've had one computer die on my this spring and I >don't fancy repeating the experience. Now, do any of you have any idea of >how to get rid of the small black ants that have begun to infest my >bathroom, kitchen, and computer desk????

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Subject: Baltimore Album Quilt on eBay From: DDBSTUFF@aol.com Date: Sat, 1 May 2004 08:32:34 EDT X-Message-Number: 7

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In a message dated 5/1/2004 12:15:54 AM Eastern Standard Time, qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.com writes: Baltimore Album Quilt on eBay I had an opportunity last October to see this quilt in person and it really is a wonderful quilt. I was doing a show in York, PA and it was exhibited there. Hard to believe but there were two Baltimore Album Quilts at the same show. I had one that I had had for some 20 years and this one. Fortunately, for me, I sold mine during set up but this one did not sell. Mine was more of a typical Album Quilt with a center eagle. I believe that was why it sold and not this one. It also sold again during the show and ended up ant a New York Show for $199,000. Ouch!

Darwin

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Subject: Re: Virus alert From: "Wanda" <fattyoldkid@houston.rr.com> Date: Sat, 1 May 2004 08:24:45 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

Judy, Thanks for sharing...I've been getting alot of these and didn't know which group I was getting it from...sounds like I'm getting alot of the same ones ya'll or getting ...now I know which group it is...I feel better and know what to watch for. Wanda

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Subject: RE: Treadles From: Sylvia Adair <piecethepast@wi.rr.com> Date: Sat, 01 May 2004 10:04:47 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

That would be Donna Kohler of Fresno, California. She's also been featured in Quilt magazine in the last year or so. BTW, she does free motion quilting on her treadle, and has a quilt in Ricky Timms new book (Conversions?). I almost feel like I know her from reading her posts on the treadleon list. She actually takes her treadle to quilt classes! She's such an inspiration, especially to those of us who love the old machines. Cheers, Sylvia Adair in Wisconsin

Velia Lauerman wrote:

> Alex Anderson's Simply Quilts show about treadles was one of the best. > Who is the lady who showed us her stuff on the treadle? Applause > applause applause ! Velia > >

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Subject: Re: Hexagons into log cabins? From: "Sally Ward" <sallytatters@ntlworld.com> Date: Sat, 1 May 2004 16:06:19 +0100 X-Message-Number: 10

We don't have any > very early log cabins that I have been able to track down (people have asked > before),

I'm here to correct my own posting because I've been reminded (by one of those people who asked<G>) that the log cabin pattern 'can' be found in the UK very early, in particular the V&A has the remains of a silk purse from the 1600s which appears to be made in the log cabin style. And there is a quote in Averil Colby's book about some scottish ones which the family claimed were made in the 1700s - but there's no picture and no reference as to where to find them, so that's really just hearsay. What I suppose I meant was that we don't see early examples of full-blown common-or-garden log cabin quilts as you know them. They were so popular around the turn of the century that that is all we seem to find.

Of course, they may have been so popular/everyday that they were used to extinction, whereas the labour-intensive hexagons were kept for best, survived, and now seem 'common'.

Sally W

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Subject: Reviewing New Quilting Books From: "Maureen Flanagan" <flanagan@booksandoldlace.com> Date: Sat, 1 May 2004 09:29:41 -0700 X-Message-Number: 11

Beth was good enough to let us know the details of Eleanor's new book = and indeed it is available through Amazon www.amazon.com at $17.65, = published in paper in April 2004. Barnes and Noble www.bn.com is not yet = distributing the title, but I'm sure it will soon. There are no used copies available = of the book when I check Advanced Book Exchange at www.abe.com

If you do buy this book, please note that it is possible for you to = write a review of Eleanor's book and post it to Amazon and to Barnes and Noble. = Just go to the page for the book and click on Write Your Own Review. Reviews = are anonymous.

Potential buyers, especially libraries and bookstores, look at the = reviews to get more information about the title and positively reviewed books = are more likely to sell more copies. Publishers watch these reviews to see = if the author's work is received favorably and so the review will influence their decision to publish future works by the author or to keep the = current work in print. Authors need the reviews to help with revisions, future directions in research and just to get a small reward for all their = efforts.

So, if you buy a new book on any subject, but especially quilting, do = the community and the hardworking author a big favor and write an online = review for Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

Maureen Battistella ********************** Books and Old Lace PO Box 1081 Ashland, OR 97520 541-552-0743

Subject: Re: late 20th century quilting & double knits From: "Beth Davis" <bethdan533@eznet.net> Date: Fri, 30 Apr 2004 05:48:11 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Regarding the new book mentioned by Marcia responding to Judy Anne: = "Yes, there is a book coming out about quilting and quiltmakers from 1970-2000 (dates may be slightly off). the woman was on faculty with me at AQS = this year. Marcia"

The book's title is" American Quiltmaking 1970-200" and the author is Eleanor Levie.

I bought a book from her while waiting in line at the airport in Paducah = on Sunday!!! Eleanor was happy to sell one more book-but it was HARD to = fit even one more item in the luggage!

Beth

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Subject: Re: leave qhl??? From: "Alan R. Kelchner" <alan@alankelchner.com> Date: Sat, 1 May 2004 10:33:47 -0700 X-Message-Number: 12

Kathy,

Every time I've gotten an unknown email with a four-digit password, it seems it was infected with a variation of the W32 virus. Delete it ! Further concerns should be brought up to Kris.

Alan

Alan R. Kelchner Textile Artist http://www.alankelchner.com

----- Original Message ----- From: "Kathy Moore" <KathyMoore@neb.rr.com> To: "Quilt History List" <qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Friday, April 30, 2004 9:10 PM Subject: [qhl] leave qhl???

I've gotten a strange email with the subject line leave qhl and a password with numbers in it.

Is this legitimate?

Thanks, Kathy Moore

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Subject: Re: Hexagons into log cabins? From: "Karen" <@charter.net> Date: Sat, 1 May 2004 15:29:19 -0400 X-Message-Number: 13

I know that one of the so-called Log Cabin purses from the early 17th century looks more like wrapped silk thread than pieced fabric; it's in Seligman and Hughes's =Domestic Needlework,= published in 1926, and is referenced in Janet Rae's =Quilts of the British Isles.= The Seligman & Hughes book is something of a mishmosh (it seems to have been based on their private collection, with little to no scholarly context), but I finally found it in the stacks at the Mount Holyoke College library in South Hadley, Massachusetts, way in the basement in a separate room for pre-Library of Congress acquisitions. Took me about ten years of searching, too. There's a lot of interesting pictures, but I'd take the text with a grain of salt.

Sally - is there a picture of the one in the V&A? Sounds extremely interesting....

Karen Evans

----- Original Message ----- From: "Sally Ward" <sallytatters@ntlworld.com> To: "Quilt History List" <qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Saturday, May 01, 2004 11:06 AM Subject: [qhl] Re: Hexagons into log cabins?

> We don't have any > > very early log cabins that I have been able to track down (people have > asked > > before), > > I'm here to correct my own posting because I've been reminded (by one of > those people who asked<G>) that the log cabin pattern 'can' be found in the > UK very early, in particular the V&A has the remains of a silk purse from > the 1600s which appears to be made in the log cabin style. And there is a > quote in Averil Colby's book about some scottish ones which the family > claimed were made in the 1700s - but there's no picture and no reference as > to where to find them, so that's really just hearsay. What I suppose I > meant was that we don't see early examples of full-blown common-or-garden > log cabin quilts as you know them. They were so popular around the turn of > the century that that is all we seem to find. > > Of course, they may have been so popular/everyday that they were used to > extinction, whereas the labour-intensive hexagons were kept for best, > survived, and now seem 'common'. > > Sally W > > > --- >

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Subject: Re: Hexagons into log cabins? From: "Sally Ward" <sallytatters@ntlworld.com> Date: Sat, 1 May 2004 23:09:37 +0100 X-Message-Number: 14

> Sally - is there a picture of the one in the V&A? Sounds extremely > interesting....

Alas, the reference is contained in notes I made many years ago when I first got interested in quilts, but didn't know much about scholarship so I no longer know where it came from. We have a bank holiday on Monday, but later in the week I'll contact them and see if I can track it down.

Sally W

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Subject: NJ silk quilt From: "Jan Drechsler" <quiltdoc@sover.net> Date: Sat, 01 May 2004 23:49:40 -0400 X-Message-Number: 15

Lynne, Are you referring to Trenton Tape on the silk quilt? It is possible, especially if the quilt was made in NJ. Trenton Tape usually had tan and green longitudinal stripes.

According to NJ quilts 1777 to 1950, pages 61 and 62, the tapes were often seen on quilts from 1830-1870. There is a photo of a quilt with Trenton Tape on page 62. Typically, the quilts using trenton Tape were from the central NJ area to southern NJ. Trenton is on the Delaware River, a 45 minute drive (today) north from Philadelphia, and about an hour and a half from NYC.

When I lived in central NJ, it was my fantasy that I would find a roll of Trenton tape at a flea market or antique store. And then I would causually call J. G. Row and tell her! <G> But it didn't happen.

As a pronunciation guide, never, never say 'ton' in Trenton. It is more like Trent, with a quiet second 't' and a mumbled 'en'. If in doubt, mumble the whole name.

Jan -- Jan Drechsler in Vermont Quilt Restoration; Quilting teacher www.sover.net/~bobmills



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