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Quilters Find a way to care

Subject: State Documentation Books From: "Maureen" 

Hi Jean:

Congratulations on make progress with the Minnesota documentation  project! What a lot of work for so many people, but such a contribution to scholarship and history.

I don't know if you looked at the State Quilt Documentation Projects and Regional Quilt History: A Selective Bibliography

The list was collaboratively compiled around 2001 and continuing and was formerly housed at the University of South Dakota until I left there in January 2004. The first part of the bibliography is a section of books published as products of state documentation projects. There are  numerous other regional or state quilt history books, but these are listed in a separate section. I recently completed a bibliographical analysis of  the publishing history for Shelly Zegart and a table from this work is now linked from the document.

Pennsylvania's state documentation project has been published as county books and Feazel's work is a dissertation, but uses the records derived  from the Nevada state quilt documentation effort. These are the only two that  are a little dissimilar from the traditional books.20

If you feel the list needs some updating, please do let me know.

Best regards (and happy mother's day if it applies!)

Maureen Battistella Ashland, Oregon.

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Subject: State Documentation Books From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarlton@att.net> 

Can someone tell me the current number of states that have conducted  quilt searches and produced a book? The QHL list includes many titles that are  not strictly state projects....I count 38 states (some with numerous titles)  but I thought I had heard it was over 40. By the way, here in Minnesota, the process is well underway. Our first drafts have been turned in and the  date of publication will be spring of 2005; in time for our annual state show  in Duluth ( June)

Jean Carlton

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Subject: An Moomen's new web site From: "sue reich" <mreich@attglobal.net> 

It is with great pleasure that I have been given permission to announce a new web site for a dear friend of mine, An Moonen. You can find it at www.antiquetextile.info. An shows some of the wonderful pieces from her collection; included are Dutch quilts, samplers and linens. Enjoy! sue reich

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Subject: Catalogueing local quilts From: "Patchwork Secrets" 

I want to catalogue local quilts. I am sure I can find the quilts with simple inquiries through local churches, newspapers and other public forums. But I am not sure what I need to include on the documentation. Does anyone have a check list or form that has been used in the past for something similar? Eventually the data will be published in a book which part of the proceeds will be used for our library new building fund raising project. Any suggestions or help is appreciated. Sharon

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Subject: Re:Subject: State Documentation Books From: "Judy Anne"

Maureen,

What a great resource? I just added a link to it from my website.

Judy Anne

America's Quilting History http://womenfolk.com/historyofquilts

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Subject: Re: Writing and Editing From: Anne Copeland

Thanks for all the kind suggestions everyone has given and all the kind words too. I have no doubt the book will eventually be published. It has just been frustrating that all the publishers wanted us to add patterns to the book to make it more saleable. It feels like prostitution to have to add patterns to a book on quilt history! I don't mean that in an offensive way to anyone who has suggested it, but there is a place for patterns and there is a place for pure history, and the book will sell with just the history aspect. I think the women's history arena may be a better choice for us. They aren't interested in patterns. They are interested in history.

Peace and blessings, Annie

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Subject: Re: Writing and Editing From: "Sally Ward"

It feels like > prostitution to have to add patterns to a book on quilt history!

Annie, why not think of it more as a 'loss leader'? Were it not for in the first instance searching for patterns I could make, I wonder whether I would have found my way into the fascinating world of quilt history. And I know I have lured others by lending them a book with a pattern, only for them to wander into the text side and discover they are interested.........

It is publishers' business to know 'why' people buy books, after all <G>

Sally W

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Subject: state books & cataloging quilts From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarlton@att.net> Date: Mon, 10 May 2004 08:56:02 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Maureen, Thank you so much for that link. The bibliography is just what I was looking for....Broken down in categories - and it's so current. But I think I'll have to move to PA now - it's just not fair! To Sharon - many of the books that have resulted from statewide searches discuss the process used to gather information in detail. Over time, better, more complete and user friendly forms have been used to gather data. Minnesota has revised their paperwork more than once - the current form makes it easier to enter info into a database - something not important nearly 20 years ago when the project began. The New Jersey book, for one, includes a complete example of their form. I am sure there are sites with suggestions - and I would be happy to share with you what Minnesota used if you email me privately. It's good to look a few over - then you can decide what will be best for your project. Glad you are doing this! Jean Carlton

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Subject: UGRR quickie - jean, don't look... From: Kris Driessen

The National Geographic is jumping into the fray:

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2004/

Kris

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Subject: Re: Writing and Editing From: Marilyn Woodin <woodin@kctc.net> Date: Mon, 10 May 2004 10:01:27 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

I'm all for a book without patterns--good for you. Marilyn Woodin

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Subject: Re: Writing and Editing From: "Karen Quilts Texas"

Anne and all about the subject of writing and publishing.

While there is indeed a place for a quilt history book without patterns, there is undoubtedly a much smaller market for such a book than for a book with patterns! Book publishers are after all, not charitable organizations, and are in business to make a profit for owners and/or investors. And, for an author, the expectation of profit, is also worthy of respect. In addition to making new information available to readers, there is also the hope by most authors that the book will provide at least some payment for time well spent, and to many authors, a necessary income!

A good book publisher is one who knows what will sell, and, what will not. Their ability to understand the market for their products is as important as their ability to recognize a good book/author (product) when they see one.

If the book has been submitted to various publishers and all are suggesting that patterns be added to improve the saleability of the book then they are probably giving the author an honest appraisal, not necessarily of the book, but of it's marketability. Offense should not be taken, as this is not a critical comment on the content, but on the market for such content.

While I enjoy a history book like any quilter, I do enjoy a book that also gives me patterns for some of the historical quilts featured. I don't think it detracts in any way from the historical information, and, if anything adds to the learning experience. What is the old saying about the value of "walking in someone's shoes?" To produce a historical quilt, is to understand another era's art and craft. If anything, adding patterns to a book might serve to offer the information up to an audience that might not normally buy "just a history" book on quilting!

I speak not from any particular experience in publishing, but I did spend over 20 years in business in marketing management. So my perspective is from that of the capitalist!

At any rate, I thought that this opinion might provide a view from a different direction for this discussion.

Karen Spring, TX

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Subject: Re: Writing and Editing From: "Christine Thresh" 

Annie said, "...all the publishers wanted us to add patterns to the book to make it more saleable."

If you don't want patterns to "sully" your history book, then put up the $10,000 to $20,000 and publish it yourself. Then, be prepared for the marking costs after the production costs.

If ALL the pubishers wanted patterns added to your manuscript they may know more about selling books than you do.

I can't see how it would hurt a good book on quilt history to have a pattern(s) included.

I used to be a publisher of fiber art books in the 1970s.

Christine Thresh http://www.winnowing.com

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Subject: Re: Writing and Editing From: "Sandra Millett" <smillett@sbcglobal.net> Date: Mon, 10 May 2004 

Dear Anne:I'm jumping into the writing content vs. patterns fray, as a quilt bo ok author and quilter. I do enjoy history books on quilting, but can become frustrated if there is one that catches my fancy and there is no pattern provided. This frustration also holds true seeing real-live quilts.  One show I was involved in exhibited a quilt made in the 1880s and had a specific block with an unusual pattern and color setting. I photographed it and spent more than many hours getting the drafting proportions just right. How much easier if there had been a pattern. I' ve had the same inclination when studying quilt history books. Frequently t he photos are so small that it is impossible to draft a multi-patch block because this block is not delineated enough. Aha, for a pattern, so that I can be historically accurate. Froncie Quinn, the museum licensed pattern writer does a terrific jo b of incorporating history with her patterns. As an active quilter, I woul d enjoy a dash of patterns along with the history. But the bottom line is that if you hear the same reasons for rejection, and want to get your manuscript published, then perhaps pattern inclusion should be considered. I learned this the hard way. 

Years ago, I sumitte d my first manuscript and got a call from Simon & Schuster: the editor want ed a book with a different topic for each chapter. Focused, I turned them d own planning to contact when I sold and wrote my book (Quilt As You Go was i n print for ten years and became a classic). When it was done about 18-mon ths later, I called the editor at S&S.  Only problem was she had moved to another house and the replacement editor wasn't interested.  As probably the only person to reject Simon & Schuster in recorded history, I certainly learned my lesson--now I say "Yes"--fast. My moto i s give 'em what they want and get another book on the shelves. It adds to  my credibility and pocketbook.  Guess my bottom line is to determine whether the the historical information is important enough to (1) get it to the public with patterns added or (2) consider the possibillity of not having it published or (3) paying out major bucks to self-publish and market. Good luck with your decision,Sandra Millett Freelance writer Quilting the Savory Garden Trophy Club, TX-

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Subject: Re: Writing and Editing From: Xenia Cord <xenia@legacyquilts.net> 

Because I have also written articles on kits and know something about their history and design, may I say that including kit designs in a book about the history of kits could violate copyright. I cite an instance where a Canadian magazine (Canadian Living) wanted to provide its readership with fabric kits for an antique kit quilt (1930s) featured in an article. The quilt belonged to someone on the editorial staff, as I remember.

Through much calling back and forth, and consultation with some of the brightest and best on QHL, we determined that the kit had been offered by Progress Quilts, a brand name of Tobin, Sporn & Glaser of NYC. The company still exists under a slightly different name, has no knowledge (or archives) of its kit quilt history, but still maintains copyright on items once marketed by them. So the magazine was allowed to offer a printed paper pattern, not anything in fabric kit form.

The only person I know who can properly market kits from 1930s designs is Gail Bomers, who is still using the patterns and equipment used by her father, who marketed through Needlearts Guild in Michigan.

It's a minefield out there...

Xenia

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Subject: Question for the list, and an 18th century quilt From: "Karen" 

I just bought a delightful little confection on Ebay and wondered if anyone on the list had ever seen such a thing. It was described as a trapunto book cover, about six inches square, of silk stuffed with cotton and lined with silk tissue. The cover itself is a silk tabby weave in beige, with the designs outlined in pale red silk thread (lovely stitching, very fine) and pre-stuffed over a scrim. The lining is cream silk in what today would be called silk habotai. The edges were once finished with pale red silk piping, but the silk has deteriorated and there's only cotton cording left. The overall condition is decent, with a couple of small holes and no obvious shattering. There's a label inside the cover: "Wilson's Handmade, Brandenburg, Kentucky."

Has anyone ever heard of this company, or seen such a book cover? It looks to me more like a small jewelry case. The seller was from Mount Orab, Ohio, and knew nothing beyond what was on the label.

If anyone knows anything about this, please let me know. Thanks!

Karen Evans

BTW, there's what purports to be an 18th century silk crib quilt for sale on Ebay, Minimum bid is $500, which is ridiculously low if it's really that old. It looks like a cut down piece, and there's definitely some deterioration of the silk.

I'd love to hear some other opinions on this one...it was compared to a piece at Winterthur, and if there's anyone on the list from Winterthur, it might be worth checking out. Have fun!

 

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Subject: Quilt Documentation Forms and Data Collection From: Beth Donaldson <quilts@museum.msu.edu> Date: Tue, 11 May 2004 09:22:26 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

To print a copy of the current form Michigan uses to document quilts click on: http://www.museum.msu.edu/glqc/MQPform.PDF For information on our documentation project, which is now in its 20th active year click on: http://www.museum.msu.edu/glqc/mqp.html. I would also suggest this site, http://www.quiltindex.org/faq.php. It is in the Quilt Index. It lists all the fields that the index uses and how to collect your data if you eventually want it included in the index.

Beth Donaldson Quilt Collections Assistant Great Lakes Quilt Center at the Michigan State University Museum 201 Central Services, MSU Museum East Lansing, MI 48912 517-432-3800

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Subject: Samuel Williams quilt From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawley@comcast.net> Date: Tue, 11 May 2004 13:59:18 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

I heard this via the grapevine, but since no one from BAS, who really should be crowing, has posted the news I will tell you that the replica of the Samuel Williams quilt made by the Baltimore Applique Society to be raffled to benefit the Baltimore Museum of Art was won on Sunday, May 2 by someone other than me. The good news is that they raised more than $24,000. I believe that quilters are born with either an applique gene or a piecing gene. I didn't get the applique gene, but I admire the efforts of these talented women all the more because of that. I was at the museum on May 1 and had another close look at the fabulous exhibit now in its last week. The good work of the BAS makes the point to museum professionals that quilt lovers work to support the institutions that give us what we want to see. Thank you BAS. Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: two questions From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawley@comcast.net> Date: Tue, 11 May 2004 14:01:24 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Does anybody have idea of how many quilts were entered in the Great American Quilt Festival Statue of Liberty Contest in 1986? Question # 2: What's the earliest Ocean Waves quilt you know of? Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: Gees Bend From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawley@comcast.net> Date: Tue, 11 May 2004 14:05:19 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

Last Wednesday I went to the Corcoran in D.C. to see the Gees Bend exhibit. The audio-guide makes it clear that much of the hype comes from people who know nothing about quilts or textiles. For instance, it is remarked with wonder that strips of corduroy appear as slightly different shades when positioned in different directions on a quilt or that tearing a fabric on the diagonal causes it to stretch and ravel. The many quilts pieced of narrow wedge shapes clearly were made from fabrics narrower at one end than the other (sleeves or pants legs perhaps). The voices of the women who made the quilts spoke eloquently about doing the best they could with the limited resources available. These quiltmakers are without pretension; that is supplied by the "art critics" who have run away with their work. The film that accompanies the exhibit and the incredibly beautiful still pictures from the Farm Security Administration project of the 1930s show examples of mainstream quilt patterns. It would seem that the rough utility quilts composed of worn and torn recycled clothing or scraps of "Sears corduroy" from the Freedon Quilting Bee were deliberately chosen for the exhibit. One wonders what percentage of the entire body of work done by the quiltmakers this style represents. .The museum gift shop is selling new quilts made by the Gees Bend quilters for $3,500 to $10,500! Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: RE: two questions From: "Karen Quilts Texas" <karenquiltstexas@houston.rr.com> Date: Tue, 11 May 2004 15:51:46 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

Lucinda -

I think I have some QNM from that time, I'll see if that info might be in the '86 issues. Actually, there was a small book published about the contest. I came across a copy and sold it not too long ago on Ebay, but I can't seem to locate my record on it. It contained pictures of the winning entries from each state, and contained some patterns for a few blocks. It also showed the quilt as it was displayed - I believe on the Mall in Wash. D.C... I'll keep looking, and see if I can come up with either for you.

Karen A. Spring, TX

-----Original Message----- From: Lucinda Cawley [mailto:lrcawley@comcast.net] Sent: Tuesday, May 11, 2004 1:01 PM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] two questions

Does anybody have idea of how many quilts were entered in the Great American Quilt Festival Statue of Liberty Contest in 1986? Question # 2: What's the earliest Ocean Waves quilt you know of? Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: Re: Writing and Editing From: "Anita G. Solomon" <solo57@worldnet.att.net> Date: Tue, 11 May 2004 20:49:02 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Fortunately I was able to persuade my C&T editor to include an essay by Laurel Horton, "Paper, Patchwork, and the Role of Innovation", as the preface to my book of paper foundation patterns. It was limited to five pages and included a few illustrations of patchwork that were pieced on paper. The five pages of preface 'took up space' where patterns ought to appear. Apparently, buyers expect a certain number of patterns for their dollars.

In the end I had the book of my dreams. But it wasn't easy for Laurel or me to bridge quilt history and quilt patterns in a "how-to" book.

Anita/NYC ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Image on Crazy Quilt From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplex@starband.net> Date: Tue, 11 May 2004 19:15:27 -0700 X-Message-Number: 7

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We have a crazy quilt with one piece which is a silkscreened (?) image of a woman. It looks like a cabinet card type of photograph which has been transferred somehow to silk, and then included in a crazy quilt otherwise devoid of human images. I have wondered if it could be the maker of the quilt... It was suggested to me that it might be a "cigarette silk" with a portrait of an actress, but I am not familiar with this kind of cigarette silk. The one we have is one-color only printed somehow on a light color silk -- more like perhaps a cyanotype? (or are those always blue?) The cigarette silks I know are smaller in size and in full color, often printed on an ecru or cream ground... ?  I'd like your help. I feel like I should know this, after all these years of studying quilts. But I do not. Do you? You can e-mail me and I will send photos, or you can see the image in our eBay listing: 3723636253. I'd appreciate any info. Thanks!  Julie Silber quiltcomplex@starband.net

 

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Subject: Re: Image on Crazy Quilt From: "Laura Syler" <texas_quilt.co@airmail.net> Date: Tue, 11 May 2004 22:30:16 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

Hi Julie, Just took a look at the quilt...pretty neat! I too am curious!! I'd like to know what responses you get. I recently did some restoration work on a crazy quilt with a similar photo/silk. We really pondered over how that photograph got on the fabric, and was in better shape than some of the other silks. "Mine" is more of a head shot rather than full length view, and was about 4" in length.. The owner told me that she was told by her grandmother that it was a "premium ribbon" of some actress - sounds familiar doesn't it? I have not seen any individual cigarette silks of this type myself, other than in the quilt. Maybe Nancy Kirk can give you a clue.... Laura Hobby Syler Richardson, Texas Certified Appraiser of Quilted Textiles Quilt Restoration Specialist

----- Original Message ----- From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplex@starband.net> To: "Quilt History List" <qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Tuesday, May 11, 2004 9:15 PM Subject: [qhl] Image on Crazy Quilt

We have a crazy quilt with one piece which is a silkscreened (?) image of a woman. It looks like a cabinet card type of photograph which has been transferred somehow to silk, and then included in a crazy quilt otherwise devoid of human images. I have wondered if it could be the maker of the quilt... It was suggested to me that it might be a "cigarette silk" with a portrait of an actress, but I am not familiar with this kind of cigarette silk. The one we have is one-color only printed somehow on a light color silk -- more like perhaps a cyanotype? (or are those always blue?) The cigarette silks I know are smaller in size and in full color, often printed on an ecru or cream ground... ?

I'd like your help. I feel like I should know this, after all these years of studying quilts. But I do not. Do you? You can e-mail me and I will send photos, or you can see the image in our eBay listing: 3723636253. I'd appreciate any info. Thanks!

Julie Silber quiltcomplex@starband.net

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Subject: Face on quilt From: "Sally Ward" <sallytatters@ntlworld.com> Date: Wed, 12 May 2004 09:46:15 +0100 X-Message-Number: 1

My first thought was the actress and royal courtesan Lily Langtree. I have flipped back and forth from these google pictures to the ebay pic and think I see the likeness. Trouble is, anyone with that hairdo and a bustle could pass for Lily on an old photo <G>.

http://www.geocities.com/uttamkumar44/lilylangtry_bierstadt.jpg

http://www.tace.com/items/7174.html

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/AClangtree.htm

Sally W

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Subject: Re: Image on Crazy Quilt From: "Judy Kelius (judysue)" <judysue@ptd.net> Date: Wed, 12 May 2004 06:48:42 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

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Although I don't think it is out of the question that it is an image of the maker, my hunch is that she is a vaudeville actress . . . images of many of these were put on cigarette silks at the beginning of the 20th century. Many of these vaudeville stars made the transition to silent movies. Somewhere I have a crazy quilt with several images in it, one of them quite large (you had to send away for the larger silks - the smaller ones were included in the cigarette packages). Such silks were often put in crazy quilts.

By the way Julie, that quilt is STUNNING! Thanks for sharing.

A couple of references: http://www.womenfolk.com/historyofquilts/tobacco.htm http://maureengreeson.com/ (maybe she would be able to identify the image?)

At 10:15 PM 5/11/2004, you wrote: >We have a crazy quilt with one piece which is a silkscreened (?) >image of a woman. It looks like a cabinet card type of photograph >which has been transferred somehow to silk, and then included in >a crazy quilt otherwise devoid of human images. I have wondered >if it could be the maker of the quilt... It was suggested to me >that it might be a "cigarette silk" with a portrait of an >actress, but I am not familiar with this kind of cigarette silk. >The one we have is one-color only printed somehow on a light >color silk -- more like perhaps a cyanotype? (or are those >always blue?) The cigarette silks I know are smaller in size and >in full color, often printed on an ecru or cream ground... ? > >I'd like your help. I feel like I should know this, after all >these years of studying quilts. But I do not. Do you? You can >e-mail me and I will send photos, or you can see the image in our >eBay listing: 3723636253. I'd appreciate any info. Thanks! > >Julie Silber >quiltcomplex@starband.net

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Subject: Re: Image on Crazy Quilt From: "Karen" <@charter.net> Date: Wed, 12 May 2004 07:21:11 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

That sure does look like Lily Langtry. She was extremely popular and I wouldn't be at all shocked to find out she was pictured on cigar silks.

The quilt is absolutely gorgeous. Wherever did you find it?

Karen Evans

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Subject: Re: Image on Crazy Quilt From: "Julia D. Zgliniec" <rzglini1@san.rr.com> Date: Wed, 12 May 2004 08:03:55 -0700 X-Message-Number: 4

Dear QHL, Good Morning to all!

In addition to cigarette silks, hat linings also contained various images of current events and activities. Sometimes they were just the manufacturer's crest or "logo". They were usually of fine quality silk and the image quality was quite good. Printed silk handkerchiefs are another source of these images.

The oval shape of the woman and the larger size in addition to the fine quality of the silk makes me think hat lining silk.

I have seen a whole quilt made of these larger silk images, sashed block style, embellished with feather stitching along the seams.

Regards,

Julia Zgliniec, Poway, CA

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Subject: Re: Great American Quilt Festival Contest From: munsey@juno.com Date: Wed, 12 May 2004 12:17:00 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

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Cinda: I quickly scanned my copies of Bishop and Houck, "American Patriotic Quilts As Expressions of Liberty", E. P. Dutton, 1986, and The Great American Quilt Festival Special Souvenir Issue of "The Clarion", The Museum of American Folk Art, Spring-Summer, 1986, and found no reference to the total number of quilts submitted to the contest. However, in QNM Issue #181, April 1986, Bonnie Leman's editorial states "Over 1200 quilt entries were submitted as slides. . . ." and Issue #182, May 1986, in a page 8 article about the festival indicates there were "More than 1,000" entries. I didn't check out the other QNM issues. Plus, there were all the other quilts like the "So Proudly We Hail" state quilts and others made for special exhibits. Where are they all now???

Check the QNM Cumulative Index for quite a number of references to both the contest and the festival. I used my print copy covering issues 1-269, but I believe that the entire index is available (and download-able) on line at the QNM web site. Sandra on Cape Cod ----__JNP_000_6fe0.08e2.1f67--

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Subject: hat silks From: "Carol H. Elmore" <celmore@ksu.edu> Date: Wed, 12 May 2004 11:14:52 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

I'm glad Julia brought up the hat silk connection. I have a small collection of them with dogs (and one cat figure)in them. Also hat silk linings were used for political campaign items. Probably other famous people were also depicted including actors and film stars. I have seen crazy quilts with various types of the hat silks. Carol Elmore Manhattan Kansas

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Subject: Quilters Hall of Fame From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessen@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 12 May 2004 10:41:09 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 7

Karen is in the process of moving, so she asked me to post this:

QUILTERS HALL OF FAME LIVE AUCTION: "QHF is actually starting to move its offices into the Marie Webster House this week! What a RED LETTER DAY!! Quilters across the country (and the world!) have made donations to QHF over the past many years and we are extremely grateful," Grand Opening Co-chair Karen Alexander writes. "Though we are opening in July, there is still a great deal of detailed finish work to be done on the Marie Webster House, not to mention the additional upkeep expenses that we will incur once we are open. It is so exciting to see the house of the first author of a book on quilting history take shape! The large upstairs bedroom out of which Marie ran her business (Practical Patchwork) is going to be set-up as close to "as it was" as we can get it. Everything quilters and Guilds do for QHF is so very much appreciated!! We would like to let quilters know that if you don't have the desire to enter our Grand Opening Block Contest (deadline June 15 – see our website for Entry Form), QHF is also in need of items such as miscellaneous UFO blocks, quilt tops or completed small wall hangings, baby quilts, handmade dolls, doll quilts or other small quilted items for our Grand Opening Live Auction! Items for the QHF Grand Opening Live Auction should be mailed to chairperson Jean Chambers, 406 Gardner St., Marion, IN, 46952-1916. Thank you, quilters, for the many ways you support QHF! If you have any questions, contact Karen at KareQuilt@aol.com or call our offices at 765-664-9333. Contest Entry Form can be found at www.quiltershalloffame.org

 

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Subject: Hat Silks From: "sue reich" <mreich@attglobal.net> Date: Wed, 12 May 2004 13:47:21 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

Go to pages 98-99 and 114-115 in "Quilts and Quiltmakers Covering Connecticut." There you will find the stories of hat trimmers from the hat manufactories of late nineteenth century Danbury, Connecticut, and the way they used the silks that fell to the floor as they cut the linings to fit hats. The first quilt is embroidered with "We Are All Crazy" and it has embroidered on it the only existing image of the first Danbury Hospital. These industrious hat trimmers/women actually made two quilts to raffle to raise for the town's first hospital. In 1885, the town's population was nineteen thousand and it did not have a hospital. It is the women of the town who are credited historically for managing its existence. The fair held on April 15 & 16 (also embroidered on the quilt) and its purpose was well documented in a local newspaper. The news accounts mention the quilts, the embroidery, where they were displayed, the amount of money both raffles raised and who the winners were. The second quilt was made by Flora and Dora Morgan, sisters from Bethel who also worked as hat trimmers. Their crazy quilt is exquisitely worked with multiple images of women in addition to the more common images of found on crazy quilts. sue reich

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Subject: IQSC Call for Papers From: "Kathy Moore" <KathyMoore@neb.rr.com> Date: Wed, 12 May 2004 12:45:59 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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Call for Papers

=93Collectors, Collecting, and Collections=94

A symposium organized by the

INTERNATIONAL QUILT STUDY CENTER

University of Nebraska-Lincoln

February 24-26, 2005

 

We invite scholars and artists to submit proposals for papers = and panel presentations that explore the phenomenon of collecting, and = especially collecting quilts and related arts, from a variety of = perspectives. These may include but are not limited to psychological, = aesthetic, historical, economic, anthropological, museological, and = sociological. We encourage papers and presentations that address the = urge to collect, the meaning of collections, and the ways collecting = influences artists=92 and source communities. We also encourage = participants to explore the business of collecting from the perspective = of all involved from private collectors to curators, from artists to = gallery owners, and from dealers to appraisers. 

 

Categories of Presentation:

=95 Individual papers are expected to be based on original research, = are generally illustrated and 20 minutes in length followed by 5 minutes = for questions.

=95 Thematic sessions should include 3 to 4 presenters, and a = moderator with a theme based on a particular aspect of the collecting = phenomenon or some other theme related to worldwide quiltmaking = traditions. Speakers=92 times are flexible; in general, a total of one = and a half hours is recommended. Panel participants must send a copy of = their working paper to their session moderator by December 1, 2004.

=95 Panel discussions should involve 3 to 4 individuals and a = moderator who poses questions to which panelists respond. A total time = of one hour is recommended for panel discussions.

 

Symposium Submission Guidelines:

Interested individuals should submit abstracts of 150-200 words = with a cover letter and brief resume (maximum 3 pages). Moderators of = thematic sessions or panel discussions should submit a proposal of = 150-200 words, a cover letter and a resume, plus a brief resume (maximum = 3 pages) for each participant. Abstracts/proposals should be sent = electronically, faxed, or postmarked no later than August 16, 2004. = Submit your abstract/proposal and resume by August 16, 2004, to:

 

Kathy Moore, Symposium Coordinator

2005 IQSC Symposium =93Collectors, Collecting, and Collections=94

International Quilt Study Center

University of Nebraska-Lincoln

P.O. Box 830838

Lincoln, NE 68583-0838

Fax: 402/472-0640

Email: iqsc-symposium2@unl.edu

 

Symposium Overview:

The International Quilt Study Center=92s second biennial = symposium features invited speakers, juried papers, thematic sessions, = and panel discussions. The two days of symposium presentations are = supplemented by pre-conference tours, including a behind-the-scenes tour = of the International Quilt Study Center=92s state-of-the-art storage = facility, curator-led tours of campus exhibitions, and special = exhibitions at other venues in the Lincoln area. Special exhibitions = will be organized at the Sheldon Memorial Art Gallery, the Robert = Hillestad Gallery, the Museum of Nebraska History and other venues in = the Lincoln area.

The =93Collectors, Collecting, and Collections=94 symposium will = bring together cultural anthropologists, curators, artists and art = historians, popular culture scholars, and consumer behavior experts, as = well as textile artists, textile historians, and collectors. It will = provide a unique forum for dialogue among a broad spectrum of = individuals interested in the phenomenon of collectors and collecting, = especially the collecting of quilts and related textiles.

 

Featured Speakers:

Russell W. Belk, Eldon Tanner Professor of Business at the = University of Utah for the past 20 years. His areas of expertise are = consumer behavior, popular culture, collecting, and marketing. He has = published more than 250 books, articles, and videotapes including = Collecting in a Consumer Society. He is president of the Society of = Marketing and Development and past president of the Association for = Consumer Research.

Guerrilla Girls came together in 1985 out of frustration that = the most influential galleries and museums exhibited and collected = almost no women artists. Assuming the names of dead women artists = wearing gorilla masks, they take the audience through their 18-year = history confronting discrimination in the world of art and culture.

Other invited speakers will include Nancy Druckman, = Sotheby=92s, Senior Vice President and Director, American Folk Art; = Jonathan Holstein, collector, guest curator, lecturer, and author; = Shelly Zegart, collector, dealer, and author of American Quilt = Collections: Antique Quilt Masterpieces; Ursula Ilse-Neuman, Curator, = Museum of Arts and Design (formerly American Craft Museum); Mary = Catherine Lamb, independent studio quilt artist and collector; Jack = Walsh, collector of studio art quilts.

Questions or more information contact:

Peter Bleed, Symposium Chair or

Kathy Moore, Symposium Coordinator

International Quilt Study Center

iqsc-symposium2@unl.edu

http://quiiltstudy.unl.edu ------=_NextPart_000_0014_01C4381F.13A2E240--

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Subject: Re: Julie Silber's question From: "Kathy Moore" <KathyMoore@neb.rr.com> Date: Wed, 12 May 2004 12:54:53 -0500 X-Message-Number: 10

Julie, could your image be the result of a process I've seen done using = turpentine (I think)? I saw it done once on Simply Quilts and the = demonstrator said it was the way image transfers were done before = copiers and printers were available. I think I remember her saying it = was done in the 19th century. The image is destroyed in the process, but = the result was impressive.

Kathy Moore Lincoln, NE ------=_NextPart_000_0023_01C43820.51AFC840--

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Subject: Radio interview re: quilt code usage and the underground railroad From: Patricia L Cummings 

Dear QHL members:

With Leigh Fellner's permission, I will share a little about her phone interview that will be broadcast tomorrow evening at 6:30 p.m., Central Time. A radio station in Jackson, Mississippi found Leigh's website and requested more information about the secret quilt code and the Underground Railroad. Leigh would like me to be certain to say that she feels that she did not do the topic justice. I doubt that that is the case, but knowing the breadth and scope of this study, it is understandable if more could have been said.

It will be possible to hear the interview online tomorrow at: http://www.wmpr901.com/ If you are interested in hearing it, you may want to check your computer ahead of time to make sure you have downloaded the necessary components. As far as I know, the interview will not be archived online.

The host of the show, Renee Shakespeare, has tried repeatedly and unsuccessfully to obtain an interview with Serena Wilson, Ozella McDaniel Williams' niece who goes about the country giving lectures on this same topic.

This afternoon, I posted an additional article to my website as an addendum to "Symbolism in Quilts as Part of the Underground Railroad" article. This new selection reviews some of the claims made by Clarice Boswell, both in her lecture and in her book (novel). The article is embedded within the initial manuscript and so, does not stand as a separate website entry.

Leigh is continuing her investigations of the "greater issue" and is coming up with some very astute observations. I am sure that she will be adding more information to her website, too, as soon as she has time. I applaud her efforts.

Pat Cummings www.quiltersmuse.com

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Subject: RE: Gee's Bend From: "Barbara Vlack" <cptvdeo@sbcglobal.net> Date: Wed, 12 May 2004 19:05:36 -0500 X-Message-Number: 12

I was also interested in Cinda's take on the Gee's Bend quilt exhibit. I did not make the time to go see it when it was in Milwaukee, but I wanted to. I just stalled too long. But I bought the coffee table book.

My take from the book is that these are ugly utilitarian quilts that someone has elevated to art status. Surely the culture that produced these quilts played a large part in that. These quilts remind me a lot of the quilts our church ladies are making to go to Lutheran World Relief. They are instructed NOT to make these quilts attractive or they would get pilfered and sold on the black market instead of going to help those for whom they were intended.

I don't mind at all that someone is finding charm or art in these quilts, but sometimes I want to say, "The emperor isn't wearing any clothes." That's probably why I'm not an art critic. VBG Why didn't _I_ think of putting all those weird fabrics and prints together? And mount an exhibit? Another VBG

Barb Vlack cptvdeo@sbcglobal.net

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Subject: RE: qhl digest: May 11, 2004 From: "Barbara Vlack" <cptvdeo@sbcglobal.net> Date: Wed, 12 May 2004 19:05:30 -0500 X-Message-Number: 13

Cinda asked if anyone knew how many quilts were entered in the Great American Quilt Festival/Contest of 1986.

I have the book, which indicates vaguely "thousands." Since the quilts were judged first on a regional basis before one from each state was chosen as a "runner-up" or representative of that state, I think it would be difficult to catalog exactly how many were entered originally. The book did list the judges for each region, so perhaps only they would know the total. The book does state that 51 quilts, one from each state and one from the territories (which included the military) plus the two winners were exhibited.

I had saved an article from the Family Circle magazine for 7/8/86 (tucked it into my Festival book) that said there were "a thousand" entries, over which Monica Calvert and Charlotte Warr Andersen won first and second place respectively. I did not order the "free illustrated how-to's" so "you can duplicate these designs," because I learned a long time ago, when Jinny Beyer won her big contest that Good Housekeeping printed her pattern with "simply draw it up to scale with 1/4-inch = 1-inch" in a graph, or something ridiculous like that. Jinny laughs that she remembers that they also added something like, "If the top doesn't lie flat, simply quilt it out (there's that "simply" again)."

Looking at this book, which has sat on my shelf for many years, is a walk down memory lane now. I appreciate a lot how many of these Quilters I've met over the years! When the book first came out, I remember feeling like I had missed a great party (I still feel that way VBG). I did not know any of the quilters whose quilts were pictured. Now I do!

Another story --- when a newcomer to our church several years ago first met me, Cynthia offered that her cousin was a quilter. In fact, she thought that this cousin, Rebecca, had won something that had to do with a quilt contest and the Statue of Liberty. I ran home and found in my Festival catalog that Rebecca was Rebecca Siegel, who was the quilter representing Kentucky. I was program chairman for my guild at that time and immediately booked Rebecca to come and visit her cousin and by-the-way give a lecture to our guild. I've since seen many quilts by Rebecca at AQS shows, and Rebecca has taught at the MAQS several times.

Barb Vlack cptvdeo@sbcglobal.net

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Subject: Gorgeous Quilts! From: danabalsamo@yahoo.com Date: Wed, 12 May 2004 20:45:47 -0400 X-Message-Number: 14

Hello all, Occassionally I like to browse the eBay Live auctions...there are a couple I thought a few of you would like to see:

Fantastic Hand-Painted California Quilt, entitled The Spirit of the Golden West. http://www.liveauctioneers.com/auctions/ebay/306131

And Appliqué Quilt with Eagle, ca 1860 quilt top http://www.liveauctioneers.com/auctions/ebay/306133

Enjoy, Dana 

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Subject: RE: qhl digest: May 11, 2004 From: "Karen" <@charter.net> Date: Wed, 12 May 2004 22:55:26 -0400 X-Message-Number: 15

Um, yeah. Right. Yup yup. Sure it does. Makes you wonder why so many unquilted Giant Dahlia and Double Wedding Ring tops show up at flea markets, no?

*snort*

Karen Evans

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Subject: RE: Gee's Bend From: Judy Schwender <sister3603@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 12 May 2004 19:57:59 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 16

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Hello- I've worked with the Cargo Collection of African American quilts at the Interntional Quilt Study Center, a group of quilts in the same vein as the Gee's Bend quilts. They are not technically perfect, true. But if I can inject one-tenth of their liveliness, spontaneity, and free, fresh attitude toward fabric selection into my own quilts, I will consider myself a lucky quilter. If you are interested, search the IQSC collections at http://www.quiltstudy.org/search/index.html Use the advanced search at the lower third of the page; click on the IQSC Collection box, and select "Robert and Helen Cargo Collection." At quilt shows, when viewers are able to vote for "Viewers' Choice," I've always voted for the quilt I'd most like to take home with me. Of all my "Viewers' Choice" quilts from the IQSC Collection, about 10 of them are from this collection. It's just a personal thing. And that's the best part of quilting: it's a big umbrella, and we can all fit under it. Judy Schwender

Barbara Vlack <cptvdeo@sbcglobal.net> wrote: I was also interested in Cinda's take on the Gee's Bend quilt exhibit. I did not make the time to go see it when it was in Milwaukee, but I wanted to. I just stalled too long. But I bought the coffee table book.

My take from the book is that these are ugly utilitarian quilts that someone has elevated to art status. Surely the culture that produced these quilts played a large part in that. These quilts remind me a lot of the quilts our church ladies are making to go to Lutheran World Relief. They are instructed NOT to make these quilts attractive or they would get pilfered and sold on the black market instead of going to help those for whom they were intended.

I don't mind at all that someone is finding charm or art in these quilts, but sometimes I want to say, "The emperor isn't wearing any clothes." That's probably why I'm not an art critic. VBG Why didn't _I_ think of putting all those weird fabrics and prints together? And mount an exhibit? Another VBG

Barb Vlack cptvdeo@sbcglobal.net

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Subject: Re: Gorgeous Quilts! From: "Judy Kelius (judysue)" <judysue@ptd.net> Date: Thu, 13 May 2004 

The "1860" top is a kit from the 1950s or 1960s, often confused for an old=  one (based on a real 19th century quilt in the Philadelphia Museum of Art).

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Subject: Re: Gorgeous Quilts! From: Margareta.Faust@cec.eu.int Date: Thu, 13 May 2004 12:53:

I remember at a seminar Bobbie Aug showing us hers, which was from the Bicentennial (i.e. 1976). But is the one Judy mentions in Philadelphia unique - maybe the pattern spread already in the 1800s? Just a thought.. Margareta

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Subject: Gee's Bend quilts From: sewsewsarah@juno.com Date: Thu, 13 May 2004 08:00:04 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Barb wrote: "My take from the book is that these are ugly utilitarian quilts that someone has elevated to art status."

I was so glad to see your post because I was beginning to wonder if I was the only one who felt that way about these quilts! :-)

Sarah

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Subject: Re: Gee's Bend quilts From: Dana at Material Pleasures <danabalsamo@yahoo.com>

Hello all, I saw the exhibit when it was at the Whitney Museum in NYC. I went with a few ladies (I think there were 6 of us) from my guild. When we went, we realized we were not going to see "Quilt Show" quality quilts, so we didn't have those kind of expectations. I think what made us appreciate the exhibit was all the history and background of the quiltmakers that we were given (a widow's deceased husband's overalls, so she could always be close to him). Yes, they are primative. They made do with what they had, like many other quilters before them. They used what we might consider unconventional materials (corduroy, bed ticking, knits, used overalls, etc). Some of them are outstandingly graphic...I remember a red, black, and white one, with circles, that I could not take my eyes off of. I think what is wonderful about the exhibit is it opened people up to quilting who were not yet exposed to it. The exhibit at the Whitney Museum had a line out the door...in the rain...it was so nice to see so many people, young and old, take an interest in these quilts. Maybe it inspired someone to start quilting. Would I pay $10k for a reproduction, heck no! Do I think they are an art form? Of course! And that opinion should be left to the beholder. Do I think that these quilts represent typical African Amercian Quilts? No! I enjoyed the exhibit for what it was. It's quilt history. My best, Dana

Material Pleasures Affordable Vintage Linens, Lace, Textiles, Buttons & More! www.material-pleasures.com

 

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Subject: Another Eagle Quilt Kit From: Ark Quilts <quiltarkmv@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 13 May 2004 05:39:49 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 5

There is another Eagle kit quilt on Ebay right now too, just like the one on live auction.

And Appliqué Quilt with Eagle, ca 1860 quilt top http://www.liveauctioneers.com/auctions/ebay/306133

“Mint 1940’s Eagle and Shield Quilt” Ebay item # 3723108019 Starting bid: $825 http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=2221&item=3723108019

The second one ends in about 2 hours 5/13/ 04 or approximately 10 am EST. The listing has excellent close-up photos of the fabrics used.

Just FYI.

C. Ark NW Ohio

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Subject: Re: Gorgeous Quilts! From: "Judy Kelius (judysue)" <judysue@ptd.net> Date: Thu, 

Eagle quilts were very popular in the mid 19th century, but this one is definitely a mid 20th century kit . . . I did a quick search and here is another identical one on eBay: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=3D2221&item=3D3723108= 019&rd=3D1

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Subject: Subject: RE: Gee's Bend From: "Judy Anne" <anne_j@worldnet.att.net> Date: Thu, 13 May 2004 06:52:38 -0700 X-Message-Number: 7

A local African American quilt artist discussed this to me. She finds that since the Gees Bend publicity many people think all African American quilters make quilts like that. She is planning to write an article for my site along the lines of "Not Just Gees Bend". I find utilitarian quilts fascinating and enjoy them for what they are. But somehow publicity on things like this blows it all out of proportion.

Judy Anne

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Subject: Re: Gorgeous Quilts! From: "Julia D. Zgliniec" <rzglini1@san.rr.com> Date: Thu, 13 May 2004 07:42:32 -0700 X-Message-Number: 8

Dear QHL, Isn't the applique eagle top the American Glory Quilt No 1147 from Paragon and published in Good Housekeeping? Ebay has one of these from time to time.

Regards, Julia Zgliniec

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Subject: Really an 1820-1830 quilt? From: Ark Quilts <quiltarkmv@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 

Found an interesting quilt on Ebay labeled from 1820-1830. Has woven tape binding on it as discussed recently on this list. "1820-1830 Lone Star Quilt With Satellites" from vtlarry #3723947928

Just wondering......... C. Ark in NW Ohio

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Subject: a Star From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawley@comcast.net> Date: Thu, 13 May 2004 14:05:20 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

Yesterday I gave a talk on 20th century quilts. One of the ladies had an absolutely smashing quilt that I think was made from a die cut kit. It's a Lone Star with smaller stars and partial stars between the blades in solid blue, pink, yellow with a triple border of strips of those colors. The diamonds of the star are arranged, not in blades, but as echoing outlines of the star shape. In other words the outside of the star is shocking pink, inside that is a blue star, then yellow and so on into the middle. Hope this is clear. Can anyone enlighten me about this? Cinda on the hot and sunny Eastern Shore

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Subject: Image on Crazy Quilt- thanks! From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplex@starband.net>

I so appreciate the feedback on the silkscreened woman's image on our Crazy quilt. I have added your (brilliant) ideas to the listing and will hope to hear more. I'm betting on Lily (also called Lillie) Langtry! Thank you (s) ! Julie Silber

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Subject: White gloves From: KareQuilt@aol.com Date: Thu, 13 May 2004 22:48:54 EDT X-Message-Number: 12

Anyone know a good source for inexpensive white gloves for use at quilt shows?

Karen Alexander

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: May 12, 2004 From: "Patchwork Secrets" 

First thanks to everyone for the info on cataloguing all these local quilts!..

I notice the discussion on "ugly" quilts and am curious. Here we have what are called "tobacco quilts". These quilts are often just big pieces of fabric or scrap string type quilts that were used to wrap tobacco in before people could afford to purchase large pieces of burlap or heavy duck to tie up tobacco for market. My mother and I have a couple of these quilts and while not valuable hold a special place in the history of quilts in the south (at least in our opinion). I know this is historically accurate since Mom can remember her Dad doing this specific thing with one of the quilts that she managed to salvage..lol.. My grandmother told stories of making them as a young child during the winter to prepare for the upcoming summer. Most of this originated during the depression I believe since the majority of quilts are from that era.

Do other parts of the US besides the south have a history of these types of quilts being made for specific uses?

I think I will include many of these so called "ugly" quilts in the cataloguing since they do have significance overall. Could the ugly quilts everyone is referring to have some such history?

Sharon in NC Final Sue in Kitty Hawk blocks now available 

 


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