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Quilters Find a way to care

Subject: RE: Fiskar scissors From: "Barbara Vlack" <cptvdeo@sbcglobal.net>

I love my Fiskars. I have a couple of pairs of the small style and one of the larger one. Straight cutting scissors. The spring loading makes a lot of difference when I'm doing a lot of patch cutting and they are invaluable when making a flannel rag-style quilt! The spring on the straight-cutting scissors is not as stiff as that reported here for the pinking shears. I really like to use the large size scissors for large cutting projects when I'm not using the rotary cutter.

The Fiskars would be great for someone having thumb trouble, Jean. You don't need to use your thumb.

I, too, prefer Ginghers for fine cutting for appliqué. But they do need to be sharpened occasionally.

The Fiskars are not self sharpening, and I don't know why they hold the sharp edge for so long. But they do. And they're very affordable (sometimes downright cheap) for quality scissors.

My "very-satisfied-customer" story about Fiskars involves the spring. It broke on one of my small pairs, and I couldn't find a replacement spring the right size in a local hardware store. I wrote to customer service at Fiskars about the problem, and they sent me two replacements, no charge. The scissors are no good without the spring!

Barb Vlack cptvdeo@sbcglobal.net

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Subject: RE: English quilt From: "Barbara Vlack" <cptvdeo@sbcglobal.net>

Jean wrote: <<i think they added one too many 0s(maybe it should read $2,000) for the embroidered quilt at

http://www.kroghauctions.com/images/big2.jpg

RESPONSE: I am not an appraiser, but I doubt that that quilt would be valued for only $2000 IF the description of it is completely accurate. Aren't there different appraisal rates depending on whether one is looking for an insurance appraisal or a value/replacement appraisal or a sales price appraisal?

The $20,000 appraisal is good only if someone actually wants to pay that amount. And this is an auction. The $20,000 pricetag may be what they WANT out of the sale, not necessarily what they are going to get.

I was interested, when I went to the site, to read that the same quilter quilted this embroidered quilt with 13 stitches to the inch and the Round the World quilt with only 8.

Barb Vlack cptvdeo@sbcglobal.net

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Subject: RE: English quilt From: billie nelle <billienellepearson@yahoo.com>

hi~ i'm a newbie to this site and to the lap quilting. i would "love' to think that i could ever get so much for a quilt someday!!! my grandmother made several quilts and many tops she never got to finish..nor intended to quilt...hoped at least one of her grandkids would someday pick it up too. long story short....my cousins all got these quilts and tops...none of who care about quilts or sewing...no chance i will ever get one now. but i do know she made some from clothing my great grandma brought over with her from germany....they're being used for dog blankets!!! i have some linen pieces tho that are dated 1907,signatures in the powder ink. can anyone tell me how to clean or restore these pieces or should i leave them as is. some stains on them, and dont know if they're a treasure or something i can cut up for crazy quilt pieces??? helpp this dumby please??? bille

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Subject: RE: Fiskar scissors From: "Karen Quilts Texas"

I was in JoAnns (the Nat'l chain store) today(Saturday), and they had all cutting implements 50% off... just today!

Karen

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Subject: scissor thank you From: Midnitelaptop@aol.com Date: Sat, 12 Jun 2004 12:47:08 EDT X-Message-Number: 5

we all know how wonderful quilters are, and proof of the pudding is: i received lots and lots of feedback on fiskar scissors(all positive)...i bought a pair on sale at joann's and they are just grrrrrrrreat... the largest size had just a little too wide and expanse for my mobility..but the medium and small size are perfect... i can't thank you all enough...for all of the advice/tips have a great weekend. PS a little tip about keeping the thumb fairly close to the palm...i take a piece of Nexcare flexible clear first aid tape(bought it at CVS)...it comes on a dispenser just like scotch tape....i tape a 4 inch long piece to the back of my hand(each one)from the bottom of the index finger to the bottom of the thumb..limiting the spread to 3/4s of what it would be naturally... i can send a line drawing of my tape idea...if you want just email me individually so i can attach it to an email . thanks again jeanL

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Subject: Tobacco Silks From: "Sondra Biacchi" <quilt@epix.net> Date: Sat, 12 Jun 2004 12:56:47 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Since we are on the subject of tobacco ephemera I will attempt to put a pic on eboard of an antique quilt made of floral tobacco silks that I purchased in an antique show recently. I found it under a pile of fabrics in a basket and couldn't believe my eyes. I think it was waiting for me. The tag read Kensita tobacco silks. Kensita was a brand of cigarettes sold in England . There are 140 silks sewn together to make this gorgeous little quilt each measuring 1-1/2" x 2-1/4". There are silks of every flower imaginable and they are beautiful. The dealer told me she had purchased it in England. I found some information on the net at http://www.kensitasflowers.co.uk/weavers.htm 

click on the thumbnail to see this up close The biggest mystery surrounding Kensitas flowers concerns the questions that everybody wants answered.Where were they woven? Who designed them? They were woven in Coventry and the factory and the records were destroyed in the Second World war. The County Archivist of Warwickshire and also the Keeper of Industry at The Herbert museum in Coventry, both confirm that, although Coventry had a large silk weaving industry, there is no evidence to suggest Kensitas silks were produced there. The firm of J. J. Cash which is still in existence (producing amongst other things name tags for sewing into childrens school clothing) again draws a blank. One of the largest cigarette card dealers in America - Franklyn Roberts suggests on his webpage that "Kensitas silks were woven by mid-european peasant labour on primitive looms". Other people have suggested that they were woven in Eastern Europe but offer no firm evidence. Can anyone shed any more light on this lovely little piece?

Sondra Pennsylvania

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Subject: RE: Kumiko Sudo From: "Sandra Millett" <smillett@sbcglobal.net>

You must contact Kumiko through her publisher. I wrote a profile article about her for McCall's Quilting several years ago and she will not talk directly to anyone, it must all go through an intermediary.   Good luck.  Sandra  Sandra Millett Author, Freelance Writer Quilting the Savory Garden, Krause Publications Needle 'n Pen columnist, The Quilter Magazine  

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Subject: RE: Fiskar scissors From: "Sandra Millett" <smillett@sbcglobal.net> 

I am now using Heritage Cutlery Scissors almost exclusively. The VP23 is= a small trimmer with micro-tips that will clip even 2mm machine stitches.=20 They are American made in Bolivar, NY. And are resharpened free.   Another point, Chris Olix, the engineer for Heritage says that using "pap= er scissors" is not necessary. It is an old wives tales started when the br= and under discussion began marketing. All you have to do is wipe the scissor blades free of paper fibers residue and they are good to go for fabrics.=20 The paper residue is what causes dulling.   The company has a new VP3 ergonomic scissor that pops open when released.= =20 Also like the removable soft cussion inserts in the finger holes in some.= =20 Go to www.HeritageCutlery.com for sources.  Hope this helps.  Sandra  Sandra Millett Author, Freelance Writer Quilting the Savory Garden, Krause Publications Needle 'n Pen columnist, The Quilter Magazine 

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Subject: Re: cigar band info From: "Newbie Richardson"

Thanks, doll. These are tow wonder ful table covers, donated to the Valentine, archival mounted and framed. One has strips of bias binding(?) used to stretch out the cigar bands. The other one is only cigar bands - even some in turquoise blue. It almost looks like she did some kind of cigar band 'swap', as there are so many diferent brands represented. Best, Newbie

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Subject: Re: cigar band info From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcrafts@verizon.net> Date: Sat, 12 Jun 2004 

You are a dear. These are two table covers, professionally mounted and framed, now at the Valentine. One has bias ribbon - or tape- used to fill in for lack of cigar ribbons. The other is solid ribbons, some in turquoise. There are so many different brands represented that I would think she belonged to some kind of "swap" club. This is the same period as charm quilts, no? Best, Newbie

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Subject: RE: washer From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcrafts@verizon.net> Date: Sat, 12 Jun 2004 17:41:19 -0400 X-Message-Number: 13

Lynn, For what it is worth, the company as well as the folks at Sears whom I talked to, claim that the mildew dorr gasget problem has been fixed in the later models....I am also looking at Sear's copy cat version. I have always had luck with Kemore stuff. I am not plunking down my money just yet! At least I can sit and read at the laudromat! ( and if I don't turn on my cell I can be blissfully OUT OF REACH! Newbie

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Subject: 19th c ink stamps From: "Newbie Richardson"

Dear list, I am quiet for months and suddenly need your collective wisdom several times in one week! A very dear friend, and very knowledgeable collector of early clothing, has acquired an early corset and chemise from an estate in NY. We are trying to date the pieces. Styllisticaly they could be anywhere from 1800 - 1835. The geneology confirms dates in the 1800 to 1840 period. But... Both the corset and the chemise have an ink stamp of a federal eagle motif surrounding the stamped name of the woman who ( we think) owned the garments. The whole is clearly one complete stamp and not two separate stamps. If the geneology is correct, then she wore the corset as a teen ager, c 1815, (as sort of a training bra). Also, she used the stamp several times on the same garment. (I remember my own teen-aged daughters stamping everything in sight when they got a set of ink stamps as a gift one year!) Stylistically, this is ok - but so is a later date. The corset is not that small. It has a waist of 24", so could have been worn by either an adolescent or young woman. I am thinking that the clue to the date maybe the stamp. My experience with stamps on clothing is more 1830 on, and more as manufacturer markings, not on what is clearly home made clothing. I am possibly of the opinion that the pieces were for another daughter of the family, who would have had the same name, if the sibling had died,( they did that a lot in the 19th c as many of you know) thus dating the clothes closer to 1830 and the kind of ink stamp that I have seen in that period. I just think that c 1815 is too early for such a stamp - any thoughts? Best Newbie Richardson

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Subject: Quilt pictures at auction From: Barb Garrett

I always know when it's a slow night -- I get to catch up on emails and bookmarks and houseclean <grin>. I know the auction is over, but I thought you might enjoy the picture show of mostly Pennsylvania quilts at this site -- they do a good job of photographing, and don't forget to click on the quilt a second time for an enlargement. http://www.williambunchauctions.com/content/images/040608/InvCat_0086.htm

Actually, I was hoping that the auction results would be listed like he did on the last large auction he had, but it's just the catalog, no prices.

Barb in sunny southeastern PA

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Subject: washing machine From: QuiltsRI@aol.com Date: Sat, 12 Jun 2004 22:21:15 -0400 X-Message-Number: 16

I have had my FISHER-PAYKEL for over and love it. Other than making otherworldly noises when it spins, it is the tops. It is so energy efficient, the state of Maryland didn't charge sales tax. Cathy Smith

 

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Subject: RE: washer From: "Karen" <@charter.net> Date: Sat, 12 Jun 2004 23:59:32 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Somebody else who uses a laundromat! At last!

I do it for the people-watching, actually...you can learn an enormous amount about humanity...:)

Karen Evans (who never, ever, washes quilts at the laundromat....:) ) ----- Original Message ----- From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcrafts@verizon.net> To: "Quilt History List" <qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Saturday, June 12, 2004 5:41 PM Subject: [qhl] RE: washer

> Lynn, > For what it is worth, the company as well as the folks at Sears whom I > talked to, claim that the mildew dorr gasget problem has been fixed in the > later models....I am also looking at Sear's copy cat version. I have always > had luck with Kemore stuff. > I am not plunking down my money just yet! At least I can sit and read at > the laudromat! ( and if I don't turn on my cell I can be blissfully OUT OF > REACH! > Newbie > > -----Original Message----- > From: Palampore@aol.com [mailto:Palampore@aol.com] > Sent: Friday, June 11, 2004 10:33 AM > To: Quilt History List > Subject: [qhl] washer > > > Newbie, DON'T get a NEPTUNE/Maytag. I have one and HATE it. It washs > clothes very well, but it is a mildewed mess around the rubber seal and no > amount of cleaning will fix it. I have complained to the person I bought it > from but he says I have no recourse because it says in the Owner's Manuel > that I should have been doing a Clorox only wash about every week or so. > Well, guess what! I didn't read that and because of it I have a mess mess > mess. What happens is that at the end of the wash I should have been wiping > the door and seal DRY before closing it. (Washing for a family of 5 with > about 1 or 2 loads a day...) If you are complusive about cleaning, which I > am not, it will be fine. Newbie, you are like me so you don't need one. > Look at a Fisher/Pycal (not sure about spelling). It got great reviews and > I debated about it. Wish I had gotten that instead. > I will soon have to replace my Neptune, and I will look at those. Have had > the Neptune 3 yrs. > My 2 cents worth, Lynn Lancaster Gorges, New Bern, NC > > > --- >

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Subject: Laundromat From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrow@patmedia.net> Date: Sun, 13 Jun 2004 00:16:20 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

> Karen Evans > (who never, ever, washes quilts at the laundromat....:) )

I have used the Laundromat twice in 45 years, and both times were to wash those newfangled raggedy ravelly quilts. I did it. I did it twice. Make those quilts I mean. It must have been some sort of bacillus in the food I'd eaten, or perhaps a funny mushroom. I'm much more careful now.

Judy Ringo judygrow@patmedia.net

Who spent this evening bonding with my seam ripper. I even bought two new ones today, knowing what lay ahead.

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Subject: Re: Hankies From: "Jocelyn Martin" <jocelynm@delphiforums.com> Date: Sat, 12 Jun 2004 23:27:17 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

>Regarding hankies, I was in a quilt shop in Springfield, Missouri recently and they had a quilt >hanging where antique hankies were made into butterflys and then appliqued onto blocks.

About 5-10 years ago, a lady on this list was bemoaning the fact that she couldn't find hankies locally at a cost she could afford. I went through our antique mall and bought her 30-40 hankies so she could make a quilt.

Is she still on the list? If so, I'd love to see a picture of the finished quilt.

Alas, I seem to have created the 'demand' around here for hankies, and they've never again been cheap enough for me to buy them en masse and make a quilt, myself. :)

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Subject: RE: another block request From: "Jocelyn Martin" <jocelynm@delphiforums.com> Date: Sat, 12 Jun 2004 23:27:15 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

>Princess feathers is another block I would like to do some >>research on........does anyone know of specfic books about >these blocks?

There's a new Kansas City Star Quilts book coming out, by Terrie Thompson, on 'Four Block Quilts'. The cover art is a Prince's Feather quilt.

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Subject: RE: Tobacco Silks From: "Judy Anne" <anne_j@worldnet.att.net> Date: Sat, 12 Jun 2004 23:04:32 -0700 X-Message-Number: 5

Could anyone tell where these tobacco silks came from and why some are bigger?

http://www.womenfolk.com/historyofquilts/cigsilklg.jpg

Thanks, Judy Anne

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Subject: RE: English quilt From: "Laura Syler" <texas_quilt.co@airmail.net> Date: Sun, 13 Jun 2004 08:04:23 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

Hi Billie, Welcome to the list. Please do nothing to your blocks before you show them - physically- to someone that can examine them. Many times fabrics "look" fine, but once you touch them, the hand tells you that they are really on their last leg and should be left alone. It is a difficult task at best to decide to clean/restore/preserve any piece of textile, and if you have someone that specializes in restoration, or even a certified appraiser who can advise you on the actual condition of your blocks, it might mean the difference between clean bright blocks and a lump of mush....voice of experience here!!!

Laura Hobby Syler Certified Appraiser of Quilted Textiles Quilt Restoration Specialist Teacher, Lecturer, Exhibit Curator Richardson, Texas ----- Original Message ----- From: "billie nelle" <billienellepearson@yahoo.com> To: "Quilt History List" <qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Saturday, June 12, 2004 10:27 AM Subject: [qhl] RE: English quilt

> hi~ i'm a newbie to this site and to the lap quilting. i would "love' to think that i could ever get so much for a quilt someday!!! my grandmother made several quilts and many tops she never got to finish..nor intended to quilt...hoped at least one of her grandkids would someday pick it up too. long story short....my cousins all got these quilts and tops...none of who care about quilts or sewing...no chance i will ever get one now. but i do know she made some from clothing my great grandma brought over with her from germany....they're being used for dog blankets!!! > i have some linen pieces tho that are dated 1907,signatures in the powder ink. can anyone tell me how to clean or restore these pieces or should i leave them as is. some stains on them, and dont know if they're a treasure or something i can cut up for crazy quilt pieces??? helpp this dumby please??? bille > > Barbara Vlack <cptvdeo@sbcglobal.net> wrote: > Jean wrote: <read $2,000) for the > embroidered quilt at > > http://www.kroghauctions.com > > RESPONSE: I am not an appraiser, but I doubt that that quilt would > be valued for only $2000 IF the description of it is completely > accurate. Aren't there different appraisal rates depending on > whether one is looking for an insurance appraisal or a > value/replacement appraisal or a sales price appraisal? > > The $20,000 appraisal is good only if someone actually wants to pay > that amount. And this is an auction. The $20,000 pricetag may be > what they WANT out of the sale, not necessarily what they are going > to get. > > I was interested, when I went to the site, to read that the same > quilter quilted this embroidered quilt with 13 stitches to the inch > and the Round the World quilt with only 8. > > > Barb Vlack > cptvdeo@sbcglobal.net > > > --- >

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Subject: RE: washer From: "Karen Quilts Texas" <karenquiltstexas@houston.rr.com> Date: Sun, 13 Jun 2004 12:55:17 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

I'm on my second Kenmore - in 25 years. These were not top of the line models... mid-range models, with heavy duty, large capacity. Never a call for the repair man. A few minor fixes provided easily by DH with parts obtained by Sears locally. I have just one child, so can't speak for their reliability in heavy use..

I do have a Jenn Air (Maytag owns Jenn Air gas range and oven, and while I love the way it works, it has had problems due to poor workmanship since I first purchased it. I've gone through 3 sets of burner grates in 5 years - they couldn't seem to get the enamel coating on the grates right!

I'm not sure you always get what you pay for when you pay 2 to 3 times more for these top of line models. I have a friend with 10 kids (age 5 to 21) all but one living at home. Her Neptune Washer lasted her just over two years, with a number of repair calls and then she went back to Kenmore. She goes through mid-range heavy duty Kenmore Washer and Dryer every 5 years. My opinion of high end sewing machines is also along these lines!

IMHO -My business experience tells me that much of the expense of the most "expensive" models is in the high marketing, advertising budgets necessary to "help" convince the consumer that these high end products provide significant value above that of "lesser" (read less expensive) brands or models.

Check out Consumer Reports ratings of appliances before you purchase. They are a non-profit organization that accepts no advertising and exist solely to provide consumers with information about product reliability. Their product testing is beyond compare. They do have a website, as well as the magazines. Every year they publish a summary of their rankings in paperback... might be available at the library. A subscription is well worth the price.

Karen Spring, TX

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Subject: Re: cigar band info From: <chrisa@jetlink.net> Date: Sun, 13 Jun 2004 10:45:51 -0700 X-Message-Number: 8

HI Newbie-

I think the swap idea has potential and I may have even heard about this happening, but seldom have I read or heard any elaboration. The whole point of the cigar companies making the later premiums of flannel and silks was for the women urging their husbands to buy different brands so they would have access to many different looks for their needlework piece. But he cigar bands were made to simply recognize the brand of the cigar. I don't think the companies had the idea of them being used inthe needlework, at least not at first.

I have seen turquoise bands, but rare they are in my experience. There is a preserved mansion home in Northern CA that has a beauty, which has this color in it, as well as purple.

I'm not quite sure what you mean by bias strip to spread them? Do you mean to go between blocks of cigar bands made in squares, to serve the form of a sashing? Or was that the finishing edge? I can't imagine the silk stretching, but to help it lay flat, that makes sense. None of mine have that though.

Kim Wulfert www.antiquequiltdating.com

One has strips of bias binding(?) used to stretch out the cigar bands. The other one is only cigar bands - even some in turquoise blue. It almost looks like she did some kind of cigar band 'swap', as there are so many diferent brands represented. Best, Newbie

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Subject: Kensitas silks From: <chrisa@jetlink.net> Date: Sun, 13 Jun 2004 10:56:39 -0700 X-Message-Number: 9

There seems to be a bit of info about the flower silks Kensitas made, but I haven't been able to get info on the flag ones that I own. They are not woven, but printed silks. Printed in the USA they say. There is a series of 60 national flags, they say and I have 8, 5 from the British Empire regions, and the others three from Switzerland, Italy and Latvia. They are quite pretty, shaded to look like they are flying in the wind and made in good color or inks. They are also slightly bigger than the others I have, made by B.D.V. Cigarettes, a common one.

I have 4 nautical flags quilts- these are the signal flags and the word they are representing is at the bottom. They are made by B.D.V too. They state Nelson's Famous Signal and are part of series 11. Does anyone know more about these?

(PS to Sondra B.,your email still kicks mine back)

Kim Wulfert www.antiquequiltdating.com

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Subject: :corection on cigar band info From: <chrisa@jetlink.net> Date: Sun, 13 Jun 2004 11:17:10 -0700 X-Message-Number: 10

The whole point of the cigar(TOBACCOO) companies making the later premiums of flannel and silks was for the women urging their husbands to buy different brands so they would have access to many different looks for their needlework piece.

Kim Wulfert www.antiquequiltdating.com

<<<HI Newbie-

I think the swap idea has potential and I may have even heard about this happening, but seldom have I read or heard any elaboration. The whole point of the cigar companies making the later premiums of flannel and silks was for the women urging their husbands to buy different brands so they would have access to many different looks for their needlework piece. But he cigar bands were made to simply recognize the brand of the cigar. I don't think the companies had the idea of them being used inthe needlework, at least not at first.>>>

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Subject: test scores for paper piecing From: Midnitelaptop@aol.com Date: Sun, 13 Jun 2004 14:31:56 EDT X-Message-Number: 11

put down the pencils and the printed test in Self Knowledge Magazine.....and take this test for patience and tenacity...

print out on verrrry lightweight paper, a 3 inch(finished) paper pieced quilt block with at least 19 pieces in the block....now start out with the "know it all" attitude of not really needing to pay too much attention..after all, you've made 100s of paper pieced blocks and you're sure you know the process... after putting almost half of the block together...you realize that the sequence you disregarded was essential...soooooo...you gently rip out parts of seams hoping you can make the block without having to take the entire seam of all of the pieces you have finished... the paper is slightly torn in spots...but you doggedly continue to reconstruct.. along the way you sew at least one piece with the wrong side of the fabric showing...and one piece that didn't quite cover the numbered piece... the completed little square is just slightly askew...due to the fact that one of the torn paper seams shifted just a little..... but you dig in and reconstruct the little bugger....

put a circle around the numbers of the actions you have performed 1. shouted words that would make a longshoreman cringe 2. thrown the seam ripper across the room at least twice 3. kicked the legs of your sewing machine chair...instead of kicking the cat/dog... 4. fed the family cheerios for sunday dinner. 5. finished an entire jumbo bag of M&Ms..

if you haven't circled any numbers you win the Mother Theresa gold cup

if you circled 3 out of the 5.. you get another not so jumbo bag of M& Ms

if you circled all of the numbers call me and we'll have lunch, my treat...

jeanL

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Subject: Re: test scores for paper piecing From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrow@patmedia.net> Date: Sun, 13 Jun 2004 15:20:09 -0400 X-Message-Number: 12

Jean

Does not kicking the cat instead of not kicking the dog count?

How about instant oatmeal instead of Cheerios?

Didn't actually throw the seam ripper, but bought two new ones yesterday and spent the entire evening last night using them on yards and yards of half square triangles at 1.5 setting on my Pfaff.

The naughty words I say anyway -- only when alone, of course.

I didn't have M&M's in the house, but I did have a half gallon of chocolate/chocolate chunk ice cream (low fat, of course) -- which I did NOT finish, but I was eating it straight from the container.

So, where do we meet for lunch?

Judy Ringo judygrow@patmedia.net

----- Original Message ----- From: <Midnitelaptop@aol.com> To: "Quilt History List" <qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Sunday, June 13, 2004 2:31 PM Subject: [qhl] test scores for paper piecing

> put down the pencils and the printed test in Self Knowledge Magazine.....and > take this test for patience and tenacity... > > print out on verrrry lightweight paper, a 3 inch(finished) paper pieced > quilt block with at least 19 pieces in the block....now start out with the "know > it all" attitude of not really needing to pay too much attention..after all, > you've made 100s of paper pieced blocks and you're sure you know the process... > after putting almost half of the block together...you realize that the > sequence you disregarded was essential...soooooo...you gently rip out parts of seams > hoping you can make the block without having to take the entire seam of all > of the pieces you have finished... > the paper is slightly torn in spots...but you doggedly continue to > reconstruct.. > along the way you sew at least one piece with the wrong side of the fabric > showing...and one piece that didn't quite cover the numbered piece... > the completed little square is just slightly askew...due to the fact that one > of the torn paper seams shifted just a little..... > but you dig in and reconstruct the little bugger.... > > put a circle around the numbers of the actions you have performed > 1. shouted words that would make a longshoreman cringe > 2. thrown the seam ripper across the room at least twice > 3. kicked the legs of your sewing machine chair...instead of kicking the > cat/dog... > 4. fed the family cheerios for sunday dinner. > 5. finished an entire jumbo bag of M&Ms.. > > if you haven't circled any numbers > you win the Mother Theresa gold cup > > if you circled 3 out of the 5.. > you get another not so jumbo bag of M& Ms > > if you circled all of the numbers > call me and we'll have lunch, my treat... > > jeanL > > > > --- >

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Subject: RE: Tobacco Silks From: "Patchwork Secrets" <patchworksecrets2@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 13 Jun 2004 19:51:17 -0400 X-Message-Number: 13

Here are some silks which are dated.. http://www.the-forum.com/EPHEMERA/Tobacco.htm#silks http://pages.tias.com/2374/InventoryPage/901211/2.html

Sharon

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Subject: Quilting in Indiana in 1830's From: "cjsp70" <cjsp70@insightbb.com> Date: Sun, 13 Jun 2004 19:04:40 -0500 X-Message-Number: 14

I am new to the list and am enjoying reading about tests if the prize is = M&M's. This summer I am doing a quilting demonstration at the Lincoln = Boyhood Memorial in Lincoln City Indiana. I would like to be able to = answer questions accurately. Where did the ladies get their fabrics and = notions? Did they use remnants from other sewing projects or the "good" = parts of worn clothing or did they buy material specifically for a = quilt? What Block patterns were used then? Is there a reference book = that I can get this information from? HELP! I am relatively new to = using a computer but determined to keep trying. Thanks, Pat ------=_NextPart_000_0040_01C45179.47295400--

 

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: June 13, 2004 From: patkyser <patkyser@hiwaay.net> Date: Mon, 14 Jun 2004 06:36:23 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

I have been off list several weeks, been in NJ helping with grand children while Mom was on business trip. One day, on a day off, I was driving from South Orange to Washington Crossing, Delaware, to meet a cousin for lunch and passed a sign that said, "Ringoes business district." I thought to stop and give Judy a call, but my aging mind could only come up with "Judy Ringo", which I knew was wrong! Hence no phone call, Judy, and no chance to meet face to face. Sorry!

On another note: I missed the Smithsonian Calico and Chintz exhibit when it was in Louisville, just never got up there. I am delighted to learn it now (through Aug 29) is at The Hermitage, President Andrew Jackson's home in Nashville, TN. If any others missed it, too, here is another chance. The Hermitage is a lovely visit in itself, has been upgraded and enhanced in recent years. The one thing they could not do though was replace the huge cedars that used to form a violin-shaped drive up to the house that were wiped out in a tornado several years back. Fortunately the house was not hit, but the storm wreaked havoc on the original landscaping. I've made kits for over 25 years for them to sell, a replica of a sampler made by Jackson's niece, and a pillow based on a quilt they used to display there. Pat Kyser in Huntsville, AL

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Subject: non-quilt: Article on slave narrative in NYT From: "Candace Perry" <candace@schwenkfelder.com> Date: Mon, 14 Jun 2004 10:04:58 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

http://www.nytimes.com/2004/06/14/national/14SLAV.html?th

Here's a link to an article about newly discovered slave narratives...I know many members have an ongoing interest in this subject (I among you)so I thought I'd post it, even if it's non quilt! Candace Perry

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Subject: RE: 19th c ink stamps From: "Candace Perry" <candace@schwenkfelder.com> Date: Mon, 14 Jun 2004 11:06:09 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Newbie, I definitely think 1815 is too early for a stamp. I have seen some early handkerchiefs with stamps...but i don't think they were as early as that. Interesting! Candace Perry

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Subject: Re: cigar band info From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcrafts@verizon.net> Date: Mon, 14 Jun 2004 11:10:32 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

The plain ribbon/fabric pieces were cut the same length as the cigar silks and sem to have been used to make the table cover more quickly thatn would have been possible if the maker had collected enough silks to fill the entire table cover. The colors match exactly. Although it is possible that these were plain bits cut off the ends of the cigar ribbons, all the cigar ribbons I have ever seen are the same length as was used in this cover, so i thin it was either ribbon or cut fabric purchased for the project. As I could not take the piece out of it's frame, I could not see the selvages. I will report back when I have done my research. Best, Newbie

-----Original Message----- From: chrisa@jetlink.net [mailto:chrisa@jetlink.net] Sent: Sunday, June 13, 2004 1:46 PM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] Re: cigar band info

HI Newbie-

I think the swap idea has potential and I may have even heard about this happening, but seldom have I read or heard any elaboration. The whole point of the cigar companies making the later premiums of flannel and silks was for the women urging their husbands to buy different brands so they would have access to many different looks for their needlework piece. But he cigar bands were made to simply recognize the brand of the cigar. I don't think the companies had the idea of them being used inthe needlework, at least not at first.

I have seen turquoise bands, but rare they are in my experience. There is a preserved mansion home in Northern CA that has a beauty, which has this color in it, as well as purple.

I'm not quite sure what you mean by bias strip to spread them? Do you mean to go between blocks of cigar bands made in squares, to serve the form of a sashing? Or was that the finishing edge? I can't imagine the silk stretching, but to help it lay flat, that makes sense. None of mine have that though.

Kim Wulfert www.antiquequiltdating.com

One has strips of bias binding(?) used to stretch out the cigar bands. The other one is only cigar bands - even some in turquoise blue. It almost looks like she did some kind of cigar band 'swap', as there are so many diferent brands represented. Best, Newbie

---

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Subject: textile workshop in Nashville, TENN From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcrafts@verizon.net> Date: Mon, 14 Jun 2004 11:43:38 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Dear List, This for members who are within striking distance of Nashville, Tenn. Please let anyone whom you think would be interested know about this:

The Costume Society of America - Region VI, is sponsoring it's 7th annual "Preserving Our Past": a costume and textile conservation, preservation, and identification seminar for small museums, their staffs, volunteers, and collectors, on Friday, August 6th in Nashville Tenn. The day long workshop is being taught by Newbie Richardson and Colleen Callahan of the Costume and Textile Specialists. There are 3 presentations in the morning: Sleuthing at the Seams: Dating Womens Clothing 1790-1930; What to Do with what You've Got: textile conservation for the layman; and Costume Exhibitions on a Shoe String: some successful display strategies for those on a budget. We break for lunch ( included in the registration fee) In the afternoon we do demonstrations of wet cleaning techniques, vacuuming, packing and storing of costumes and textiles. The registration fee is $40 for CSA membvers and $50 for non members. The location is at the Doubletree Hotel from 8am to 3:30pm. There is a plantation evening planned that evening, should participants wish to join us. Our anuual symposium will be held over the next two days. The theme is: Costume and Country. Among the many excellent papers being presented is: "We're nothing but a bunch of hill billies": working clothing and the country music look, 1900-1940 by Cecilia Gunzburger, the Textile Museum, Washington, DC. This workshop is designed as outreach to the small museum community and it's cost is underwritten, in part, by a grant from the Susan Varner and Suzanne Arena Memorial Fund. If anyone would like to receive a brochure, please email Newbie directly at: pastcrafts@verizon.net.

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Subject: Quilting in Indiana in 1830s From: "Maureen" <maureen@booksandoldlace.com> Date: Mon, 14 Jun 2004 09:49:26 -0700 X-Message-Number: 6

Hi Pat:

The Indiana Quilt History Project has published a quilt history book and = you might find a lot of information there. There is also a dissertation on Indiana quilt history, and a book on Indiana Amish quilting. The books = might be at your local public library or available through the library's interlibrary loan service. Visit = http://www.booksandoldlace.com/quilting/ where you can review the selective bibliography, State Quilt = Documentation and Regional Quilt History.=20

The best price for a used copy of Goldman's Quilts of Indiana is on = Amazon www.amazon.com, about 14.95.

Best regards,=20

Maureen. Ashland, Oregon ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilting in Indiana in 1830's From: "cjsp70" <> Date: Sun, 13 Jun 2004 19:04:40 -0500 X-Message-Number: 14

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------=3D_NextPart_000_0040_01C45179.47295400 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

I am new to the list and am enjoying reading about tests if the prize is = =3D M&M's. This summer I am doing a quilting demonstration at the Lincoln = =3D Boyhood Memorial in Lincoln City Indiana. I would like to be able to =3D answer questions accurately. Where did the ladies get their fabrics and = =3D notions? Did they use remnants from other sewing projects or the "good" = =3D parts of worn clothing or did they buy material specifically for a =3D = quilt? What Block patterns were used then? Is there a reference book =3D that I = can get this information from? HELP! I am relatively new to =3D using a = computer but determined to keep trying. Thanks, Pat ------=3D_NextPart_000_0040_01C45179.47295400--

******************** Ashland Mystery ... ******************** Carola Dunn Thursday, July 8th, 7pm at the Ashland Public Library. The Daisy Dalrymple mysteries reflect a simpler and grander time, the 1920s. The mysteries are set against a background of complex class = relationships, a time of rapid social change and remarkable global prosperity. =20 ******************** Steve Brewer 8/12/04 ** Hosting a Mystery Party by Carol McNair and Bob Devoe 9/9/04 ** Donna Cohen on Ladies No. 1 Detective Agency 10/3/04 2p = ** Forensic Anthropologist Nici Wanek 10/23/04 ** Ron Lovall 11/11/04, = Oregon's own author of the Dr. Thomas Martindale series -- Speakers and books on second Thursdays!=20 ******************** Sponsored by the Ashland Mystery Readers Group, the Friends of the = Ashland Public Library and Bloomsbury Books.=20 www.booksandoldlace.com/mysteries/ Ashland, Oregon 541-552-0743

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Subject: calling everyone interested in kit quilts... From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessen@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 14 Jun 2004 12:08:29 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 7

This is a message from Phyllis Hewitt, robhew@volcano.net. If you can help her, please contact her directly - and CC the list so we can all learn!

Kris

I have a Bucilla Applique "Rose Buds and Bows" kit #3329 still in the original package. I purchased it over 30 years ago and do not think I will ever get around to making it. I was wondering what it is worth today and what would be a reasonable price to ask should I decide to sell it? Can you date it? I think it is older than 30 years. I tried searching the net to no avail.

Any help you can give me would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Phyllis Hewitt robhew@volcano.net

 

__________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Friends. Fun. Try the all-new Yahoo! Messenger. http://messenger.yahoo.com/

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: June 13, 2004 From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrow@patmedia.net> Date: Mon, 14 Jun 2004 17:48:15 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

Pat,

What a shame we didn't meet. If you saw that sign you were on Route 202 and not 2 miles from my house. Ringoes business district is a gas station, two deli's, Mom's Restaurant, Fleet Bank, the library and the post office. You didn't miss much by not taking the turn-off.

I didn't know there was a Washington Crossing Delaware. Washington Crossing Pennsylvania. is only 10 miles or so from Ringoes.

Next time.

J. G. Row aka Judy Ringo

----- Original Message ----- From: "patkyser" <patkyser@hiwaay.net> To: "Quilt History List" <qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Monday, June 14, 2004 7:36 AM Subject: [qhl] Re: qhl digest: June 13, 2004

> I have been off list several weeks, been in NJ helping with grand > children while Mom was on business trip. One day, on a day off, I was > driving from South Orange to Washington Crossing, Delaware, to meet a > cousin for lunch and passed a sign that said, "Ringoes business > district." I thought to stop and give Judy a call, but my aging mind > could only come up with "Judy Ringo", which I knew was wrong! Hence no > phone call, Judy, and no chance to meet face to face. Sorry! > > On another note: I missed the Smithsonian Calico and Chintz exhibit > when it was in Louisville, just never got up there. I am delighted to > learn it now (through Aug 29) is at The Hermitage, President Andrew > Jackson's home in Nashville, TN. If any others missed it, too, here is > another chance. The Hermitage is a lovely visit in itself, has been > upgraded and enhanced in recent years. The one thing they could not do > though was replace the huge cedars that used to form a violin-shaped > drive up to the house that were wiped out in a tornado several years > back. Fortunately the house was not hit, but the storm wreaked havoc on > the original landscaping. I've made kits for over 25 years for them to > sell, a replica of a sampler made by Jackson's niece, and a pillow > based on a quilt they used to display there. > Pat Kyser in Huntsville, AL > > > > --- > You are currently subscribed to qhl as: judygrow@patmedia.net. > To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1441754M@lyris.quiltropolis.com >

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Subject: Tobacco Seals From: Jennifer Perkins <qltrstore@harlannet.com> Date: Mon, 14 Jun 2004 17:16:57 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

I looked at the links provided yesterday and found the type found in the quilt I was telling you about. They are in the tobacco seal section and are the College Seal S25, and City Seal S90. I don't see any of the same type here for the states and lodges, but they all had the same look as these two do, (not with pictures.) Thanks for the help! Jennifer

http://www.the-forum.com/EPHEMERA/Tobacco.htm#silks

PS, does anybody know if they would have about the same value sewn together as they do as a single unit?

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Subject: Quilts in new music From: "Marcia Kaylakie" <marciark@earthlink.net>

HI All, I just bought American Angels, the last CD made by Anonymous 4, = a most amazing and beautiful female acapella group. Imagine my surpirse = when I saw part of a quilt on the cover. The liner notes are nothing = less than a small text on anglo-american folk and gospel singing in = America, and very small photos of quilts are sprinkled throught!! Closer = inspection notes that they are from the collection of the American = Museum of Folk Art in NYC! What a treat, both visually and audially!! Thought you all might lke to know. I am enjoying my quilting time this = evening with these 4 spectacular musicians and I am sorry that they no = longer sing together. I was fortunate enough to hear them about 7 years = ago when they were here in Austin. Marcia

Marcia Kaylakie, AQS Certified Appraiser Austin, TX =20

 

 


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