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Quilters Find a way to care

Subject: Quilters Hall Of Fame From: JBQUILTOKaol.com Date: Mon, 5 Jul 2004 07:31:44 EDT X-Message-Number: 1

I know that the grand opening of the the Marie Webster house is coming up later this month, but I have not been able to locate any information about when the place will be 'open' after the grand opening. And what kind of exhibits, etc they would have in place on an ongoing basis.

I'll be traveling this month - may not be able to get there for the big celebration, but was wondering if it would be worth stopping a few days later.

Janet Bronston

Subject: Biscuit quilts From: JBQUILTOKaol.com Date: Mon, 5 Jul 2004 07:37:56 EDT

There was a publication in the early 1970's on Puff Quilts & how to make them. It covered not only the square biscuit quilts, but several other patterns done in the same manner - stuffing individual pieces & whipping them together.

The term Biscuit Quilts always reminds me of bread making day at home. We made biscuits for that night by jamming little rolls of bread dough together in a rectangluar cake pan & baking them with the regular loaves. We could break these apart & eat them warm without messing up a whole loaf trying to cut it before it cooled. When we had them at home, the were biscuits. When we took them to a covered dish dinner, they became rolls. So does a biscuit quilt become a roll quilt if it is hung in a show?

Janet Bronston

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Subject: Re: samplers From: Judy <jrocheqpil.net>

Hi Cinda I will be working in the Red Cottage Antiques booth- at the VQF- hope to see you! Not sure which building, but was told it is near JS's exhibit. New England is a dangerous place for me-antique shops all over, just waiting to be plundered! Judy Roche Solebury Pa

On Jul 2, 2004, at 12:59 PM, Lucinda Cawley wrote: > Who else is going to > VT? I wasn't planning to go this year, but the prospect of the > Silbers' > blue and white quilts made it irresistible. > Cinda on the Eastern Shore > > ---

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Subject: Re: Biscuit quilts--very strange! From: "Pepper Cory" 

Hello all-Once in the late 1970s in an auction box, I discovered a large folded piece of paper (about the size of the old Mountain Mist patterns) that had directions for a 'stocking quilt.' The text was badly typed with misspellings and the illustrations crudely drawn. What it was essentially was a biscuit quilt with nylon stockings used as the stuffing! The directions, as I recall them, told you to cut the tops and toes off the stocking and wash them and then cut each stocking into about three pieces. In addition there were biblical quotes all through the text and an advertisement, for want of a better term, for a full gospel church on the south side of Chicago. Boy, I wish I knew where I put that thing--it's now an artifact of a defunct age--when women regularly wore stockings with tops! Happy 4th- Pepper

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Subject: Biscuit quilts--very strange! From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Mon, 05 Jul 2004 18:12:33 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Oh Pepper, count yourself lucky that you missed the full-length hosiery stage. It wasn't the tops which were a pain but the gizmo they connected to called a garter belt. :-D

 

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Subject: Re: Biscuit quilts--very strange! From: "Pepper Cory" 

Ah, I well remember garter belts. To crack up my sisters in church, I would, especially during a boring sermon, slowly slide my skirt above my knees and pretend to play guitar on the garters! Since there were five of us kids, plus Mom, squashed into a pew, the shennaigans were not on public view. My father, being the minister and pontificator of said boring sermon, could not understand why his family occasionally dissolved in giggles while he spoke. I never enlightened him either. Since moving to muggy NC eight years ago, I have worn panty hose exactly three times! Sure you wanted to know that.... Pepper

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Subject: Garter belts From: "Sally Ward" 

> Ah, I well remember garter belts.

Ever felt like a bygone? Last week, passing through a lingerie department with DD (21), she spotted knickers with integral suspenders (stockings are back, did you know?) She hadn't a clue how the suspenders worked, I had to give her a demonstration. I couldn't believe she didn't know, but she pointed out...why would she?

As to the item we saw, I couldn't help wondering how the knickers would stay up, with stockings pulling them down. Maybe designed by someone else who had never worn the real thing <GG>

Sally W

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Subject: migration to the Salinas Valley From: Alice Kinsler <alicekmbay.net> Date: Mon, 5 Jul 2004 15:56:15 -0700 X-Message-Number: 8

I am new to this forum and a graduate student in the textiles master's program at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln. I have been invited to submit an exhibition proposal for the revolving exhibit space at the Steinbeck Center Museum in Salinas Valley, CA. I am exploring whether (or not) there are quilts remaining from the days that Steinbeck wrote about, most specifically in the 1930's. Since I've begun this search for information or quilts, I have received conflicting views: the quilts arrived in shreds because of their use along the way of migration vs. if they were treasures to their makers, they would have been preserved. I would like to connect quilts from that era with the contemporary quilts of the Steinbeck Quilters Guild in an exhibit. I appreciate any information/leads for my research that anyone can provide. Thank you. Alice Kinsler

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Subject: Re: Biscuit quilts--very strange! From: "Alan R. Kelchner" <alanalankelchner.com> Date: Mon, 5 Jul 2004 16:09:48 -0700 X-Message-Number: 9

I actually was shown a worn out, but completed, example of this in Florida once - stuffed with all sorts of the ladies' used undergarments (not just hosiery). And here I thought it was a complete oddity. It appeared to have been made somewhere around 1970.

Alan

Alan R. Kelchner Textile Artist http://www.alankelchner.coms

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Subject: UGRR-Good news - sort of From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net> Date: Mon, 5 Jul 2004 19:42:20 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

Dear list, When at the ALHFAM ( Assoc. of Living History, Farm and Agricultural Museums - a wonderful group of small and large museum staff and volunteers) meeting at the Henry Ford in Dearborne, Mich. I took a day long trip to visit UGRR sites in Canada. I was interested in actual scholarship, and this came with both the Canadian Park Service and our own NPS guides. To my surprize our Amrican guide was wearing a tee shirt with a quilt patch stenciled on it. I then inquired about whether the quilt code myth would be addressed. Well, he practically kissed me! Long story short THAT book has made it North of the border, complete with display case with "reproduction" quilt blocks illustrating the "code". The US Park Service has a dedicated team promoting UGRR sites and tours in the US - and with their Canadian counterparts. Appearantly, the staff are very frustrated by the questions about the use of quilts in the UGRR. None of them is a textile/costume/quilt historian, but they are all historians and knew instinctivley that most of this "story" is not quite 'right' -and they finally came into contact with me, a real live historian who could debate the issue with some (not as much as many of you on this list, though) authority. There was a very lively discussion on the long drive back to Detroit where I fielded lots of questions. I was very diplomatic and asked if anyone thought that the now defunct myth of George Washington cutting down the cherry tree had had any ill effects on scholarship when it was taught in school? The response was that a charming story can frequently get people involved in their own history - so what was the harm of the story of the quilt code ? I answered in starkly economic terms. The cult of George Washington in the 19th century led to an industry of George Washington fakes which bilked many folks - including museums and auction houses - out of millions of dollars. ( these artifacts are still turning up, and being disproved - with devastating consequences to the owners, when they try and donate to Mount Vernon.) I told them my concern was that this seductive story would lead this first generation of African-American collectors to be bilked out of hard earned money by unscrupulous quilt dealers and dealers in African American artifacts. I think I struck a nerve. So anyway, I have sent information to the guys at NPS: Pat Cumming's wonderful essay, as well as many other refferences that I have been collecting. We finally have the ear of the type of people who can actually DO SOMETHING about this! Let freedom ring! Newbie Richardson

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Subject: Re: UGRR-Good news - sort of From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Mon, 05 Jul 2004 18:57:54 -0600 X-Message-Number: 11

'Atta girl, Newbie!!!

Xenia

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Subject: FW: Re: Biscuit quilts--very strange! From: Gail Ingram <gingramtcainternet.com> Date: Mon, 05 Jul 2004 19:03:11 -0500 X-Message-Number: 12

Pepper, your father was a minister. Hmmmmm. Re Pepper's playing guitar on her garter belt.

And this garter belt plunking is a very ingenious trick, Pepper. Oh how I hate I never thought of that. Just proves you have a brilliant mind.

Of course, I did well to survive church services because my Aunt Bunnie sang in the choir and thought she was the choir. She actually had a lovely soprano voice. My friend Margaret and I just wondered what the voices of the other 25 choir members were like.

Once I went to a Baptist Church for 2 years, when one of the 2 bridges over the troubled waters of the Red River was being repaired and the other was many times clogged with military convoys from Ft. Polk, south of Alexandria, LA., impeding our getting to church on time. At the end of each Baptist service, there was an Invitational Hymn in which those interested in conversion and/or joining the church would come forward and discuss their intentions with the minister. No one was ever turned down, as I recall.

On the last day of one particularly unprofitable summer revival, when all the lost refused to come forward and confess their sins and all the saved had bravely held forth in their righteousness, the congregation sang 64 verses of "Just As I Am"----well, not 64 different verses, of course, but 64 verses, repeating the same 4-5 over and over and over.

Oh how we prayed for a lost and struggling soul to walk in the back door and straight down the maroon-carpeted aisle, shake hands with the evangelist, and renounce his wayward ways. The evangelist, President of a local Baptist college, said he just KNEW there was a such a soul amongst us. Yet, despite much craning of necks, no one could spot such an individual. We seemed doomed to spend all Sunday afternoon singing "Just As I Am," listening to our stomachs growl, and thinking of the fried chicken that waited on us at home.

Finally, in the pew behind us, Marie Carolino's mother, who had recently been listed in the local newspaper as witness to a bar brawl at the Red Dog Cafe, slapped her hymnal shut rather loudly, sighed, and asked the gentleman next to her to let her pass. Margaret and I held our breaths, for we knew Mrs. Carolino had her limits, and we feared that 64 verses of "Just As I Am" was one of them.

She walked deliberately forward, toward the would-be evangelizing educator. All wriggling and foot-shifting stopped as we valiantly headed into the 65th verse of "Just As I Am" (Margaret was mathematically inclined and could keep track of such numbers). The evangelist bent down, put his hand on the very pretty shoulder of Mrs. C, and they remained in quiet conversation for the duration of the verse. Then still keeping his hand on Mrs. C, he held up his left hand to the choir director and the music stopped.

This was the one, he said triumphantly. He had known there was a struggle going on in the heart of someone, and he had been proven right. Mrs. C. had told him she had fallen astray and had come to re-dedicated her life to Jesus. He besought each member of the congregation to come forward and wish her well in her renewed battle with the Enemy. Of course, everyone was so grateful to her that all but a few cynics did as instructed. As my friend Margaret and I walked up to hug Mrs. C., we didn't know what to say. She looked at us dead on and said, "Well, SOMEBODY had to end it. It might as well have been me!"

Later I learned that this was her role in that church. Every visiting evangelist was judged by his ability to bring forth the black sheep among us so they could be turned white as snow. Ours was a polite congregation, desirous of being spoken well of by evangelists, but alas, nearly everyone except the toddlers were already members of the church. Mrs. C herself was a member of long standing, but alone amongst us, she tended to drift into places like the Red Dog Cafe. She was young and pretty and a good candidate for rededications, which she dutifully yielded up on a number occasions. The visiting minister always seemed to maintain his grip on her shoulder longer than he did on plainer but clearer strugglers. I think there was a trade off: none of the gossips in the church would say a word about her shenanigans so long as she did not let our evangelists go away with a zero batting average.

Ohhh, I miss being the fifth grade when everything was funny.

From North Louisiana, where, after 2 straight clear days, thunder is rumbling in the west, Gail

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Subject: of mice and gaters From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net> Date: Mon, 5 Jul 2004 20:12:14 -0400 X-Message-Number: 13

Any of you who have had the dubious pleasure of cleaning up after mice the Spring after the Fall when a summer house has been inadequately "put away", will agree with me that a) Beatrix Potter never had to do her own house work, and B) neither did Walt Disney! Garters: I was 10 in 1963 and my grown up gift was a garter belt and REAL STOCKINGS! ( To be worn on "state occasions" only. I spent my early teen-aged years trying to hide garters under mini skirts! Thank God for panty hose. Newbie

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Subject: Re: samplers From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Mon, 5 Jul 2004 20:33:14 -0400 X-Message-Number: 14

Hi Judy, I'll find you. I'll be there on Sat. all day. Happy plundering! Cinda

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Subject: Re: of mice & garters & Baptists & the UGRR & the 4th From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrowpatmedia.net> Date: Mon, 5 Jul 2004 20:35:24 -0400 X-Message-Number: 15

Dear List,

I am sure you will agree that we have been thrice blessed this Monday. We've had Pepper, Gail, and Newbie to make us laugh and to make us cheer.

Many thanks to Sue Reich for her wishes for the 4th. Right back at you, Sue. And expecially to you on every other day of the year as well. And to our listmom, Kris (and John), the same.

Judy Ringo judygrowpatmedia.net

>Thank you to the men and women of your families who have made great >sacrifices to provide our Country with its freedoms and the right to enjoy >weekends such as this.

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Subject: Re: UGRR-Good news - sort of From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Mon, 5 Jul 2004 20:48:09 -0400 X-Message-Number: 16

Great news, Newbie. Good for you! Cinda

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Subject: UGRR issue and Newbie's post From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> Date: Mon, 05 Jul 2004 22:23:53 -0400 X-Message-Number: 17

Dear Newbie:

"Pat Cummings" (me) has a big smile on her face in reading the last paragraph of your post re: the UGRR issue.

Newbie, if you are indeed collecting written information, I am happy to announce to you and to the other list members that another, updated article which I wrote on this same subject, is currently hitting the newsstands across America and beyond, in/ The Quilter/ magazine, September 2004 issue.

I am still trying to do my part in sharing information.

Leigh Fellner has continued to do excellent work in tracking more "goings-on" that she has discovered, including a major grant for which relatives of Ozella McDaniel Williams applied from the government. I believe that Leigh has posted this incredible information on her site, and I hope I'm not speaking out of turn in mentioning it. Leigh also was interviewed over a three week span in May/June on a Jackson, Mississippi radio station. She did an excellent job and I really enjoyed hearing both the interviewer's fine questions and Leigh's answers.

I would love to know more about how the U.S. Forest Service has been promoting the idea of the secret quilt code. Was it Barb Garrett that mentioned seeing a poster a month or so ago that had actual photos of blocks believed to have been used to share messages between escaping slaves? I looked on their website and there was nothing of the kind " in plain view". (Sorry, couldn't resist!).

The rate at which the secret code is spreading is truly like wildfire, so it does seem appropriate for the Forest Service to get involved. However, I would say that Smokey the Bear is not on the job in this case.

The trouble with the dissemination of information by agencies, schools, and institutions is that the public believes the conveyors of this wisdom. We look to teachers, and yes, even to forest rangers to tell us the truth.

The situation is probably just as disheartening to blacks who want a true accounting of their cultural history, as it is to non-blacks who are simply trying to make sense of things.

Anyhow, thanks for speaking up Newbie. If all of us who know better would respond with our comments when the subject arises, we would be doing our part to make people think and consider the idea that the story is indeed a new American myth.

Pat Cummings www.quiltersmuse.com

Newbie Richardson wrote:

So anyway, I have sent information to the guys at NPS: Pat Cumming's wonderful essay, as well as many other refferences that I have been collecting. We finally have the ear of the type of people who can actually DO SOMETHING about this! Let freedom ring! Newbie Richardson

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Subject: Re: Biscuit quilts--very strange! From: Gail Ingram <gingramtcainternet.com> Date: Mon, 05 Jul 2004 21:41:02 -0500 X-Message-Number: 18

PepCory: you will never know how I envy you. I never, never, never thought of this. I'm sending it to Jill McCorkle, who came along in the panty hose era but who will love it.

Where did you grow up?

Or did you?

Gail

 

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Subject: Re: UGRR-Good news - sort of From: "Monica MacDonald" <jmacdon6earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 6 Jul 2004 07:28:09 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

I was just at the Henry Ford a few weeks ago. The kids and I explored Greenfield Village and as they were choosing some toys in the gift shop afterward we found some "American Adventure Play Sets" by a company called Child Light. The Harriet Tubman play set included a "secret sign freedom quilt". On the box they indicated a website with activities; however, when I went to their website, it was no longer there. They have apparently gone out of business. A lot of this particular myth seems to be aimed at children - books, lesson plans for teachers to use, and now toys. The Child Light logo showed a candle and book and the words, "True Stories". I sometimes talk with people who have no idea that UGRR quilts are anything but solid, proven fact. Things like this make me wonder what I might be unknowingly accepting as facts and teaching the kids (we homeschool). Which brings me to my question - do any of you ever watch PBS's History Detectives? I like the way they show them searching through archives to find primary sources and information to verify or disprove the stories that have been handed down with the artifacts featured. Maybe we need a PBS documentary on the UGRR/quilts issue... BTW, I loved Greenfield Village - I left Michigan in 4th Grade so I only vaguely remember a few field trips to the Village as a student. Monica MacDonald in Maine

> Dear list, > When at the ALHFAM ( Assoc. of Living History, Farm and Agricultural > Museums - a wonderful group of small and large museum staff and volunteers) > meeting at the Henry Ford in Dearborne, Mich. I took a day long trip to > visit UGRR sites in Canada. I was interested in actual scholarship, and this > came with both the Canadian Park Service and our own NPS guides. > To my surprize our Amrican guide was wearing a tee shirt with a quilt > patch stenciled on it. I then inquired about whether the quilt code myth > would be addressed. Well, he practically kissed me! > Long story short THAT book has made it North of the border, complete with > display case with "reproduction" quilt blocks illustrating the "code".

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Subject: Kris' quilt From: "Karen Erlandson" <quiltercooke.net> Date: Tue, 6 Jul 2004 06:43:45 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Here is an update on the quilt. When the questions came out a few weeks ago, I had recently completed the top and was waiting for my quilter, who has had some health problems - but now, the top, batting and backing are being sent to Christine Thresh, who will take over the quilting situation. I would have written back with an immediate answer, but needed to wait as some hurtful emails were sent my way - silence seemed the best answer then. I will be brief with explanation - since those who understand don't need it and those who don't understand hear only an excuse: When this all began, I had time to do the top -then, I couldn't get in touch with Lori East for a very long time - but - she was having computer problems and health issues that I didn't know about, lest anyone be quick to judge. when I finally got the other blocks from Lori East, my time had become less available by then and the result is that the blocks had to wait. It is not as I would have chosen, but it is what happened. I will send a photo of the top to Kris and I am sure the top will be finished quickly - Christine sounds like she has a quilter that can get to it right away, unlike my quilter here. There were not enough blocks for two quilts as reported, only one. I am sure that Kris will enjoy the quilt, late in coming or not.

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Subject: UGRR-Good news - sort of From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Tue, 06 Jul 2004 08:42:28 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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I would like to applaud Pat, Newbie, Leigh and Kim and all others who are working to dispel the UGRR myth. Last month I finally got around to reading the book prompted by list discussions for the past two years. Not being a quilter and thus not familiar with the many "code" designs, I first found it difficult to get past the dust jacket blurb, especially the three-year wait. Deepthroat has a rival were my first thoughts, the land of Oz my later thoughts. I also found the book difficult to navigate as it switched authors which kept you guessing whose chapter was whose and thus interrupting the thought process. And the ending reminded me of all those westerns which trail off into the golden sunset. My final thoughts were that even if no one disputed the coded quilt story and it were factual, this book was not the vehicle to carry the message. I had a friend read it, a non-quilter also, but one who like me loves history. She gave up after the first few chapters in disbelief that anyone could buy such a tale, let alone publish it. What carried me through the book were the findings by those quilt detectives which pointed out so many fallacies via this list and their websites and which I would have not otherwise been aware of. And then the further investigation by Leigh into the geneology of Ozella's family which turned up some amazing age discrepencies. Let's hope your messages continue to reach those who may unknowingly be spreading the wrong story. I've pointed many quilt friends to the UGRR websites so that they may be aware of the controversy.

Monica MacDonald wrote:

>I was just at the Henry Ford a few weeks ago. The kids and I explored >Greenfield Village and as they were choosing some toys in the gift shop >afterward we found some "American Adventure Play Sets" by a company called >Child Light. The Harriet Tubman play set included a "secret sign freedom >quilt". On the box they indicated a website with activities; however, when >I went to their website, it was no longer there. They have apparently gone >out of business. > > > >

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Subject: Biscuits and things From: "Barbara Vlack" <cptvdeosbcglobal.net> Date: Tue, 6 Jul 2004 07:46:52 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

As I started to read the biscuit thread here, I was thinking of the biscuit wreath I made for my best friend. It was in the 70s. I stuffed the biscuits with shredded pantyhose. That sucker was HEAVY and eventually sagged from the round shape to quite oval before my friend gave up on it. I didn't remember there were actually instructions for stuffing it with pantyhose, and my memory was that I was clever to think of that. The "clever" trick of the nylon stuffing must not have been my own idea, though, since it was mentioned here. It was bad enough stuffing biscuits with pantyhose for a "decorative" item. With the weight that produced, I cannot imagine trying to sleep under a biscuit quilt stuffed with nylons. Oh, yuck.

Cutting off the tops of the hose meant cutting off the panty part of the hose. But Pepper suggests it could have also meant the tops of stockings.

That leads me into other "fond" memories of the era, some of which were learned from my very frugal mother, who has never gotten out of the Depression mindset of "Wear it out, make it do, use it up, or do without." Well, Mom taught me to cut off the ruined leg of one pantyhose and wait for the next pair to do the same. Then wear both so you'd have two good legs - but double the top. I bought into that for a while.

The next frugal thing she did was cut off the waistband elastic and use it as a very large rubberband. Actually, she still does this. She ties up storage boxes this way. And she flaunts them in public. My line that this exceeds was drawn a long time ago. I'd rather use duct tape.

In the great UGRR debate, I am intrigued with the focus of getting the facts straight for the purpose of avoiding deceptive practices of offering unsubstantiated items to museums or historical sites in exchange for money or tax benefits. Hmmmm. I hadn't thought of that as part of the rub, but I accept it!

Barb Vlack cptvdeosbcglobal.net

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Subject: Grief and needlework From: Margareta.Faustcec.eu.int Date: Tue, 6 Jul 2004 15:13:13 +0200 X-Message-Number: 5

Yesterday I saw a report about an exhibition in Germany (Berlin) of handkerchiefs embroidered by Bosnian refugee women in memory of their menfolk killed in the Balkans in the 1990s. The women worked in groups led by a German therapist, and they embroidered the names of their husbands, brothers etc and some other motifs they connected with them. They explained that this was a way of forming links with the men, whose bodies often had not been found and thus not given a proper grave.

That report made me think of the - maybe universal? - therapeutical value of needlework, as we see in 19th century mourning quilts and more recently in the 9/11 quilts. Margareta - back in Europe after a wonderful Quilt tour. Thank you Kim, Kris, Candace and everybody else on the list whom I met in Pennsylvania and New York!

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Subject: Re: UGRR-Good news - sort of From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net> Date: Tue, 6 Jul 2004 09:28:33 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Xenia, I kept wishing that the whole list could have materialized behind me. Talk about being on the hot seat.... N

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Subject: Re: Biscuits and things From: Sylvia Adair 

Another note on biscuit quilts--in the 70s my grandad's mother made a pillow from lots of "fancy" fabrics (acetate, brocade, velvet, etc.) and stuffed the biscuits with old support hose. It was kind of pretty, but not comfortable, more for show than use. My grandmother wouldn't have it in her house, so she gave it to my mother. This was Gran's second marriage, and she and her mother-in-law didn't get along. Gran was 10 years older than Grandad, and his mother mentioned that fact whenever she saw them. Gran did keep the quilts Grandad's mother made, but they were more practical and useful (and were out of sight in the closet). Just chiming in, Sylvia Adair in Wisconsin

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Subject: Re: Biscuit quilts--very strange! From: "Karen Quilts Texas" <karenquiltstexashouston.rr.com> Date: Tue, 6 Jul 2004 09:47:03 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

I keep an eye out for crafting books to sell in my Ebay biz, and (I almost hate to tell you this), but there was actually a book on making things with hosiery. I ran across is a number of months ago at a yard sale where I picked up several old crafting books. I believe it was made in the late 60's, when all those handcrafts, like macrame, and such were hot. Recycling was also very big... I spent an evening looking through it, as it was so bizarre! It had (of course) how to make "real" looking "granny" dolls of pantyhose stuffed with - more pantyhose, and stitched to look like remarkably real faces, hands and feet! If you'll remember, all things "granny" were "in".... Granny glasses, Granny dresses, big lace up granny shoes with long skirts - well, I'm dating myself now!

It had a number of items made using hosiery for stuffing, and recommended using them to stuff dolls, pillows, or anything that needed a filling. Makes sense to me, since it's basically the same substance as polyester fiberfill! Probably not a bad idea. If I had a $1.00 for all the panty hose I've ever bought and thrown away...but then that's another thread - eh?

It also had purses crocheted from twisted lengths, bathroom rugs, and even a HAMMOCK! Of course the pictured items were modeled by very 60's looking folks... lots of bell bottoms, ponchos, and floppy hats!

I remember that it actually sold on Ebay...for about $10.00! I put in in the "Really Weird" category. If anyone is interested, I'll search my database, and see if I can come up with the name.

Karen Spring, TX

-----Original Message----- From: Alan R. Kelchner [mailto:alanalankelchner.com] Sent: Monday, July 05, 2004 6:10 PM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] Re: Biscuit quilts--very strange!

I actually was shown a worn out, but completed, example of this in Florida once - stuffed with all sorts of the ladies' used undergarments (not just hosiery). And here I thought it was a complete oddity. It appeared to have been made somewhere around 1970.

Alan

Alan R. Kelchner Textile Artist http://www.alankelchner.com

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Subject: Re: Kris' quilt From: "Christine Thresh" <christinewinnowing.com> 

Isn't this wonderful news about the quilt!!! Karen has contributed the backing fabric for the quilt, plus she has done all the setting. I am really looking forward to seeing our friendship blocks together. I'm the lucky one because I'll get to see it before anyone else does.

I love it when a plan comes together.

Christine Thresh

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Subject: teaching history From: "Charlotte Bull" 

Sorry, but I did not listen closely enough to quote exact figures, but I heard a bit of regional news. Evidently they are offering major grant money to improve the knowledge of History Teachers in a number of schools in cities near me. According to the newscaster, a very wide percentage of the existing history teachers had not taken History as either a Major or Minor study area when they got their college degree. Yet, now they are Teaching it!!! That might help explain some of the acceptance of false info.

I was recently talking with several young folks who are considering teaching as a future career. Several of the boys mentioned that they wanted to be coaches and that they'd probably have to teach a couple of History classes to fill out their schedules. They were aware that teachers interested in Literature, Art or Science had never been interested in being coaches. As I thought back to my teaching 45 years ago, I recalled that one year I was asked to teach one history class as well as my 5 English classes... just to fill out the need! The principal refused to listen to my explanation that I had only taken one year of college history as a freshman. He said my many art history and literary classes would suffice. So I taught "history"!

Actually, as I recall, I have often wished I'd taken more history classes - specifically Textile & Quilt History!!! : ))) But I did also note a great combo deal when it came to literary classics and the history of a country or an era of time or a specific culture. When I read a classic, I ended up studying the history of the times! It should be a Double Major!

I refuse to discuss garters & panty hose, although I once contributed my old stockings to a quilter to use as stuffing!! Evidently for "biscuits"! I am now back in my teens! I wear bobby socks & loafers or sneakers. No saddle shoes. But I sometimes wear cowboy boots! I am liberated! I was told recently by a young man visiting my church that he was going to join it since he knew he would not be expected to wear a business suit if "an old lady can wear jeans to church." We both knew to whom he was referring and I welcomed him and his delightful family! His wife stood there blushing and ready to sink through the floor! His boys hugged me. So now I'm their Sunday Grandma.

Garters? Bungee Cords!!! But some guys still wear Suspenders!!! cb

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Subject: Re: Old things From: Jccullencrewaol.com Date: Tue, 6 Jul 2004 11:18:18 EDT X-Message-Number: 11

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That leads me into other "fond" memories of the era, some of which were learned from my very frugal mother, who has never gotten out of the Depression mindset of "Wear it out, make it do, use it up, or do without." Well, Mom taught me to cut off the ruined leg of one pantyhose and wait for the next pair to do the same. Then wear both so you'd have two good legs - but double the top.

OK, Barb, So what's so wrong with your mom's frugal ideas, like wearing two panty hose tops with one leg each??? (said laughingly as I recall doing the very same thing)! They worked fine for me at the time (cause I didn't know anything different). I'm also a depression baby and we "made do" with a lot of stuff. Clothes were always cut down "to fit" the next one in line. God bless gramma who used the old treadle machine (which I still have) and any scraps not used were saved and put into a quilt top. Not only did we recycle stockings, but I spent hours darning socks and became quite adept at it with no complaints about bumps or knots in the heels. It was a traumatic event when DH asked me to get rid of some of my "stuff" but I have done it three times. It is getting somewhat easier, but some things I cannot part with. And of course, once I send it to the thrift shop, someone will ask for it for some project or other. Never fails. Lessons learned years ago are hard to unlearn. Now fifty years later I still cringe to see anyone wasting water, wasting food ("my husband won't eat leftovers"), tossing out clothes cause they're out of style, or not taking care of what they have. Maybe that's why saving fabric and creating something new with it has such appeal to me. Plus, the savings can always be used for fun things I still enjoy. Thanks all for a wonderful trip back in time. Carol Grace

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Subject: VQF From: "Pam Weeks Worthen" <pamworthenhotmail.com> Date: Tue, 06 Jul 2004 11:20:43 -0400 X-Message-Number: 12

Hi all!

I'll be at VQF as usual, at the ABC Quilts table in Plumley. This year we are excited to share our space with the American Quilt Study Group and a Vermont museum group. Come and sit and sew or just visit if you like. I'm traveling on Wednesday, setting up on Thursday, working the booth Friday and Sunday, and taking Monday to go up to the Shelburne Museum show that I missed last year.

Hope to see you!

Pam in NH, and it looks like we won't have temps over 85 for Vermont. AMAZING!!!

_________________________________________________________________ FREE pop-up blocking with the new MSN Toolbar – get it now! http://toolbar.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200415ave/direct/01/

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Subject: Garters in church! From: Judy Knorr <jknorroptonline.net> Date: Tue, 06 Jul 2004 11:46:44 -0400 X-Message-Number: 13

I too remember my first garter belt and trying to fasten than darn clasp in the back!!! Oh Gail, I am still wiping my eyes and giggling at your description of the service at the Baptist church! Toooo funny!! What a story teller! Judy Knorr

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Subject: Re: Stuff From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Tue, 06 Jul 2004 10:45:42 -0600 X-Message-Number: 14

Hi, Newbie - I am just recently back from teaching a grad seminar at UNL, like the one we took 2 summers ago with Margaret Ordoñez. Teddy Pruett (who was also there 2 years ago) was my grad seminar assistant. She tells me you have been very helpful to her, especially now that she is beginning again to earn a degree. I just wanted you to know that she spoke so highly of you and how generous you have been to her.

Also returning this summer were Maggie Farance and Linda McShannock.

Xenia

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Subject: Gail's essay From: "Teddy Pruett" <aprayzerhotmail.com> Date: Tue, 06 Jul 2004 12:31:42 -0400 X-Message-Number: 15

Gail's marvelous description of the 65 verse invitational belongs in the guest column of Country Living Magazine. Teddy Pruett

_________________________________________________________________ Check out the latest news, polls and tools in the MSN 2004 Election Guide! http://special.msn.com/msn/election2004.armx

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Subject: Re: Gail's essay From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrowpatmedia.net> Date: Tue, 6 Jul 2004 12:41:52 -0400 X-Message-Number: 16

I live with someone who paints more beautifully than anyone around and who doesn't usually seek a wider audience. Now I have a friend who writes more beautifully than anyone around and does (or doesn't do) the same. I can't tell you how frustrating that is to us hacks who recognize great art, and aspire to great art, but can't and will never be able to do it ourselves.

Judy in Ringoes, NJ judygrowpatmedia.net

>From: "Teddy Pruett" <aprayzerhotmail.com> >Subject: [qhl] Gail's essay

> Gail's marvelous description of the 65 verse invitational belongs in the > guest column of Country Living Magazine. Teddy Pruett >

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Subject: Quilters Hall of Fame From: quilt2musicrockisland.com Date: Tue, 6 Jul 2004 10:16:15 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 17

Howdy everyone! Someone asked about QHF hours and exhibits. Following the Grand Opening we will have a quilt exhibit up in the QHF/Marie Webster House of quilts loaned and/or made by Honorees for three months. Hours are Tues-Sat 10-4; Sunday 1-4.

I have now successfully “immigrated’ from Northern Virginia to the San Juan Islands, Washington State – our final nesting place, God willing, until they carry me out feeeeet first! It was VERY emotional leaving that quilt gang back in Northern VA, MD and PA!! Hubby (born and raised in this area) has not retired, only “telecommuting” now to his job in Maryland from the house he inherited from his folks. Those attending AQSG in Vancouver, WA, in October, will be only 5-6 hours south of our new location and will get a taste of the incredible beauty of the Pacific Northwest. I hope my FIL is not turning over in his grave, but I converted his large lovely garden and tool shed (12’x18’) into climate-controlled year around storage for my genealogical and family files. MY MIL's large quilt studio in the house has become my quilt research library as well as quilt studio, as has one of the extra bedrooms. (Give a quilter an inch and she’ll take two rooms every time!) I am about half unpacked but things are on hold for the month of July while I fly back east (wee hours tomorrow) to help run the Grand Opening of The Quilters Hall of Fame. I hope we are going to see a number of you there!! We have two fantastic Honoree Quilt Exhibits plus two other exhibits, one the Founder’s (Hazel Carter) Exhibit of early 19th century quilts, plus quilts by contemporary Indiana quiltmakers. Plus Quilts all over Marion, IN, in shop windows; lectures and workshops by 12 Honorees; and the Book Launch Party for our first QHF book(covers all 34 Honorees)!! (You can order the book after the Grand Opening through our website or by contacting the office at quilterscomteck.com.) The Grand Opening is a 4-day event (Thurs July 15-Sun July 18). See our website for more information www.quiltershalloffame.org Cheers! Karen Alexander

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Subject: PA Quilt Exhibits (long) From: Paul and Nancy Hahn <phahnerols.com> Date: Tue, 06 Jul 2004 13:50:08 -0400 X-Message-Number: 18

Barb Garrett, Cinda Cawley and I have been like ships passing in the night as we have been visiting the quilt exhibits in Southern PA just a few days apart 2 weeks ago, and then sharing our impressions at FVF a few days later. I just wanted to reiterate that if anyone on the list is in the area of Lancaster, PA or Hanover, PA, not to miss any of these exceptional shows. The new Lancaster Quilt and Textile Museum is incredible, lighting and display space is excellent and Cinda and I can still remain friends as we play our usual "Which one would you take home if you could?" game, as I wanted the one with "too much quilting." To preserve the friendship, I try to never choose one with cheddar fabric or fractur writing on it! The Lancaster Cultural Museum, just steps away, has a most "knock your socks off" Lone Star Quilt, with Lancaster or Double Blue background, presiding over the upstairs room. Try to get to either of these on a Tuesday or Friday when the adjacent Central Market is in operation for a wonderful lunch of local delicacies. On my visit, I brought 2 Old Order or Team Mennonite ladies who have been surrounded by wonderful quilts as their lives, and yet, they too were astounded by the beauties at these 2 exhibits.

Lesser known, though just as powerful, I found, is the current exhibit, "Labor of Love," Quilts and Fabric Heirloom Exhibition at the Hanover Area Historical Society, in Hanover, just outside of Gettysburg. Open on Mondays, Wednesdays and Saturdays, 9am-2pm until October 31, 2004, this is a gathering of quilts and related items from local families, most never before displayed to the public. I spent 21/2 hours there one Saturday and was the only person there until just before I left when 2 other ladies came in. About 60 quilts are displayed along with ephemera, needlework tools, coverlets and samplers. Some are hung, some folded over racks or trunks, most you can get your nose right up to for close looks. There were red and green appliqué wreaths, a warm and toasty wool and challis pineapple/log cabin, a chintz Broderie Perse, numerous variations of log cabins, and the most unusual album quilt done in 30s and 40s fabrics that Cinda previously mentioned. I wished I could see them all opened up fully or see the backs when the catalogue note mentioned an interesting one, but the lovely docents, when I asked if they had something to turn over a small corner of one, gently reminded me "no one" was allowed to touch them, not even they. The $3 admission charge is to help with further exhibits. The group said they are hoping for larger turn-outs as word gets 'round. Hopefully, more folks will be able to get out and see this most enjoyable display.

I would add my garter belt stories, but that will have to wait for another day! Gee, what I learn from this list-and my computer illiterate sister can't figure out what I could possibly gain from siiting at my keyboard for hours!

Nancy Hahn, Bowie, Maryland

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Subject: textile book From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Tue, 06 Jul 2004 14:40:59 -0400 X-Message-Number: 19

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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For those of you who love textile mill history, an excellent copy of the oop The Springs Story -- the First 100 Years is available. Contact Judi Fibush at judifibush.net for further information.

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Subject: Re: teaching history From: Rissa Peace Root <rissapeaceyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 6 Jul 2004 11:47:50 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 20

--- Charlotte Bull <charloumo-net.com> wrote: > According to the > newscaster, a very wide > percentage of the existing history teachers had not > taken History as > either a Major or Minor study area when they got > their college degree. > Yet, now they are Teaching it!!!

That is an interesting tidbit. I have a bachelor's degree in history, with way more than the required 40 hours of 300/400 classes! :-) After I moved to Jackson, MS ... I found my options for persuing my Masters in History somewhat limited. My boss told me if I took the time off to go to Hattiesburg and complete a dual masters in Library Informations Sciences and History, I would "make a great archives librarian, but earn less" than I do now. LOL

So history remains my hobby instead of my job. :-)

Rissa Peace Root http://www.prettyimpressivestuff.com

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Subject: Is this for real, friends? From: "Pepper Cory" <pepcorymail.clis.com> Date: Tue, 6 Jul 2004 15:06:48 -0400 X-Message-Number: 21

Hello all-With all the web-knowledgeable folks on QHL, I wonder if anyone out there can tell me if this is for real? Couldn't find out what said inquirer wanted and so 'registered.' Have I just done something stupid? Thanks for your help- Pepper Cory ----- Original Message ----- From: <INVESTIGATIONSOMEONE-RESEARCHING.US> To: <pepcorymail.clis.com> Sent: Tuesday, July 06, 2004 12:59 AM Subject: A user at our website is searching for information re:

> ****NOT COMMERCIAL EMAIL**** > > A user is looking into your background via our website. > > Our website is used to find and then communicate with people that know and have experiences and opinions about a business or person. > > The mission of the Web site is to promote goodness in people by efficiently extending the concept of "word-of-mouth" to the Internet, allowing the people of our world to share their experiences with others in a secure and anonymous fashion. > > To view all of the postings in our system regarding your email address use this link: > > http://e.wres.us/sel.php?a=search&b=5&c=pepcory%40mail.clis.com > > How does our website work? > > Users of our website can search for and submit connections about people and/or businesses that they are interested in researching. A connection is simply an indication of interest in sharing word-of-mouth information regarding the connection subject. Each connection has an author and a subject. Connection subjects are searchable, but connection authors are anonymus. Our website protects the anonymity of connection authors. When a user searches for and then finds a connection at our website the user then has the option to communicate with the connection author via our Anonymous Email System (AES) toward learning the experiences and opinions that the connection author has regarding the connection subject. > > Add your email address to our DO NOT EMAIL LIST by clicking the link below: > > http://a.wores.us/sel.php?a=donotemail&b=pepcory%40mail.clis.com > > WordofMouthResearch.com has made its best effort to provide a legal forum for the dissemination of word-of-mouth information. Defamation is written or spoken injury to the reputation of a living person or organization. Injury to reputation generally is considered to be exposure to hatred, contempt, ridicule, or financial loss. Libel is the written act of defamation; slander is the spoken act. Whether libel or slander, the defamation must be published - communicated to someone other than the subject of the defamation. Trth is generally an absolute defense to defamation: if what you say is true, it cannot be defamatory. Additionally, you are protected against defamation providing your statement is an opinion, not an assertion of a fact. If you follow these guidelines when submitting a Connection you will be well within the boundaries of the law. > > Regards, > > Support Department > > > >

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Subject: new reproduction fabrics From: <chrisajetlink.net> Date: Tue, 6 Jul 2004 12:07:51 -0700 X-Message-Number: 22

FYI- There is a fabulous reproduction of THE bird and palm tree chintz now out by P&B, designed by Harriet Hargrave. They offer it in 3 colorways, a polychrome most like the original,on a brown ground, a blue-green and red on beige grd., and a pink, red and brown on lightest grd. There are 8 other prints in the collection in similar colorways. I am not affiliated with P&B, this is just a heads up on a long overdue reproduction print!

I will be posting the collection and reviewing them on my website in the near future, along with a scan of the original for anyone that may not have seen it. (I know this is highly unlikely on this list, but there is always a first time)

Another really great reproduction fabric I recently found at Zooks, but I don't know that it's all that new, is by Kaye England, who is now working with Benartex. The line is called Gothic Grace and the one I recommend for accuracy and rarity of those designs available to day, is the one with 'earthy" flora and fauna designs seen in the early 1800s, for a rather short duration. There are "bluebell" type flowers on it too and a hint of seashells. My piece is all shades of dark brown, so I don't know if they are exotic flowers or bluebells, but this print looks like ones I've occasionally seen in early American quilts.

Last but not least, thank you Judy and Corinne for reproducing the half circle polka dot in red, black and beige, in your Copper Hill collection. It's great and is long overdue. Suggestion for another time, do it in a larger scale, with irregular spacing.

Kim Wulfert www.antiquequiltdating.com

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Subject: Re: PA Quilt Exhibits From: <chrisajetlink.net> Date: Tue, 6 Jul 2004 12:27:55 -0700 X-Message-Number: 23

I agree with you Nancy. I was lucky enough to see the two Lancaster exhibits and they were wonderful. The strong, but safe, lighting in the Lancaster Quilt museum with the quilts placed on slightly slanted board, affords the visitor an excellent view of the quilting patterns. Very well done. The gift shop had some wonderful items to offer and we each bought a fair share. I got the "Peace and Plenty" runner made by the folks who wove the cloth for Cold Mountain. I just love the design they wove around this wonderful saying. The price was very fair.

The heritage Museums' exhibit was a knock-out! they had some really early block quilts. One very large one, that was also stuffed in places, had fabric very similar to one of the new Baum prints in brown and Prussian blue. The samplers and other embroideries on display were unusual and beautifully displayed. The information panels were very helpful. There were pillowcases, and other home textiles. It was such a wonderful exhibit, but there is no catalogue or book for purchase. That is my only complaint.

I did find a book called "The Homespun Textile Tradition of the Pennsylvania Germans" is an exhibit catalogue onthe work of spinners, weavers and dyers in the Landis Valley. Although it is in black and white, it offers good pictures and text on Homemade textiles, samplers, coverlets, cloth from southeastern PA. The exhibit in Lancaster's museum has more fancy needlework than this catalogue shows, but it is full of interesting and varied items and information that's useful to have on hand.

The blueberries at the Central Market were big and juicy.

Kim Wulfert www.antiquequiltdating.com

----- Original Message ----- From: "Paul and Nancy Hahn" <phahnerols.com> . I just wanted to reiterate that if anyone on the list is in the area of Lancaster, PA or Hanover, PA, not to miss any of these exceptional shows. The new Lancaster Quilt and Textile Museum is incredible, lighting and display space is excellent and Cinda and I can still remain friends as we play our usual "Which one would you take home if you could?" game, as I wanted the one with "too much quilting." To preserve the friendship, I try to never choose one with cheddar fabric or fractur writing on it! The Lancaster Cultural Museum, just steps away, has a most "knock your socks off" Lone Star Quilt, with Lancaster or Double Blue background, presiding over the upstairs room. Try to get to either of these on a Tuesday or Friday when the adjacent Central Market is in operation for a wonderful lunch of local delicacies. On my visit, I brought 2 Old Order or Team Mennonite ladies who have been surrounded by wonderful quilts as their lives, and yet, they too were astounded by the beauties at these 2 exhibits.

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Subject: Re: Biscuit quilts--very strange! From: "Karen and Paul Fail" <kfailbigpond.net.au> Date: Wed, 7 Jul 2004 06:13:43 +1000 X-Message-Number: 24

HI Pepper, No stories about garter belts to match that one! But thought I would drop you a line to say hi from sunny Sydney. We have met several times at Houston when I have been there with the Australian girls. At that time, I was working for Fairfax publishing books featuring Australian artists and had written a few books myself. Probably the one you will remember was Between Friends - Quilts to Share abour Friendship quilts in Australia. Now I am editing a wonderful quilting magazine - Quilters Companion - www.quilterscompanion.com.au - and have just recently resigned. I will finish my final magazine by late August.It seems to take a long time to resign in publishing.... Anyway, nice to read your posts. Karen Fail - 

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Subject: Quilt Museum in Intercourse, PA From: Barb Garrett 

Many of us have enjoyed the wonderful exhibits of antique quilts at the People's Place Quilt Museum in Intercourse, PA, over the years. This year's exhibit is different than what we are used to. I did a quick walk through this mornig as it is finally open for the season. Usually the exhibit opens in April for the large quilt show, but this exhibit didn't open until July 1, and features all newly made quilts.

For those who have been there, the first change I noticed was the gift shop has expanded into the exhibit area -- the first room of the "old" exhibit area is now part of the enlarged gift shop. I will say here their gift shop is a delight for the eyes -- absolutely beautiful things. I even found a book on Amish quilts that I don't own <grin> -- but unfortunately, it's written in French (which I don't read). The exhibit area is now 4 rooms instead of the "old" 5 rooms. Admission is now free -- which is why I can pop in and out when I'm in the area <grin>. The woman working there said they plan to have the museum open year round -- it used to open with a new exhibit each April -- and this exhibit will be up for at least a year. If you are in the area doing fabric shopping, I would recommend going up to see the show -- it's very nice. But if you want to see antique quilts, this year you need to visit Hanover in York County -- excellent exhibit at the Neas House. And with a little encouragement, they would probably mount another show, they had so much fun doing this one.

This is what their flyer says -- "A Showcase of Quilts: Dazzling Contemporary Creations"

The exhibit showcases 23 contemporary quilts, selected for their outstanding design, color, and workmanship. A number of educational features about the art and practice of quiltmaking are included. The exhibit has been curated by Jan Mast, Manager of The people's Place Quilt Museum and Museum Shoppe. Phyllis Pellman Good and Merle Good served as consultants for the exhibit.

"We are honoring the many creative decisions and acts involved in making a quilt,"commented Mast. "The exhibit explores how a quilt becomes a masterpiece. And in the spirit of both celebration and education, we are offering free admission to the show."

The People's Place Quilt Museum has received extensive national acclaim for it's exhibits of antique Amish and Mennonite quilts since it first opened in 1988. It has also exhibited stunning African American quilts, as well as a show of antebellum album quilts. "We may return to exhibiting antique quilts in the future, but this year we wanted to give attention to the art of contemporary quilt design," said the Goods.

Open Monday thru Saturday 9 to 5 800-828-8218

Barb in sunny southeastern PA, where the corn is way taller than "knee high by the fourth of July" -- the farmer's guage as to how wet/dry the spring and summer have been

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Subject: Re: Is this for real, friends? From: Jackie Joy <joysbeesyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 6 Jul 2004 14:22:39 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 26

--0-278193365-1089148959=:88748 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

My service thinks these are spam and I delete them. Of course, Yahoo just thought your message to which I am replying was spam, but I recognized your name. lol.

jackie Joy

Pepper Cory <pepcorymail.clis.com> wrote: Hello all-With all the web-knowledgeable folks on QHL, I wonder if anyone out there can tell me if this is for real? Couldn't find out what said inquirer wanted and so 'registered.' Have I just done something stupid? Thanks for your help- Pepper Cory ----- Original Message ----- From: To:

Sent: Tuesday, July 06, 2004 12:59 AM Subject: A user at our website is searching for information re:

> ****NOT COMMERCIAL EMAIL**** > > A user is looking into your background via our website. > > Our website is used to find and then communicate with people that know and have experiences and opinions about a business or person. > > The mission of the Web site is to promote goodness in people by efficiently extending the concept of "word-of-mouth" to the Internet, allowing the people of our world to share their experiences with others in a secure and anonymous fashion. > > To view all of the postings in our system regarding your email address use this link: > > http://e.wres.us/sel.php?a=search&b=5&c=pepcory%40mail.clis.com > > How does our website work? > > Users of our website can search for and submit connections about people and/or businesses that they are interested in researching. A connection is simply an indication of interest in sharing word-of-mouth information regarding the connection subject. Each connection has an author and a subject. Connection subjects are searchable, but connection authors are anonymus. Our website protects the anonymity of connection authors. When a user searches for and then finds a connection at our website the user then has the option to communicate with the connection author via our Anonymous Email System (AES) toward learning the experiences and opinions that the connection author has regarding the connection subject. > > Add your email address to our DO NOT EMAIL LIST by clicking the link below: > > http://a.wores.us/sel.php?a=donotemail&b=pepcory%40mail.clis.com > > WordofMouthResearch.com has made its best effort to provide a legal forum for the dissemination of word-of-mouth information. Defamation is written or spoken injury to the reputation of a living person or organization. Injury to reputation generally is considered to be exposure to hatred, contempt, ridicule, or financial loss. Libel is the written act of defamation; slander is the spoken act. Whether libel or slander, the defamation must be published - communicated to someone other than the subject of the defamation. Trth is generally an absolute defense to defamation: if what you say is true, it cannot be defamatory. Additionally, you are protected against defamation providing your statement is an opinion, not an assertion of a fact. If you follow these guidelines when submitting a Connection you will be well within the boundaries of the law. > > Regards, > > Support Department > > > >

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Subject: vintage quilt top From: "Marcia Kaylakie" <marciarkearthlink.net> Date: Tue, 6 Jul 2004 17:46:23 -0500 X-Message-Number: 27

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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Oh, I just gotta brag a little! Last night was our guild's 2nd Chance = Boutique (affectionately called Last Chance Boutique!). I had a few little "leftovers", mostly my scrapbag to sell , so I took = a table. Well, next to me was a guild member with a table and hanging = there was a glorious Bow Tie quilt top with THE most fab-u-lous Fifties = prints!! Snagged it for $35...just to have the fabric library alone is = worth more, until Eileen Trestain's new book comes out! The top is very = sturdy and quite quiltable. Now comes the question. It still needs = borders. Should I follow my heart and go find a site with vintage = goodies or would someone like to suggest another alternative? Still = jumping for joy! Marcia

Marcia Kaylakie, AQS Certified Appraiser Austin, TX =20 www.texasquiltappraiser.com ------=_NextPart_000_0024_01C46381.276C5A80--

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Subject: Re: Is this for real, friends? From: "Karen" <charter.net> Date: Tue, 6 Jul 2004 19:06:09 -0400 X-Message-Number: 28

I sure wouldn't pay any attention to it. It's likely a scam, and a nasty one at that.

Ignore it, and forget it ever happened, and enjoy your summer...God knows it's a lovely time of year.

Karen Evans

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Subject: Antique quilting patterns on ebay From: "Elizabeth Fritsche" <

Hello Ladies: Mostly I just soak up all your wonderful information. = But I remember a discussion a few months back regarding old quilt = patterns and I just came across a batch on ebay. The auction ends = today.... and I do not need a thing in my overcrowded sewing room! The = item number is: 8115235505 Best Wishes. Libby Fritsche

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Subject: RE: Is this for real, friends? From: "Karen Quilts Texas" <karenquiltstexashouston.rr.com> Date: Tue, 6 Jul 2004 18:41:12 -0500 X-Message-Number: 30

Pepper -

Lots of people trying to figure out how to make money on the internet... this seems to be one of the more "interesting" sites. Hmmm - play on people's current paranoia and fear of privacy invasion or identity theft by offering a "word of mouth" way to check people out?! Pretty bizarre idea.

I don't think you are in big trouble. But it's just as likely that no one has "inquired" about you. It's likely that this may be this Web business' way of getting more registrants - after all, they already had your email address. I don't think their idea will work well unless they get an unusually large proportion of internet users registered. And, in today's lawsuit crazy environment, I don't think they could last long.

Karen Spring, TX

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Subject: RE: teaching history From: "Karen Quilts Texas" 

All the history teachers at my son's High School are the coaches of the various athletic teams. Seems that they major in Phys Ed, and minor in History...since the schools don't have room/budget for full-time Phsy ed teachers/coaches. I think that's becoming the norm at many schools. My sister says she sees it at her children's kids schools in Kansas. I think it's sad that the schools are having to squeeze not just the fine arts, but other important elements of education like History, and Geography.

Karen A. Spring, TX

-----Original Message----- From: Charlotte Bull [mailto:charloumo-net.com] Sent: Tuesday, July 06, 2004 10:04 AM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] teaching history

Sorry, but I did not listen closely enough to quote exact figures, but I heard a bit of regional news. Evidently they are offering major grant money to improve the knowledge of History Teachers in a number of schools in cities near me. According to the newscaster, a very wide percentage of the existing history teachers had not taken History as either a Major or Minor study area when they got their college degree. Yet, now they are Teaching it!!! That might help explain some of the acceptance of false info.

I was recently talking with several young folks who are considering teaching as a future career. Several of the boys mentioned that they wanted to be coaches and that they'd probably have to teach a couple of History classes to fill out their schedules. They were aware that teachers interested in Literature, Art or Science had never been interested in being coaches. As I thought back to my teaching 45 years ago, I recalled that one year I was asked to teach one history class as well as my 5 English classes... just to fill out the need! The principal refused to listen to my explanation that I had only taken one year of college history as a freshman. He said my many art history and literary classes would suffice. So I taught "history"!

Actually, as I recall, I have often wished I'd taken more history classes - specifically Textile & Quilt History!!! : ))) But I did also note a great combo deal when it came to literary classics and the history of a country or an era of time or a specific culture. When I read a classic, I ended up studying the history of the times! It should be a Double Major!

I refuse to discuss garters & panty hose, although I once contributed my old stockings to a quilter to use as stuffing!! Evidently for "biscuits"! I am now back in my teens! I wear bobby socks & loafers or sneakers. No saddle shoes. But I sometimes wear cowboy boots! I am liberated! I was told recently by a young man visiting my church that he was going to join it since he knew he would not be expected to wear a business suit if "an old lady can wear jeans to church." We both knew to whom he was referring and I welcomed him and his delightful family! His wife stood there blushing and ready to sink through the floor! His boys hugged me. So now I'm their Sunday Grandma.

Garters? Bungee Cords!!! But some guys still wear Suspenders!!! cb

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Subject: Re: vintage quilt top From: Gail Ingram 

Dear Marcia K.,

I'm on my Scots-Irish jag right now, so you need to take that into consideration, but were I you and found a perfectly love bow-tie quilt top for $35 from the fifties, I would not put a repro border on it. I would look for some nice fabric from the era to make a backing (I've found this on e-Bay several times) and pray there were enough of it to make a binding. Or, if I wanted to be really "of the period," I'd go out and buy some binding (I feel the brickbats coming my way, but this is my "if I were you"), for it is my recollection that in our part of the country manufactured bias tapes were often used in the 50's. And I would tell everybody this was a REAL fifties quilt and I'd be very proud of myself.

Of course, I'd also tell them I myself had not been born yet in the fifties and the way I knew the quilt's vintage was from my many appraisal and textile courses and my brilliant mind.

Gail 

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Subject: Re: Is this for real, friends? From:

When I receive something like this, if I don't delete it immediately, I check it out on Snopes.com, home of the urban legends lists. They tell you if something is a legend or if there is some truth to the story.

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Subject: Re: vintage quilt top From: "Marcia Kaylakie" <marciarkearthlink.net> Date: Tue, 6 Jul 2004 22:05:29 -0500 X-Message-Number: 34

Dearest Gail (my Scots-Irish sister), I promise, on my honor, that I will not put any reproduction fabrics on this quilt. I will be searching out "good stuff" that is appropriate to the time period, but I will have to think long and hard about the manufactured bias tape. I still own some from the 60s and 70s ....no, wait that must have been my older sister's (phew!) I am definitely planning on using your last statement! If I do, however, I may have to go to confession after each and every time. Since I declared a cease and desist on the actual enumeration of years, I now only celebrate anniversaries of past birthdays. By the time anyone figures out your true age, you can sail gracefully from the room! Works like a charm. Now my mother and my aunts, of which there were 3, did this with the best of them. However, one aunt has reversed aged and her fourth husband, and now her current one (#5) cannot seem to figure out how she could be her current age and still have attended USO dances druing the war (WWII). This is also the aunt to tried to have the birth date changed on my other aunt's tombstone because "everyone knew that the girls were all born two years apart and once they know, then they can figure out the rest...." Now can't you just see someone standing at my Aunt Gloria's grave going, "now if Gloria was born in '23, then that makes Jane....!" This is a true story. My mom and my aunts were just hilarious when they all got together. Their menfolk retreated under the onslaught of words. They all talked at once and amazingly, each heard every word of every other person talking. Two of the four sisters have since passed away and my mother and her remaining sister talk a little less frequently than they used to. It is so fun to remember these family affairs as they were! Hi-ho, I am off tomorrow to southern NJ to see family and enjoy the fruits and vegetables of the Garden State! Marcia

Marcia Kaylakie, AQS Certified Appraiser Austin, TX www.texasquiltappraiser.com

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Subject: Re: Is this for real, friends? From: Judy Kelius <quiltsptd.net> Date: Tue, 06 Jul 2004 16:26:50 -0400 X-Message-Number: 35

Sorry Pepper, but this is a scam. I have also received several of these emails (different web site, but exact same wording and links) so I did some research. Their purpose is to get you to join their so-called network, but there is no information to be had. Here is more information : http://www.snopes.com/computer/internet/wordofmouth.asp

With all the junk I get, including many emails intended to get my credit card account information, etc., I am in the process of changing my email address - judysueptd.net will be gone forever! To make it even worse, some of this junk purportedly comes from me! (That's called "spoofing" when someone sends an email that looks like it came from you and you are the reply-to address, but you had nothing to do with sending the email!) If you are getting a lot of junk mail and having other problems like reports that a message you sent was infected with a virus, you may want to change your email address too!

 

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Subject: reproduction feedsacks From: Debby Kratovil <kratovilhis.com> Date: Wed, 7 Jul 2004 06:00:36 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Forgive me if this was posted recently; I don't read every day's QHL posts. I taught a class this last Saturday and one of my students had reproduction feedsacks! They are gorgeous and since one of my class samples was made with original feedsacks, I was able to compare the two, and to my untrained eye (I'm not that serious of a quilt historian), they looked equal. Of course, the "hand" of the newer fabrics was so much finer, certainly not with the loose weave of the originals, but the colors and patterns were so delightful that I'm going hunting for a shop that carries them and buying yards and yards. I love them. Does anyone know when these were released? Thanks, Debby (the wanna-be quilt historian without all the sweat and labor) -- Debby (with a "y" and not "ie") Kratovil http://www.quilterbydesign.com Visit my workshops page for guild programs!

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Subject: RE: reproduction feedsacks From: "Karen Quilts Texas" <karenquiltstexashouston.rr.com> Date: Wed, 7 Jul 2004 06:28:19 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

JoAnn's ( The fabric chain) came out with a line or reproduction feed sacks this year that are actually a fair duplication of the coarser weave of feedsacks. There are of course several lines of reproduction 30's fabrics too out there... The Aunt Grace line by Marcus Bros being one of my favorites. These have been around for quite a few years, with new patterns coming out each year. They are all over the web... just search "Aunt Grace" and you'll find them in shops on line. Of course many quilt shops carry them.

JoAnn also came out with a nice little line of repro 30's fabrics for $2.99 a yard (price may vary by area) this summer. I know some out there may want to flame me for suggesting that you shop the chain fabric stores, but I do find some nice quality fabrics mixed among the flimsy stuff from time to time, and they are trying hard to provide fabrics for the quilter market. There's always been this rumor running around the Quilting community about the manufacturers using lower quality greige goods for their fabrics made for the chains, but I've bought fabrics there that I can't tell from those I've purchased at the Quilts shops (for significantly more!).

I'm not that knowledgeable about all the current fabric manufacturers, so perhaps someone else on the board can chime in about feedsack repros.

Karen A. Spring, TX

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Subject: RE: reproduction feedsacks 

Karen -- Joanne's has been gradually stocking first line quilting fabrics but they are mostly subbrands of major manufacturers. The quality is there although the cotton strain may be a lesser strain and may not always be combed. Company has finally started to realize that customers want and will pay for quality. Also much depends on how much discount manufacturer will allow as to which fabrics are first or second line.

Karen Quilts Texas wrote:

> >JoAnn also came out with a nice little line of repro 30's fabrics for $2.99 >a yard (price may vary by area) this summer. I know some out there may want >to flame me for suggesting that you shop the chain fabric stores, but I do >find some nice quality fabrics mixed among the flimsy stuff from time to >time, and they are trying hard to provide fabrics for the quilter market. >There's always been this rumor running around the Quilting community about >the manufacturers using lower quality greige goods for their fabrics made >for the chains, but I've bought fabrics there that I can't tell from those >I've purchased at the Quilts shops (for significantly more!). > >I'm not that knowledgeable about all the current fabric manufacturers, so >perhaps someone else on the board can chime in about feedsack repros. > > >

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Subject: www.oldandsold.com From: <kerrybrackozemail.com.au> Date: Wed, 7 Jul 2004 21:29:16 +1000 X-Message-Number: 4

> karen there is a great article on www.oldandsold.com about jobbers, and converters for cotton. kerry in sydneyx

This message was sent through MyMail http://www.mymail.com.au

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Subject: Re: UGRR poster From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net> Date: Wed, 07 Jul 2004 08:34:37 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Good Morning All -

Yes, I have a poster about the UGRR published by the US Forest Service and other groups -- and I found a picture of it at this site -- plus a little information -- http://www.fs.fed.us/na/morgantown/nanews/apr03.htm

Barb in southeastern PA

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Subject: The 70s From: "Barbara Vlack" <cptvdeosbcglobal.net> Date: Wed, 7 Jul 2004 07:49:36 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

My mantra is that there is a very good reason why we left the 70s behind us. Neon signs proclaiming this are blinking in my mind as I'm reading our current thread and remembering some of the crafts we used to do in the 70s. Crocheting rugs out of plastic bread wrappers or nylons does not rank among my fondest memories. Macrame is a different story. I run away from anything with the color scheme orange, gold, and avocado. Actually, in my house, which we built in the 70s, we still have the gold carpet, which is now accented with navy and burgundy to bring a whole new scheme to light. My avocado stove, a TOL with a combination oven and microwave (in one oven), still hasn't died, though I have replaced all my other avocado and gold appliances long since. I know, I need a major redecorating, which I will be glad to do "in my spare time."

But I think my aversion to the 70s stuff is similar to my mother's attitude toward 30s stuff. I love the 30s things and collect them. I have several quilts that I rotate on my beds and in my decorating. I am gradually sliding into Shabby Chic or Cottage decorating and loving it. My mother's attitude, no doubt planted by her mother, is that her family was too proud to have mended clothes or anything but the finest looking things even though they were poor. They were poor but never wanted to look like it. She can't believe that we paint furniture and then rough it up to look shabby and used and think it's fine stuff. But remember that this is the same woman who uses the elastic waistbands of her pantyhose as large rubberbands.

Barb Vlack cptvdeosbcglobal.net

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Subject: Re: UGRR poster From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrowpatmedia.net> Date: Wed, 7 Jul 2004 11:59:20 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

I just followed Barb's link and then cut and pasted an e-mail address and asked for a copy of the poster. Nowhere did they say there was a cost or fee for the poster -- your tax dollars at work, I suppose.

If we all request the poster and then rip it up, or squirrel it away, or display it with a big "X" and the word "MYTH " splashed across it we may do some good.

Judy Ringo judygrowpatmedia.net

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: July 06, 2004 From: "gb-best" 

Hello to all,

I had a quilt question. I saw this quilt listed for sale on Ebay.

My question is, is this an import type baltimore album? I have seen many in different designs. I was just wondering if anyone knew for sure if this one is and what company produced it?

Thanks for your help. The auction number is 3734926367.

I found another one too. I know this one is an import, but what company makes it? Does anyone know. Just curious. I have seen this one several times. Item number 3733891379.

Just doing some research.

Thanks!

Donna

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Subject: Log Cabin Quilts/Civil War era From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Wed, 7 Jul 2004 10:24:32 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 9

I was just re-reading Virginia Gunn's article called Quilts for Union Soldiers in the Civil War from AQSG's Uncoverings regarding the U.S. Sanitary Commission quilts and noted on page 88 she makes reference to "Log Cabin" silk quilts at the Great Western Sanitary Fair in Cincinnati that was made as a raffle quilk by the Willow Glen Aid Society, and another made by Morris Chapel Soldiers' Aid Society and yet another made by Trinity Methodist Episcopal Church.

Interesting.

Does anyone know when the Great Western Sanitary Fair was held? Obviously during the war, which would mean that the making of Log Cabin quilts--and the use of the name probably was common place during that period.

On an up-date on my guild's Home of the Brave Quilts for War Dead--we now have 15 Sanitary Commission quilt made as replicas of the Lincoln Shrine's Album (Album Cross) quilt--a pattern also referenced by Gunn--and have received the endorcement of our regional Depart of Veterans Affairs officers for the project. In fact they have asked us to try to move this nationally. Next week I will be meeting with guild reps from Southern California; and the VA is contacting Northern Cal VA reps to expand there.

If anyone is a member of a quilting guild who might be interested in participating in this program, please contact me privately so we can coordinate efforts. (Even local politicians are jumping on the band-wagon, so to speak.) In Riveside County all eleven of our war dead families have been contact and not only want quilts, but would like a public presentation. So we feel very gratified and humbled.

What I am trying to find out, by the way, was common Sanitary Commission quilt block patterns.

So far, I know that Album, Nine Patch, Log Cabin, Chimney Sweep, Georgetown Circle (Bracman 2048), many Flag quilts, and Friendship Album (Brackman 2376), and the pattern at the Vermon Historical Society, which I don't think has a name, were used. Do any of you know of other block patterns used? Thanks

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Subject: Re: before we get into... From: Midnitelaptopaol.com Date: Wed, 7 Jul 2004 16:02:24 EDT X-Message-Number: 11

before we get into yet another discussion of the quality of Joann's fabric ...let's just shop wherever we can afford the merchandise and wherever we can get to, by whatever transportation available.... ...sooooo i'm off to joanns today by public transportation aka the bus... jeanL

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Subject: chains From: "weemsjm" <weemsjmearthlink.net> Date: Wed, 7 Jul 2004 15:02:46 -0500 X-Message-Number: 12

Amen! Karen

Thanks for being brave enough to mention the chain stores. Most quilting folks have been brain washed into thinking they must pay 8 = or more dollars a yard. I have always thought that to be crazy for use in an baby gift or a = quilt for daily use. If you are planning to make a future family treasure spend spend spend. If you just want a warm attractive blanket make three or four for the = price of one from quilt shop fabrics. You can even wash them once a month and not fret over it.

My Grandmother would thing me crazy to buy new let alone top dollar.

Jeff

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Subject: Great stories and Helpful Hints From: "Teddy Pruett" <aprayzerhotmail.com> Date: Wed, 07 Jul 2004 17:06:59 -0400 X-Message-Number: 13

You just never know what you will find on the backs of old quilt patterns that have been cut out of newspapers. I recently read an article on the back of such a pattern, written during WW11. It was about a soldier who was prounounced dead, and after a while his wife remarried. Said soldier was not dead, after all, but returned home and was not even upset about the remarriage, even though he dearly loved his wife. When he shipped out, he left a letter with her, telling her that if he should die, he wanted her to remarry and be happy and have a good life. So, she did. The end of the article was happy and upbeat, and he said all was fine and all was good, and they would find a way to figure this all out. Yall, this man was glad to be alive!!

On the back of another ad for purchasing a pattern, there is a list of helpful hints. One particular hint that pertains to us, is the following:

**Pieces of white candle wax spinkled freely between the folds of white fabrics stored away will keep the material from turning yellow.**

DISCLAIMER:::Please understand that I am NOT saying to do this - it is a hint from the 1930's.

Anyway, just FYI - dont' forget that the reverse of the pattern is often the great find. Teddy Pruett, who wants to remind you all how amazing a blessing it is to have running water. Our pump was hit by lightning, and we spent the night and all day without water. Oh, you just dont miss your water til your well runs dry. And then, you miss your MONEY when it does!

Teddy Pruett

_________________________________________________________________ Get fast, reliable Internet access with MSN 9 Dial-up – now 2 months FREE! http://join.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200361ave/direct/01/

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Subject: Re: The 70s From: " verla geinert" <geinertsrt.com> Date: Wed, 7 Jul 2004 17:22:03 -0500 X-Message-Number: 14

My one sister in law and her daughter went to work in a Mission one summer in South America. She taught them how to make huge rugs out of grocery bags. They had dirt floors which turned to mud when it rained. This way the plastic bag rugs acted like a waterproff mattress and kept them drier when they slept. I grew on a farm that didn't have running water or a phone. Thought we were poor, but that sort of poverty is beyond comprehension.

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Subject: Re: The 70s From: Vivien Sayre 

Hi All,

The idea of reusing plastic has never died. About a year and a half ago I was asked to do an appraisal of a quilt hanging in the Folk Art Museum in New York. I took the time after the appraisal to look through the gallery. Hanging in a very prominent place was a large 'textile' completely constructed out of Wonder Bread plastic bags. It was wonderful, shinny, and begging to be touched. Unfortunately, the Museum guard was near by so that was out of the question. I guess what's one persons bread bag is another persons art work.

Vivien in Massachusetts

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Subject: Help identifying pattern and fabrics? From: "Patchwork Secrets" <patchworksecrets2earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 7 Jul 2004 22:16:14 -0400 X-Message-Number: 16

I recently won an ebay auction on a set of unusual quilts, at least unusual to me. I am waiting for them to arrive but hoping someone can give me a few guidelines on the pattern and fabrics from the sellers picture if you would be so kind.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=947&item=6104608523

You can click on the picture for a larger image. I have never seen this pattern before and am guessing the fabrics to be 40's. Am I close? I just got the Dating Fabrics book and plan on sitting down and figuring out each fabric once the quilts arrive. Wait til DH hears I plan on taking them on vacation with us this week so I can research and study while he drives..lol...

Sharon in NC

http://home.earthlink.net/~patchworksecrets/patchworksecretsquiltpatterns/index.html

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: July 05, 2004 From: Qill888aol.com Date: Wed, 7 Jul 2004 23:43:26 EDT X-Message-Number: 17

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Gail - - -

I am new to the quilting digest but I just read your story ! & am still shaking my head & laughing !

My Dear Uncle was a southern Baptist Minister !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! so-o-o I know what you're sayin' !

Only he, would actually take hold of you 'round the neck , like in a " head - lock " , and absolutely NOT let go untill you professed to be saved & answered ALL his very detailed & involved questions !

You can only imagine my Dear Hubby's surprise when my Uncle, of course with every good intention , took hold of him 'round his neck ! ! !????????????????????? Just so you get the full picture - - - - - - my D.H. is a " Catholic , Italian from N.Y.City ! ! ! to beat all !

Of course we ( my family ) were all rather used to it , to some extent , but my Hubby had never even heard of such a thing ! There's NO name for the shade of red his face turned to !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Everytime I think of this , I still can't believe he actually married me & we lasted this long together . . . . . . because he wasn't exactly thrilled when I told him how my Mom & Uncle ( different uncle ) would always " yodle " together when ever they got together , either ! What a test ? HUH ?

Just had to share this with you !

Thanks for the laugh !!!!!!!!!

= : Qill : =

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: July 05, 2004 From: Gail Ingram <gingramtcainternet.com> Date: Thu, 08 Jul 2004 07:30:16 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

> > > You can only imagine my Dear Hubby's surprise when my Uncle, > of course with every good intention , took hold of him 'round his > neck ! ! !????????????????????? > Just so you get the full picture - - - - - - > my D.H. is a " Catholic , Italian from N.Y.City ! ! ! to beat all

Thank you for taking the time and kindness to respond to my post, which really was just a funny memory for me.

I can appreciate both your future husband's and your uncle's dilemma. I grew up in Central Louisiana, where Catholicism in its most orthodox met Protestantism in its festiness. Alexandria was both a cathedral city and the state headquarters for the Southern Baptist Church and in Pineville, across the Red River, was Louisiana College, the state Baptist College.

In those days, a "mixed marriage" was a marriage between Catholicc and Protestant, something every mother sought to ward against. Cinda Cawley of our list and I have talked about this a lot. Cinda grew up in PA, Irish Catholic and says even within the Catholic Church, there were these divisions---Irish C. didn't marry Italian C.

I hope your husband came to appreciate yodeling. When I was in grad school, I lost my voice trying to yodel like Hank Williams!

Where are you from, Qill? You should introduce yourself to the list.

Gail

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Subject: RE: Help identifying pattern and fabrics? From: "Barbara Vlack" <cptvdeosbcglobal.net> Date: Thu, 8 Jul 2004 07:45:00 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Oo, oo. (Read with a staccato inflection, as in "Car 54, Where Are You?") I think I can help with this one!

Sharon wrote: <<I recently won an ebay auction on a set of unusual quilts, at least unusual to me. I am waiting for them to arrive but hoping someone can give me a few guidelines on the pattern and fabrics from the sellers picture if you would be so kind.

<<http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=947&item=61 04608523

<<You can click on the picture for a larger image. I have never seen this pattern before and am guessing the fabrics to be 40's. Am I close? I just got the Dating Fabrics book and plan on sitting down and figuring out each fabric once the quilts arrive. ... >>

RESPONSE: I did a search for "Windmill" in BlockBase2 (Brackman's Encyclopedia of Pieced Quilt Patterns on CD, by EQ) and found this pattern! I don't have a date for when it was first published, but it is called Windmill and is from Old Chesea Station Needlecraft Services, Brooks/Wheeler, #5903.

I could see from the enlarged picture from eBay that the windmills are on blocks set on point. On the pattern, the blades of the windmill are pieced into the block. The windmill base itself may be pieced in or appliquéd. The seller says "appliquéd," and that may be true. It would be a little tricky to piece it in.

I agree about dating the fabrics to be 40s, perhaps with some 30s thrown in, too.

Is the quilting by machine? It kind of looks that way in the picture.

I think you got a deal for these quilts. Nice find.

Barb Vlack cptvdeosbcglobal.net

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Subject: Feedsacks and JoAnn's From: "Barbara Vlack" <cptvdeosbcglobal.net> Date: Thu, 8 Jul 2004 07:45:06 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

I don't remember the source, but I read that it's difficult to authenticate a true feedsack unless you have the entire piece and you can see the holes left by the stitching of the sack. I think the term "feedsack" is used to label many fabrics from the 30s that might not have truly been feedsacks. Certainly the texture of the weave must play into the identification, but not everyone heeds that.

The thought comes to mind that finding feedsack reproductions at JoAnn's might duplicate the fabrics of the 30s in more ways than one. Cheaper fabrics, lesser quality. They fit!

Barb Vlack cptvdeosbcglobal.net

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Subject: eBay Baltimore style quilt From: "Barbara Vlack" <cptvdeosbcglobal.net> Date: Thu, 8 Jul 2004 07:45:07 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Donna offered:

<<Thanks for your help. The auction number is 3734926367.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=2221&item=373 4926367&rd=1

and wondered if it was an imported quilt.>>

RESPONSE: I don't know, but it is a beauty. The designs look to be more intricate than those I've seen on other imports.

I understand that one identifying characteristic of an import is no binding. The edges of the quilt are "pillowcased." This quilt looks to be bound.

The reported number of stitches per inch may be iffy. My opinion is that a quilter skilled enough to produce good appliqué for these designs may have skill for stitching/quilting more than 6-7 spi.

Barb Vlack cptvdeosbcglobal.net

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Subject: Feedsacks and JoAnn's From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> 

Barb -- yes the best authentication is to see the large stitch holes. However, not all feedsacks were the coarser osnaburgs we associate with feedsacks fabric. Many were made in rayon, gingham, fine percales and fine muslins for instance in lovely prints to be used for pillowcases and other respectible items of clothing or simply as collector items. I have both percale and good muslin borderprint feedsack pillowcases [made them] which I wouldn't trade for any of the high thread counts today.

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Subject: Re: eBay Baltimore style quilt From: "Cheryl Wolf" <cwolfverizon.net> Date: Thu, 8 Jul 2004 10:29:56 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

I believe the quilt on eBay is one of the Smithsonian-licensed American Pacific Chinese imports: "The Bride's Quilt" (see Bowman's "American Quilts" p. 50-51) . I have one of these repros (in the same full/queen size, in fact), and the blocks, quilting & color placement are identical to the quilt being auctioned; the pink and yellow fabrics appear to be the same. My repro of known origin has inserted red piped binding and the narrow stems & vines are all embroidered rather than appliqued, if anyone is inclined to query the seller on those details.

pax- Cheryl

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Subject: ebay "imports" From: Laura Robins-Morris

They look too good to be imports in my uneducated opinion (and without really close-up photos). They aren't antique of course but look to me like they were made by serious quilters. I should do so well! One claims to be "vintage" 1950s (so I'm vintage now?), and the other wisely doesn't claim a date. Has any company yet sold imports that are well-made, rather intricate quilts? Donna, how do you know about the second one? Where have you seen it for sale? Other opinions??? Laura in Seattle

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Subject: Re: Feedsacks and JoAnn's From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Thu, 08 Jul 2004 09:45:11 -0600 X-Message-Number: 8

Is it possible that the mills producing printed feedsack fabric also sold the same as on-bolt yardage?

The stuff was tremendously popular in the time between the wars (especially), in part because it was a "free" source of fabric for home sewing, but also because of its cheery colors and designs. During WW II the American Cotton Council printed booklets showing economical ways to furnish the home using these sacks, and held contests for the most creative uses (a woman won one year by making seatcovers for her husband's truck). In the 1950s and early 1960s, the Cotton Council had home dressmaking contests, with Singer machines as prizes, and trips to large cities for regional winners.

A lot of feedsack designs were reproduced from more expensive sources: I have toile feedsacks illustrating a military event, and first printed in the late 1700s. Also Disney from various films and cartoons, which Disney also produced in better quality yardage.

Xenia

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Subject: QHL: UGRR Poster From: "John Seater" <seatermindspring.com> Date: Thu, 8 Jul 2004 10:56:09 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

Dear List,

I have requested 2 posters from 'tjonesfs.fed.us' as listed on the website. Thanks to Barb for the website, Kim for a good reference site, and Judy for the idea to order. I'll let you know the response if I get any.

Dear Toni Jones, Your name is listed for requests for the poster "Women's Quilts and the Underground Railroad" poster, designed by Vicky Evans for the Morgantown Field Office's Women's History Month Special Observance.

I am a quilt historian who would like to use this poster as an example of how myths become "facts". The scholarly community who has studied this issue is trying to urge caution because no other sources beyond one woman have verified it and several of the supposed patterns were not even used in the time period in question, yet the government has endorsed and propagated the myth without checking.

For some examples see http://www.antiquequiltdating.com/ugrrwrightinterview.html for an interview with an underground railroad historian.

Please send me 2 posters.

Susan Seater Raleigh NC

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Subject: Re: eBay Baltimore style quilt From: "Cheryl Wolf" <cwolfverizon.net> Date: Thu, 8 Jul 2004 11:07:34 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

I should have mentioned that I am referencing the eBay item # 3734926367.

Must... not... email... before... 3rd... cup... of... coffee...

pax- Cheryl

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Subject: Imports From: "Laurette Carroll" <rl.carrollverizon.net> Date: Thu, 8 Jul 2004 08:31:27 -0700 X-Message-Number: 11

Hello, The second quilt is made by the Arch company, it is mentioned in the seller's description. If you google for Arch quilt, or do an ebay search, you will find a number of quilts made by this company. They sewed a label with the Arch name onto their quilts.

Laurette Carroll Southern California

Look to the Future With Hope

> I had a quilt question. I saw this quilt listed for sale on Ebay. > My question is, is this an import type baltimore album? I have seen many in > different designs. I was just wondering if anyone knew for sure if this one > is and what company produced it? > Thanks for your help. The auction number is 3734926367.

> I found another one too. I know this one is an import, but what company > makes it? Does anyone know. Just curious. I have seen this one several > times. Item number 3733891379.

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Subject: Feedsacks and JoAnn's From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>

Xenia -- I've heard feedsack collectors say that from time to time feedsack fabric was made available as yardage. And I believe during the 1970s-80s there was such a revival of prints which manufacturers preferred to called homespun rather than feedsacking. I also understand from a great article in ACS journal -- possibly this is the one you refer to?? -- that the fine fabric feedsacks held soft content such as sugar or flour rather than harsh feed or grains which might penetrate and damage cloth.

Xenia Cord wrote:

>Is it possible that the mills producing printed feedsack fabric also >sold the same as on-bolt yardage? > > > >

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Subject: feedsack fabric and prints From: <chrisajetlink.net> Date: Thu, 8 Jul 2004 08:54:51 -0700 X-Message-Number: 13

These are quotes from a research paper "Recycling Feedsacks and Flour Bags,Thrifty Housewives or Marketing Success Story? " by Loris Connelly, in the journal DRESS - one great article about the use of sacks for dress and home textiles from the 1940s and up.

"With the 'lovely linen-like" bags of the early 1940's, a far cry from the plain ray goods bags of many years ago, with their gaudy trademarks that wouldn't come out in the wash, the origin of one's dress fabric became the wearer's secret. Women supposedly no longer resented a comment like "that dress you're wearing looks like a feed bags. Approximately fifty million dress goods bags had been manufactured through 1941, sold chiefly in the South, Southwest, and Middle west to women of all income groups. "

"By January 1945, the production of cotton bags across the United States required a billion and a half square yards or cloth, representing the longest single use of cotton in its history. Bemis also wanted the cotton mills to know that the preferred fabric for printed bags was sheeting, with lower count osnaburgs used to a much lesser extent."

"Bemis cited several factors that prompted farm women to buy printed feedsacks enthusiastically. It was economical to purchase a feedsack for a grand total of 25 cents and receive not only chicken feed but up to one and one half yards of usable cotton print material. A dress goods bag cost only five cents more than an ordinary trademarked bag of greige goods. Furthermore, Bemis stressed that the cloth was not only printed with 'the best quality of tubfast, sunfast inks, but the designs were practical, colorful, stylish and up to date."

"In spring 1947, the Bemis company began advertising Bemilin Prints, a trade name for it's improved 'linen-like' cotton prints and solid pastels. Its ad stressed the importance of feed and flour companies giving style to their products by using Bemilin bags with 'exclusive patterns created by noted New York designers..different, unusual, desirable patterns usually found only in high-priced, exclusive garments."

Kim Wulfert www.antiquequiltdating.com

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Subject: eBay BAQs From: <chrisajetlink.net> Date: Thu, 8 Jul 2004 08:58:06 -0700 X-Message-Number: 14

I can't help but wonder if the very poor quality of the close up pictures, or lack of close-up pictures on the one site, is meant to obscure the fact that they are imports. I would think a real Baltimore style album quilt would be shown off as much as possible through photography.

Kim Wulfert www.antiquequiltdating.com

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Subject: Sanitary Fair From: "Jan Drechsler" <quiltdocsover.net> Date: Thu, 08 Jul 2004 12:39:33 -0400 X-Message-Number: 15

Don,

There is more info at the website below and Google will pull up much about Cincinnati history.

>http://www.heritagepursuit.com/Hamilton/HamiltonChapXXII.htm

HISTORY OF CINCINNATI AND HAMILTON COUNTY. - 355

free transportation to all commodities consigned to the Sanitary Fair. December 21, 1863, the Fair was opened, and during the succeeding weeks the great forces set in motion by enthusiastic patriotism gathered gifts of whatever kind could be made available.

The first week in January was intensely cold. A storm, unequalled in severity, swept over the Mississippi Valley as the old year went out, which made the next day memorable as " the cold New Year." During the next six days the winds were out, and the temperature hovered about zero. Among the ladies who stood at the counters in the Great Bazaar suffering was not uncommon, and impaired health in not. a few cases was an additional sacrifice. The closing of the Fair, with its gifts, labors, lectures, concerts and sales, did not take place until April 21, 1864. On that date the managers submitted their final report to the public.

You have become the Sanitary Fair Quilt expert, and I have not read Gunn's article. May I suggest caution in your wording:

>which would mean that the making of Log Cabin quilts--and the use of the name probably was common place during that period. < ((the Civil War))

There are three referenced to which you refer. Saying they were 'common place' is a big jump in inference. Just wary (or weary) and cautious after all the HIPV research and hype.

Has that beautiful raffle quilt been shipped to its new home or should I look for my tickets in hopes I won?

Jan -- Jan Drechsler in Vermont Quilt Restoration; Quilting teacher www.sover.net/~bobmills

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Subject: feedsack fabric and prints From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>

Kim -- that was the article I was referring to. A great piece of research and information which was published in 1992. I believe it is still available through the American Costume Society website although there might be a small fee.

chrisajetlink.net wrote:

>These are quotes from a research paper "Recycling Feedsacks and Flour >Bags,Thrifty Housewives or Marketing Success Story? " by Loris Connelly, in >the journal DRESS - one great article about the use of sacks for dress and >home textiles from the 1940s and up. > > > >

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Subject: RE: ebay "imports" From: "Karen Quilts Texas" <karenquiltstexashouston.rr.com> Date: Thu, 8 Jul 2004 14:18:01 -0500 X-Message-Number: 17

I have seen quite a few very well-made imports in the Houston area. But, we are "import central" now. Do you know that the Port of Houston now is a port of entry for more container shipments into the US than any other Port?! There was a big article in the paper about it just the other day.

We have a store called "Anna's Linens" that has an incredible array of imported linens. Some with an extraordinary amount of fancy embroidery, stuffed work, etc. I'm sure you've all seen the very finely appliqued linens at all the linen "Warehouse" type stores (Linens and Things, etc.). Even the Hobby "Big Box" stores carry small worked cotton pieces with very small hand appliqued flowers, usually pastels, on 30" x 28-36" pieces of fine white cotton for use in making pillowcases, blouses, collars etc. Though most of the quilts at this place are inexpensive and not necessarily well made. It is all hand done with a fine 50-60 weight thread.

This tiny, fine work is done in many places around the globe... I've seen labels from Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Korea, and of course China. The problem is that you don't know which of this is done by 10 year old girls in abominable situations, and which is done in legitimate, decent factory situations. For example, The Phillipines is known for it's exquisitely quilted (12 stitches to the inch or better) pieces. Roxanne McElroy made references to this work in her book on Hand Quilting.

The department stores here carry some pretty finely worked quilts in their better linen departments... they too run $200.00 and up. I've seen some pretty detailed appliqued quilts, though none as fancy as quilt # 2 in your list. I've seen some at Tuesday Morning too!

Pottery Barn offers a commissioned line of fancy appliqued quilts featured annually in their Christmas catalogue, and I have seen these in the store. They are phenomenal, and priced at under $300.00. They are of course imported!

The stuff on Ebay is typically not described as imported... just "hand made" or "hand crafted" - a sure sign of import. They know that if they put "Made in China" on the description, it might turn off some buyers immediately. If you email the seller and ask for origin, they will usually tell you then...

If they say it is US made, and you buy it and determine that it is not, be sure to pay via Paypal. You'll be covered against fraud under their program, and can get your money back. A report to Ebay will bump the seller from the site!

The first quilt you are referring to looks legitimate (note the comment about it being 50's-60's in the description). And this seller has a long, good feedback record, so it's doubtful that this is an import. The other seller has some dubious feedback, I'd beware of purchase from someone with so many bad comments from customers.

Karen Spring, TX

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>Subject: Re: qhl digest: July 06, 2004 >From: "gb-best" <vitaleptd.net> >Date: Wed, 7 Jul 2004 12:38:57 -0400 >X-Message-Number: 8

>Hello to all, >I had a quilt question. I saw this quilt listed for sale on Ebay. >My question is, is this an import type baltimore album? I have seen many in >different designs. I was just wondering if anyone knew for sure if this one >is and what company produced it?

>Thanks for your help. The auction number is 3734926367. http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=2221&item=3734926367& rd=1

>I found another one too. I know this one is an import, but what company >makes it? Does anyone know. Just curious. I have seen this one several >times. Item number 3733891379. http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3733891379&ssPageName=STR K:MEWA:IT

>Just doing some research. >Thanks! >Donna

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Subject: UGRR From: "weemsjm" <weemsjmearthlink.net> 

I have one of the posters on the way. I simply emailed them They asked how many I wanted.

You do not even have to pay shipping

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Subject: Re: UGRR-poster problem From: Jccullencrewaol.com 

Hi, can you repost the web address please for the poster? I tried and tried with both of them but got no response. Thanks so much. Carol Grace

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Subject: Searching for book From: Gail Ingram <gingramtcainternet.com> Date: Thu, 08 Jul 2004 20:08:15 -0500 X-Message-Number: 20

I am searching for a copy of Laurel Horton's "Social Fabric." Been to abebooks to no avail. ebay too.

I stupidly lent a friend a copy after she had begged and begged and I'll be switched if she didn't keep it so long, she thought she owned it and lent it to a friend who is now in Afghanistan on military duty as a nurse. So far in my life, I've never been able "not to speak to" anyone and never notice when someone is not speaking to me. But I'm working up the former talent on this one.

I know I'll never get it back, so I'm on a serious search.

Please send suggestions to me privately.

Thanks, Gail Ingram

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Subject: RE: Help identifying pattern and fabrics? From: "Patchwork Secrets" <patchworksecrets2earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 8 Jul 2004 22:02:30 -0400 X-Message-Number: 21

Thank you everyone for your help identifying these quilts. They arrived today and are in pretty good shape as described! The base or housing part of the blocks are machine pieced with the single blade inserted then the house is appliquéd on the block and the remaining three blades appliquéd on also. The appliqué stitching looks similar to a basting stitch and is on top of the pieces instead of hidden or over lapping the edges of the appliqué. The blocks are then joined together by machine and they are hand quilted. The hand quilting is unusual to me also. It is quilted in the shape of one of those tear drop Christmas ornaments (if that makes any sense..lol) but the shapes are about 6 inches wide and 8 inches tall. It just has those semicircular shapes quilted and they are not joined together. Then beside each teardrop is a single line of quilting about 6 inches long. Just one single short line not touching or connecting to any of the shapes that are quilted. Weirdest thing I have seen...lol... They actually look like they may have at one time been a very large quilt which was cut down and made into two. The windmill blocks run all the way out to the edges and have been trimmed off square giving bits and pieces of blocks around the edges of the quilts. I did try laying them side by side to try matching the pieces of blocks but can't seem to find the exact match. I find it interesting the blocks were chopped around the edges. One of the quilts has a few bad blocks along the top edge which I may be able to repair. The backing appears to be a thinner linen type cotton. The binding is also of this looser weave type fabric. They both have a very nice soft feel to them. The batting is cotton which looks like it may have done a little shifting in a few places but overall in very good shape. There are a few fabrics which have a patterned weave in them. I am not familiar enough with 40-50 era fabrics yet to be able to date these. I plan on getting a few pics tomorrow if anyone is interested I can upload them on a webshots or webpage for viewing. I think I got a pretty good deal too. Now to convince DH these are going to be perfect to hang in our pumpkin colored bedroom to cover the windows....lol.. He is a day sleeper and covered the windows in mirrored film then added black plastic on the inside so I can hang them safely with no worries about sun hitting them at all...VBG> Sharon in NC

http://home.earthlink.net/~patchworksecrets/patchworksecretsquiltpatterns/index.html

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Subject: Re: Help identifying pattern and fabrics? From: Judy Kelius <quiltsptd.net>  

Barbara Brackman identifies the pattern as "Windmill," published by the Old Chelsea Needlework Service which published columns under the Alice Brooks & Laura Wheeler names and also put out several booklets which are still available in some quilt shops today. The company started in 1933 - your quilts are 1930s or 1940s. Congratulations! They are really different ones.

 


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