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Quilters Find a way to care

Subject: Re: qhl digest: July 08, 2004 From: "Virginia Berger"

Just a note of triva--there is a small mill in Western Nebraska (not the panhandle but more southwest) that sells flour in fabric sacks through regional grocery stores. I never bought any as I never needed 10 or 25 lbs of flour at a time! These sacks appeared to be cotton/poly percale and the prints/colors are more 1960's looking.

Virginia

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Subject: Feedsack clarification From: Debby Kratovil <kratovilhis.com Date: Fri, 9 Jul 2004 07:45:45 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

I do know the difference between the real feedsacks and the new reproductions. I own a very large box stuffed full of the authentic ones, yet have been reluctant to use many of them because when they're gone, they're gone. To have the reproductions means that I can sew with abandon, get the same "look" without having to use up all my treasures. I sew for class samples, quilt show workshops and programs, and of course, for the magazine. I do appreciate the historical details this list provides and in no way meant to stir things up with questions about "bag holes" and thread count. This is probably why I usually remain a lurker - my postings can create a technical whirlwind that I hadn't anticipated. My love for fabrics and quilts is greater than my love (and attention to) the historical details. I leave that to the experts, and I thank you for doing that with such precision. No rancor here - honest! Debby -- Debby (with a "y" and not "ie") Kratovil http://www.quilterbydesign.com Visit my workshops page for guild programs!

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Subject: Re: Searching for book From: Jo Horsey <jhorseymail.newnanutilities.org Date: Fri, 09 Jul 2004 08:33:01 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

 I stupidly lent a friend a copy

Gail, I am sorry about your loss.I have done the same thing. I know this won't help your present situation, but: I came across a wonderful invention or product called "The Book Lovers' Borrow Book". It has book marks on which you write your name to leave in the book you lend out, and a sort of stub that remains in the book so you can note the particulars of the book you lent, ie name of book, name of borrower, date. This was produced by Starrhill Press, Wash DC and the ISBN 0-913515-24-8 The phone number listed on the item is 202-686-6703, but heaven only knows how old that info is. The usual no affiliation, yadayada. I just know that so many folks on this list have irreplaceable reference books they want to keep up with- Hope this is okay,since it is slightly off topic. thanks, Jo, in Newnan

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Subject: Re: ebay "imports" From: Laura Robins-Morris <lrobinsfhcrc.org Date: Fri, 09 Jul 2004 07:45:38 -0700 X-Message-Number: 4

Thanks, Karen for all the information on imported quilts and linens. I guess I notice only the $49 specials at Penneys and was unaware of the better qualily imports available. If it's difficult for us to know everything that's out there now, what ever will future quilt lovers do!

And thanks, Laurette, for the information on the Arch quilts. I wondered what that meant in the ebay listing. I googled Arch but there were so many variations -- is it the garden catalog company? (Their web site didn't help.) Googling "Arch quilts" brought up several ebay listings and an American quilter who made a commissioned quilt for the Arch auction in Milwaukee, whatever that is. But you settled the main point.

The Internet has so much information but always leaves me with more questions :)

Laura in Seattle

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: July 08, 2004 From: <chrisajetlink.net Date: Fri, 9 Jul 2004 08:29:22 -0700 X-Message-Number: 5

They also sell flour in printed sacks here in California at regular grocery stores and markets.

Kim Wulfert www.antiquequiltdating.com

----- Original Message ----- From: "Virginia Berger" <cifbanetins.net

Just a note of triva--there is a small mill in Western Nebraska (not the panhandle but more southwest) that sells flour in fabric sacks through regional grocery stores. I never bought any as I never needed 10 or 25 lbs of flour at a time! These sacks appeared to be cotton/poly percale and the prints/colors are more 1960's looking.

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Subject: QHL: Julie Silber at Deere Carriage House Moline, Illinois (Long) From: "Susan Wildemuth" <ksandbcwgeneseo.net Date: Fri, 9 Jul 2004 14:10:02 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

Julie Silber came to the Quad Cities ((Iowa) - Davenport, Bettendorf - (Illinois) - Moline, Rock Island - add East Moline and Silvis into that mix) July 5th and 6th -- to give a program sponsored by the Mississippi Valley Quilter's Guild. I was not able to attend all the events, but the one I did attend was the 1-4 Show and Share at the Deere Carriage House in Moline, Illinois on the 5th.

Here are some of the highlights of the quilts we saw:

#1 Double Wedding Ring Quilt - circa 1940 - a choice scrap quilt featuring repetitive fabric choices -- probably a combo of the scrap bag and some larger "store bought yardage " of fabrics.

#2 Crazy Quilt - circa 1930 - a multigenerational family quilt with random cotton scraps.

#3 Victorian Wildlife Crazy Quilt - this amazing work of art made its way from PA. to Fulton, Illinois to the Quad Cities - this quilt is unique as each square contains a definite center design such as a lion, flower, etc (a picture of this quilt can be seen on the Iowa-Illinois Quilt Study Group's QHL web page - click on first meeting)

#4 Pink and Tan Embroidered Strip Quilt - circa 1930 or 1940 - this quilt has a whisker/chin/beard guard and is from Miles, Iowa. The edges of the quilt are blanket-stitched and the overall pattern of this strip quilt is unique -- a lively discussion ensued whether this quilt was foreign made, a rare quilt kit, or an original design. (a picture of this quilt can bee seen on the Iowa-Illinois Quilt Study Group's QHL web page - click on second meeting)

If you do click on this quilt would you share if you have ever seen this pattern before and your thoughts about it's origin?

#5 Tulip Basket Quilt - circa 1950's - This is a red and green family quilt.

#6. Indigo and Muslin - 9- patch quilt - circa 19th century quilt top finished with 20th century quilting in the 1950's.

#7 Cross Quilt - circa 1870 - double pink with Paisley backing from York County in beautiful condition.

#8 Snowball Quilt - Bright yellow scrap quilt form southeast Iowa/northern Missouri quilted around 1950, but the tope was probably pieced earlier.

#9 Crown of Thorns Quilt - circa 1996 - this was an opportunity quilt from California. The backing of the quilt featured a sailing boat and signatures.

#10 Scrap quilt sampler - 19th century fabrics mixed with 1940 fabrics -- it appeared someone got the blocks and then added a border to them at a later date -- it was quilted by a church group in the 20th century.

#11 Double Pink Quilt with green backing - circa 1870 - a Canadian quilt

#12 Flying Geese Crib quilt - circa 1835-1840 - this amazing quilt was done in the miniature flying geese pattern and separated by single strips - an amazing study of 1835-1840 fabric - a gorgeous mixture of fabrics.

#13 Snowball Quilt - circa early 20th century - a family quilt from Jackson County, Iowa - heavier fabric and a whisker guard - another lively discussion took place over the possibility that this quilt might have another quilt hidden in it's batting.

#15 Embroidered Flower Quilt - Ruby Short McKim - Flower Newspaper Series - Circa 1920 or 30's. Pastel or mint green sashing with white blocks embroidered in the center with a flower pattern from Ruby's newspaper series.

#16 9 Patch Quilt with dust ruffle - circa middle 20th century - a family wedding quilt - a bright yellow dust ruffle with brown piping separating the main body of the quilt from the dust ruffle giving this wonderful 9-patch a unique -- almost bedspread-like look.

Pictures were taken of each of the quilts and they are developed already -- would be glad to scan and send any of the pictures of the quilts (privately or to a board) as the quilts are much prettier and more detailed than I have described them. Bravo to Julie Silber for the wonderful program and to the Mississippi Valley Quilter's Guild for hosting her here in the Midwest. As stated earlier Quilt #3 and #4 can be seen on the following the IIQSG webpage

http://www.quilthistory.com/study/IAIL.htm

Also, thanks to everyone from the list who e-mailed me privately about the possible date of my petticoat from my June posting to QHL. I appreciate your help.

Sue in Illinois

 

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Subject: T'was just a matter of time....... From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net Date: Sat, 10 Jul 2004 11:29:28 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Good morning:

Just now, I was browsing through some ebay listings and found this one called "antique quilt from the underground railroad", #6106970525. Looks like a "Turkey Tracks" quilt to me.

Now, I suppose I'll have to go on a search to find out when these were first made. I should know this already, as I own an antique quilt of this type, but it is always good to check the dates that others have assigned to quilt patterns. The wording and description of this quilt are /very/ interesting. What do you think?

Pat

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Subject: Colorful posters promote quilt blocks as message carriers on the Underground Railroad From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net Date: Sat, 10 Jul 2004 11:52:43 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Hi again!

Wow! Today is my day to revisit the topic of the Underground Railroad and quilts.

The posters I requested two days ago arrived via first class mail today. Any self-respecting quilt historian should ask for one of these, if only to keep on hand as proof of the involvement of the U.S. government in promoting what many of us have come to believe is a myth.

Perhaps these, too, will be "collectible" someday, especially since only 7,000 were issued. You will be amazed to see this poster.

If you have lost the contact information, it is conveniently posted for you at the end of my article in the "Historical Articles" section of my website. The article itself is entitled, "Symbolism in Quilts and the Underground Railroad: African Textile Traditions".

Pat Cummings www.quiltersmuse.com

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Subject: Re: Colorful posters promote quilt blocks as message carriers on the Underground Railroad From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrowpatmedia.net Date: Sat, 10 Jul 2004 12:33:49 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

When I requested my UGRR poster I got a message asking if I only wanted one!! I wrote back and said I'd take 20 and give them to my quilt study group.

My mail comes at 4PM today, so maybe my posters will be there.

Perhaps if each of us requested 10 - 20?

Judy Ringo judygrowpatmedia.net

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Subject: Re: UGRR Poster From: "Peggy O'Connor" <mnocbrinet.com Date: Sat, 10 Jul 2004 14:44:09 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

Hopefully all the demand from QHL members for the UGRR poster won't make the service think that they should print more of these! I liked Susan Seater's letter requesting the poster, because she made it clear why she wanted it. Thanks, Susan. Peggy in NC

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Subject: Colorful posters promote quilt blocks as message carriers on the Underground Railroad From: Joan Kiplinger 

Judy and other poster requesters -- it's been in the news [or am I behind the times] today that Oprah has donated $1 million toward UGRR museum to be built along Ohio River -- don't know where. Wonder if there will be literature housed there on coded quilts. This may be another task for myth dispellers to find out and contact museum owners.

J. G. Row wrote:

When I requested my UGRR poster I got a message asking if I only wanted one!! I wrote back and said I'd take 20 and give them to my quilt study group.  My mail comes at 4PM today, so maybe my posters will be there.  Perhaps if each of us requested 10 - 20?     

 

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Subject: re: new museum for UGRR From: Patricia L Cummings

Dear Joan:

There is a museum opening in August in Cincinnati. Is this the same one, do you think?

Center for the Study of the Underground Railroad. Will open in the summer of 2004. http://www.freedomcenter.org/

Pat Cummings

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Subject: Oprah's donation From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net Date: Sat, 10 Jul 2004 15:20:41 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

Sure enough!

http://www.enquirer.com/editions/2004/07/09/loc_artbrf.09.html

Pat

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Subject: : new museum for UGRR From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com Date: Sat, 10 Jul 2004 15:23:20 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

Pat -- that would have to be it; can't see the coincidence of two new museums on the riverfront. :-D

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Subject: Off Topic: But Barely From: Gail Ingram <gingramtcainternet.com Date: Sat, 10 Jul 2004 16:11:41 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

Mizrus Teddy Pruett and I spoke today and in consequence of all the UGRR posts, had an idea.

Let's face it: it's been a long time since the Civil War. The world has changed. New needs have arisen. Let's move on.

And here's one need we were thinking about---an Underground Railroad for Middle-Aged (we're planning to live to be 120?) Women who have served their time, done their duties, reared their children, taken their pets to the vets regularly, put balanced meals on the table only to have children beg for BurgerKings and their husbands inquire into the ingredients IN that casserole. Women whose 33-year-old daughters still complain, "But you didn't love me as much as you loved Brunhilde" or "I'll never forget that time you swatted my derriere royale in the grocery store." Or who find themselves changing both their parents' and their grandchildren's diapers at the same time.

All of you know what we mean---people who need to ESCAPE but who have Onstar on their vehicles or whose bankers would ask questions if they withdrew the family's life savings in one lump sum or whose grown children would hire detectives to hunt them down and bring home the cash and jewelry. Or some whose automobiles simly won't make it past the next town down the interstate.

Now this is a contemporary need to which all the UGRR information floating around could be put to use. And, at the same time, tested. We know, for instance, that our mugshots might appear on 2% milk cartons and McDonald bags, but would anyone notice a quilt draped over the front mailbox on a rural route or flown from surburban front-porch flagpole? And would families be clever enough to join together and fling quilts across azalea bushes to entrap the hopeful escapee? What about quiltshops: would the growing piles of laundry make the seekers stake out the likely haunts of such women? Maybe we could use all these posters members are ordering, instead of quilts. Much to consider here.

Admittedly many questions remain to be answered, but it's time someone gave some serioous thought to them. If there's a CIA retiree on the list, she should come forward. Or just anyone with a brain cell or two left and one or two critical thinking skills.

Teddy gets first ride. Others must line up behind her.

From North Louisiana, where the peaches and peas are in, Gail Ingram

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Subject: Re: Colorful posters promote quilt blocks as message carriers

The museum is in Cincinnati, and is already open, I think. Expect deeper historical thought and less "myth" from this museum; Cincinnati was the eventual home of Levi Coffin of UGRR fame, where he operated a "free trade" mercantile. He earlier lived in Fountaintown, Indiana, and was a prime mover in the Anti-slavery Friends, a splinter group of the Indiana Yearly Meeting. The Anti-slavery Friends went beyond simple abolitionist views, and refused to buy or sell products made with slave labor. The split between the ASF and the abolitionist Friends, who were simply for the abolition of slavery, was not healed for many years after the end of the War Between the States.

Xenia

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Subject: Off Topic: But Barely From: Jennifer Hill <jennifer.hillshaw.ca Date: Sat, 10 Jul 2004 22:39:40 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1

Let's face it: it's been a long time since the Civil War. The world has changed. New needs have arisen. Let's move on.

And here's one need we were thinking about---an Underground Railroad for Middle-Aged (we're planning to live to be 120?) Women who have served their time, done their duties.........

Everyone is welcome to head on up to my place. I'm in the same country as one terminus of the original UGR, only about 2000 miles west of it (but the road is paved all the way). I have a few vintage quilts, lots of contemporary ones, and plenty of vintage and antique sewing machines for all of us to play with.

Jennifer Hill Calgary, AB

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Subject: Turkey Tracks From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net Date: Sun, 11 Jul 2004 04:39:43 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Good morning!

I really like the "Turkey Tracks" pattern! The quilt I have has double pink fabrics on a white background. Its pristine condition makes me believe that it is of late 19th century vintage. Hand quilted, it is a bed size quilt.

In looking at Blockbase, I can see that the first published name which referred to the pattern as "Turkey Tracks" was that of Nancy Cabot in the 1930s. I have not had time to look further. My first reaction is that the quilt mentioned on eBay yesterday is not from the era stated in the description, although the very tattered condition of the quilt itself does make one wonder about its true age. I see that it did not sell.

When I have time, I'll look for other sources to help date the particular quilt I own, which I bought not knowing its provenance or anything whatsoever about it. Do you ever collect a quilt just because you love it and can't NOT bring it home with you? That was the case here.

Speaking of turkeys, on our recent trek up the road to Vermont, there were no less than five different groups of turkeys, visible in various fields, as well as one deer. Seems every time we go out we see many wild animals lately, including the bear sighting this spring. The habitat for wildlife is being encroached upon and the animals don't know where to go anymore. The new housing industry is booming right now here.

Have a terrific day!

Pat Cummings

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Subject: Re: Turkey Tracks From: "Laurette Carroll" <rl.carrollverizon.net Date: Sun, 11 Jul 2004 07:19:15 -0700 X-Message-Number: 3

Hello, Pat, Barbara Brackman wrote an article (I have found very useful) for the 1983 volume of Uncoverings, titled "A Chronological Index to Pieced Patterns 1775-1825. In this article she shows the early date of 1800 for a Turkey Tracks quilt like this. I took a look at the ebay quilt and it looks to be at least 2nd quarter 19 C. (could be earlier but can't tell from the photos.) Also I can't tell if it's pieced or appliquéd, :-( Please note the quilting patterns, they are very interesting, especially that of the large feather wreaths. The "feathers" are separated, each feather outlined on it's own, unlike the usual feather wreaths, and I have only seen this on the earlier quilts. Anyone else care to comment on the quilting patterns.?? Laurette Carroll Southern California

Look to the Future With Hope

  In looking at Blockbase, I can see that the first published name which  referred to the pattern as "Turkey Tracks" was that of Nancy Cabot in  the 1930s. I have not had time to look further. My first reaction is  that the quilt mentioned on eBay yesterday is not from the era stated in  the description, although the very tattered condition of the quilt  itself does make one wonder about its true age.

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Subject: Re: Turkey Tracks From: Jo Horsey <jhorseymail.newnanutilities.org Date: Sun, 11 Jul 2004 10:31:03 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

 Do you ever collect a quilt just because you love it and can't NOT bring  it home with you?

Dear Pat, do we ever NOT? <LOL I feel certain there are many kindred spirits on this list, that's why I enjoy it so much! Jo, in Newnan

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Subject: UGRR museum From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com Date: Sun, 11 Jul 2004 10:46:14 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

--------------070006030901030905060703 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Xenia -- thanx for this information. I guess I am a dollar short and a day late on this information but the news made it sound like a "just-happened" event. Wonder if there will be a poster? Will anyone from this list or quilter's group be contacting musuem's staff if there are displays about quilts being touted as factual?

Xenia Cord wrote:

The museum is in Cincinnati, and is already open, I think. Expect deeper historical thought and less "myth" from this museum; Cincinnati was the eventual home of Levi Coffin of UGRR fame, where he operated a "free trade" mercantile. He earlier lived in Fountaintown, Indiana, and was a prime mover in the Anti-slavery Friends, a splinter group of the Indiana Yearly Meeting. The Anti-slavery Friends went beyond simple abolitionist views, and refused to buy or sell products made with slave labor. The split between the ASF and the abolitionist Friends, who were simply for the abolition of slavery, was not healed for many years after the end of the War Between the States.    

--------------070006030901030905060703--

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Subject: UGRR for M-A From: "Edith L. Taylor" <etaylorku.edu Date: Sun, 11 Jul 2004 09:55:21 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

--=====================_3334504==.ALT Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"; format=flowed

Oh, Gail, thank you for this wonderful laugh!

Edie Taylor ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Subject: Off Topic: But Barely From: Gail Ingram <gingramtcainternet.com Date: Sat, 10 Jul 2004 16:11:41 -0500  Mizrus Teddy Pruett and I spoke today and in consequence of all the UGRR posts, had an idea.  Let's face it: it's been a long time since the Civil War. The world has changed. New needs have arisen. Let's move on.  And here's one need we were thinking about---an Underground Railroad for Middle-Aged (we're planning to live to be 120?) Women who have served their time, done their duties, reared their children, taken their pets to the vets regularly, put balanced meals on the table only to have children beg for BurgerKings and their husbands inquire into the ingredients IN that casserole. Women whose 33-year-old daughters still complain, "But you didn't love me as much as you loved Brunhilde" or "I'll never forget that time you swatted my derriere royale in the grocery store." Or who find themselves changing both their parents' and their grandchildren's diapers at the same time. etc.  From North Louisiana, where the peaches and peas are in, Gail Ingram ----------------------------------------------------------------------

--=====================_3334504==.ALT--

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Subject: Re: Turkey Tracks From: "Laura Syler" <texas_quilt.coairmail.net Date: Sun, 11 Jul 2004 09:59:34 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

Hi Pat, According to my research for my Myths and Superstitions lecture, this pattern was originally called Wandering Foot, (Brackman 3100 and variations through 3109) but during the 30's, at the instance of a reader (who owned a turkey farm) the name changed. The reader made the pattern for her son, and sent it in to Ruth Finley and told her that she was changing the name to forgo the superstition about her son sleeping under the Wandering Foot pattern......It appeared under Ruth Finley's pen name under both titles at various times.

Laura Hobby Syler Richardson, Texas

----- Original Message ----- From: "Patricia L Cummings" <quiltersmusecomcast.net To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com Sent: Sunday, July 11, 2004 3:39 AM Subject: [qhl] Turkey Tracks

 Good morning!   I really like the "Turkey Tracks" pattern! The quilt I have has double  pink fabrics on a white background. Its pristine condition makes me  believe that it is of late 19th century vintage. Hand quilted, it is a  bed size quilt.   In looking at Blockbase, I can see that the first published name which  referred to the pattern as "Turkey Tracks" was that of Nancy Cabot in  the 1930s. I have not had time to look further. My first reaction is  that the quilt mentioned on eBay yesterday is not from the era stated in  the description, although the very tattered condition of the quilt  itself does make one wonder about its true age. I see that it did not sell.   When I have time, I'll look for other sources to help date the  particular quilt I own, which I bought not knowing its provenance or  anything whatsoever about it. Do you ever collect a quilt just because  you love it and can't NOT bring it home with you? That was the case here.   Speaking of turkeys, on our recent trek up the road to Vermont, there  were no less than five different groups of turkeys, visible in various  fields, as well as one deer. Seems every time we go out we see many wild  animals lately, including the bear sighting this spring. The habitat for  wildlife is being encroached upon and the animals don't know where to go  anymore. The new housing industry is booming right now here.   Have a terrific day!   Pat Cummings    --- 

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Subject: What a gang! From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net Date: Sun, 11 Jul 2004 11:14:51 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

Thanks for all the great information, Xenia, Laurette, Laura, and Joan, and for other comments from Jo, Gail, and Judy. We can always count on those southern gals, Gail and Teddy to "keep us in stitches". You "guys" are the best.

Pat in hot, humid NH

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Subject: Re: the serenity of acceptance...... From: Midnitelaptopaol.com Date: Sun, 11 Jul 2004 13:40:07 EDT X-Message-Number: 9

regarding the ugrr quilt legend/myth... first i felt like hans brinker putting my thumb in the hole in the dike.. but it wasn't long before i knew i would need 10 thumbs....or more thumbs than i could ever generate or collect.. it's sort of like being born under a horoscope sign....there are people that truly believe that the skies,on the date of your birth, were a major influence on who you are... it didn't matter whether you and genghis kahn were born on the same day... you were both destined to have the same personality traits.....i wonder if someone who was born on that same day knew that before he became a monk ?... we have come to accept myths and legends for facts since apple picking time... we will never stop the underground locomotive now... it's too late... there's large groups of the slave descendants that want to believe...they were in charge of their own destiny...that there were little bands of slaves walking along roads, in the daytime, looking for clotheslines and fences with coded quilts..or better yet walking along in the nighttime, with lanterns looking for clotheslines and fences with coded quilts.... might as well give it up quilters... as for me i no longer wish to refute anyone's need to cling to a myth/legend/fairy tale... i have to finish making my folk art santas for this year's holiday bazaar... jeanL PS and no matter what ...i'm keeping my little st christopher statue, on my shopping cart handle...

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Subject: Fwd: amish show redone From: Marilyn Woodin <woodinkctc.net Date: Sun, 11 Jul 2004 13:06:01 -0500 X-Message-Number: 10

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Here are some pictures--although not as clear as I would like--to show the wonderful quality of Midwestern Amish quilts hanging in the Kalona Quilt and Textile Museum inside the Kalona Historical Village in Kalona Iowa. If you would like more information call 3196563232--the museum or me 3196562555. It is a wonderful show of 3 collections from private collectors. Marilyn Woodin curator.

Begin forwarded message:

 From: mary v zielinski <mvzkctc.net  Date: July 11, 2004 11:49:18 AM EST  To: woodinkctc.net  Subject: amish show redone  

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Here are some pictures--although not as clear as I would like--to show the wonderful quality of Midwestern Amish quilts hanging in the Kalona Quilt and Textile Museum inside the Kalona Historical Village in Kalona Iowa. If you would like more information call 3196563232--the museum or me 3196562555. It is a wonderful show of 3 collections from private collectors. Marilyn Woodin curator.

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Subject: Fwd: amish show redone From: Marilyn Woodin <woodinkctc.net Date: Sun, 11 Jul 2004 13:08:42 -0500 X-Message-Number: 11

Here are some pictures--although not as clear as I would like--to show the wonderful quality of Midwestern Amish quilts hanging in the Kalona Quilt and Textile Museum inside the Kalona Historical Village in Kalona Iowa. If you would like more information call 3196563232--the museum or me 3196562555. It is a wonderful show of 3 collections from private collectors. Marilyn Woodin curator.

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Subject: Fwd: Fwd: amish show redone From: Marilyn Woodin <woodinkctc.net Date: Sun, 11 Jul 2004 13:16:51 -0500 X-Message-Number: 12

--Apple-Mail-19--406538432 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; format=flowed

Begin forwarded message:

 From: Marilyn Woodin <woodinkctc.net  Date: July 11, 2004 1:06:01 PM EST  To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com  Subject: [qhl] Fwd: amish show redone  Reply-To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com   Here are some pictures--although not as clear as I would like--to show  the wonderful quality of Midwestern Amish quilts hanging in the Kalona  Quilt and Textile Museum inside the Kalona Historical Village in  Kalona Iowa. If you would like more information call 3196563232--the  museum or me 3196562555. It is a wonderful show of 3 collections from  private collectors. Marilyn Woodin curator.   Begin forwarded message:   From: mary v zielinski <mvzkctc.net  Date: July 11, 2004 11:49:18 AM EST  To: woodinkctc.net  Subject: amish show redone    --- 

Here are some pictures--although not as clear as I would like--to show the wonderful quality of Midwestern Amish quilts hanging in the Kalona Quilt and Textile Museum inside the Kalona Historical Village in Kalona Iowa. If you would like more information call 3196563232--the museum or me 3196562555. It is a wonderful show of 3 collections from private collectors. Marilyn Woodin curator.

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Subject: Re: the serenity of acceptance...... From: Gail Ingram <gingramtcainternet.com Date: Sun, 11 Jul 2004 13:50:50 -0500 X-Message-Number: 13

  we will never stop the underground locomotive now...  it's too late...

I respectfully decline to believe this. I have been surprised at the progress already made within last few months. No good museum wants it disclosed that the Mondrian hanging on the first floor is a fake. I don't think any good museum wants to perpetuate a lie, especially one that, in my view, speaks ill, not positively, of a culture.

I give you Winnie Churchill in his "Blood, Sweat, & Tears" speech:

"You ask, what is our aim? I can answer in one word. It is victory. Victory at all costs - Victory in spite of all terrors - Victory, however long and hard the road may be... "Come then, let us go forward together with our united strength."

 there's large groups of the slave descendants that want to believe...they  were in charge of their own destiny...that there were little bands of slaves  walking along roads, in the daytime, looking for clotheslines and fences with  coded quilts..or better yet walking along in the nighttime, with lanterns  looking  for clotheslines and fences with coded quilts....  might as well give it up quilters...  as

Again, respectfully, I feel the need to differ. These descendants of slaves want to know the truth, I suspect, just as the descendants of their masters wanted to know the truth about George Washington. Myths like Parson Weems' cherry tree myth captured succinctly the character of the man, but I know of no one who was disappointed to learn it was an illustrative story invented by a biographer, without documentation. Indeed, folks took some glee in learning that. Young boys being what they are, that little cherry tree speech seemed a little over the top and weak to suit the man who held 13 states together in a union. Today, when they are taught about him at all, childen are being taught how remarkable W's achievements really were.

In fact, it might be a good thing to have the whole UGRR very public. Then letters to the editors and the boards of directors and grant and funding agencies become more meaningful, more likely to get attention.

Oprah doesn't strike me as a dummy. She doesn't want to be associated with error, sentimental or otherwise. After all, she took on Texans, something nobody has done in 160 years. And unlike the last person who tried it, a man, she won.

Good historians must have a lot of persistence.

Gail

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Subject: In agreement From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net Date: Sun, 11 Jul 2004 15:25:38 -0400 X-Message-Number: 14

Dear Gail:

Amen to that!

"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed people can change the world - indeed, it is the only thing that ever has". - Margaret Mead

Pat

"You ask, what is our aim? I can answer in one word. It is victory. Victory at all costs - Victory in spite of all terrors - Victory, however long and hard the road may be... "Come then, let us go forward together with our united strength."

Good historians must have a lot of persistence.

Gail

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Subject: Re: Off Topic: But Barely From: "Marcia Kaylakie" <marciarkearthlink.net Date: Sun, 11 Jul 2004 17:29:19 -0500 X-Message-Number: 15

Gail, May I ride along with Teddy? Marcia, who has just come back from clearing out her in-laws home that hadn't been touched in 50 years of living there, and we , Bill and I, did it in 2 days by ourselves! Noted BIL and his wife couldn't be obothered to come over and help, jsut arrived late on day 2 and pointed to the things they wanted 'added to their pile"! Can you see the steam coming out of my ears yet? Sorry, needed to vent. I can make it quilt related by saying that I saw my mother's first quilt top as well (as age 78!) Marcia ----- Original Message ----- From: "Gail Ingram" <gingramtcainternet.com To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com Sent: Saturday, July 10, 2004 4:11 PM Subject: [qhl] Off Topic: But Barely

 Mizrus Teddy Pruett and I spoke today and in consequence of all the UGRR  posts, had an idea.   Let's face it: it's been a long time since the Civil War. The world has  changed. New needs have arisen. Let's move on.   And here's one need we were thinking about---an Underground Railroad for  Middle-Aged (we're planning to live to be 120?) Women who have served their  time, done their duties, reared their children, taken their pets to the vets  regularly, put balanced meals on the table only to have children beg for  BurgerKings and their husbands inquire into the ingredients IN that  casserole. Women whose 33-year-old daughters still complain, "But you didn't  love me as much as you loved Brunhilde" or "I'll never forget that time you  swatted my derriere royale in the grocery store." Or who find themselves  changing both their parents' and their grandchildren's diapers at the same  time.   All of you know what we mean---people who need to ESCAPE but who have Onstar  on their vehicles or whose bankers would ask questions if they withdrew the  family's life savings in one lump sum or whose grown children would hire  detectives to hunt them down and bring home the cash and jewelry. Or some  whose automobiles simly won't make it past the next town down the  interstate.   Now this is a contemporary need to which all the UGRR information floating  around could be put to use. And, at the same time, tested. We know, for  instance, that our mugshots might appear on 2% milk cartons and McDonald  bags, but would anyone notice a quilt draped over the front mailbox on a  rural route or flown from surburban front-porch flagpole? And would  families be clever enough to join together and fling quilts across azalea  bushes to entrap the hopeful escapee? What about quiltshops: would the  growing piles of laundry make the seekers stake out the likely haunts of  such women? Maybe we could use all these posters members are ordering,  instead of quilts. Much to consider here.   Admittedly many questions remain to be answered, but it's time someone gave  some serioous thought to them. If there's a CIA retiree on the list, she  should come forward. Or just anyone with a brain cell or two left and one or  two critical thinking skills.   Teddy gets first ride. Others must line up behind her.   From North Louisiana, where the peaches and peas are in,  Gail Ingram    --- 

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Subject: NZ & AU From: Palamporeaol.com Date: Sun, 11 Jul 2004 20:04:06 EDT X-Message-Number: 16

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Since I have just completed over 3 weeks worth of QHL posting I felt that I MUST write to all of you. First of all, what a treasure of smart and fun women (& a few men). Due to this treasure my trip to NZ & AU was made extra special. Traveling with a husband and 3 teenagers (13, 17, & 19) made it a bit difficult to do extensive quilt touching, however due to the help from members on the list I managed to go into about 6 quilt/fabric shops and buy a pretty ridiculous amount of fabric hailing from the 2 countries. I also saw 1 US antique quilt that was from the 1880's labeled 20th Century in NZ. (It was $500NZ.) The best part was meeting members of our list and being extended a most gracious and wonderful hand of hospitality by them. Elizabeth in NZ sent me a great list of shops in NZ which I used. 

When I arrived in Cairns I was welcomed by Peter Leate of the Craft Center with a book about his lovely city waiting in our hotel room. He then chauffeured me to he and his wife, Frances, wonderful chocked full store. They have EVERYTHING in the way of quilting fabrics, paints, and craft supplies. The following evening my family and I joined the 2 of them at a local pub for dinner and had a wonderful time. Hiranya Loder had become my penpal early into our trip plans. What a great help she was, even down to helping with a hotel and a rental car when I got into a bind. When we got to Sydney she joined us for an afternoon of touring. The following day she and her family welcomed our family into her lovely home for dinner. She has as much STUFF as I do. What a kindred spirit. We shared fabrics, hugs, laughter, and wonderful food. Fortunately our families meshed well, so they left us alone so we could "play" endlessly in her fabric stash, and touch all of her fabulous antique quilts. We had a marvelous trip, and the most lasting memories will certainly be of my encounters with quilt folks from QHL. Thanks Kris for bringing us all together. 

After reading all of those posts within a 2 day period it is certain that we must get a Southeast Quilt Study Group going. I too suffered through similar alter calls as a child. That is a major reason I am now a Presbyterian. And I too wore a garter belt. I even did the girdle thing with garters as a teen. What torture! I once bought a quilt that had absolutely NO BATTING, but it weighed in at 11 pounds. It was full of curtains, newspapers (Had WWII ration ads in them.), an orange sack, long johns, a slip, and a girdle with garters attached. One day I need to drag all of that stuff out and take a picture of it. I took the quilt apart and put it all away in a suitcase. It was a very fun $20 experience. Great birth control.....once the couple was in bed under that quilt..... they couldn't move!!!! It's good to be home. Now to dream up quilts to make with my wonderful new fabrics. Off to do more laundry, Lynn Lancaster Gorges, New Bern, NC

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Subject: Re: Turkey Tracks From: Babette Moorleghen

 Do you ever collect a quilt just because you love it and can't NOT bring  it home with you?

Dear Pat, I think most all of the quilts I have collected have come to me because I felt I had to "rescue" them or because they called my name out and I just HAD to have it! While I would love to know the Who, When and Where of the quilts I have I will probably never have that information. As I study, however, I am learning to be able to "date". Now to work on recognizing a region the quilt may have come from! Oh, soooo much to learn and, I fear, so little time! Hugs, Babette in hot, humid Southern Illinois

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Subject: Certified! From: Jennifer Perkins <qltrstoreharlannet.com Date: Sun, 11 Jul 2004 23:29:27 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Just wanted to let you know that I have just received my certification as an NQA judge! I am so excited! Please keep me in mind for judging opportunities in your part of the country! Jennifer

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Subject: Marilyn Woodin posts From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrowpatmedia.net Date: Mon, 12 Jul 2004 01:31:00 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

There are 3 posts in my e-mail from QHL/Marilyn Woodin and two of them have attachments. The last does not. They arived in my mailbox at 2:12, 2:16, and 2:18 this afternoon. I thought that QHl didn't allow attachments to go through, so I have been reluctant to open the attachments. My virus protection software was even updated tonight (Trend Micro updates several times a day) and didn't detect a virus, but I am wondering about the attachment. I'm not going to open it until Kris or someone in the know tells me it is OK.

Below is the last post -- the one without attachment: The text is the same in all three messages. -----------------------------------------------------

Begin forwarded message:

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Subject: Re: the serenity of acceptance...... From: "quiltstuff" <quiltstuffoptusnet.com.au Date: Mon, 12 Jul 2004 17:20:32 +1000 X-Message-Number: 3

I had to laugh how you started this post. My husband is Dutch and when he came to Australia, he couldn't work out why people kept talking about the little boy who stuck his finger in the dyke.. They don't tell that story in Holland at all but over here we seem to think it is a historical story. And Hans Brinker is another Dutch boy from a story who wanted to win silver skates .

Your start point is a classic example of how something repeated enough times begins to seem like a fact. VBG

Suzy Atkins

----- Original Message ----- From: <Midnitelaptopaol.com To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com Sent: Monday, 12 July 2004 3:40 AM Subject: [qhl] Re: the serenity of acceptance......

 regarding the ugrr quilt legend/myth...  first i felt like hans brinker putting my thumb in the hole in the dike..  but it wasn't long before i knew i would need 10 thumbs....or more thumbs  than i could ever generate or collect..

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Subject: RE: netting From: Margareta.Faustcec.eu.int Date: Mon, 12 Jul 2004 12:34:16 +0200 X-Message-Number: 4

Hello all, I've been trying my hand at netting this weekend. There are some = appliqu=E9 chintz pieces on the quilt that needed protection. So far I have only = pinned the net to the pieces. I suppose I should stitch them down following = the edge of the original fabric? What do I do with a fairly large piece? Is = it OK to stitch it down following the quilting (straight lines)? (I hope = you see what I mean). Thankful for your advice, Margareta

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Subject: Oprah & the UGRR From: Jackie Joy <joysbeesyahoo.com Date: Mon, 12 Jul 2004 10:12:47 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 5

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Gail wrote: "Oprah doesn't strike me as a dummy. She doesn't want to be associated with error, sentimental or otherwise."

Has anyone contacted the producers of Oprah's show to see if she would be interested in doing one on the Myths of the UGRR?

Jackie Joy

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Subject: Re: Certified! From: "Barbara Obaker" <bobakerzoominternet.net Date: Wed, 11 Aug 2004 12:52:01 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

What does one have to do to become certified as an NQA judge? Barb

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Subject: Re: Crazy Quilt tune From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrowpatmedia.net Date: Wed, 14 Jul 2004 02:00:21 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

OH MY GOSH!

I can just hear Teddy and Xenia serenading us at AQSG with this ditty. Karen Alexander will make it a trio, perhaps with Dawn Heefner making a quartet. But, it is about how to do the Crazy Quilt dance, obviously, so you need to do something about getting your shimmy skirts ready and putting those taps on your shoes.

Definitely one of Harry Warren's less memorable ditties, but of course you gals will make it special.

Judy Ringo judygrowpatmedia.net

 http://www.harrywarren.org/songs/0079.htm

-----------------------------------------------------------------------   Subject: Judging  From: Jennifer Perkins <qltrstoreharlannet.com  Date: Mon, 12 Jul 2004 23:36:23 -0500  X-Message-Number: 1   To answer the question about how one becomes a  certified judge you could  look at the NQA website under "Programs" and then  "Judging".  http://www.nqaquilts.org/ It is a long process so  be sure you really want  to do it before undertaking it! The best way to  start is to take the  judging course taught at the NQA show. It is  excellent, even if you just  want to find out how to make your own quilts better.  Let me know if you  have more questions after looking at the website!  Jennifer in western Iowa, close to the Omaha, NE  airport!    ----------------------------------------------------------------------   Subject: New underground railroad!  From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net  Date: Tue, 13 Jul 2004 08:58:43 -0400  X-Message-Number: 2   Gail, loved your post regarding the "new" need for  an underground railroad -  show me where to go! I'm thinking of quilt block  possibilities as I write  this!  How 'bout the Burger King or McDonald's log with one  of those "X" type of  sings through it? I can envision the diaper  changing of grandchildren and  grandparent's block as well, really intricate!  Thanks for making my laugh a bit about my current  lot in life.... I seldom  post to this digest, but I am learning from you all!  I bit of frivolity is  so nice and I just had to make a remark!  Linda in NH whose teenage children buy pizzas,  having them delivered to the  house when she slaves over a healthy dinner that  gets thrown out. : (    ----------------------------------------------------------------------   Subject: Re: certified!  From: RBCochranaol.com  Date: Tue, 13 Jul 2004 11:56:51 EDT  X-Message-Number: 3    --part1_d7.f239740.2e256043_boundary  Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"  Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 7/13/2004 12:17:32 AM Eastern  Daylight Time,  qhllyris.quiltropolis.com writes:    Subject: Certified!   From: Jennifer Perkins <qltrstoreharlannet.com   Date: Sun, 11 Jul 2004 23:29:27 -0500   X-Message-Number: 1     Just wanted to let you know that I have just  received my certification as   an NQA judge! I am so excited! Please keep me in  mind for judging   opportunities in your part of the country!   Jennifer     Congratulations, Jennifer! I know this took a lot of  time and hard work. Good  for you!  --Rachel    --part1_d7.f239740.2e256043_boundary--    ----------------------------------------------------------------------   Subject: Re: certified!  From: "PatchworkGirl"  <emeraldcitygirlbellsouth.net  Date: Tue, 13 Jul 2004 12:27:50 -0500  X-Message-Number: 4   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=_NextPart_000_049E_01C468D4.CFE47D70  Content-Type: text/plain;  charset="iso-8859-1"  Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   Congratulations....what a great feeling!  Celebrate and treat yourself to something special.  Best Wishes,  DianeL  ------=_NextPart_000_049E_01C468D4.CFE47D70--    ----------------------------------------------------------------------   Subject: Any NQA or AQS Certified teachers or  quilters in....  From: "PatchworkGirl"  <emeraldcitygirlbellsouth.net  Date: Tue, 13 Jul 2004 12:41:49 -0500  X-Message-Number: 5   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=_NextPart_000_04E2_01C468D6.C424C290  Content-Type: text/plain;  charset="iso-8859-1"  Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   I want to say I have really enjoyed reading the  posts on this list. Very =  interesting information!   I have been sewing since age nine and made my first  full size quilt at =  age 17, so let's just say I am half a century young.  I love collecting =  and making quilts.  I am wondering if there are any AQS or NQS certified  teachers anywhere =  close to my area. I would love to be an  'Apprentice" :)   Anyone in the North MS, West Al, South TN, or East  AR areas?   I am located in northwest MS, but would be willing  to drive a little to =  learn more quilt history and about dating fabrics  and quilts.   Enjoy the hunt for unexpected treasures,  DianeL    ------=_NextPart_000_04E2_01C468D6.C424C290--    ----------------------------------------------------------------------   Subject: Re: Any NQA or AQS Certified teachers or  quilters in....  From: Gail Ingram <gingramtcainternet.com  Date: Tue, 13 Jul 2004 13:01:45 -0500  X-Message-Number: 6   Diane,   Do you know about the Deep South Quilt Study Group?  We organized last  winter and plan to have 2 meetings a year. We have  several teachers in the  group and some folks with fine collections. You will  learn about dating  fabrics. We have two members in Huntsville area. Was  hard to rope in the  Mississippians! But we had two. Bunch of Texans, 5  Arkansans, rest from LA.   I live in Ruston, LA. Where do you live--Columbus  area?   Gail Ingram   P.S. To learn about our first meeting go to  www.quilthistory.com/study/    From: "PatchworkGirl"  <emeraldcitygirlbellsouth.net   Reply-To: "Quilt History List"  <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com   Date: Tue, 13 Jul 2004 12:41:49 -0500   To: "Quilt History List"  <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com   Subject: [qhl] Any NQA or AQS Certified teachers  or quilters in....     I want to say I have really enjoyed reading the  posts on this list. Very   interesting information!     I have been sewing since age nine and made my  first full size quilt at age 17,   so let's just say I am half a century young. I  love collecting and making   quilts.   I am wondering if there are any AQS or NQS  certified teachers anywhere close   to my area. I would love to be an 'Apprentice" :)     Anyone in the North MS, West Al, South TN, or  East AR areas?     I am located in northwest MS, but would be willing  to drive a little to learn   more quilt history and about dating fabrics and  quilts.     Enjoy the hunt for unexpected treasures,   DianeL        

----------------------------------------------------------------------   Subject: Re: Any NQA or AQS Certified teachers or  quilters in....  From: "PatchworkGirl"  <emeraldcitygirlbellsouth.net  Date: Tue, 13 Jul 2004 15:24:29 -0500  X-Message-Number: 7   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.     ------=_NextPart_000_0138_01C468ED.7D65FBF0  Content-Type: text/plain;  charset="iso-8859-1"  Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   Hello Gail,  Thank you for the information about the Quilt Study  Group.  Yes, I am in Caledonia, just north of Columbus. I  lived in Bastrop, LA =  in the past and in Mansfield, LA.   Ok, now I am going to the website.  Diane  ------=_NextPart_000_0138_01C468ED.7D65FBF0--    ----------------------------------------------------------------------   Subject: Re: Mississippi  From: Rissa Peace Root <rissapeaceyahoo.com  Date: Tue, 13 Jul 2004 14:04:43 -0700 (PDT)  X-Message-Number: 8   --- PatchworkGirl <emeraldcitygirlbellsouth.net  wrote:   Anyone in the North MS, West Al, South TN, or  East   AR areas?     I am located in northwest MS, but would be willing   to drive a little to learn more quilt history and   about dating fabrics and quilts.   Well, I am in Jackson. :-) I generally travel for  classes and conferences, but if I hear of any good  workshops, I'll let you know. Anita Shackleford was  here just a few months ago, but I missed it. :-/   Rissa Peace Root  http://www.prettyimpressivestuff.com    ----------------------------------------------------------------------   Subject: RE: Fwd: amish show redone  From: "Ilene Brown" <ilene3earthlink.net  Date: Tue, 13 Jul 2004 20:23:53 -0400  X-Message-Number: 9   Did anyone else get photo files? I only got three  emails with note pad  text.  Ilene     [Original Message]   From: Marilyn Woodin <woodinkctc.net   To: Quilt History List  <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com   Date: 7/11/2004 2:12:52 PM   Subject: [qhl] Fwd: amish show redone     Here are some pictures--although not as clear as I  would like--to show   the wonderful quality of Midwestern Amish quilts  hanging in the Kalona   Quilt and Textile Museum inside the Kalona  Historical Village in Kalona   Iowa. If you would like more information call  3196563232--the museum   or me 3196562555. It is a wonderful show of 3  collections from private   collectors. Marilyn Woodin curator.     Begin forwarded message:      From: mary v zielinski <mvzkctc.net    Date: July 11, 2004 11:49:18 AM EST    To: woodinkctc.net    Subject: amish show redone          ----------------------------------------------------------------------   Subject: Vermont Highlights  From: "Pam Weeks Worthen" <pamworthenhotmail.com  Date: Tue, 13 Jul 2004 21:37:06 -0400  X-Message-Number: 10   Dear QHL friends:   The Vermont Quilt Festival was wonderful fun this  year, and a great learning  experience. Highlights were Julie and Mary Silber,  and their collections of  Maverick and Indigo quilts, respectively. Julie gave  a lecture on indigo on  Friday night, introducing her mom, Mary, who  celebrated her 90th birthday at  the Festival.   I have to say that although the indigo quilts were  elegant and plentiful,  the Maveric collection was my favorite. From the  funky use of wool in crazy  and applique quilts to the wondeful "combo" blocks  that combined elements  from two or more patchwork patterns in the same  quilt, to things that looked  like mistakes but just couldnt' have been. Most were  eye-popping in use of  color or screw-ball design, and I spent lots of time  studying fabrics and  color placement.   The antique quilt vendors seemed better than ever,  (I have no affiliation  with any of the following) from Cindy Rennels to  Julie Silber to Sandy  Crudgington's booth where Judy Roche was assisting  and everyone else I'm too  tired to think of tonight. It was great fun to see  Cinda nosing around the  ReproductionFabrics.com booth and to meet owner  Margo face to face and  explain why my credit card never seems to work on  the first try.....?   The ABC Quilts booth was busier than ever on Friday  and Saturday, and we  made about 60 quilts and some great contacts in AIDS  education in Vermont.  We were right across the aisle from the NE Quilt  Museum table where we saw  friends from Mass. and the American Quilt Study  Group booth was womaned by  Dawn Hefner and Kathy Metelica who signed up several  new members.   Well, I guess this sounds a little bit too much like  a quilt gossip column  for the local small town paper. Sorry, but the  people are as much fun as the  quilts! I had a grand time, and look forward to next  year.   I miss the place so much that on tonight's walk, I  dragged the dog up the 76  steps behind the UNH library, hoping there were more  steps than from the  lowest elevation exhibit at VQF to my dorm, but, no  chance! Double that, and  you might be close!   If you like new and old quilts and aerobic exercise  in between exhibits,  don't miss next years VQF!   Pam in NH where tonight's monsoon should keep me  from watering for a day or  two.   _________________________________________________________________  Get tips for maintaining your PC, notebook  accessories and reviews in  Technology 101.  http://special.msn.com/tech/technology101.armx    ----------------------------------------------------------------------   Subject: Crazy Quilt  From: Barbara Woodford <haqgalenalink.net  Date: Tue, 13 Jul 2004 20:43:32 -0500  X-Message-Number: 11   Hey, hey,   A friend was writing up a thing about quilts for an  exhibit and found  this.  http://www.harrywarren.org/songs/0079.htm  Barb Woodford   ---------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: ? for the Deep South Quilt Study From: "Nancy Roberts" <aquilteralltel.net Date: Wed, 14 Jul 2004 09:27:14 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

I've noticed very attractive buildings in a lot of small communities around Central Florida with signs indicating they are the Woman's Club. I think it's Woman's rather than Women's, but in an internet search, I found it both ways. Anyhow, the buildings are architecturally appealing. I see on the web that most are part of a larger organization known as the General Federation of Women's (or Woman's?) Clubs and that they have various "Departments" which reflect efforts in areas like education, arts, home life, conservation. They've been in existence in FL since the late 1800s. And they are present in other states as well. My questions for members of the Deep South Quilt Study is this: Do you know of a connection between these clubs and quilt history? Are any historic quilts attributed to the efforts of the organization? Do you know the story behind their charming buildings? I wondered if the buildings might have been constructed as part of the CCC efforts of the Depression era. Every time we spot one of these centers in communites like Alachua, Palatka, Trenton, and others, my curiosity is piqued. Southern connection, can you shed light? Thanks. Nancy Roberts

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Subject: Re: ? for the Deep South Quilt Study From: Gail Ingram <gingramtcainternet.com Date: Wed, 14 Jul 2004 09:57:26 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Nancy,

Goggling (e.g.,http://rotaryhistoryfellowship.org/women/issues-early/womensclubs.htm) suggests that their early purposes seemed to be less domestic than quilting groups. They were part of the general movement of upper-middle-class women to elevate the living conditions of women and childen and the communities in which they lived. I found it interesting to note at Rotary site (above) that 'men's clubs later took up their causes.'

The architecture is a different thing. Look on the cornerstones of these buildings to see if you can find construction dates, architect in order to research.

Or ask state architectural boards.

They appear to have been established first in more affluent areas and to have been rather like the Junior League, but perhaps more bookish and political.

My own experience suggests that such clubs would have been unlikely to have had quilting departments for members themselves. Church and neighborhoods seemed to be the source of most quilting groups in this region. Can't say in general.

Why don't you contac national headquarters? Would be interesting to know.

Gail Ingram

 From: "Nancy Roberts" <aquilteralltel.net  Reply-To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com  Date: Wed, 14 Jul 2004 09:27:14 -0400  To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com  Subject: [qhl] ? for the Deep South Quilt Study   I've noticed very attractive buildings in a lot of small communities around  Central Florida with signs indicating they are the Woman's Club. I think  it's Woman's rather than Women's, but in an internet search, I found it both  ways. Anyhow, the buildings are architecturally appealing. I see on the web  that most are part of a larger organization known as the General Federation  of Women's (or Woman's?) Clubs and that they have various "Departments"  which reflect efforts in areas like education, arts, home life,  conservation. They've been in existence in FL since the late 1800s. And they  are present in other states as well. My questions for members of the Deep  South Quilt Study is this: Do you know of a connection between these clubs  and quilt history? Are any historic quilts attributed to the efforts of the  organization? Do you know the story behind their charming buildings? I  wondered if the buildings might have been constructed as part of the CCC  efforts of the Depression era. Every time we spot one of these centers in  communites like Alachua, Palatka, Trenton, and others, my curiosity is  piqued. Southern connection, can you shed light? Thanks. Nancy

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Subject: embroidery/quilting From: Gail Ingram <gingramtcainternet.com Date: Wed, 14 Jul 2004 12:49:21 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

For those of you who, like me are also captivated by the embroidery arts in their many forms, may I suggest a peek at the www page of our new (?) formerly quiet member, Rissa Peace Root=AD=AD=AD=AD=AD www.prettyimpressivestuff.com?

It includes some terrific ideas that might easily translate into more conventional quilting and especially lift crazy quilting to another level.

Gail

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: July 13, 2004 From: DDBSTUFFaol.com Date: Wed, 14 Jul 2004 14:00:59 EDT X-Message-Number: 5

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I'd love to see those Iowa Amish Quilt pictures. I have written directly to Marilyn Woodin to post them on the eboard but have not heard anything in return. If anyone got them, would they kindly post them on the eboard? Lots of us would appreciate it I'm sure...

Darwin

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Subject: RE: Off Topic: But Barely From: "John and Veronica Richmond" <johnandveronicasympatico.ca Date: Wed, 14 Jul 2004 14:09:45 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Though I actually live in a terminus of the original UGR (Oakville, on Lake Ontario just west of Toronto), I think I'll have to head to Calgary to Jennifer's place. It's the sewing machines I want to play with! I would dearly love my grandmother's treadle or my mom's Singer (must have been a roughly 1950 model in a cabinet) but they're long gone. ..so I'll do the next best thing and go into hiding in the Rockies!

Veronica

-----Original Message----- From: Jennifer Hill [mailto:jennifer.hillshaw.ca] Sent: Sunday, July 11, 2004 12:40 AM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] Off Topic: But Barely

Let's face it: it's been a long time since the Civil War. The world has changed. New needs have arisen. Let's move on.

And here's one need we were thinking about---an Underground Railroad for Middle-Aged (we're planning to live to be 120?) Women who have served their time, done their duties.........

Everyone is welcome to head on up to my place. I'm in the same country as one terminus of the original UGR, only about 2000 miles west of it (but the road is paved all the way). I have a few vintage quilts, lots of contemporary ones, and plenty of vintage and antique sewing machines for all of us to play with.

Jennifer Hill Calgary, AB

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Subject: Appraisers list From: "Cindy Brick" <brickworksatt.net Date: Wed, 14 Jul 2004 12:19:21 -0600 X-Message-Number: 7

Dear Diane... I smiled to myself when I saw 'patchworkgirl' as your moniker -- I just got an old copy of Frank Baum's (I mean YOUR) book, and the color copy is wonderful! You can answer your question about AQS-certified appraiser easily by visiting http://www.quiltappraiser.org This is the website of the PAAQT appraiser organization, which you currently have to be AQS-certified to join. The PAAQTers are listed by state, along with their contact info, and it's easy to find one in your neck of the woods.

YAY for Jennifer getting certified as a judge! When I got certified as an appraiser, my bratty little brother (now in his forties) announced that he knew all along that I was "certifiable..."

Cindy Brick

BRICKWORKS www.cindybrick.com

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: July 13, 2004 From: Marilyn Woodin <woodinkctc.net Date: Wed, 14 Jul 2004 13:24:00 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

My apologies on the Amish pictures and the 3 messages that came through. I do not know why the pictures did not come through. Not being totally computer literate I did what I thought I should and it evidently did not work.

Our Media person at the Kalona Historical Village had forwarded the pictures to me and me on to you.

I am sorry Darwin and just as soon as we get the problem worked out we will post to eboard. We are also doing a catalog of the pictures that should be completed the end of the month. If anyone is interested please contact me at woodinkctc.net. Again I am sorry as it is a wonderful show. Marilyn Woodin On Jul 14, 2004, at 1:00 PM, DDBSTUFFaol.com wrote:

 I'd love to see those Iowa Amish Quilt pictures. I have written  directly to  Marilyn Woodin to post them on the eboard but have not heard anything  in  return. If anyone got them, would they kindly post them on the  eboard? Lots of us  would appreciate it I'm sure...   Darwin   

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Subject: Re: embroidery/quilting From: Rissa Peace Root <listsprettyimpressivestuff.com Date: Wed, 14 Jul 2004 12:36:58 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 9

I've been on the list under a different email name for well over a year, but I switched everything over about a month ago. :-) Thanks for the kind words...

Rissa Peace Root http://www.prettyimpressivestuff.com

--- Gail Ingram <gingramtcainternet.com wrote:  For those of you who, like me are also captivated by  the embroidery arts in  their many forms, may I suggest a peek at the www  page of our new (?)  formerly quiet member, Rissa Peace Root­­­­­  www.prettyimpressivestuff.com?

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Subject: Re: ?FL. WOMANS CLUBS for the Deep South Quilt Study From: AG32040aol.com Date: Wed, 14 Jul 2004 18:05:39 EDT X-Message-Number: 10

Nancy, You can contact the FL. FEDERATION of Womans Clubs . I belong to the Womans Club of Coconut Grove which was founded in 1891 as the Housekeepers Club.These were pioneer women and the clubs archives are very complete . We are cataloging them now. They did meet to do good deeds for the community , and for educational purposes. We have not found any quilting refereces yet. A my Goodhart

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Subject: Newspaper article From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net Date: Wed, 14 Jul 2004 19:34:23 -0400 X-Message-Number: 11

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Good Afternoon -

I'm wandering around the internet looking for information about some local quilt guilds and found this quote on the website of the Love Apple Quilters of New Jersey. I found it interesting.......

Quote from the Zanesville Daily Courier, Zanesville Ohio, November 8, 1877.

"Another silly Ohio woman has just completed a quilt containing five thousand pieces. A woman that would spend her time over such worthless nonsense, when there is so much useful and beautiful work to be done in the world, ought to be ashamed of herself."

Barb in rainy southeastern PA

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Subject: Re: Newspaper article From: Gail Ingram <gingramtcainternet.com Date: Wed, 14 Jul 2004 19:32:23 -0500 X-Message-Number: 12

Oh Barb, thank you for posting this. I was feeling sort of "down," but this perks me up. Imagine reading that---afterpiecing 5,000 pieces!

Did you happen to check the obits to see if the writer was listed among them?

Gail

 From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net  Reply-To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com  Date: Wed, 14 Jul 2004 19:34:23 -0400  To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com  Subject: [qhl] Newspaper article   Good Afternoon -   I'm wandering around the internet looking for information about some  local quilt guilds and found this quote on the website of the Love Apple  Quilters of New Jersey. I found it interesting.......   Quote from the Zanesville Daily Courier, Zanesville Ohio,  November 8, 1877.   "Another silly Ohio woman has just completed a quilt containing five  thousand pieces. A woman that would spend her time over such worthless  nonsense, when there is so much useful and beautiful work to be done in  the world, ought to be ashamed of herself."   Barb in rainy southeastern PA    --- 

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Subject: RE: Newspaper article From: "John and Veronica Richmond" <johnandveronicasympatico.ca Date: Wed, 14 Jul 2004 21:03:36 -0400 X-Message-Number: 13

Obits? Look for my name in the next couple of years. I'm doing Dear Jane right now and am up to over 2800 pieces, and I haven't counted my sashing - nor am I anywhere near done!!

Veronica Richmond Oakville, Ontario, Canada My Virtual Design Wall, Quilt stuff and John's handcrafted Santas and sculptures: http://richmondandco.tripod.com/ My Dear Jane & QD blocks: http://community.webshots.com/user/johnandveronica

- Quote from the Zanesville Daily Courier, Zanesville Ohio, November 8, 1877.

"Another silly Ohio woman has just completed a quilt containing five thousand pieces. A woman that would spend her time over such worthless nonsense, when there is so much useful and beautiful work to be done in the world, ought to be ashamed of herself."

Barb in rainy southeastern PA

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Subject: RE: Newspaper article From: Ivory22986aol.com Date: Wed, 14 Jul 2004 21:13:12 EDT X-Message-Number: 14

LOL I wish I had this quilt!! Ivory

Quote from the Zanesville Daily Courier, Zanesville Ohio, November 8, 1877.

"Another silly Ohio woman has just completed a quilt containing five thousand pieces. A woman that would spend her time over such worthless nonsense, when there is so much useful and beautiful work to be done in the world, ought to be ashamed of herself."

Barb in rainy southeastern PA

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Subject: Re: Playing the Garters in Church From: "Louise"

Greetings, I was checking out my Ladies Art Company catalog today - it was pouring rain and it seemed like the thing to do - and I had to laugh. Pattern number 123 is the Village Church and the very next one, 124 is called the Tangled Garter. TOO FUNNY! Having a good chuckle in upstate NY, Louise

tangledgarter.jpg (13285 bytes)

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Subject: Re: Playing the Garters in Church From: Gail Ingram

Louise, are these quilt patterns? Could you post the Tangled Garter one?

Gail

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Subject: UGGR in mainstream magazine From: "Kristina Strom" <KristinaStromcelestialperspectives.com> Date: Thu, 15 Jul 2004 01:18:18 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Kudos to Patricia Cunningham for her article in the September 2004 issue of The Quilter. When I saw the cover tease (UGGR quilts--fact or fiction?) I actually resigned myself to the thought that the article might be about defending the myth, given all the hoopla these days, but it wasn't!

Rather, the piece is elegant, sensitive, and based (finally) in historicity.

Kristina www.romancingthequilt.com

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Subject: Re: Playing the Garters in Church From: "Louise" <ltiemannstny.rr.com> Date: Thu, 15 Jul 2004 02:32:43 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

Gail, yes these are quilt patterns from a 1928 Ladies Art Company catalog. I just scanned the patterns from the page, but I am new to this list and haven't a clue on how to post them. I can e-mail the image to you if you would like and maybe you could post? Let me know. Best regards, Louise >

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Subject: Re: Are we THAT old??? From: Anne Copeland

I may have misinterpreted a recent discussion on another list about JoAnn's and reproduction feedsack, but at any rate, I came to think that JoAnn's was now carrying reproduction Feedsack, so my neighbor and I beat a path to their door today. We looked and looked and could find nothing, so we asked several salesgirls. Now the response was so funny I just had to share it. One girl suggested we look in the floral department and another suggested we try the upholstery (at least she had the idea it was fabric) department. When my friend told the first one that feedsack was yardgoods, boy, the mouths really hung open wide. Goodness, are we really that old? How can a whole generation grow up and not even know what yardgoods or feedsack is? I bet they don't know what an ice cream man, milkman, bread man or rag man is either! Boy, what is this world coming to? Now those of us who are interested in quilt history surely need to get out there and provide education for the rest of the world. Sure makes me aware of my age. Peace and blessings, Annie

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Subject: Re: Playing the Garters in Church From: Judy Kelius <

I looked up the patterns in Barbara Brackman's Blockbase and posted them at http://home.ptd.net/~judysue/qhl/churchgarters.htm. The Tangled Garter pattern is wonderful when set side by side!

Gail, I think you should make a quilt combining the two!

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Subject: Re: Playing the Garters in Church From: Gail Ingram <gingramtcainternet.com> Date: Thu, 15 Jul 2004 07:31:42 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

What a seredipidous find---Pepper's church pew and the garters right next to each other. Surely if there is a God, He guided Louise to Brackman and these.

Not, of course, that our Pepper would ever tangle her garters!

Gail

 

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Subject: Re: Appraisers list From: "PatchworkGirl"

Hi Cindy, How wonderful to find one of the older books by Baum. Is it 1914? Yes, = I am a Wiz/Oz fan and always will let that part of the child stay alive = inside. I have looked through the AQS list and may take the AQS course when it = is offered again. I will search out that http://www.quiltappraiser.org = site, also. Thank you for the information. Happy Wishes,=20 DianeL

" I smiled to myself when I saw 'patchworkgirl' as your moniker -- I = just got an old copy of Frank Baum's (I mean YOUR) book, and the color copy = is wonderful!"Cindy Brick

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Subject: Re: Mississippi From: "PatchworkGirl"

Rissa,=20 I appreciate your reply. Jackson is a couple of hours from me..and a = wonderful drive down the Natchez Trace. Lots of history on the Trace. = I always enjoy to stop by the little quilt shop at French Camp.

Your work is so wonderful. I visited your website and enjoyed seeing = all the needle arts. Best Wishes, DianeL

"Well, I am in Jackson. :-) I generally travel for classes and conferences, but if I hear of any good workshops, I'll let you know. Anita Shackleford was here just a few months ago, but I missed it. :-/=20

Rissa Peace Root"

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Subject: RE: Newspaper article From: "Candace Perry"

Barb, this is funny -- you know we have that postage stamp top that has 11,000 pieces -- and the last group that was here went crazy for it! Little did these writers know what might appeal to 21st century sensibilities... Candace Perry Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center

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Subject: Re: for the Deep South Quilt Study (Rotary Club funny) From:

Gail, I can remember my mom being invited to join the Ladies Rotary Club when = we lived in LA back in the 60's. My mom had a large upholstery shop and = worked with fabrics and furniture. =20 The membership lady came to the shop just as my mom was cleaning out her = pillow stuffing machine and ...well...mom did not look so good <G>. =20 I remember the lady asked mom to come to the meetings and to join them, = and then she added, "I know you will enjoy a bit of time in the beauty = shop before the meeting." hahaha....how tactful was that? When the lady = left mom and I looked at each other and laughed so much! But my mom did = join and although she was not making quilts, she was using quilting = techniques in some of the furniture covers she made. Still smiling about this... DianeL

<http://rotaryhistoryfellowship.org/women/issues-early/womensclubs.htm) suggests that their early purposes seemed to be less domestic than = quilting groups. They were part of the general movement of upper-middle-class = women to elevate the living conditions of women and childen and the = communities in which they lived. I found it interesting to note at Rotary site (above) = that 'men's clubs later took up their causes.'>

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Subject: Are we THAT old??? From: Joan Kiplinger 

Anne -- the feedsack discussion only made reference to feedsacks being lesser quality fabrics like Joanne's carries, not that they currently have this cloth in stock. And yes, there are oldsters like me, city born and bred, who never heard of a feedsack until 6 years ago and was delighted to discover this fascinating field. :-D It's amazing the "depth" of field many sales associates have, especially in fabric stores. I am forever reminded of an incident some time ago in a fabric store when I asked a helper where the wool section was; with the most startled eyes she asked me what wool was. I walked away speechless and found it on my own. :-(

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Subject: UGGR in mainstream--errata From: "Kristina Strom"

Argh....a reminder to never send email past midnight!

When I sent the following, of course I meant Cummings, not Cunningham. I'm hoping everyone knew who I was talking about.

Is my face red, K.

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Subject: RE: Are we THAT old??? From: "quilt25" <quilt25swbell.net> Date: Thu, 15 Jul 2004 09:24:25 -0500 X-Message-Number: 14

Our JoAnn's here in North Texas is currently selling feedsack reproduction fabric, $3.00 a yard. I cannot remember what it was called, Granny's feedsacks or something like that. Several familiar looking pieces.

Peg

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Subject: feedsacks From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> 

Peg -- thanx for mentioning this. Is this very recent addition. Last time I looked about several weeks ago, there wasn't any. Not all stores carry the same lines as the chain is going into regional stocking like so many other home improvement and retail stores.

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Subject: re: UGRR article in mainstream magazine From: Patricia L Cummings

Kristina wrote:

When I sent the following, of course I meant Cummings, not Cunningham. I'm hoping everyone knew who I was talking about.

Dear Kristina:

I knew who you were talking about (very big grin) and I really appreciate your having read the article and for saying nice things about it. With both a Cunningham (Joe) and a Cummings (Pat) on this list, it is no wonder that you mistyped the author's name. No harm done!

Your website in progress looks most promising. Thanks for sharing the url.

Best of luck with all of your activities and thanks again for your very kind words about the latest article in The Quilter..

Pat Cummings www.quiltersmuse.com

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Subject: RE: Newspaper article From: "Marcia Kaylakie"

Well, speaking of pieces! I have a postage stamp quilt top from the 1920s from Texas (of course!) that has 8,871 pieces! Just a joy of look at! Marcia ]

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Subject: RE: feedsacks From: "quilt25" <quilt25swbell.net> Date: Thu, 15 Jul 2004 10:05:54 -0500 X-Message-Number: 18

Re. JoAnn's feedsack fabric, I bought several different prints this past Monday.

Peg in North Texas

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Subject: feedsacks From: Joan Kiplinger 

Will have to check this out later today or tomorrow. Quilt section, correct??. Wonder if prints are per originals and on osnaburg or medium-grade muslin.

quilt25 wrote:

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Subject: TX quilt exhibit From: Crm793aol.com Date: Thu, 15 Jul 2004 12:14:49 EDT X-Message-Number: 20

Hi All,

I just found out about a quilt exhibit curated by Laura Syler in Plano, Texas. We went yesterday and it is wonderful, about 50 quilts. Some of Laura's and some from the private collection of local quilt dealer Mary Ann Walters and others. If you are in the Dallas area it is a must see. Location: downtown Plano at the Plano ArtCentre. See their web site for more info, but hurry, it ends July 24.

Carolyn

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Subject: Re: Are we THAT old??? From: Judy Schwender

I used to buy fabrics mostly in 1/6 yds because I find 6 inch widths more useful than the 4 1/2" of eighth yards. At one store the sales girl wouldn't sell me 1/6 yd. She said she'd sell me 1/8. I tried to explain that 1/6 yd was more fabric than 1/8, but she didn't believe it. I ended up with a quarter yard. And didn't go back.

It's amazing the "depth" of field many sales associates have, especially in fabric stores. I am forever reminded of an incident some time ago in a fabric store when I asked a helper where the wool section was; with the most startled eyes she asked me what wool was. I walked away speechless and found it on my own. :-(

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Subject: RE: feedsacks From: "quilt25" <quilt25swbell.net> Date: Thu, 15 Jul 2004 13:37:30 -0500 X-Message-Number: 22

The feedsack fabric in my JoAnns was not in the quilting section, but in the section, right up front, where they place special buys, etc. Some A couple were osnaburg, most a low weight muslin. Hope they have them in your store.

Peg North Texas

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Subject: Re: TX quilt exhibit From: "Laura Syler" <texas_quilt.coairmail.net> Date: Thu, 15 Jul 2004 20:13:45 -0500 X-Message-Number: 23

Carolyn,

Thanks for the kind words! " Sewing Up History" was curated in conjunction with the Art Centre of Plano's "Jump Start for Arts" summer program for kids 7-15. It was a lot of fun pulling this exhibit together. Unfortunately, the Centre has had a turn over of staff and the PR fell through the cracks. The first articles appeared in the Plano paper on Friday, the Dallas Morning News Tuesday and again today.....But they tell me that they have had a lot of traffic since the exhibit opened on June 11. I have on loan quilts from Mary Ann Walters (her private collection...the really REALLY spectacular ones) Karen Erlandson, and some from my own collection. Also featured are 3 current quilt makers, Barbara Oliver Hartman, Pat Campbell and Heather Costen - who is a brand new quiltmaker, and won several blue ribbons for her machine pieced and machine quilted Mariners Compass quilt at the Dallas show this March. And by another mishap...the exhibit will not come down until Friday the 30th <G> There are a few quilts on the Centre's web site, and Mary Ann's husband Jim has put some photos of the exhibit on their's as well. www.quiltsquilts.com

Laura Hobby Syler Richardson, Texas

 

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: July 15, 2004 - feedsack repros From: Anne Copeland <anneappraiser1juno.com> Date: Thu, 15 Jul 2004 23:28:04 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

Hmmm, some people have reported that they found the repro feedsack and others have reported that it is just cheap loose fabric (gee, that sounds kind of funny). Anyway, I am going back to comb both the local stores. I couldn't find it online, but I did get an e-mail from a nice lady at Quilts and Other Comforts and they carry the feedsack repro that feels like the real thing. She is going to send me some samples. I hope it is what I am looking for. Anyway, it is good to know some source.

Peace and blessings, Annie

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Subject: feedsack repros From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Fri, 16 Jul 2004 06:35:58 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

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Annie -- From the repros I have seen in the past two decades, the similarity is in the print or design, not the weave structure and low-strain cotton used in original feedsack production, and in what is often called homespun, often nothing more than high-count muslin or osnaburg. As feedsacks were made in a wide variety of coarse to fine cloths, the descriptions will vary according to the feedsacks which persons are describing and their comparisons to repros. Please keep in mind that the repros you find being sold today will depend on each manufacturer's choice of cloth so you will get a variety of descriptions and comparisons. Hope this is more helpful than confusing.

Anne Copeland wrote:

>Hmmm, some people have reported that they found the repro feedsack and >others have reported that it is just cheap loose fabric (gee, that sounds >kind of funny). Anyway, I am going back to comb both the local stores. >I couldn't find it online, but I did get an e-mail from a nice lady at >Quilts and Other Comforts and they carry the feedsack repro that feels >like the real thing. She is going to send me some samples. I hope it is >what I am looking for. Anyway, it is good to know some source. > > >

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Subject: feedsacks at joannes From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Fri, 16 Jul 2004 10:05:18 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

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Annie and others -- just returned from Joanne's which anymore is an excursion into the unknown and which requires direction signs. Apparently the feedsack repros vary from store to store, according to the sales associate. Ours, which is a flagship store as it is located 40 miles from headquarters, had no such display. Several weeks ago there was a special grouping of repro fabrics on sale featuring mostly Revolutionary War prints and calicoes on high-quality muslin with soft finish to give a silky feel. These bolts have been put back in their original shelves but marked with an R to show they are repro. It's possible some of the calicoes might have been fodder for feedsacks but were not designated as such either on bolt label or by store. I saw no osnaburgs nor homespuns in that selection, only in the home decor section and those were the traditional designs, not necessarily feedsack-type prints. But then again, many feedsack prints were adapted from the same prints on regular dress fabrics so the defining line can be quite thin. Some of you in checking out your Joannes might encounter a similar situation so if you see bolts marked with an R you will know what they represent. Annie -- let us know what you find.

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Subject: Abstract Design in American Quilts -- Special Purchase Opportunity From: Patricia C Crews <pcrewsunlnotes.unl.edu> Date: Fri, 16 Jul 2004 10:31:00 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

The University of Nebraska Press is offering Abstract Design in American Quilts by Jonathan Holstein at a special deeply discounted rate for a limited time only --$5.99 plus the costs of shipping and handling. The shipping fee in the US, for the first book is $5, each additional book is $.50. International shipping is $8 for the first and $1 for each additional book. If someone places a volume order--which they welcome--the NU Press charges actual freight costs, depending on what is more advantageous for the buyer.

The NU Press invites persons to place an order on their website, www.nebraskapress.unl.edu, to call 800-755-1105 or fax 800-526-2617. The offer ends October 1.

Please share this information with anyone you think may be interested. Thanks.

Patricia Cox Crews, Cather Professor of Textiles & Director, International Quilt Study Center

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Subject: RE: feedsacks From: "Laurette Carroll" <rl.carrollverizon.net> Date: Fri, 16 Jul 2004 09:49:28 -0700 X-Message-Number: 5

Would anyone who purchased the "feedsack" fabrics, please check the selvage for whoever the manufacturer is and tell us? thanks! Laurette

> The feedsack fabric in my JoAnns was not in the quilting section, but in the > section, right up front, where they place special buys, etc. Some A couple > were osnaburg, most a low weight muslin. Hope they have them in your store.

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Subject: feedsack i.d. From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> Date: Fri, 16 Jul 2004 12:58:02 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

The selvedge says Granny's Feedsack, circa 1943, exclusively for JoAnn Stores, copyright (c with circle) Springs.

This is the feedsack I bought about six months ago and which was a whole line with all kinds of colorways and patterns. They had even published two books with patterns on suggested uses in quilts. I bought a bunch, just because I liked it. Also bought the books. Somehow, the idea that all this was done to commemorate a 60th anniv. of JoAnn's sticks in my mind.

Pat

Would anyone who purchased the "feedsack" fabrics, please check the selvage for whoever the manufacturer is and tell us? thanks! Laurette

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Subject: Re: feedsack i.d. From: "Julia D. Zgliniec" <rzglini1san.rr.com> Date: Fri, 16 Jul 2004 10:42:54 -0700 X-Message-Number: 7

Good Morning All, Regarding Feedsack Reproductions:

In the fall of 1996 I ordered a 3" sample pack of a line called Polly's Feedsack Prints from Patchworks in Bozeman, MT.

I did not write down the manufacturer of the line - at least I cannot find it in my notebooks. The line was VERY authentic looking in terms of the weave of the cloth and the style and color of the prints. I remember thinking at the time that I was glad I had them in the files because if I encountered them used in a quilt as a repair, I might miss them.

Perhaps someone else on our list has collected them as well and knows who the manufacturer was.

Repros have been around for years and years.

Regards, Julia Zgliniec

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Subject: feedsack i.d. From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Fri, 16 Jul 2004 13:46:58 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

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Pat -- thanx for this feedback on feedsacks. Definitely narrows the search on shelves now that I [and others] know what to look for.

Patricia L Cummings wrote:

> The selvedge says Granny's Feedsack, circa 1943, exclusively for JoAnn > Stores, copyright (c with circle) Springs. > >

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Subject: Centennial Fabrics From: "Susan Wildemuth" <ksandbcwgeneseo.net> Date: Fri, 16 Jul 2004 14:44:19 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

I recently purchased an older quilt top and the fabrics appear to be in the 1870-1890 range - a lot of variety of cadet blue, double pinks, and brown prints. One of the brown print fabrics has the word Centennial scattered on it in several places. Another of the brown print fabrics has miniature American Flags scattered about it. Each block utilizes the same quilt pattern, but each block has a different print with muslin as it's partner. The 6" pieced blocks are set together with the 6" cadet blue print fabric (some white in the design of the print) which gives the cadet blue blocks a "solid" look from a distance. My question is did they create fabric for the 1876 Centennial which actually had the word Centennial on it? Any help you can give me would be greatly appreciated. Thanks

Sue in Illinois

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Subject: Kansas City Star From: "Brenda & Roger Applegate" <rbappleg1comcast.net> Date: Fri, 16 Jul 2004 20:09:13 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

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I am looking for a Kansas City Star block either Blockade (1938) or A = Four Corner Puzzle (1943). I have been asked to teach a quilt from = Eleanor Burn's, Still Stripping after 25 years. I believe that her = rendition is from either of the Kansas City blocks according to = Brackman's encyclopedia. I thought there was something published a year = or so ago that had many of the Kansas City Star blocks reprinted.

The Reference guide suggested Groves Quilt Patterns and when I did a = search, I came up with nothing. Also Keepsake Quilting could not pull = up anything.

Any help would be appreciated.

Brenda Applegate

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Subject: Vermont etc. From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Fri, 16 Jul 2004 22:00:10 -0400 X-Message-Number: 11

Something strange happened last weekend in Vermont. It was cool. There are probably people out there who think that northern New England is a great escape from summer heat and humidity. If you believe that you've never been to the Vermont Quilt Festival at Norwich university in Northfield, VT. Norwich is a military school and part of their philosophy apparently is that comfort leads to serious dereliction of duty (or some other military failing). There is no airconditioning and the weekend of the quilt show usually brings temperature and humidity in the nineties. There have been times when people have keeled over from the heat. Once or twice it was bad enough to make even die hards like me and my friends leave early. But this year was perfect and we stayed until they threw us out at 5 p.m. Reports that I was skulking around the Reproductions Fabric booth were absolutely accurate. The new Dargate Indigoes are smashing. Margo Krayer had wonderful handouts to match her great fabric. I haven't put my purchases away yet. They are too beautuful--yards of the bird chintz. Any one of us would say that the highpoints of the show were the two antique quilt exhibits curated by Julie Silber. It was wonderful to participate in the gallery talk that Julie and her delightful mother Merry gave on the indigo quilts. Is there anyone who doesn't respond to a blue and white quilt? "Breathes there a man," etc? You just have to love them and to see more than thirty collected by a woman (Merry Silber) with a great eye is a rare treat. The second exhibit, Maverick Quilts, was every bit as much fun as Pam Worthen described. Those liberated creations reminded me of some of the free spirits on QHL. These quiltmakers marched to a different drummer. Life is way too short to worry about matching! The most breathtaking quilt I saw all weekend was on the way home at Herman Melville's house, Arrowhead, in western MA. It's a 32 point Mariners Compass in red, green and yellow (circa 1840) with fabulous stuffed motifs snaking between the compasses. The quilt has nothing to do with Melville; the house is the headquarters of the Berkshire Co. Hist. Soc. and it is in their collection so they put it on Herman's bed. Arrowhead is a great place to visit, many Melville items and the view is practically unchanged from his days there in the 1850s. Like Barb Garrett we stopped at Vassar to see the samplers. It was an outstanding exhibit of about thirty pieces from the college's collection--about half of them from the British Isles and a couple from Spain and Italy. Amazingly, there was a free catalogue (about 15 pages) with a small color picture of each sampler and an essay by the curator. It was a rare treat. The fun continued at my guild meeting on Wednesday. Phyllis Twigg was our speaker. She talked about appraisals and brought lots of great quilts to illustrate her points. She also told us how to go about estimating the value of what's in our quilt studios/sewing rooms. She got people's attention by asking how many of us had more than one sewing machine: almost everybody; an embarrassing number confessed to having more than five. Sometime soon I'm going to start weighing my fabric (4 ounces equals one yard). Cinda on the Eastern Shore where it looks like a perfect beach weekend

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Subject: Re: Vermont etc. From: Jccullencrewaol.com 

In a message dated 7/16/2004 9:57:57 PM Eastern Standard Time, lrcawleycomcast.net writes: They are too beautuful--yards of the bird chintz. Hi Cinda, I love bird prints and was wondering if you knew the web site of the supplier of the bird chintz that you bought. I'd love to include some birds in a quilt and work around them. TIA for any info you can provide. Sounds like you had a great time looking at quilts. I really wish I could go to some of these shows, but have a lot of trouble with heat and crowds. I'm hoping one day we can have a show in NJ I can get to. Thanks for your report. I enjoyed reading it. Best wishes. Carol Grace

 

 


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