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Quilters Find a way to care

Subject: Re: summer vacation From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Sat, 28 Aug 2004 22:25:20 -0600 X-Message-Number: 10

I noticed some differences between the one show in UK that I attended, and several here in the US. Of course the scope, direction, and mechanics of any show reflect the influence of the promoters or show organizers, so it may be unfair to suggest that the differences are national in origin. The differences I noticed involved the methods by which quilt winners are denoted, the sorts of equipment used to display quilts, the size and organization of the vendor booths, and food service. Delightfully, at the UK quilt show wine and beer were available with tea and sandwiches; I have never attended a show in the US where this was true!

In the US we are used to seeing ribbons, display signage, and occasionally special placement for winning quilts in different categories. At the UK show the choice was to recognize winners by placing a small square of gold, silver, or bronze paper behind the number for the winning quilts; no other designation was provided. The list of winners was posted only near the entry to the exhibit hall, and did not give the quilt numbers, only the names of the makers. Since the quilts were identified only by number on small cards placed by each quilt, with makers' names printed separately in a show program, correlation was difficult.

There was some complaint that the layout of the UK show was confusing; the creation of boxes or roomettes inside which quilts were displayed may have contributed to this; but also notable was the use of raw wood standards on which the quilts were displayed, rather than the less intrusive pipe and drape frequently used in US shows. Unusual to me was the practice of having very small demonstration booths in which teachers and other quilt notables could demonstrate and and sell for some of the days of the event, only to be replaced by others on other days of the show. And the vendor spaces seemed cramped to me, but perhaps only because of the crush of customers.

Certainly the shows in the US and UK are more alike than they are different, and quilters appear to be enthusiastically the same - the world over!

Xenia

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Subject: Re: summer vacation From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Sun, 29 Aug 2004 10:40:42 +0100 X-Message-Number: 1

I noticed some differences between the one show in UK that I attended, > and several here in the US. Of course the scope, direction, and > mechanics of any show reflect the influence of the promoters or show > organizers, so it may be unfair to suggest that the differences are > national in origin.

The UK is some years behind the US in the quilt revival and the growth of shows, and at the moment there is a power struggle going on. Some years ago we saw the growth in strength of a number of regional shows, independently run. Then along came a professional outfit who graduallybought out nearly all of them. Recently another professional outfit, seeing a market, instigated the big new show (Festival of Quilts) that Xenia refers to. This show is run in conjunction with our biggest quilters organisation, the Quilters Guild of the British Isles, and this was only its second year.

There is much of it that is successful and exciting to Brit quilters who have never had such a big event to attend. We are still getting used to the idea that there might even be a show which takes several days to see and requires us to stay over and be sociable <G> However, it does remain very much the vision of one man at the top, one man who has his own ideas of the corporate identity he is seeking. And that identity does not include Rosettes. (Nobody knows the source of his powerful antithesis to them, perhaps they never let him in the Pony Club when he was small <G>). His evident desire to run this as an Art event extends to the 'subtle' signage and 'interesting' layout. He's getting plenty of feedback, but it remains to be seen whether he will listen to it.

If you attend other shows in the country you will find different (more logical) layouts; more space for vendors (cost per square foot is an issue, and the Festival of Quilts is at one of our most expensive venues for traders); better labelling and signing; and Great Big Rosettes You Can See From The Other Side Of The Room <G>.

Happily there are new independent shows coming on stream, run by quilters for quilters. A good outcome would be that when we learn that its 'okay' for us to spend three days at the Festival of Quilts, we will become more willing to travel to and stay over at these regional shows, such as Quiltfest in Wales and an exciting new show which will be launched next year in Scotland.

You'll just have to come back and taste some more, Xenia <G>.

Sally W

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Subject: Dry Silica Jell Pack Source From: DDBSTUFFaol.com

I've been reading with interest the discussion about the silica gel.

Here is a link to Desiccare, a supplier: Click here: desiccant - Desiccare - silica gel - humidity indicating cards 

 

Darwin

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Subject: Iowa-Illinois Quilt Study Group Pictures - August 7, 2004 From: "Susan Wildemuth" <ksandbcwgeneseo.net> Date: Mon, 30 Aug 2004 12:38:04 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

The pictures from the August 7, 2004 meeting of the Iowa-Illinois Quilt Study Group held at the Kalona Quilt and Textile Museum in Kalona, Iowa are on our web-page. We had a wonderful turnout and got to see some amazing quilts. Enjoy!

Click on this site to view them: http://www.quilthistory.com/study/IAIL.htm

Thanks a million Kris for providing all the quilt study groups with a place to share our meeting pictures. We really appreciate it.

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Subject: more on copyrights From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Tue, 31 Aug 2004 10:48:25 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

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During the thread on copyrights I was finishing a fun quilt for my granddaughter [see fun quilts on eboard]. It was built around the Cranson VIP/Simplicity illustrations from its cut and sew doll dress panels. Reverse side of quilt contains the labels and selvage markings as part of quilt's provenance. The copyright discussion got me to thinking that if I wanted to sell this quilt publicly such as on Ebay, would there be any copyright infringements. I posed these questions to Cranston after explaining a hypothetical situation:

1. Would I be in copyright violation and could Cranston prevent me from selling quilt by my using its name and labels and making a profit? Would I be fined? 2. Selling quilt with the above mentioned Cranston labels sewn on back of quilt and stating this is made using Cranston VIP/Simplicity doll dress panels. 3. Same as above but without labels sewn on back but mentioning that the doll blocks are from Cranston? 4. Not being caught by Cranston in the above scenarios, I now become greedy and duplicate doll prints via one of the many photo processes, and sell with and without labels sewn on quilt backs but still mentioning the Cranston name.

Here is Cranston's reply:

"If you buy the fabric from us [i.e. the fabric itself is not a copyright violation], then any use you make of it would be okay. You can use the Cranston label or not as you choose. With or without a label is fine, though we enjoy the free publicity if you in effect advertise for us. "However, if you copy the fabric in anyway without permisson -- even if you credit Cranston -- that would be a copyright violation. It comes down to: you must use genuine Cranston fabric, not copied fabric, to avoid copyright infringement."

This particular type of copyright information is not directly connected to the previous thread on the subject, but it may be of interest to some who may encounter such a situation in the future.

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Subject: book From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Tue, 31 Aug 2004 12:36:53 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Amazon is showing a book called "Mary Schafer: American Quiltmaker" by Gwen Marston. How is this different from the book "Mary Schafer and Her Quilts" that Gwen wrote with Joe Cunningham in 1990? Given my proclivity for buying things I already have I thought I'd check. Thanks. Cinda on the Eastern Shore really tired of all these left-over hurricanes (I'll admit, I'll take the rain without the wind anyday)

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Subject: FVFs study group meeting From: Hazelmaccaol.com Date: Tue, 31 Aug 2004 15:31:09 EDT X-Message-Number: 3

ran's Vintage Friends

Fran's Vintage Friends Study Group met August 27th at the lovely home of Barbara Butler. For me it was an hour drive on interstate highway but then I was to turn off of old Route 40 onto a country road in Maryland. The views along this drive were breath taking! What a treat! What a contast!

Following a delicious luncheon, the table was made ready for our show and share time. Nancy Hahn had been antiqueing in Maine (sigh). She showed a piece of fabric with "Cameo Cotton" labels on it, but also there were printed labels and four pastel printed flour sacks with labels on each: "Centennial Crown Flour" with an address of Portland, Oregon with a zip code but also a bar code (more research is underway on these sacks). And then the Poster! It was a poster sponsored by NE/NA Civil Rights Committee & Civil Rights Eastern Region Multicultural Team with the heading "Women's Quilts and the Underground Railroad". But she also had this beautiful top with blocks of circa 1870s madder prints and each with signatures. On her shopping trip in Maine she also found patterns for dresses dated 1908, from Biddeford, Maine. They resembled skeletons. When describing to a friend I learned they are called "slopers". Assembled with little nuts and bolts they could be adjusted for different sizes. Talk about shopping - Barb Garrett and Judy Kelius stopped on the way to the meeting with Barb purchasing a neat top with fascinating collection of fabrics and Judy an interesting Triple Irish Chain quilt with a zigzag border. Barb's mother pleasantly surprised when she gave her a wholecloth quilt that had been made for her parents' wedding July 9, 1943. She as well had been given a bow-tie quilt in green and peach plaindyes that had been another wedding gift. Judy had a wonderful applique quilt with poinsettia and tree peonies in Turkey red and green with lovely quilting. The great part - on the bottom in the quilting was "Sarah, daughter of Alice Stoughteagle, April 1853". Judy searched on the Internet and found that the family was from Ohio.

Georgina Fries shared a recently made quilt designed from a picture in the Washington Post. Georgina makes up kits for each block for her sewers. Georgina puts the blocks together adding a border and sends it to her quilters. For more on Georgina, see Quilter's Newsletter Magazine, issue October 2004, "Coxcomb & Cactus". There is a pattern for the quilt that is pictured. Her recent purchase was what she titled "Sunbonnet Cow Girls". It was circa 1920/30s but these delightful ladies were so well outfitted - some with umbrellas, some with purses and all types of other embellishments. Not all thought the ladies to be cow girls. Then Phyllis Twigg pleased us with a circa 1850s cheater wholecloth quilt in tans and brown with a back in tan and green. The design of the cheater cloth was of four patches set with like-sized blocks of floral motifs. Judith McLean shared three quilts purchased in the area that had a great variety of fabrics for our study.

Susanne Cawley had recently found two wonderful sewing samplers. She then made us guess the date of her new find that was all folded - we could only see several pieced areas but upon it being unfolded, therein lay the surprise. It was a T-shaped quilt and on two sides and at the bottom of the T were gorgeous glaze chintz borders. Phyllis was the wise one and dated it to circa 1860. Our hostess showed tin patterns for stump work and quilting. My knowledge of the stump work comes from Barb G. who explained that this work is seen in Pennsylvania, but is not like the English stump work. Debby Cooney delighted us with a quilt that she and I have been researching its pattern. She also shared some darker palette quilts that come from the Shenandoah Valley, VA. I had earlier shown my cotton crazy quilt, circa 1870s from the Valley. But, Debby kept the best for last, which were two early quilts: an 1830s and an 1820s medallion. The center block of this medallion was quite a pieced wonder followed by eight borders.

I stated that I was going to make a block of the one that Debby and I have been researching. Fran chided me "Oh, yes some day". After attending these inspiring meetings I often want to go home and make something new -- no working on started projects. That evening I made a pattern, cut pieces and stitched thetwelve-pointed star, which to me resembles a Dresden Plate. I now have to cut out 154 little triangles to complete the block. The next day I cut 70 triangles and began piecing them. Second night only partially stitched so when completed it will be "some day."

Subbing for Cinda once again, I am Hazel Carter from No. VA. And, yes, Sally you can post this for your group...hc

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Subject: Re: Mary Schafer book From: Dana at Material Pleasures <danabalsamoyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 31 Aug 2004 11:15:01 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

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Hi Cinda, I have and read the recent Mary Schaffer book, but haven't read the previous one. This new book is about Mary's life as a quilter, her correspondence with other quiltmakers, her search of antique quilts and how she reproduced them. It goes into her relationships with other quilters and how she came to that hard decision to sell her quilts. There are lists of the quilts she sold and for how much...much below appraised value, by the way. There are a few patterns as well. Lots of beautiful color pics of antique quilts and Mary's copies. She is an amazing woman I'd be happy to loan it to you if you want to take a glance at it before purchasing. My best, Dana

Lucinda Cawley <lrcawleycomcast.net> wrote: Amazon is showing a book called "Mary Schafer: American Quiltmaker" by Gwen Marston. How is this different from the book "Mary Schafer and Her Quilts" that Gwen wrote with Joe Cunningham in 1990? Given my proclivity for buying things I already have I thought I'd check. Thanks. Cinda on the Eastern Shore really tired of all these left-over hurricanes (I'll admit, I'll take the rain without the wind anyday)

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Subject: Re: Fulling and Waulking Cloth From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Tue, 31 Aug 2004 23:08:42 +0100 X-Message-Number: 5

A new series has just started on UK Channel 4 Television featuring a well-known presenter re-enacting 'the worst jobs in history'. It sets out to show the really grotty, uncomfortable, dangerous and downright disgusting jobs done in different ages by the common man (and woman).

On the Mediaeval jobs page you can see the presenter's feet in a vat of urine, fulling woollen cloth. Nice <G>

http://www.channel4.com/history/microsites/W/worstjobs/medieval.html#1

(and if you have a strong stomach, the other pages make interesting reading too)

Sally W

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Subject: Fulling and Waulking Cloth From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Tue, 31 Aug 2004 20:00:20 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

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Fulling appears to be worse than trodding in dung during one of the linen-making processes at that time. :-D

Sally Ward wrote:

> > A new series has just started on UK Channel 4 Television featuring a > well-known presenter re-enacting 'the worst jobs in history'. It sets > out to show the really grotty, uncomfortable, dangerous and downright > disgusting jobs done in different ages by the common man (and woman). > > On the Mediaeval jobs page you can see the presenter's feet in a vat > of urine, fulling woollen cloth. Nice <G> > > http://www.channel4.com/history/microsites/W/worstjobs/medieval.html#1 > > (and if you have a strong stomach, the other pages make interesting > reading too) > > Sally W > > > > --

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Subject: underground railroad From: "Brenda & Roger Applegate" <rbappleg1comcast.net> Date: Tue, 31 Aug 2004 20:34:42 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

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I have been asked to meet with a woman from Duquesne University in Pittsburgh. She wants to do some research on quilts and the underground railroad. I have not personally talked with her at this point, but I

got the impression that she believes in the connection between the two of them.

I have many of the previous e-mails and some of the sites saved to share with her. I was wondering if any of you would be willing to communicate with her in the future and I can share this information as well as your background with her. A meeting has been tentatively arranged for Sept 29th. Thank you.

Brenda Applegate

rbappleg1comcast.net

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Subject: it never ends From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Tue, 31 Aug 2004 20:51:46 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

Sorry to have to raise the ugly spectre of HIPV yet again, but I got a notice of a conference called Refuge Among the Mountains: Northeastern Pennsylvania and the Underground Railroad. This event is co-sponsored by the PA Historical and Museum Commission, the Luzerne County Historical Society and Luzerne County Community College. On the program is a talk called Underground Railroad Quilt/Traveling Trunk Demonstration by Gina Thackara. Does anyone know who Gina Thackara is? Google turned up a reporter for the Scranton Times/Tribune but nothing about quilting. Also, please give me the website for the man in New Jersey who wrote that impressive article about the controversy. J. G. Row? I would like to refer the sponsoring organizations to a strong dose of truth versus myth. Thanks. Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: Re: it never ends From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrowpatmedia.net> Date: Tue, 31 Aug 2004 20:58:52 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

http://historiccamdencounty.com/ccnews11.shtml

Giles Wright is his name. The link is to the first time he published on the web, through the Camden County Historical Society.

Judy, aka the Ringoes Kid judygrowpatmedia.net ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: it never ends From: "Beth Davis" <bethdan533eznet.net> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2004 07:56:34 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Hello, There is also an Underground Railroad lecture listed to be given at Chautauqua Institution in western upstate New York (near PA border), by a Sue Bouchard. There are no details as to the subject being addressed during this lecture. So I am not sure how the topic is being approached. This is being given during their Fall Festival the weekend of October 9-10. There is also lectures listed on 'Women, History through Quilts' and 'Quilting Appraising'

Beth ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: it never ends From: Gail Ingram <gingramtcainternet.com> Date: Wed, 01 Sep 2004 07:59:15 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Re UGRR story, I give you the words of the laconic Calvin Coolidge (1932):

"Nothing in the world can take the place of PERSISTENCE.

Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent.

Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb.

Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts.

Persistence and Determination alone are omnipotent. The slogan 'Press On,' has solved and will always solve the problems of the human race."

So....... Press On!

Gail

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Subject: Re: Fulling and Waulking Cloth From: Laura Robins-Morris <lrobinsfhcrc.org> Date: Wed, 01 Sep 2004 06:44:15 -0700 X-Message-Number: 3

I should probably know the answer from the recent posts but can't recall --- what process or chemicals replace fulling in todays wool production? (Other than tiny barefoot gnomes.) Thanks. Laura in Seattle

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Subject: RE: it never ends From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2004 10:21:22 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

oh no! Again! The PHMC is sponsoring? They need to distance the agency from that stuff... Candace Perry

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Subject: RE: underground railroad From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2004 10:21:22 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Oh, lord...I received my masters' from Duquesne...I hope she's looking to do good reseach... Candace Perry

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Subject: Interesting stuff about evidence . . . From: Anne Copeland <anneappraiser1juno.com> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2004 07:45:00 -0700 X-Message-Number: 6

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Well, I haven't been quiet for lack of anything to say. I am immersed up to my eyeballs with receiving the entries for an online competition I organized and with the live venues that will follow. The deadline is August 31 for Myths and Legends: Past, Present, and Future, and many of the entries are starting to come in so I am up until 1 and 2 AM every night trying to get all the paperwork done. I am also curating a mixed media exhibit for September so I have much to do for that one as well. And my own fiberarts pieces (3 currently) to get done, so if you don't hear from me, it isn't because you have managed to make me go away. I have my own priorities.

Meanwhile, back to my writing about Hidden in Plain View. Not one person who has attacked the book, Hidden in Plain View, has managed to prove anything different in a well researched, well documented paper or book or pointed to such a publication. So what I am continuing to read from those writing about the book is a lot of anger about the fact that someone outside the quilt history world or even the quilt world in general dared to write a book about something related to quilt history but I am not reading any information that explicitly disproves the authors' theories. I know there has been some chit chat about it, but nothing seems to have transpired.

Also, people keep writing how the authors of the book keep allowing others to present the book as if it were true, in fact, as if it were "God's truth," but again, I have not seen one bit of writing that proves definitively that it is wrong. Apparently "Innocent until proven guilty" doesn't apply to the quilt history world.

It is also interesting to me how people are so absolutely positive that the truth of a thing exists outside our consciousness since no one I have read about at any time in my lifetime has been there. But then again, from the sounds of it, maybe some quilt historians have. Perhaps it's time for Sainthood! Peace and blessings, Annie ----__JNP_000_2379.79a3.1fae--

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Subject: RE: Interesting stuff about evidence . . . From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2004 11:30:35 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

Wow. Candace Perry

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Subject: Re: Interesting stuff about evidence . . . From: <charter.net> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2004 15:23:12 +0000 X-Message-Number: 8

>

> Meanwhile, back to my writing about Hidden in Plain View. Not one person > who has attacked the book, Hidden in Plain View, has managed to prove > anything different in a well researched, well documented paper or book or > pointed to such a publication. So what I am continuing to read from > those writing about the book is a lot of anger about the fact that > someone outside the quilt history world or even the quilt world in > general dared to write a book about something related to quilt history > but I am not reading any information that explicitly disproves the > authors' theories. I know there has been some chit chat about it, but > nothing seems to have transpired. >

I suggest you check out Giles Wright's work in New Jersey. I also can state categorically that I submitted a list of several detailed, scholarly questions to Jacqueline Tobin and received a form letter in reply.

It is extremely hard to prove a negative. However, there is plenty of evidence to suggest that the HIPV quilt code, if true, was confined to the Williams family. There's also plenty of things that the authors got wrong, such as the dates of quilt patterns and their regional names.

Again, I'd suggest you check out Giles Wright's critique at http://historiccamdencounty.com/ccnews11_doc_01a.shtml. It's considerably more than "chit chat."

Karen Evans

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Subject: : Fulling and Waulking Cloth From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Wed, 01 Sep 2004 11:42:03 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

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Laura -- I don't know how detailed you want this information, so in the most generalized terms, fulling, which is controlled felting, is automated today through a vigorous process of squeezing and pounding wool fabric in a soap solution, and is usually done in the finishing stage. From Fabric Reference, Mary Humphries, second edition 2000. The ASI [American Sheep Industry/Wool Council] website can give you a more detail accounting.

Laura Robins-Morris wrote:

> I should probably know the answer from the recent posts but can't > recall --- what process or chemicals replace fulling in todays wool > production? (Other than tiny barefoot gnomes.) >

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Subject: Fw: Interesting stuff about evidence . . . From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrowpatmedia.net> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2004 12:02:47 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

Anne,

You just don't get it.

Those who disagree with Dobard's and Tobin's "theory" [your word] have offered many instances of their failings.

Where is their proof of the validity of their claim? They have offered none.

The authors cited absolutely no evidence that what they say happened (quilts in certain patterns, those patterns memorized to be used as memory devices for escaping slaves) happened. They didn't say where it happened, how it happened, what people were a part of it, when it started, when it ended. The continued lack of concrete evidence to back up the story the authors relate point to it not being history, but pure fiction. What the quilt world is riled up about is that the authors saw the place for such a myth and perpetrated it on the uneducated public to their own economical enrichment. The authors are guilty of re-writing history for personal gain.

History is in written records. Without proof all the rest is myth at best. It is for the authors to prove the truth of their words. Lacking that historians will call them out for fabrication.

Their book offers no proof. Only hearsay. There is a method for researching history and here it is:

The Research Process

© 2002 Michael L. Umphrey

Historians do research by making systematic plans to (1) find evidence, (2) evaluate it to establish the facts, (3) reflect on the facts to decide what they tell us about the people and events of the past, and (4) publish their new knowledge.

The authors in question did not find evidence (1.). Therefore any claims to have done (2)and (3) are false, and so their completion of (4) is total fabrication. (1) Researchers should make a plan to find out systematically what primary sources and secondary works are available.

The authors in question found NO primary sources, only one hearsay source.

(2) Researchers should make a plan for studying each primary source as part of a larger systematic plan. Historians develop new interpretations of the past by finding evidence in primary sources that support their interpretation. Any document can be read in many different ways.

Again, there were no primary sources. The authors developed an interpretation of a single questionable source.

3. Thinking about what you are finding and developing systematic plans for clarifying things that seem confusing or contradictory lies at the heart of the research process. The ideal is to create a new interpretation, that accounts for all the known facts.

Their interpretation was based on hearsay, not known facts. There was no clarification of anything.

4. Your research plan should include publishing what you learn. The project of human knowledge goes forward one little bit at a time. We add a fact or two here or there, a new interpretation, a new set of data. Your plan to publish your findings is a plan to add your work to our shared project of better knowledge and understanding.

The authors have not added facts, only their interpretation of hearsay. But they published anyway, confusing myth with fact.

All research starts with an hypothesis -- "I think this may be true." The researcher then sets out and proves the hypothesis so he or she can say, at the end, "This is true because..."

Dobard and Tobin did none of these things.

There are those who accept gospel (small g) on faith, and those who say, "prove it." History is not accepted on faith. Historians say "prove it."

Judy in Ringoes, NJ judygrowpatmedia.net

----- Original Message ----- From: "Anne Copeland" <anneappraiser1juno.com> To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Wednesday, September 01, 2004 10:45 AM Subject: [qhl] Interesting stuff about evidence . . . > > Meanwhile, back to my writing about Hidden in Plain View. Not one person > who has attacked the book, Hidden in Plain View, has managed to prove > anything different in a well researched, well documented paper or book or > pointed to such a publication. So what I am continuing to read from > those writing about the book is a lot of anger about the fact that > someone outside the quilt history world or even the quilt world in > general dared to write a book about something related to quilt history > but I am not reading any information that explicitly disproves the > authors' theories. I know there has been some chit chat about it, but > nothing seems to have transpired. > > Also, people keep writing how the authors of the book keep allowing > others to present the book as if it were true, in fact, as if it were > "God's truth," but again, I have not seen one bit of writing that proves > definitively that it is wrong. Apparently "Innocent until proven guilty" > doesn't apply to the quilt history world. > > It is also interesting to me how people are so absolutely positive that > the truth of a thing exists outside our consciousness since no one I have > read about at any time in my lifetime has been there. But then again, > from the sounds of it, maybe some quilt historians have. Perhaps it's > time for Sainthood! Peace and blessings, Annie >

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Subject: Re: Interesting stuff about evidence . . . From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2004 12:20:19 -0400 X-Message-Number: 11

Anne you seem to have it wrong way round. In science, history and high school debate the burden of proof rests on the affirmative. If the quilt code theory is to be accepted it must be proved. The proponents must present convincing, verifiable evidence to support the theory. Not many of those on QHL who are involved in this discussionsare academics. I've never gotten the impression that this is some sort of turf war. I welcome any and all contributions to quilt history. I do ask for sound research. In scholarship truth is what matters not some sort of vague politesse which avoids questions because they may hurt someone's feelings.. Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: ugrr myth From: "Liz Lois" <loislanetds.net> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2004 12:33:20 -0500 X-Message-Number: 12

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I spent the weekend with 7 other quilter's on the border of western Wisconsin and we had a pretty lively discussion about this issue after being told by a shop owner that the building across the street was a

stop on the UGRR. Western Wisconsin is pretty far west! It's easy to see how these myth's get started and continue to grow. Thanks... J. G. Row for the www.historiccamdencounty.com/ccnews11.shtml link! Liz In WI ------_NextPart_000_0087_01C4901F.DD613DE0--

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Subject: comments - UGRR - no end in sight From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> Date: Wed, 01 Sep 2004 15:07:26 -0400 X-Message-Number: 13

Dear Friends,

Last week, I attended a quilt show in northern New Hampshire. In the small show, in the sleepy little town, were not one but two, so-called "Underground Railroad" quilts. Eleanor Burns' book was displayed near one of the quilts, along with some childrens' books.

I have come to a conclusion that is not startling to those of us who know human nature, all too well. Taking the path of least resistance, many thousands more quilters will make Underground Railroad quilts to buy into this "trip" of being part of American history.

Upon seeing these quilts, I mentioned to the local gals there that the quilts were not based on any solid historical evidence. One of them smiled and said, "Well, you must admit it makes a good story".

Some quilters have become more enamored of stories than the truth. Or do they not bother to look a little further than the book they pick up at the quilt store? It's in print.........so it must be accurate?

Those of us who object to making UGRR quilts are not trying to take something away anyone. We are solely and intentionally trying to stick to verified/verifiable historical information/proof.

This new American myth has taken on a life of its own. I think that we will have to recognize that the quilt world is clearly divided into two camps: those who are scholars and who care for the truth and will defend it at all costs; and those who are more "casual" about quilt history, or are disinterested, or who do not even have the intellectual capacity to grasp the concepts or the objections that have been explained (ad nauseum).

We (historians) will never be able to prove that something....anything did not happen. Only when there is conclusive proof will we be able to embrace the doctrine and chant the mantra of the secret quilt code. If anyone finds this evidence, I want to be the first to know!

In the interest of not hogging the list with my opinions, I wasn't going to speak out again on this matter. However, I don't like the road we are starting to go down.

Thank you very much for your detailed summary of what good research entails, J. G. Row. We can always count on you to explain things, and do so very well.

Leigh Fellner has some excellent information on her website and is following the continuing saga of Ozella's family and their public lectures, their geneology (which so far has not seemed to add up in any consistent way), and other related issues.

I am just sorry that after all I have said and written (and published), all that Kim Wulfert, Kris Driessen, Leigh Fellner, Judy Anne Johnson and other serious quilt historians have also written, as well as the public comments written and spoken by Giles Wright that ALL of those words seem not to have made a whit of difference in the understanding of some people regarding the issues at hand.

People will believe what they want. /Die Gedanken Sind Frei/.

Patricia L. Cummings www.quiltersmuse.com

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Subject: - UGRR - no end in sight From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Wed, 01 Sep 2004 15:47:21 -0400 X-Message-Number: 14

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To all the dedicated and concerned quilters on this list and elsewhere who are interested in the pursuit of history as fact, I admire your perservance and dedication. Judy, thank you so much for your common sense comments. To others like me who were made aware of this controversary and then read the book, I found the most convincing aspect about its duplicity in the fact that a perfect stranger [Ozella] tells the author a story, stops midstream and tells her to come back in three years for the finale. It made me realize that the sale of the Brooklyn Bridge still lives on in the hearts of the gullible. :-D

Patricia L Cummings wrote:

> Dear Friends, > > Last week, I attended a quilt show in northern New Hampshire. In the > small show, in the sleepy little town, were not one but two, so-called > "Underground Railroad" quilts. Eleanor Burns' book was displayed near > one of the quilts, along with some childrens' books. > > I have come to a conclusion that is not startling to those of us who > know human nature, all too well. Taking the path of least resistance, > many thousands more quilters will make Underground Railroad quilts to > buy into this "trip" of being part of American history. > >

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Subject: political quilt books From: Teri Klassen <teresakbloomington.in.us> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2004 15:55:33 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 15

many thanks to everyone who suggested titles. i hope to get all of these (5 total I think, all included in qhl e-mails of the last couple of days) except the Threads of History one that costs hundreds of dollars! Teri

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Subject: Re: ugrr myth From: "jocelynmdelphiforums.com" <jocelynmdelphiforums.com> Date: Wed, 01 Sep 2004 21:32:08 +0000 X-Message-Number: 16

On September 1, 2004, Liz Lois wrote:

> I spent the weekend with 7 other quilter's on the border of western Wisco nsin and we had a pretty lively discussion about this issue after being tol d by a shop owner that the building across the street was a stop on the UGR R.

Not to mention, was the building built prior to the 1840s? So many people t hink the UGRR ran during the Civil War.

Being in a town where there ARE confirmed UGRR stops, there are dozens more that are legends, but which have been disproven because of being built too late. Houses with tunnels can be for escape in case of Indian attack. Ther e's one store here in town with tunnels, that were apparently used for roll ing beer barrels from the boats they arrived on to a tavern! The owner for some reason thought it was better to have a tunnel than to roll them down t he street- possibly, he wanted to avoid Carrie Nation et al. <G>

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Subject: pattern making From: "Laura Fisher" <laurafishernetlink1.net> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2004 

HiQHL I believe I have made this inquiry before, but never saw it posted, so here it is again. Am I contacting you correctly to do this?

I need someone who can write instructions for creating quilt patterns

based on several antique quilts I plan to include in my next book. Hopefully this will be someone who has been published, so the patterns will be well-done and easy to follow! This is not a design project, rather a mechanical project. There will be a fee for each quilt pattern made, as well as acknowledgement in the text.

Please email me privately. Best to send to both email addresses, as the netlink1 email gets overloaded with spam, no matter how many times I

send them to be blocked. Anyone have any suggestions. I have the virus and spam walls, but those russian language things, drug offers, mortgage approvals etc keep getting through no matter how many I block.

thanks for your help.

Laura Fisher






 


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