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Quilters Find a way to care


Subject: name recognition From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date:

Lynne -- all good wishes for a successful exhibit. Great time frame for fashion styles. Maybe you can post some photos of exhibit costumes to eboard????

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Subject: update on my Sanitary Commission repro project From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Tue, 14 Sep 2004 07:32:32 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Just a quick update on my project to make a quilt for the family of a soldier who died in Iraq. Firstly, I have 9 people who have volunteered to make blocks, a few of them will make two, but I could sure use one or two more. I need 15 to make up one quilt. I will be donating the sashing, batting and will probably do the quilting or tying. The original Sanitary Commission quilts were often tied, so I may go along with that practice, especially considering that it will speed my work along a bit. Out of three soldiers who died from the state of NH (where I am from) I have chosen Army Sgt. 1st Class Robert E. Rooney, 43, who was assigned to the 379th Engineer Company, U.S. Army National Guard, based in Bourne Mass. who died on September 25, 2003 at Shuabai Port, Kuwait. I chose him as his death was the earliest death in the war on terrorism in our state. I want his family to know that he is NOT forgotten, even if some time has passed since he died. When I get a quilt done for his wife, Diane, his two sons and daughter, I hope to move on to the two other families in NH that also lost a family member. I will go from the last to the most recent, in order. I sure hope that there are no more of them to add to my list. Robert and his family resided in Nashua NH, and Robert was a huge NACSAR fan, his favorite driver being Jeff Gordon. Does anyone have a contact with Jeff Gordon or know someone who does? It would probably mean a great deal to have his signature on one of the quilt blocks as well! So, I move ahead on this project. If anyone else has the time to do a block, I could really use a few more. No pressure, everyone is very busy and we all have our own "charity" projects, of all types, I know. Also, I have one volunteer who might be able to help put the blocks together, but I am still searching for one or two local quilters to give me a hand with that part. I live in Southern NH, near the Haverhill MA border (about a mile from the border) and am only one hour from Boston and from Concord NH, in either direction. Also, am about an hour and 20 minute ride from Portland ME. Thanks is you can help in any way! Linda Heminway Plaistow NH

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Subject: Recycled fabrics in quilts From: Beth Donaldson <quiltsmuseum.msu.edu> Date: Tue, 14 Sep 2004 09:31:12 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

The Michigan State University Museum has a quilt, ca. 1845 that was donated by Merry Silber. It is made of diamonds paper pieced into vertical strips and made from wool paisley shawls. You can see it in our book, American Quilts from Michigan State University Museum, page 28. The book can be purchased at http://secure.museum.msu.edu/MTAPStore/category.asp?time=92725&category=QOT. Beth Donaldson

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Subject: press release - forwarded on behalf of the Alliance for American Quilts From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 14 Sep 2004 06:24:25 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

CONTACT: Robert Shaw, Executive Director The Alliance for American Quilts (502) 897-3819 (telephone and fax) quiltallianceaol.com http://www.centerforthequilt.org

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

The Alliance for American Quilts Offers a Unique “Place” to Belong

Louisville, Kentucky, September 13, 2004-The Alliance for American Quilts has announced a new opportunity for everyone who loves quilts to be a part of history as a Charter Member. Members of The Alliance will be active participants in ensuring that our great quilt heritage is documented, preserved and, most importantly, shared at the Center for the Quilt Online, www.centerforthequilt.org. Membership also comes with many benefits and opportunities for those who join.

The Center for the Quilt Online already shares incredible, FREE resources with everyone who cares about quilts. As Alliance President Shelly Zegart said, “The Center for the Quilt Online is the place to go for information about American quilts and quiltmakers-from our Quilters’ S.O.S. - Save Our Stories oral histories, to the Quilt Index database of quilts, to web documentaries of the “Quilt Treasures” who made the quilt revival possible, to wonderful films in streaming video, to opportunities to get advice and information from quilt experts. Membership adds great value to what is already available.”

For as little as $50, new Charter Members receive a handsome limited-edition Alliance pin; advance email notification of Alliance projects, plans, and activities; invitations to quilt event openings, lectures, and symposia; access to special members-only pages on the website; and website recognition for their support. For membership at higher levels, Members may receive signed books, invitations to private museum receptions and private guided tours of quilt exhibitions or museums, provided freely by the members of The Alliance’s board of directors.

For example, one of the first exclusive offerings on the members-only pages is a pattern for a block designed by Alliance board member and quilt artist Yvonne Porcella. It is from The Voice of You and Me 2004, the second raffle quilt created by Yvonne and quilt artist and board member Karen Musgrave to benefit The Alliance. This year’s quilt is a naïve rendition of a Baltimore Album-style quilt made with 1850s reproduction fabrics.

-more- The Alliance for American Quilts, cont.

The Alliance for American Quilts, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization, implements its projects in partnership with institutions and organizations nationally, including three regional centers-the Center for American Material Culture Studies at the University of Delaware, the Great Lakes Quilt Center at the Michigan State University Museum, and the Center for American History at the University of Texas. Other Alliance partners include the Library of Congress American Folklife Center, and MATRIX, the Center for Humane Arts, Letters and Social Sciences Online.

For information on membership, to purchase tickets for the raffle quilt and to learn more about The Alliance for American Quilts, visit the Center for the Quilt Online, www.centerforthequilt.org or contact The Alliance (502/897-3819, quiltallianceaol.com).

For more information contact: Robert Shaw, Executive Director The Alliance for American Quilts (502) 897-3819 (telephone and fax) quiltallianceaol.com http://www.centerforthequilt.org

# # #

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Subject: Re Recycled Fabrics From: "Ann-Louise Beaumont" <albeaumontcomcast.net> Date: Tue, 14 Sep 2004 07:31:55 -0600 X-Message-Number: 5

The Amherst MA museum has a quilt made from the dresses of Lucia E. Young's father's young sisters who died in 1816. As I recall, the Puss in the Corner style blocks were very large, displaying the fabric to advantage. The fabric was in very good condition. Best Wishes, Ann-Louise Beaumont

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Subject: Fwd: Re: louisiana Purchase Exposition 1904 From: Babette Moorleghen <happyquilterqsbcglobal.net> Date: Tue, 14 Sep 2004 07:24:00 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 6

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I didn't see this come through so thought I would send it again. I did read another post which mentioned a Redwork quilt on display at the Museum but I haven't had a chance to go over so don't know about that. Have a great day! Hugs, Babette

Babette Moorleghen <happyquilterqsbcglobal.net> wrote: Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 19:04:49 -0700 (PDT) From: Babette Moorleghen Subject: Re: [qhl] louisiana Purchase Exposition 1904 To: Quilt History List

Hi, Carol. In response to you question about quilts at the 1904 World's Fair in St. Louis I did some research earlier this year as I was asked to do a presentation to 2 groups regarding quilts that were displayed at the Fair. However, that research came up with absolutely NO quilts shown or displayed during that time. The experts I talked to felt the reason behind that was it was a fair showcasing technology and that quilts were "out of fashion" for the time. I live in Illinois, within 20 minutes of downtown St. Louis and they are celebrating the Centennial year and have put together some really nice exhibits, however NO quilts from that time! In fact, everyone I talked to said they were really surprised to find this bit of information out knowing the popularity of quilts. Thanks to a member on this list (and whose name I am forgetting) I did find out that commemorative quilts were made in the years following the 1904 Fair and she was kind enough to send me a picture o! f the one she had in her collection! I talked to someone this past weekend at the St. Charles, MO "Quilts On Main" show who said she had a St. Louis Star quilt but didn't have any other information on it as to who the maker was or when it was made. One sad thing, there is no longer a Curator of Textiles at the St. Louis Museum handling the quilts already archived there. Don't know if or when one might be in place. Babette in Belleville, IL

Carol Elmore <celmorek-state.edu> wrote: To partially answer my own question that I posed to the list this morning, there were many Native American craft exhibits at the 1904 St. Louis Fair. I did some research in journal literature this morning at the library and found several articles on Native American crafts but found no mention of quilts. I also ordered another article on interlibrary loan that deals with arts and crafts of the St. Louis Fair. I don't know if there were any tribes that were making quilts as early as 1904. If anyone knows of any quilts or references to them being displayed at the fair I'd appreciate knowing about it. Or if you know about how early Native American quilts were being made I'd appreciate that information also.

Carol Elmore Manhattan, KS

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Subject: Red Cross quilts--question for Xenia From: "Lynne Z. Bassett" <lzbassettcomcast.net> Date: Tue, 14 Sep 2004 10:26:58 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

Dear Xenia,

I am researching a Red Cross quilt in the collection of the Connecticut Historical Society in preparation for a lecture next Tuesday. In your Blanket Statements article on "Signature Quilts," you mention that The Modern Priscilla magazine in December, 1917 had instructions for making a Red Cross quilt. What did it look like? The CHS Red Cross quilt has a large central red cross set in a field of smaller red crosses--just like the "Moscow History" Red Cross quilt featured in Nancy J. Rowley's article, "Red Cross Quilts for the Great War" in the 1982 Uncoverings.

Thanks for your help!

Best, Lynne

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Subject: Re: recycled fabric and family quilt history From: AndreaBlackhurstaol.com Date: Tue, 14 Sep 2004 11:05:07 EDT X-Message-Number: 8

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I just made a quilt of my own (and a little family quilt history as well, I hope) of recycled fabric.

My husband just retired from the Air Force after 30 years (and 15 moves) and I made him a quilt out of my collection of his old uniforms. I included a piece of everything I had, including a used dress uniform he bought for ten cents at the base thrift shop in 1974, a cummerbund, some of the lining fabric, and a hat. The entire top, including the background (Ohio Stars - shirts) is from uniform fabric. He loved it! My only regret is that everyone I know wants to copy it, and I would rather they come up with an idea of their own. Is there any nice way to tell them that? I'm sure they have no idea of the time I spent thinking about this project and "false starts".

If you would like to see it, go to : http://groups.msn.com/retirementweekend , click on "pictures" on the left, then go to "page 2".

Thank you, everyone for all the great information you contribute to this list. I don't claim to be a historian, but I appreciate it, and love to read about it.

Andrea near Dayton

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Subject: Calendars From: Jennifer Perkins <qltrstoreharlannet.com> Date: Tue, 14 Sep 2004 11:16:27 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

I have been on a calendar hunt again. Contacted the Shelburne Museum where I got one last year, and they will not be making one this year. Went to Calendars.com and saw one on chintz quilts from the Smithsonian so ordered it. It is really a beautiful calendar! Has a big picture on top of a closeup detail of the quilt showing fabric details and a smaller full picture of the quilt on the bottom along with the calendar page. It is a little wider than my last calendar, but I am going to like it! I think there is a picture of the back cover of the calendar showing each of the months on the website. Hope you all have a wonderful 2005 to go with your wonderful calendars! Jennifer in Iowa NQACJ

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Subject: Re: update on my Sanitary Commission repro project From: Babette Moorleghen <happyquilterqsbcglobal.net> Date: Tue, 14 Sep 2004 09:19:46 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 10

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Linda, regarding getting a signature from Jeff Gordon on one of the blocks for the quilt, you might want to contact jeffgordonfoundation.org and make a request. If that doesn't work you might want to check out his fan clubs and see if they could be of help. (not a NasCar fan perse but have many friends who are!) Hugs, Babette in Illinois

Linda Heminway <ibquiltncomcast.net> wrote: Just a quick update on my project to make a quilt for the family of a soldier who died in Iraq. Firstly, I have 9 people who have volunteered to make blocks, a few of them will make two, but I could sure use one or two more. I need 15 to make up one quilt. I will be donating the sashing, batting and will probably do the quilting or tying. The original Sanitary Commission quilts were often tied, so I may go along with that practice, especially considering that it will speed my work along a bit. Out of three soldiers who died from the state of NH (where I am from) I have chosen Army Sgt. 1st Class Robert E. Rooney, 43, who was assigned to the 379th Engineer Company, U.S. Army National Guard, based in Bourne Mass. who died on September 25, 2003 at Shuabai Port, Kuwait. I chose him as his death was the earliest death in the war on terrorism in our state. I want his family to know that he is NOT forgotten, even if some time has passed since he died. When I get a quilt done for his wife, Diane, his two sons and daughter, I hope to move on to the two other families in NH that also lost a family member. I will go from the last to the most recent, in order. I sure hope that there are no more of them to add to my list. Robert and his family resided in Nashua NH, and Robert was a huge NACSAR fan, his favorite driver being Jeff Gordon. Does anyone have a contact with Jeff Gordon or know someone who does? It would probably mean a great deal to have his signature on one of the quilt blocks as well! So, I move ahead on this project. If anyone else has the time to do a block, I could really use a few more. No pressure, everyone is very busy and we all have our own "charity" projects, of all types, I know. Also, I have one volunteer who might be able to help put the blocks together, but I am still searching for one or two local quilters to give me a hand with that part. I live in Southern NH, near the Haverhill MA border (about a mile from the border) and am only one hour from Boston and from Concord NH, in either direction. Also, am about an hour and 20 minute ride from Portland ME. Thanks is you can help in any way! Linda Heminway Plaistow NH

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Subject: teal From: <chrisajetlink.net> Date: Tue, 14 Sep 2004 11:28:15 -0700 X-Message-Number: 11

There is a R&G appliqué quilt with a teal appliqué border- it is large unusual leafs coming out of a thin stem forming a wide zigzagged vine for the border. It is dated "shortly after her marriage in 1834," from the "Eastern Shore" in Virginia. This quilt received first prize at the Accomac County Fair, no date is given.

Fortunately, it is one of the few quilts pictured in color in LC Patchwork Quilts, summer 1982. They call the pattern "Whirling Leaves" and describe the border as teal blue. It was made by Anne James Edmonds Mapp, 1816-1895.

Hope this helps you Gail. I look forward to hearing about your findings on teal!

Kim Wulfert www.antiquequiltdating.com

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Subject: Recycled fabric - A rural thing? From: "Susan Wildemuth" <ksandbcwgeneseo.net> Date: Tue, 14 Sep 2004 13:34:21 -0500 X-Message-Number: 12

I don't know whether the making of quilts out of recycled clothing/fabric is a myth or not. I'm a city girl who married into an Illinois farm family about 23 years ago. The farm women in my husband's family and many of my senior neighbors have/do recycle fabric from clothing.

Grandma W. (Husband's g-ma born in the late 1800's) made quilts out of recycled material -- I have one of her quilts, my m-i-l (born around 1931) still makes rugs out of recycled clothing - blue jeans mostly as they make the most beautiful country blue rugs.

A dear senior neighbor (who has passed) -- thought it frivolous of me to go out and buy fabric for a quilt -- all her quilts were made out of recycled fabric or she didn't make a quilt and Elvira made a lot of "utilitarian" quilts.

Do you suppose the recycling of fabrics from clothing is a rural thing? Your thoughts?

Sue in Illinois

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Subject: Interesting Quilt Item on Ebay From: Ark Quilts <quiltarkmvyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 14 Sep 2004 09:53:10 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 13

Hello all. I ran across an interesting listing on Ebay :

ANTIQUE/VINTAGE AMISH ALBUM APPLIQUE QUILT Item number: 3747043073

I do believe this is an imported quilt (from the Museum of American Folk Art reproduction line perhaps?). I believe this was a mass produced item which has a misleading "signature" copied from the original quilt. Unless, of course, the item was purchased is the original "model" for the mass production.

Anyone have any ideas?

Thanks-Connie Ark in NW Ohio where my sheep are resisting instructions on how to walk on a halter lead. (Offered only because many people feel that sheep are stupid--not so!)

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Subject: Re: recycled fabric and family quilt history From: Babette Moorleghen <happyquilterqsbcglobal.net> Date: Tue, 14 Sep 2004 12:06:27 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 14

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Andrea, what a wonderful quilt you have! I can tell by the picture your husband is so proud of you and the quilt! As to your dilemma on how to tell people "no", I would say, "I really appreciate knowing you like the quilt. However, it was a project done with love and so many memories I just can't share right now." I have a good friend whose husband retired from the Marines and she designed a quilt for him and that's what she tells people. So far no problems! Hugs, Babette in Illinois

AndreaBlackhurstaol.com wrote:I just made a quilt of my own (and a little family quilt history as well, I hope) of recycled fabric.

My husband just retired from the Air Force after 30 years (and 15 moves) and I made him a quilt out of my collection of his old uniforms. I included a piece of everything I had, including a used dress uniform he bought for ten cents at the base thrift shop in 1974, a cummerbund, some of the lining fabric, and a hat. The entire top, including the background (Ohio Stars - shirts) is from uniform fabric. He loved it! My only regret is that everyone I know wants to copy it, and I would rather they come up with an idea of their own. Is there any nice way to tell them that? I'm sure they have no idea of the time I spent thinking about this project and "false starts".

If you would like to see it, go to : http://groups.msn.com/retirementweekend , click on "pictures" on the left, then go to "page 2".

Thank you, everyone for all the great information you contribute to this list. I don't claim to be a historian, but I appreciate it, and love to read about it.

Andrea near Dayton

--- You are currently subsc

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Subject: calendars From: <chrisajetlink.net> Date: Tue, 14 Sep 2004 12:12:59 -0700 X-Message-Number: 15

There are some great calendars out this year it seems. One of them offers some unique aspects that might be of interest to you when deciding which one to actually use!

Masterpieces in Cloth by Gerald Roy has a spiral binding which is covered with a laminated paper book-style cover. It has flaps in the front and back which can be placed in the calendar pages to save your place, as in a book. The flaps serve a dual purpose as they have the 2005 and 2006, front and back respectively, so that a quick glance there can help you find a date.

The pages are laid out at two weeks per page, with a quilt pictured on the left page, as large as the Quilt Engagement calendar pictures, and maybe a tad larger. All the quilts are from the Pilgrim and Roy collection. They are wonderful, varied, and dated. At the end of the calendar, several pages are dedicated to information on "Protecting your Quilts", and resources for this purpose, written by Gerald. Lastly there is a list and brief description of 21 museums in American that have a large quilt and or textile collection.

I plan to use this calendar, but I will be hanging the Smithsonian one on the wall- what a beauty and a gift that one is to chintz lovers everywhere.

FYI-Many of the B&N calendars are on sale at Marshall's, the national discount store, for $7.99. The quilt one was not at the one near me when I was there, but they had all the rest of them, so you might want to check in your area.

Kim Wulfert www.antiquequiltdating.com

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Subject: Re: Interesting Quilt Item on Ebay From: Judy Kelius <quiltsptd.net> Date: Tue, 14 Sep 2004 15:12:45 -0400 X-Message-Number: 16

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At 12:53 PM 9/14/2004, you wrote: >Hello all. I ran across an interesting listing on >Ebay : > > ANTIQUE/VINTAGE AMISH ALBUM APPLIQUE QUILT Item >number: 3747043073

Made in 1990s - and this makes it "antique" or "vintage"???? It does look familiar but photos aren't large enough to judge the quality.

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Subject: Re: changing the subject From: "cjsp70" <cjsp70insightbb.com> Date: Tue, 14 Sep 2004 15:24:36 -0500 X-Message-Number: 17

Finally something on the Quilt History List I feel competent to comment on and not just ask questions. Besides loving quilts I have been a staff nurse in a Neonatal Intensive Care unit for the last 29 years and your grandson looks great. I just got home from a long weekend and it took time to catch up with my email. When I first started working in the NICU a 32 week premie had very little chance but these days over 90-95% of them survive and thrive. Hope he is still doing well. September 15th is National Neonatal Nurses day. As I always say neonatal nurses have very little patients and big hearts. God Bless! Pat Sauer 

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Subject: More Underground RR From: Alice Kinsler <alicekmbay.net> Date: Tue, 14 

I have read with interest the postings about the underground railroad theory and hesitate to bring it up again. However, a colleague's daughter wants to research said topic and the Civil War for her school history class. What sources can I give her that will refer her to the most accurate accounting? Thanks much, Alice Kinsler

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Subject: Re: Red Cross quilts--question for Xenia From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Wed, 15 Sep 2004 07:24:31 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1

Hi, Lynne - yes, that appears to be the Modern Priscilla Red Cross quilt design. I have searched frantically and can't find the visual reference Merikay Waldvogel once sent me; maybe I gave it to our historical society, which owns a carbon copy Red Cross quilt.

The Modern Priscilla instructions detailed how to create the quilt, with a central red cross surrounded by signatures of important political figures, with the smaller crosses endorsed by local residents for a fee. The article also described adding signatures to the back, so that each small cross may have been backed by a square of fabric containing 6-8 embroidered signatures; the one our historical society has is like this.

I have tried for several years to buy a copy of the Dec. 1917 issue of MP, to no avail. But if you need more information on the article, and/or the author who described the fundraising plan, you might ask Merikay. I know she has a copy. I am pretty sure there is also an article somewhere - by someone - that shows the page from MP, but I can't remember who/where.

Xenia

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Subject: Re: changing the subject From: Gail Ingram <gingramtcainternet.com> Date: Tue, 14 Sep 2004 21:44:59 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

As someone who once had a five-year-old with HUS spend 4 weeks in a peds ICU that was integrated with the neonatal unit, I say bless you, Pat Sauer, both for perseverance and dedication. I've never seen more professional, devoted medicine practiced than was practiced by the nursing staff in that little unit. I gathered such units experienced significant turnover in staff. So to have held forth for 29 years is worthy of a book on the experience.

Gail Ingram

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Subject: Re: changing the subject From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney"

As the mom of twins who were born in 1996 also 8 weeks premature, I add my thanks, especially today, to those NICU/SCU folks! My twins now tower over me (and I'm 5' 10") at 14 years old with no short term or long term effects since they were 2-1/2 years...whew!... Regards, Margaret (Meg) Geiss-Mooney Textile/Costume Conservator Professional Associate, AIC mgmooneymoonware.net 

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Subject: Re: changing the subject From: "Nancy Gibbs" <izannah1msn.com> Date: 

<<When I first started working in the NICU a 32 week premie > had very little chance but these days over 90-95% of them survive and > thrive. Hope he is still doing well. September 15th is National = Neonatal > Nurses day. As I always say neonatal nurses have very little patients = and > big hearts.>>

I agree! Both my kids were 32-week preemies (we're talking 28 and 30 = years ago respectively), and spent several weeks in neonatal units. The = nurses at both hospitals (this was Denver) were just great--very = supportive and knowledgeable.

Nancy G

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Subject: Hand Hooked and Sewn Rug Documentation Project From: Trishherraol.com Date: Thu, 16 Sep 2004 15:56:03 EDT X-Message-Number: 1

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For those members living Southeastern Pennsylvania and surroundings (Maryland's Eastern Shore too, Cinda!) The Heritage Center of Lancaster County is starting a documentation project of Southeastern Pennsylvania Rugs similar to our Quilt Harvest documentation in 1988. We plan to have a rug exhibit, in addition to more Amish quilts, at the Lancaster Quilt and Textile Museum next year.

If anyone is interested in learning more about rugs and training to document them, we are having a training session in Lancaster, Pa. on October 30, 2004 from 9-11 AM. You need not be a "hooker" or needleworker, just interested.

If you are a collector and wish to have your rugs documented we would also like to hear from you.

The first actual documentation will be done on Museum property working with the Museum's collection on November 20, 2004. Next year we will have locations in other parts of Lancaster County.

If you are interested in learning more you may call the Museum and ask for Helene Tingle or email her at htinglelancasterheritage.com.

Trish Herr

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Subject: Electric Quilt 5: Complete Quilt Design Software From: "weemsjm" <weemsjmearthlink.net> Date: Thu, 16 Sep 2004 13:13:47 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------=_NextPart_000_0014_01C49BEF.00444660 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

If anyone on the list has and uses EQ5 do you think it would be good for = a beginner.

I was thinking of getting Quilt Design Wizard but in the reviews many = people said it was to basic.

I only piece in strait lines and only with a machine.

I think Quilt Design Wizard is enough for me and I can get it for $75.00 = less than the EQ5.

Any thoughts are welcome.

Thanks and God Bless

Jeff

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Subject: SANITARY COMMISSION/HOME OF THE BRAVE QUILTS From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Wed, 15 Sep 2004 19:32:49 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

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Well, I wish Linda Hemingway lived near me in So. Cal. What a wonderful, take charge attitude. It is inspiring.

I have posted on the VINTAGEPICTURES.EBOARD.COM site three of the the 50 quilts my guild has made for the Cal War Dead--our (now) 21 servicemen in Riverside and San Bernardino Counties and we are now moving the project out into smaller counties in our state. I also posted the back of one of the quilts so you can see how we are labeling them and tying them into our history.

I have had an amazing response to this project--10 guilds and groups of people are now helping in five states--but we need more. If any of you are interested in doing one or two quilts for servicemen/women in your area, e-mail me and I will provide you with the info and some names of your local losses.

This is quilt history at its best--everyone involved in this project, feels as though they are making an important contribution to the families of these brave servicemen/women as well as quilt history.

Thanks to those who have also put us on their web sites and to one of our members who is arranging an article in a national quilting magazine. Don Beld

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: September 14, 2004 From: Ady Hirsch

>Finally something on the Quilt History List I feel competent to comment on >and not just ask questions. Besides loving quilts I have been a staff nurse >in a Neonatal Intensive Care unit for the last 29 years and your grandson >looks great. I just got home from a long weekend and it took time to catch >up with my email. When I first started working in the NICU a 32 week premie >had very little chance but these days over 90-95% of them survive and >thrive. Hope he is still doing well. September 15th is National Neonatal >Nurses day. As I always say neonatal nurses have very little patients and >big hearts. God Bless! Pat Sauer

And here's my chance too to say thank you to all those wonderful NICU nurses - my youngest was born at 33 weeks and a little over 4 lbs. The NICU staff could not have been kinder or more supportive. He's now a healthy, happy 2.5YO. I am currently working as a lactation consultant in a large maternity hospital in Israel, and when working with mothers of premies am always filled with admiration for the NICU staff battling for the little ones' lives, and at the same time managing to encourage the families. You are truly special. Ady in Israel

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Subject: need a Spanish translation From: "Karen Erlandson" <quiltercooke.net> Date: Thu, 16 Sep 2004 16:00:14 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

Hi, I need to know what "quilt" translates into in Spanish. Not the verb "to quilt", but the noun "quilt"

Thanks!! Karen

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Subject: Re: Electric Quilt 5: Complete Quilt Design Software From: quiltzoo <quiltzooearthlink.net> Date: Thu, 16 Sep 2004 16:02:12 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

Once you see what EQ5 can do, you will no longer piece in straight lines. You can't outgrow EQ5 and the upgrades are MOST reasonable. Why not buy EQ5 to begin with. If you don't, you will have wasted your $75, IMHO.

At 01:13 PM 9/16/2004, you wrote: >If anyone on the list has and uses EQ5 do you think it would be good for a >beginner. > >I was thinking of getting Quilt Design Wizard but in the reviews many >people said it was to basic. > >I only piece in strait lines and only with a machine. > >I think Quilt Design Wizard is enough for me and I can get it for $75.00 >less than the EQ5. > >Any thoughts are welcome. > >Thanks and God Bless > >Jeff > > > > > >--- >

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Subject: Sunday at Sully (long) From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Thu, 16 Sep 2004 11:15:12 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

The quilt show and sale at Sully Plantation in Chantilly, VA was exceptionally nice this year because the temperature and humidity were less than tropical. It's always fun to wander the grounds of the 18th century plantation with antique quilts strung on clothes lines and draped over rail fences while jets from nearby Dulles Airport fly overhead. The absolute #1 quilt of the day was a huge, circa 1830, medallion-style quilt with hexagonal Lemoye Stars set in concentric circles with a chintz border and phenomenal quilting. The dealer thought it was from PA. You can see something very like it at williambunchauctions.com. Go to the auction for Tues., Sept. 21 and click on quilts. It's lot 309 (the estimate is $15 to $20K). The price on the quilt at Sully was around $5,800. I love full size quilts made from very small blocks. There were two wonderful examples: from Rockingham Co., VA (Shenandoah Mountains of western VA) a quilt made from 546 tiny Lemoyne Stars (2-1/4", I measured them) with alternating plain blocks, circa 1840; the other (of the same vintage, but unknown origin) tiny Flying Geese (1-1/2") set as sashes around exquisitely quilted plain blocks. In the "caveat emptor" category was a Whig Rose with serpentine vine border and super quilting, dated 1867 in the quilting. Price tag $1,675. Only problem is that every single piece of red had been replaced with an Ely Walker orange print (awful applique in contrast to the beautiful work on the stems and leaves). I am going to encourage my friend Julie to make herself available as an enabler to other collectors. When I announced firmly that I was not going to buy the mid-19th century red, green and cheddar 4-block that I kept revisiting all day she asked "Am I going to have to listen to you moaning about this all the way home?" So, now instead of regretting the one that got away I am looking at that wonderful quilt as I type: each block has a large flower (pieced of diamonds and then appliqued) in an undersized vase with two branches (each with a different blossom) on each side. The blocks have leaves of three different designs all unknown to nature. The border is lovely: graceful serrated leaves connected by carnation-type flowers. It is quilted in an all-over 3/4" diagonal grid. The quilt comes from southwestern Ohio. Newbie told us about the exhibit of antique clothing in the mansion house. It was wonderful. Each piece (late 18th century to post Civil War) was in perfect condition and beautifully displayed. The signage was excellent. I only wish there had been form! The quilts exhibited in the house were a disappointment but the clothing more than made up for that. Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: RE: Electric Quilt 5: Complete Quilt Design Software From: "Ilene Brown" <ilene3earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 16 Sep 2004 19:31:01 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

Hi, I, also, have EQ5 and though, I do not have much time herelately to use it, I love it. It is fairly user friendly. I did take a beginners class on using it, but found I already had learned most of what the teacher covered, enough that I was able to help the other classmates. I am a quick study and they include some practice lessons with the software. And you can scan in your own fabric. Ilene of Raleigh (I'm hoping all my family in Pensacola, Fla are OK. I can not contact anyone.)

> [Original Message] > From: weemsjm <weemsjmearthlink.net> > To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> > Date: 9/16/2004 4:16:57 PM > Subject: [qhl] Electric Quilt 5: Complete Quilt Design Software > > If anyone on the list has and uses EQ5 do you think it would be good for a beginner. > > I was thinking of getting Quilt Design Wizard but in the reviews many people said it was to basic. > > I only piece in strait lines and only with a machine. > > I think Quilt Design Wizard is enough for me and I can get it for $75.00 less than the EQ5. > > Any thoughts are welcome. > > Thanks and God Bless > > Jeff > > > > > > --- >

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Subject: Re: Electric Quilt 5: Complete Quilt Design Software From: "Peter LEATE" <craftersbigpond.net.au> Date: Fri, 17 Sep 2004 10:45:48 +1000 X-Message-Number: 9

IMHO my response is- don't even consider the lesser product - you will get the 75 dollars worth many times over from EQ

I used to teach software design so have some qualification and I have tried the rest

Peter

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Subject: Re: need a Spanish translation From: "Karen Evans" <charter.net> Date: Thu, 16 Sep 2004 22:42:39 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

I believe it's "colcha" in Portuguese but don't know what it is in Spanish. Any Spanish speakers out there?

Karen Evans ----- Original Message ----- From: "Karen Erlandson" <quiltercooke.net> To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Thursday, September 16, 2004 5:00 PM Subject: [qhl] need a Spanish translation

> Hi, > I need to know what "quilt" translates into in Spanish. Not the verb "to > quilt", but the noun "quilt" > > Thanks!! > Karen > > > > > --- >

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Subject: Re: Electric Quilt 5: Complete Quilt Design Software From: "Sandra Mackay" <mackayslverizon.net> Date: Thu, 16 Sep 2004 23:15:55 -0400 X-Message-Number: 11

You wrote:

"If anyone on the list has and uses EQ5 do you think it would be good for a beginner.

I was thinking of getting Quilt Design Wizard but in the reviews many people said it was to basic."

Jeff,

I haven't used Quilt Design Wizard so I can only give you an opinion as an EQ5 user. I love EQ5 - the more I use it the more I find it can do. Even if you only work with straight-line projects I don't think you will regret the price.

The tech support is the best I've ever encountered with any software product. They really care about the quality of their product and the satisfaction of their users. Besides responding to questions from users directly, there is an email list where other users as well as the EQ5 folks help each other out. The list covers everything from simple to complex questions and I find it is a great, free, source of ideas and information.

Besides the support, the block libraries that come with the package as well as from other add-ons such as Block Base, are a great source of inspiration as well as being a short-cut since you won't have to draw every block that you want to use from scratch.

I taught myself to use the program by following the directions and exercises in the manuals that come with the program. It is relatively simple for a beginner to learn how to use the program. I now teach the software at my local quilt shop, but spending some time working through the lessons in the manuals and trying to work up a project on your own should be all you need to get up and running. You really don't need to take a class before you can use the software.

If you ever decide that you want to expand beyond straight lines to curves or to just add more complex straight lines the software will be able to support you.

Regards, Sandy Mackay

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Subject: Re: Electric Quilt 5: Complete Quilt Design Software From: "quiltstuff" <quiltstuffoptusnet.com.au> Date: Fri, 17 Sep 2004 13:58:10 +1000 X-Message-Number: 1

Does Quilt Design Wizard have rotary cutting instructions?? if not, I would go for EQ5 as that is a great feature for beginners. I think EQ is good for all levels and frankly you won't be a beginner forever.

Suzy

If anyone on the list has and uses EQ5 do you think it would be good for a beginner.

I was thinking of getting Quilt Design Wizard but in the reviews many people said it was to basic.

I only piece in strait lines and only with a machine.

I think Quilt Design Wizard is enough for me and I can get it for $75.00 less than the EQ5.

Any thoughts are welcome.

Thanks and God Bless

Jeff

---

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Subject: re: Spanish word for quilt From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> Date: Fri, 17 Sep 2004 04:33:39 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Hi!

I had answered Karen E. privately, but for those who are interested to know, the Spanish noun for quilt is "colcha". The quilt= la colcha; a quilt= una colcha. The verb to quilt= acolchar. Quilted= acolchado.

Of course, as a romance language, many Spanish words derive from Latin. In this case, the Latin word for quilt= culcita.

All you wanted to know, and more? :)

From a fluent Spanish speaker,

Pat Cummings B.A. in Spanish, UNH, 1973, and study in Spain (University of Navarra, Pamplona)

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Subject: RE: Electric Quilt 5: From: Midnitelaptopaol.com Date: Fri, 17 Sep 2004 08:04:51 EDT X-Message-Number: 3

i've used EQ (3,4 and 5) and i can't imagine my quilting life without it...and the support system is fabulous. jeanL

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Subject: Update on Sanitary Commission Repro Quilts From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Fri, 17 Sep 2004 08:09:25 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

First let me say how busy I've been these last couple of days, answering e-mails, taking trips to the copy center, post office and all that. I've been trying to get copies of the block pattern out to those of you who volunteered. If you contacted me and don't get your information, either via e-mail or snail mail, by the middle of next week, please get back in touch with me. First, let me say I am touched and overwhelmed with the support I have received from members of this list, and a few local people, who have come forward to help on this end. The three quilts that I will be making and putting in the hands of family members of those NH residents who died in either Iraq or Afghanistan will probably be in these their homes by Thanksgiving, if all goes well! Wow! I needed 45 blocks (fifteen for each quilt) and I think I may have enough to make all three quilts now. I have booked my church hall for a day on November 10th (Wednesday) starting at 9:00 am. Whoever is local to me and wants to come is welcome. This is the First Congregational Church in Kingston NH. I will have snacks, coffee, tea and we will order out for pizza for lunch, probably (if we don't finish by lunchtime!). Another wonderful thing that has happened with regard to this project is that I mentioned what I was doing this week at the My Brother's Keeper Quilt Group meeting. This is a group I lead that makes what are called Ugly Quilts (quilted sleeping bags) for The Homeless. We also make quilts for children who have cancer. When they heard about this Sanitary Commission project, immediately, two of the group members (the fastest and best quilters!!!!) stepped forward and volunteered to help put the quilts together. I also think I can get the help of another woman I know who can tie an entire queen sized quilt in about an hour - she's amazing! Let's keep our fingers crossed that she decides to help! So, in a few short days, I was able to post a need, get volunteers, mail or e-mail patterns and get people working! My head is spinning! I will have blocks coming in by October 15, and then I will plan layouts, buy fabric for sashing and backing, get batting (if anyone would like to send a bat for this project, please contact me - I need three full sized ones). If there is also anyone out there who would be willing to purchase, on behalf of this project, a special Sanitary Commission label at $20.00 each, please contact me as well. I will pick up the tab for the sashing and backing, myself. I will show up at the church with a cutting mat, ruler, and a rotary cutter, and if my volunteers bring a sewing machine, scissors, and basic sewing supplies, we should be well on our way to getting these quilts done in a day! I hope that a few others come forward to work on that day with us, as my mom always said, "many hands make light work". I am feeling that the hardest part, for me, is now done, which is communicating a need, and getting those of you who have volunteered to make your blocks. Without those individuals who have come forward, this would not be possible. Everyone who has any hand whatsoever in making this quilt has carved their names on my heart and the heart of those who will receive the quilts. Thank you. Linda Heminway Plaistow NH

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Subject: Re: need a Spanish translation From: SheMeows <mlbatresyahoo.com> Date: Thu, 16 Sep 2004 21:06:40 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 5

Hi Karen, "Quilt" can be translated as "edredón".

María

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Subject: Quilt in Spanish From: Debbie Guidi <debbieguidisbcglobal.net> Date: Fri, 17 Sep 2004 05:28:52 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 6

--0-1026373559-1095424132=:38480 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

Hi Everyone,

I just recently rejoined the list & saw the question about how to say thw word quilt in Spanish. I looked it up through Babelfish & the noun "quilt" is listed as edredon (with an accent marked over the o) and "to quilt" is al edredon. Hope this helps.

I'm glad to be on the list again. I learn so much from all of you!

Debbie Guidi Roselle, IL

--0-1026373559-1095424132=:38480--

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Subject: Re: need a Spanish translation From: "Cristina" <cristina68telefonica.net> Date: Fri, 17 Sep 2004 13:44:38 +0200 X-Message-Number: 7

To be honest with you there isn´t an specif word for quilt. A quilt is a quilt but if you say to someone in Spain that you have a "quilt" in your bed they won´t know what you are talking about. Some people call them "edredon". However, Spanish people also say "edredon" when they refer to "duvets". Best wishes, Cris

----- Original Message ----- From: "Karen Erlandson" <quiltercooke.net> To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Thursday, September 16, 2004 11:00 PM Subject: [qhl] need a Spanish translation

> Hi, > I need to know what "quilt" translates into in Spanish. Not the verb "to > quilt", but the noun "quilt" > > Thanks!! > Karen > > > > > --- >

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Subject: Never believe automatic translation devices From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> Date: Fri, 17 Sep 2004 09:07:45 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

I just recently rejoined the list & saw the question about how to say thw word quilt in Spanish. I looked it up through Babelfish & the noun "quilt" is listed as edredon (with an accent marked over the o) and "to quilt" is al edredon. Hope this helps.

I'm glad to be on the list again. I learn so much from all of you!

Debbie Guidi Roselle, IL

There is a word, "edredón", masculine noun. (El edredón means "down quilt, comforter, quilted blanket"), according to the University of Chicago Spanish-English/ English-Spanish Dictionary.

"Al edredón" makes absolutely no sense whatsoever and definitely does NOT mean "to quilt".

Pat

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Subject: Re: need a Spanish translation From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Fri, 17 Sep 2004 14:09:48 +0100 X-Message-Number: 9

SheMeows wrote: > Hi Karen, > "Quilt" can be translated as "edredón".

So...'Eiderdown',then? What a circular world!

Sally W

-- Sally ('Tatters') Ward

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Subject: Alliance for American Quilts presents webblog on quiltmaking in the Republic of Georgia From: Bob Shaw <shaw.bobverizon.net> Date: Fri, 17 Sep 2004 09:54:21 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

The Alliance for American Quilts is pleased to announce its new webblog, which quilt artist and Alliance board member Karen Musgrave will be using to send daily reports on her experiences in the former Soviet Republic of Georgia over the next three weeks,. This is Karen's

second trip to Georgia. She formed a quilt group on her first trip and

is returning to continue her teaching and to document the antique quilts and appliqu=E9 work of the country. She leaves on Saturday September 18th and will return on October 8. =A0 Karen will also travel with Irena Koshoridze from the State Museum and

Andrea Harris of the Eurasia Foundation to Aspindza in the mountainous

SW part of Georgia near Turkey and Armenia, where she will teach local

"mountain" women to quilt by hand while sitting on the ground. She will

also be traveling to Akahaltshikhe=A0to visit the textile collection of

the Akahaltshikhe Museum. =A0 You can read Karen's postings and add your own comments and messages on

The Alliance for American Quilts webblog at: http://centerforthequilt.org/webblog/index.php

Check in daily to learn about the people and traditions of the Republic

of Georgia and about Karen's experiences with with Georgian quiltmakers

and textile history!

For more information contact:

Robert Shaw, Executive Director The Alliance for American Quilts P.O. Box 5251 Louisville, KY 40206 502/897-3619 quiltallianceaol.com=

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Subject: Alliance for American Quilts contact information From: Bob Shaw

Dear Friends:

Please excuse my flying fingers!

Here is correct contact information for The Alliance for American Quilts.

The Alliance for American Quilts P.O. Box 6251 Louisville, KY 40206 502/897-3819 quiltallianceaol.com

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Subject: To further explain From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net>

I said:

"Al edredón" makes absolutely no sense whatsoever and definitely does NOT mean "to quilt".

The word "al" is a combination of "a" and "el" and translated means "to the". The addition of "al" to a noun does not change that noun into a verb. All verbs, such as "to quilt", in Spanish, end in either "ar", "er", or "ir".

Acolchar = to quilt

The word most commonly used to mean quilt as we know it, is "colcha". This word is commonly used throughout Latin and Central America and I'm told is the preferred usage by my Argentinian friend.

When I lived in Spain, quilting was not "happening" although it is increasingly in popularity now, in the northern part of Spain, especially in and around Barcelona. Spain is a very warm country except for the far north where I lived and there is no real need for warm bedcovers. It rains a lot in the mountains where I was (Pamplona). In fact, I suffered from bronchitis most of the time I was there, because of the dampness in the air.

In the essay that I wrote in response to the events of 9/11, entitled "Para Mis Amigas", and still available on my website, I use the words "colcha" and "acolchando" (which means "quilting") exclusively.

There are variances of word usage in the Spanish speaking world and now that quilts have become more popular in Spain, I would not be surprised to learn that they are using the word, (edredón) there, and applying it to a more current usage. However, in my experience with Spanish speakers, the word more commonly used is "colcha", as I've already stated.

Some may doubt me and prefer to use the Internet translator source, but I must say that I received the grade of "sobresaliente" (A+) for my studies in Spain, and also was elected to the very prestigious collegiate honorary society for Spanish scholars, Sigma Delta Pi. At my induction into this society, I was honored to meet Jorge Luis Borges, a prolific author whose theme was often "labrynths". He was very old then, and of course, has since died. I graduated with honors with 16 more credits in Spanish than needed for a major. Okay, shameless self-promotion...brag, brag, brag. You get the picture. :)

Have a terrific day!

Pat www.quiltersmuse.com

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Subject: Re: Never believe automatic translation devices From: "Sharon's" <sstarknni.com> Date: Fri, 17 Sep 2004 10:40:12 -0400 X-Message-Number: 13

Interesting that Babelfish translates "acolchar" as "to quilt", but doesn't seem to recognize the noun form "colcha".

Sharon Stark

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Subject: Re: To further explain From: <charter.net>

"Edredon" sounds like it would be the equivalent of "duvet" or "comforter." "Colcha" is what they use in Portugal, and sounds much closer to "culcita" (Latin), "culte" (Dutch), "courtepointe" (French) and "quilt" (English - where it was occasionally written as "twilt" well into the 16th century!). It's "yorgan" in Turkish, btw, and a quiltmaker is a "yorganci."

Now - does anyone know what the word for "quilt" is in Italian or Swedish? Both those countries have native quilting traditions. I'm assuming it would be some derivative of "culcita" in Italy, but Sweden is another story.

Karen Evans (currently working on 16th century style silk cradle "twilt" while waiting for next temp assignment)

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Subject: EQ5 From: Gail Hurn <gailhurnyahoo.com> 

Colcha is also quilt in Spanish.

Another wonderful way to Learn to use EQ5 is QuiltUniversity.com. Minimal cost and wonderful guided instruction. And you can pick the topics you want to explore.

Gail

===== Gail Hurn Amish Quilt Connection http://www.amishquiltconnection.com

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Subject: Swedish words for patchwork From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> Date: Fri, 17 Sep 2004 12:58:40 -0400 X-Message-Number: 16

From the book: Old Swedish Quilts by Asa Wettre:

"Patchwork quilts were associated with "simple folk" in Sweden and Holland. They spoke of "poverty covers" (armoededeken) and "beggars' covers (bedelaarsdeken)."

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Subject: Spanish word From: "Karen Erlandson" <quiltercooke.net> Date: Fri, 17 Sep 2004 12:30:37 -0500 X-Message-Number: 17

I used the word supplied by Pat (thanks again Pat!) - "la colcha" and my audience (an ESL class - from Mexico - not Spain) understood exactly what I meant. Now, if only I could understand what they said . . . Thanks again to all who responded. Karen

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Subject: Wooden Treadle Machine From: Jennifer Perkins <qltrstoreharlannet.com> Date: Fri, 17 Sep 2004 13:28:53 -0500 X-Message-Number: 18

Has anyone ever seen a wooden full-size treadle machine? I saw one at the Granary Mall in Walnut, Iowa today, where I purchased a beautiful 1870 quilt for a steal of a price! Anyway, the machine had a big picture of the US patent listing posted beside it. It was patented in April 26, 1880 by John and William Webster in Springfield, Ohio. Listed price is $7550.00 I told the guy I couldn't afford it, but I knew those who could! Their phone is 712-784-3331, and email is Granarymallcox.net if anyone is interested. They also had quite a collection of toy size sewing machines, some of which looked very unique! I have no connection, just thought that someone might really like this machine! Jennifer in Iowa NQACJ

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Subject: more definitions From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> Date: Fri, 17 Sep 2004 14:35:40 -0400 X-Message-Number: 19

That's great, Karen. This is National Hispanic Heritage Week!

I just looked in a Spanish to Spanish dictionary. First I looked for "colcha" and the definition translated means "covering of a bed".

On the other hand, when I looked for edredón, the definitions translated mean 1) plumage of certain doves of the north or 2) large pillow(s) that one places at the foot of the bed.

This info. is from /Iter Sopena: Diccionario Ilustrado de la Lengua Española/.

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Subject: Hand Hooked and Sewn Rug Documentation Project From: munseyjuno.com Date: Fri, 17 Sep 2004 14:51:09 -0400 X-Message-Number: 20

Trish: Are any other museums/states/whoever also documenting hand hooked rugs elsewhere in the country? Sandra on Cape Cod

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Subject: Vintage Quilt Show in Madison, GA From: Feedsackfanaticcs.com Date: Fri, 1

I received the following notice about a vintage quilt show in Madison, GA from Sarah Maugliani, Heritage Hall:

It is my pleasure to announce that the Morgan County Historical Society is hosting a Vintage Quilt Show beginning on October 21st and ending on November 13th.

The show will include pieced and appliqued quilts that date back from 1850-1910. One of the quilts, sewn in 1852, is even signed and dated with a handprint. We will also be featuring several Amish quilts (the log cabin in wool and the Courthouse steps). In addition to the displays at the show, there will be two Red Work Quilts done by children and documented in Ohio and an 1865 Crazy Quilt embroidered and constructed of silk, satin, and velvet.

Jean Wacker has exhibited quilts throughout Georgia at Quilt Guilds. We invite you to join us here at Heritage Hall for this three week event. If there are any questions you have concerning this upcoming attraction, please give us a call at (706) 342-9627.

Paula in GA


 


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