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Quilters Find a way to care

Subject: "Quilt" in Swedish From: Ady Hirsch <adamroninetvision.net.il>

> > > >Now - does anyone know what the word for "quilt" is in Italian or Swedish? Both those countries have native quilting traditions. I'm assuming it would be some derivative of "culcita" in Italy, but Sweden is another story.

Quilt in Swedish is lapptacken (with an Umlaut over the a  prnounced ae, lapptaecken) - much like the Dutch Lappendeken. Ady in Israel

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: September 17, 04 From: Trishherraol.com Date: 

Trish: Are any other museums/states/whoever also documenting hand hooked rugs elsewhere in the country? Sandra on Cape Cod I am not aware of any. But if there are other groups wanting to do this, we would be happy to share our experiences. We have no idea what will happen right now. But we do have some enthusiastic people wanting to do this project. I can hardly believe that we will get the overwhelming response that we did with our quilt documentation. Quilts have such a personal place within families that I doubt rugs can match. But if you don't ask you won't know. I am excited about the project.

Trish

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Subject: Quilt at the Met From: KareQuiltaol.com Date: Sun, 19 Sep 04

Just stumbled across this gorgeous English uilt on the Met's website

http://www.metmuseum.org/home.asp

When you get to the Met website (above) put the word "quilt' in the seach window. Next click on "The online Collection?" A choice of two quilts will pop up.

Also check out the Met's Antonio Ratti Textile Center http://www.metmuseum.org/Works_Of_Art/department.asp?dep

Enjoy both!

Karen Alexander

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Subject: Re: Quilt at the Met From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrowpatmedia.net>

Search for this too!!!!

Coverlet, ca. 1803 Sarah Furman Warner Williams Made in Mid-Atlantic, New York, New York, America Gift of Catharine E. Cotheal, 1938 (38.59)

Judy, aka the Ringoes Kid judygrowpatmedia.net

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Subject: Quilt at the Met - put coverlet in search From:  3

> if you put coverlet in the search facility it comes up...thanks. kerryx

> Coverlet, ca. 1803 > Sarah Furman Warner Williams > Made in Mid-Atlantic, New York, New York, America > Gift of Catharine E. Cotheal, 1938 (38.59) > > Judy, aka the Ringoes Kid > judygrowpatmedia.net > >

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Subject: Re: Quilt at the Met - put coverlet in search From: Sally Ward 

kerrybrackozemail.com.au wrote:

>>if you put coverlet in the search facility it comes up...thanks. kerryx

What a fantastic piece. Hours of entertainment with the zoom facility <G>. I'm puzzled though about the squiggles on the urn, which look like handwriting sloping backwards. Can anyone interpret for me, or is it possible the site has put the slide up reversed? And who is sheperding the sheep? Is it a longhaired youth or a lady in trousers?

Also what does 'Mid-Atlantic' mean in the details listing?

BTW - a great detail for me is the way the maker represented the sheep, with the fleece trailing at their rear ends. So exactly 'how it is'.

Sally W in Yorkshire, UK (plenty of sheep <G>)

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Subject: Re: Quilt at the Met - put coverlet in search From: "Monica

Mid-Atlantic usually refers to the region of States that are midway on the American Atlantic coast - Maryland, Delaware, Virginia, states in that area.

I have a question of my own, too. In the 19th century quilt description, it mentions the German quilting tradition. I've tried searching for German quilts to see what I can find for early German quilts but all that I can find are Pennsylvania quilts. Does anyone know of any sites that address German quilting history? I'm just curious now.

Thanks! Monica in Maine

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Subject: Re: Quilt at the Met - put coverlet in search From: Barb Garrett

Hi Sally --

Wonderful coverlet. Growing up in PA, I was taught that Mid Atlantic meant those states along the Atlantic Ocean that weren't New England (Maine, Conn, Mass, Rhode Island, Vermontt, New Hampshire), and weren't "The South" (Virginia, North and South Carolina, Georgia and Florida). Which would leave the Mid Atlantic states of New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware and Maryland -- the middle.

Barb in southeastern PA where it finally stopped raining

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Subject: Re: Quilt at the Met - put coverlet in search From: "Karen Evans"

Alas, there's very little on German quilting - there's a German quilt from the 16th century in the V&A (pictured in Colby and Staniland) and a couple of medieval appliques, but that's about it. Germans in Europe appear to have preferred applique to quilting; I'd be willing to bet that the "German quilting tradition" means "ethnic Germans in Pennsylvania making quilts."

Sorry I couldn't be of more help -

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Subject: Message from a Mennonite Quilt Maker From: Kris Driessen

This message is from Ann Lind, penlindyahoo.com, who sent it through the quilt history website.

I was born Old Order Mennonite. My family names include Yoder, Bontraeger, and Bollinger. I am still Brethren, but also work in the

English world with computers. Some people on your site are asking if

there is a specific pattern that we use. No, we use many traditional

patterns that the English use. We tend to cherish and repeat the ones that are from faith. My favorite is the Crown of Thorns, and my

mother's is the Peace Dove. Some of the names do not match the English names, because many of us who are Old Order still speak Old Dutch in the home. I quilt only by hand, and I cut each piece out one at a time with scissors. Also, I make rag dolls in the same way that my grandmother did and so on, with the hair of wool and each strand placed and knotted. I used to beg the mothers of my school friends to teach me to use a machine, but they would just laugh and shake their heads. I just wanted you to know that we do use many patterns which are the same, but have different names. Thank you.

Forwarded by Kris

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Subject: Re: Quilt at the Met - put coverlet in search From: Sally Ward

> Mid-Atlantic usually refers to the region of States that are midway on the > American Atlantic coast - Maryland, Delaware, Virginia, states in that area.

Ah! That makes sense. I was confused, you see, because when our more affected pop groups or actors start to adopt an American-tinged accent it is sometimes referred to as a 'mid-Atlantic' accent, meaning half-and-half.

Sally W Yorkshire, UK

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Subject: Re: Quilt at the Met - put coverlet in search From: "Laurette Carroll"

Hello Sally, the image is reversed, and the initials on the urn are PW for Phebe Warner for whom the coverlet was made. There are photos of this in America's Quilts and Coverlet's (Safford and Bishop). Laurette

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Subject: Re: Quilt at the Met - put coverlet in search From: "J. G. Row"

Hey, Moncia. You forgot Pennsylvania, New Jersey and New York. We're all considered Mid-Atlantic too.

Judy, aka the Ringoes Kid judygrowpatmedia.net 

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Subject: Monica's question From: Patricia L Cummings

Dear Monica:

In the UNL History of Quilts class that I took, we learned that Germans have no strong, early tradition of quiltmaking in their country. Even now, it is kind of a novelty. When my friend Tamara moved there a few years ago from Ukraine, she started teaching quilting and this was something very new to the area. Quilting is just starting to pick up speed in Germany but there is high interest.

Pat Cummings

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Subject: Re: Monica's question From: "Monica MacDonald"

Thanks, Pat - it explains why I couldn't find anything. The statement in the quilt's description piqued my curiosity primarily because I've never really heard anything about German quilting and I wondered why I hadn't. I wanted to make sure I wasn't missing anything! <G> Karen, thanks for your insight, too - you're probably right.

Just one more question today - is anyone else reading Founding Myths: Stories That Hide Our Patriotic Past by Ray Raphael? Very fascinating and lots of food for thought. I am particularly intrigued with Mr. Raphael's understanding of why these myths (Molly Pitcher, Paul Revere's Ride and more) came into being and how these myths sell us short. Anyway, as I read, this book frequently puts me in mind of some of the myth-busting challenges facing quilt historians - there are many parallels that can be drawn, I think.

Monica in Maine

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Subject: hooked mats documentation and quilt documentation in Nova Scotia

The Rug Hookers Guild of Nova Scotia have done an extensive documentation of mats here. They took on this project after a couple of their members volunteered for a Nova Scotia Heritage Quilt Project documentation day. They were quite fascinated with the process and all that we had learned. I believe they based their documentation form on the one we use for quilts. It is my understanding that they have registered thousands of mats/rugs. here is a link to their project...

http://www.rughookingonline.com/registering/registering.html

Our quilt documentation project has over 10 quilts registered so far and I feel we have barely scratched the surface. We hope to get going again in the spring.

Cheers,

Barbara Robson Fox Point, Nova Scotia Canada

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Subject: Re: recycled fabric and family quilt history From: JBQUILTOKaol.com

Years ago, my husband & I were both in the Air Force (He retired, I got out after 10 yrs). One of my first original quilt designs was a wall hanging to commemorate our time in uniform. I used the back of one of his light blue shirts for the center & appliqued silloettes of a male & female head wearing AF hats. I put a flag pole w/ an American flag between them. On the sides, I did a strip for each that has our stripes sewn to it. The top corners have our ribbon bars. Name tags, insignia, his sharp shooter medals & anything else that I could incorporate are stored on it.

This went to guild one night for show & share but has things that mean too much to me to hang in a show where little things tend to disappear off quilts. It was an early project & I'd do a lot of things differently if I ever had to remake it, but we've gotten a lot of compliements on it & we've really enjoyed the reminder of the great blue-suiter days after I married 'a southbound assignment'.

I agree that anyone who wants a military career keepsake needs one custom designed for the service member. And any quilter with a relative or close friend in service should volunteer to do it for them!

Janet Bronston

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Subject: Washington DC From: "Brenda & Roger Applegate"

I am going to Washington DC this week to see the native American exhibit  with my family.

Can anyone direct me as to where I can see an exhibit of quilts? My  guys will not be very patient and I know they will complain if I intend  to visit too many exhibits.

Thanks.

Brenda

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Subject: Re: Washington DC From: Senoperaaol.com Date: Sun, 19 Sep 04

Brenda,

Do you mean the new Indian Museum?? Bring comfortable shoes - it will probably be jammed!! It has just opened.

The DAR Museum is in that general area and they always have quilts on display, tho sometimes more than others. And the Smithsonian always does as well. Take a look at their websites and see what's currently up.

Sue

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: September 17, 04 From: MMiller138aol.com Date:

I live in Springfield, Ohio and would be glad to find out any info on the treadle by the Webster Bros. I am sure our Historical Society has that sort of info...let me know if you are in need thereof! Mary Miller

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Subject: Re: Washington DC From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net>

The DAR Museum at 1776 D. St. NW is usually the best bet for seeing quilts. However, I just got a notice of a quilt and sampler exhibit opening Oct. 7 so the gallery may be closed for installation. Call ahead and check. 2-879-3241. Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: Re: Electric Quilt 5: Complete Quilt Design Software From: "Merry

Jeff, I have never used Quilt Design Wizard, so I can't say anything about it, but I do own Electric Quilt 5, and it is a wonderful program. Not only is it very user friendly, which makes it perfect for beginners, but you will be amzes at what this program can do. Go to www.electricquilt.com to learn more. You will love it. I am not affiliated with Electric Quilt, yadda, yadda, yadda- I am merely a very satisfied customer who has used their products for years, and their customer service is absolutely the best! Good luck in your choice!

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Subject: Re: Quilt at the Met - put coverlet in search From: "Monica

Sorry, Judy - you were all lumped in under "states in that area". I hadn't had my coffee yet, what can I say... Monica in Maine (in cold, cold New England)

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Subject: Re: German quilting From: patkyser <patkyserhiwaay.net> Date:

RE: Dear Monica:

In the UNL History of Quilts class that I took, we learned that Germans have no strong, early tradition of quiltmaking in their country. Even now, it is kind of a novelty. When my friend Tamara moved there a few years ago from Ukraine, she started teaching quilting and this was something very new to the area. Quilting is just starting to pick up speed in Germany but there is high interest.

Pat Cummings

Back in the eighties, my friend Ginie Curtze lived here in Huntsville, Alabama and took quilting classes from me. She went home to Konstanz, Germany and has put on larger and larger quilt seminars/festivals each year. I taught for her several times in the 90's. Additionally she has taken the Esprit collection over there to exhibit, had Nancy Crow and many other "big name" American quilters over to teach. She is doing a great deal to promote quilting in Germany. If anyone is interested in contacting her personally, email me privately. As a result of her efforts (and that of others, of course, too) quilting is thriving, even booming in Germany now. Pat Kyser

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Subject: Quilt in Spanish and Quilt in Chile From: "Pilar Donoso"

Dear Friends:

We did it!!!!! We just had our Primer Congreso Chileno de Quilts. for  4 days we showed 250 Quilts, we have about 8 classes, stands and  everyting turn out great!

I organized this event. For the last 10 months I have not be able to  Quilt, to clean or anything else not related to the organization. We  had also participants from Argentina, Bolivia and USA. Quiltmaking it  is (or was maybe) not very well known in Chile, but we were surprised  about the amount of people that visit the Show. The place were we held  the Exposition it is an old Train Station, remodeled,and now serves as a  Cultural Center. The space is big, and very well lighted.

Even if the word Quilt it is not translated here in Chile, the word  should be colcha. We donB4t use edredF3n at all. Personally, I  donB4t like to use the word colcha too much, because it is related to  bed, and we are trying to teach the chilean people that Quilts could be  use also as wallhanging.

I didnB4t read the Digest from the last couple of days because we were  celebrating our Independance days.

Pilar Pilar Donoso Santiago, Chile

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Subject: something special From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Mon,  Sep 04 09:34:39 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

I love small house museums. There's almost always at least one fabulous treasure. The Calvin B. Taylor House in Berlin, MD is beautifully restored to the period when it was built (1830). They have an incredible chintz quilt made in Talbot Co., MD circa 1825 which descended in the family of one of their trustees. It's the kind of pieced medallion that Maryland ladies made before they turned their attention to applique in the 1840s. The quilt on the cover of A Maryland Album is an example (also made on the Eastern Shore), but not as spectacular as what I saw in Berlin. The center of the quilt (it is mostly red, white and blue) is a large Sunburst. The first border is four slightly smaller Sunbursts alternating with four chintz appliques of an eagle with his wings spread on a floral swag (okay, Xenia, tell us about this one). It's absolutley wonderful; I don't think I've seen it before. The second border is large half square triangles; #3 is a solid chintz; #4 is a wide band of pieced diamonds in a kind of chevron design; #5 is another wide band of chintz. The quilt is huge. One of the reds is blown, but otherwise it's in pretty good shape and so incredibly beautiful that I begged the docent to let me in the room for a closer look. I'm really good at whining and pleading so I prevailed. This confirms my belief that when you see a sign that says open you have to go in. Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: Re: something special From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net>

What would we do without Cinda to lead us visually through so many museums and quilt exhibits that most of us will never get to see in person? Her ability to draw word pictures for us is almost as good as being there.

OK, so Cinda has asked for comments on an eagle with his wings spread on a floral swag. All I know is what I have read various places: that after the War of 1812, when we flexed our national muscles and discovered we were in better shape in international conflicts than we thought, the eagle began to appear everywhere as a symbol of pride (think of the outbreak of flags following 9/11). In the early 19th C one could buy wallpaper, stenciled designs, butter molds, decorative mantle clocks, weathervanes, dinnerware, and on and on, all with images of the eagle. Coverlet weavers adopted them for the borders on jacquard coverlets (and sometimes the centers), and Samuel Graham of New Castle, in Indiana, created his own fairly fat and abbreviated eagle as his identifying corner block on the coverlets he wove. To be fair, his version is somewhat later, maybe in response to the Mexican War. And then there were the candlewick spreads, stuffed whitework quilts, and the appliqués.

Some of the eagles looked like road kill and others were posed more gracefully. Look, for instance, at the eagle on p. 15 of All Flags Flying; it looks like it was flattened by a steamroller. The Bird, The Banner, and Uncle Sam has numerous images in various media, some giving evidence that the makers' patriotism exceeded their ability to render the bird with elegance. The Baltimore Album Quilt Tradition shows a number of BAQs with eagles, some in Audubon-like poses with impossibly crooked necks, some flat, some busily holding all manner of military and patriotic accoutrements.

There, Cinda; now you've made me late for my quilt bee meeting <g>!

Xenia

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Subject: Re: Monica's question From: "Candace Perry"

And to insert my two cents, early immigrant Germans brought no quilting traditions, as far as I know, with them from the old country... Candace Perry

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Subject: Cotton exhibit news... From: "Candace Perry" 

I was just notified by our illustrious Congressman, Pat Toomey, that my museum is going to be receiving grant funds for our exhibit "Cotton in Pa German Life"...I am rather shell shocked at the moment because it is a highly competitive, Institute of Museum and Library Services grant program... I am going to sketch out details for those who are interested in an email to the list in the next day or so. The entire project will consist of the exhibition, a seminar, a kids' art exhibit (funded by another grant), a catalog and an online exhibit of some of the objects in exhibition. The in-house exhibit will open next spring. I'll be soliciting individuals who wish to present at a seminar and possibly for short article(s) in the catalog. I am very interested, for example, in a discussion of the importation of cotton to the U.S. and/or domestic production and distribution. And of course, any topics of PA German relevance...the use of cotton in quilts, clothing, and household accessories . Seminar has not yet been scheduled: I would be delighted to entertain suggestions as to favorable times (late spring? summer? early fall?) Still reeling, but most thrilled about our grant, Candace Perry Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center Pennsburg, PA

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Subject: Re: Cotton exhibit news... From: Kathie Holland

Congrats Candace will look forward to coming and spending a day at the musuem again! Keep us posted! Kathie in NJ

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Subject: Re: Cotton exhibit news... From: "selpaolini" <cigar2winverizon.net>

Sounds great Candace. A few questions. This is only for historically  made articles? And they must be made by either a German or Dutch German household? Other  ethnicities are excluded?

Thanks

Sue, on the Delaware in the Poconos ps just joined. how fortuitious!

matter represents the usefulness; non-matter the essence lao-tze

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Subject: Re: Cotton exhibit news... From: "Candace Perry"

Sue, yes, this is exclusively PA German, because my institution is very nearly exclusively PA German...and the materials in question would be produced by Pennsylvania Germans (or Pennsylvania Dutch, if that helps to define them). I suppose, most specifically, it would be objects produced by persons who were either immigrants, or descendants of immigrants, during the massive German immigrations to PA of the 18th century, rather than the later 19th century German immigrations. Candace Perry

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Subject: Re: Cotton exhibit news... From: "selpaolini" <cigar2winverizon.net>

thanks for the clarifcation. I know braiders and hookers who would fall  into that category. I'll pass it on. Parens added in for clarity.

Thanks Sue

matter represents the usefulness; non-matter the essence lao-tze.

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Subject: Re: Cotton exhibit news... From: "Candace Perry"

Sue, actually not produced only during the 18th century...sorry I wasn't clear...actually, produced from the 18th into the mid th century. Candace

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Subject: Re: Quilt in Spanish and Quilt in Chile From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> Date: Mon,  Sep 04 10:03:56 -0700 (PDT)

Congratulations, Pilar!!!! I remember when you first joined the list. You have accomplished a lot in a very short period of time. Welcome to our fellow quilters in Chile! Judy Schwender

Pilar Donoso <quiltpdmi.cl> wrote: Dear Friends:

We did it!!!!! We just had our Primer Congreso Chileno de Quilts. for 4 days we showed 250 Quilts, we have about 8 classes, stands and everyting turn out great!

I organized this event. For the last 10 months I have not be able to Quilt, to clean or anything else not related to the organization. We had also participants from Argentina, Bolivia and USA. Quiltmaking it is (or was maybe) not very well known in Chile, but we were surprised about the amount of people that visit the Show. The place were we held the Exposition it is an old Train Station, remodeled,and now serves as a Cultural Center. The space is big, and very well lighted.

Even if the word Quilt it is not translated here in Chile, the word should be colcha. We don´t use edredón at all. Personally, I don´t like to use the word colcha too much, because it is related to bed, and we are trying to teach the chilean people that Quilts could be use also as wallhanging.

I didn´t read the Digest from the last couple of days because we were celebrating our Independance days.

Pilar Pilar Donoso Santiago, Chile

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Subject: : Quilt in Spanish - is it patch From: <kerrybrackozemail.com.au>

pillar congrats. my argentinian friend says that people say commonly the word patch for quilting the verb. kerry who is presently in memphis.

This message was sent through MyMail http://www.mymail.com.au

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Subject: quilted petticoat From: Palamporeaol.com Date: Mon,  Sep 04 15:21:35 EDT X-Message-Number: 16

I have a quilt that is made of a quilted petticoat. Should I put it up on my website??? I didn't realize what it was for several weeks/days--- can't remember---. Then I saw a quilted petticoat in the Conn. quilt documentation book and it hit me in the head with a loud thud. A really fun piece. Not a beautiful quilt, but a fabulous textile for study. My mother-in-law gave us a quilt for our wedding in 1980 and she had fabric in it that dated from 19-1980. It has swatches from her clothing in it. She didn't do it to be sentimental. She did it because she liked the fabric. She grew up on the coast of NC and they didn't have road to the mainland until the early 1930's. She was accustomed to using what she had. Don, do you have several Sanitary Com. quilts to share with us? What are the patterns you are using? Have you written an article on this? I think your project is a great idea. Lynn in NC where the weather is fabulous.....blue sky with cool temps....AND NO RAIN!!!!

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Subject: Re: Cotton exhibit news... From: "selpaolini" <cigar2winverizon.net> Date: Mon,  Sep 04 16:50:40 -0400 X-Message-Number: 17

well that's why I wrote it as I understood it. I've got some people via  a friend on other lists; she posted it and they all contacted her  wanting to know if they are eligible. Should I have them contact you  directly?

Regards

matter represents the usefulness; non-matter the essence lao-tze

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Subject: a black centered log cabin quilt From: ikwltcox.net Date: Mon,  Sep 04 15:36:26 -0700 X-Message-Number: 18

a lady called me who is a long arm quilter and told me about a quilt top that she has in her possession. it comes from a woman who is about 70 years old and that woman said that her great-great grandmother made it. it is a log cabin design and has black centers. the quilter and i had a long discussion about the 'underground signal' of the black centers and she doesn't have any thots that it might be a signal quilt, but she had heard of the story and wondered about any extra value this quilt might have because if its rarity. i explained to her the highly controversial HIPV book along with the skepticism that quilts were ever used in this way -- and i'm sorry to bring it up to this group once again. the owner knows nothing about quilts, just wanted it quilted to give to her daughter for christmas. also, i'm taking all of this information with a grain of salt until i can actually see the quilt top in question.

i will see the quilt tonite (hopefully), or at least in this next week. i would love any comments about a black center in the log cabin as i have never seen one before, and only heard of it in the story of the UGRR. from her vague description, it sounds like it is going to be from the late 1900s, basing this mostly on the shirtings and a few what sound like mourning prints. i hope to borrow a digital camera for a few pictures, but have never posted pictures before. as i take the digest, i most likely won't even see any responses to my post until after i see the quilt unless you e-mail me directly. she was asking me about quilting it and at least at this point she is considering using cotton batt, muslin backing, and just gridding the quilt using the centers of every other '3/4" log.

some questions won't be able to be answered unless i can talk to the owner, but i'm anxious to get my paws on this one. patti in san diego

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Subject: Re: a black centered log cabin quilt From: Judy Schwender

As part of my research on Log Cabin quilts for my master's degree in textile history from the University of Nebraska- Lincoln, I analyzed 72 Log Cabin from the International Quilt Study Center that were made in the 19th century.

Of the 72 quilts surveyed for the project, 33 have red centers, 10 have blocks with many different fabrics for centers, 6 have orange centers, 5 blue, 4 pink, 4 brown, 4 black, 2 green, 2 off-white or tan, 1yellow, and 1 purple.

So, while black as a center color appears to be not as common in surviving Log Cabin quilts (there is always the bias of survival) as some other colors, it may have been used as often as pink or brown, and could have been more frequently used than purple, yellow, off-white or tan, and green. I don't think you can say it is rare. Unless there is accompanying documentation such as a letter or diary which specifically states why a particular color was used, any ideas we may have are pure speculation.

If this quilt was, in fact, made in the late 19th century, any connection to the UGRR would be entirely misleading. More likely the black centers came about because black was part of the palette of the day: claret, navy, black.

As for value, that determination should be made by a qualified appraiser. You can find appraisers in your area at http://www.quiltappraisers.org or http://www.americanquilter.com/members/appraisers/.

I would be interested as to whether the black centers are solid black or black prints.

Judy Schwender

ikwltcox.net wrote: a lady called me who is a long arm quilter and told me about a quilt top that she has in her possession. it comes from a woman who is about 70 years old and that woman said that her great-great grandmother made it. it is a log cabin design and has black centers. the quilter and i had a long discussion about the 'underground signal' of the black centers and she doesn't have any thots that it might be a signal quilt, but she had heard of the story and wondered about any extra value this quilt might have because if its rarity. i explained to her the highly controversial HIPV book along with the skepticism that quilts were ever used in this way -- and i'm sorry to bring it up to this group once again. the owner knows nothing about quilts, just wanted it quilted to give to her daughter for christmas. also, i'm taking all of this information with a grain of salt until i can actually see the quilt top in question.

i will see the quilt tonite (hopefully), or at least in this next week. i would love any comments about a black center in the log cabin as i have never seen one before, and only heard of it in the story of the UGRR. from her vague description, it sounds like it is going to be from the late 1900s, basing this mostly on the shirtings and a few what sound like mourning prints. i hope to borrow a digital camera for a few pictures, but have never posted pictures before. as i take the digest, i most likely won't even see any responses to my post until after i see the quilt unless you e-mail me directly. she was asking me about quilting it and at least at this point she is considering using cotton batt, muslin backing, and just gridding the quilt using the centers of every other '3/4" log.

some questions won't be able to be answered unless i can talk to the owner, but i'm anxious to get my paws on this one. patti in san diego

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Subject: Boothbay Harbor (Maine) Quilt Festival Sept 30-Oct3 From: "Bonnie

Hello all,

I am way behind in reading my QHL messages, so forgive me if this has already been posted by someone else. However, it sounds too good to miss, so here it is.

For those of you who might be in the northeast in a couple of weeks, you may be interested in a first (hopefully annual) quilt festival on the beautiful coast of Maine. I will include the organizers' brief description from the brochure and provide a link to the website, so you can read more if you wish.

"The festival begins with a champagne reception featuring guest lecturer Robert Shaw, the newly appointed Executive Director of The Alliance for American Quilts. Our program then offers visitors "three different shows"! The centerpiece will be the juried quilt show on the first floor of the Opera House with a special exhibit of antique quilts. On the second floor, in the "quilting room", is "New Directions". In this exhibition, Jennifer Gilbert, curator of the New England Quilt Museum, arranges an exploration into the personal vision of three Maine quilt makers- Elizabeth Busch, Mary Allen Chaisson and Patricia Wheeler. There are vendors on board to offer quilters and quilt lovers everything from fabric and supplies to finished quilts and wearable art. Our highly qualified teachers offer a wide range of classes to satisfy all, from beginners to seasoned quilters, both traditional and contemporary in style." For more info: http://www.msquilts.com/brochure%intro.htm

See you all in Vancouver. My 2-color study piece is almost done!

Bonnie Dwyer in Maine, where the trees are *just* beginning to show some fall color. <http://www.msquilts.com/brochure%intro.htm> <http://www.msquilts.com/brochure%intro.htm>

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Subject: black centered log cabin From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>

Hi, I have a number of late 1800's Log Cabin quilts and mounted an exhibit last year of late 1800's Log Cabins. Of mine, I have one with dark brown, one with black, and one red--in the exhibit of 18 quilts, I have two black, one cream, one dark blue, one brown and the rest were either red or pink. So it probably has nothing to do with UGRR. In fact, black fabric was almost never used in Civil War era quilts and did'nt become popular until the 1880 onward. Don Beld

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Subject: RE: Quilt at the Metropolitan Museum online From: "JG Kane"

Thanks for the recommendation. I've been having a wonderful time zooming in and out - beware it leads to stiff necks!

The use of so many fabrics in the quilt reminded me of a couple of quilts in the new exhibition at Carlisle,(Cumbria, UK) both of which had hexagon borders, and the same beautiful ,mosaic -type ,overall effect.I was interested to see, in the description at the Met. site, that they think the maker may have had access to fabric samples.One of the quilts that I mentioned is dated 1790, and is absolutely exquisite - in design, colour, stitching. It has an applique centre of 4 squares of flowers tied with striped ribbon with borders of plain zigzag, separated by unbleached calico sashing that also has applique flowers and their stems twining along them.There are 3 further borders of mosaic patchwork - the double hexagon rosettes, zigzag and chained squares. In making this ,however, the stitcher has often first pieced tiny fragments of fabric together before she had sufficient to cut the square or hexagon that she then pieced into the pattern. In many instances she even managed to match the fabric patterns- 4 or 5 bits going together to create a 1 1/2" or 2" square.Some of the calico used in sashing looked like the edges of patterned fabrics - there are traces of the tips of a design or printing on them. I'm planning to return with a magnifying glass!

The other quilt can be seen at the Tullie museum website <www.tulliehouse.co.uk>. Go to the textile collection and scroll down to the quilts section, where there is a picture of an 1850 quilt, another northern, English, beauty 

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Subject: Irish Chain From: "Celia Eddy" <celia.eddybtinternet.com>

Does anyone know why this pattern is so-called? What's Irish about it?

Barbara Brackman, in Clues in the Calico, suggests that it may be  derived from a weaving pattern of that name. Any other thoughts?

Thanks Celia Eddy ------_NextPart_000_0013_01C49FC9.73C5C400--

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Subject: Re: Irish Chain From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Tue, 21 Sep 04 13:21:43 +0100 X-Message-Number: 5

Celia Eddy wrote:

> Does anyone know why this pattern is so-called? What's Irish about it?

On the back of Celia's question, I've just read a reference to 'ninepatch chain' which I took to be the same pattern but wasn't something I have often heard. Any comments on that, as well?

Sally W

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Subject: old log cabin top From: "Jan Drechsler" <quiltdocsover.net> Date: Tue, 21 Sep 04 11:30:25 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

The question that wasn't asked may be the most important.

Why on earth would a quilt top, probably foundation pieced, with mourning prints aging it to about 100-1 years old, even BE machine quilted to "preserve it?'

A log cabin that was hand quilted, instead of tied, is unusual. What damage will machine quilting render...immediately or in a decade or more.

IMHO, any knowledgeable machine quilter wouldn't touch this job. I have seen a ton of log cabins here in Massachusetts and wouldn't put a sewing machine to an heirloom.

That said, I did take a circa 1910 red and white court house square top apart entirely and square it and remove damaged squares. But it had no provenance, was stained in parts beyond bearing and was saved from a junk pile. I then resewed the squares back together by machine, backed and tied it and I have a visually dynamic wall quilt. All the fabrics were sturdy, with backings of linen or denim to start with, not fine dress cottons.

Question machine quilting the piece.

Regards, Jan -- Jan Drechsler in Vermont Quilt Restoration; Quilting teacher www.sover.net/~bobmills

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Subject: that black centered log cabin From: ikwltcox.net Date: Tue, 21 Sep 04 08:59:56 -0700 X-Message-Number: 8

well, i am a bit disappointed now that i've gotten to see the quilt. it did have shirtings, but it was made closer to the 30s/40s by using the fabrics to date it. the earliest fabric was a mourning print with color, and only two of those. the majority was s fabrics, and a good number of 40s. the MQer is going to pass along the information to the owner so that a label can be made to more accurately put a time-frame to it. i explained that this is an important thing to stress to the owner so that she doesn't assume it is really really old based on the family story. the centers were definitely a solid black, and i hope i was able to impress on this list that in no way did i ever even think it was related to the UGRR. thank you to all who e-mailed me privately, i passed along the info the the MQer who called me because she first met me at her guild meeting after a trip back east where she had bought three quilts. i helped give her an idea of the time frames for those quilts, and she knew enough to have second thots about MQing this quilt. with this new knowledge she feels better doing it now, and we talked about some appropriate patterns and backings to use. it feels good to be able to help increase knowledge and appreciation of old quilts. that you all so much for the information that is discussed each day on this list. i have learned much by just lurking and checking out referenced websites. dutchrose

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Subject: Washington, D.C. From: "Edith L. Taylor" <etaylorku.edu> Date: Tue, 21 Sep 04 11:29:03 -0500 X-Message-Number: 10

One of my favorite D.C. museums is the Textile Museum. It's on a quiet side street near Dupont Circle, I think. It's at 23 S Street NW. It's a small museum, but has a wonderful gift shop with an excellent selection of books and other treasures! http://www.textilemuseum.org/

Also, within the Smithsonian museums, the Renwick Gallery (not on the mall) is the museum of American craft. They often have interesting exhibits. And I've heard that the Museum of American History (on the Mall) has quilts and other textiles on display, but I haven't been there (yet). Look on the Smithsonian's web site: www.si.edu for more information about current exhibits.

Have fun! I love to do the musems in D.C.!

Edie Taylor Lawrence, KS

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Subject: New quilt book story From: Susan Bleimehl <bleimehlmailbag.com> Date: Tue, 21 Sep 04 11:33:10 -0500 X-Message-Number: 12

I recently read a book geared for middle school audience called "The Quilt" by Gary Paulsen. The summary reads: During World War II, while his father is in Europe fighting and his mother is working in Chicago, a six-year-old boy goes to live with his grandmother in a rural Norwegian American community in Minnesota. Based on events from the author's life.

The quilt of the title refers to a signature quilt that is the family, but has an interesting twist. This quilt only gets names put on it when a person dies. The quilt is carried to family gathering occasions and stories are told about each of the names on the quilt. In this way family history and stories are passed from one generation to another.

It is a really sweet story. I hope that those of you who have an interest in signature quilts have a chance to read this. It brings alive the very personal meaning these quilts have.

Susan Bleimehl

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Subject: Congreso Chileno de Quilts From: RBCochranaol.com Date: 

I

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Subject: Re: Washington, D.C. From: Carol Elmore

"One of my favorite D.C. museums is the Textile Museum. It's on a quiet side street near Dupont Circle, I think. It's at 23 S Street NW. It's a small museum, but has a wonderful gift shop with an excellent selection of books and other treasures! http://www.textilemuseum.org/"

Edie and all, Yes, I loved it, too. I visited there this past June. The contemporary and historical tapestry exhibits were oustanding. Did you also tour the Woodrow Wilson home which is a couple of doors down on the same street? I thought it was quite interesting also. It was the home that Pres. Wilson lived in after his presidency. Walking around some of the streets where the embassies were located was interesting as well. There were many from countries that I didn't know a lot about. I had to ask my geography major son where Myanmar, Benin, and Mauritania were located. Then it was interesting to read about those countries. I learned a lot.

Carol Elmore Manhattan, Kansas

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Subject: Old quilt tops and machine quilting From: Patricia L Cummings

Jan D. brought up a very important point when she said that she does not generally machine quilt old tops. I can't tell you how many times I have been asked for advice on this very subject. Generally, no one likes my answer. The end up doing what they had intended to do before asking me. I guess they just wanted me to wave my hand and give a blessing that it was okay to do this, and were extremely disappointed to hear the following answer:

Old quilt tops can be very fragile. While they may look "sturdy" to the naked eye, there is more going on, on a molecular level. Cotton was once a growing fiber. If the fiber is old, it is the process of breaking down, decomposing. There are some old fabrics I would not even hand quilt, let alone subject the ancient cloth to the rigors of machine quilting. Such weak fibers can often turn to dust (poof!) before your eyes, the minute you put a needle to it.

While machine quilting is a growing industry that is enjoyed by many and while it is very excellent in getting a new quilt quilted very rapidly, my personal preference is that it be used only for new quilts. I'll go out on a limb even further here and say that to me, it looks ridiculous to see some of the traditional patterns (antique quilts) overlaid with pantograph stitching. There, I've said it. You can hate me, if you must.

I think that we can best honor our tradition of quilting and the work of our grandmothers, aunts, and other forebears whose heirloom treasure we may have in hand, if we keep her work, as she left it. Enjoy it for what it is. Make a copy of it and make your own quilt to use and if you want to machine quilt it, that will be your preference.

These are just a few thoughts, and probably unwelcome, unsolicited advice. Not trying to start WWIII here or a huge discussion as to the value of machine quilting or not. I'm just saying that it is important to think about your decision very carefully because sometimes the result will be irreversible.

From one who cares about the treasures of time,

Pat Cummings

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Subject: Re: Old quilt tops and machine quilting From: "Sharon in NC" 

Well I do machine quilt older tops per customer requests. These tops are usually era 1940-1970, made of all types of fabrics and would be impossible to hand quilt.

Currently I have three in progress that were made around 1967 ( the maker died in 1969) and are made from cotton scraps. They are all off kilter, none of the seams match, one is more of a diamond shape than a square and I won't even begin to get into the other problems..lol... But the owner remembers her mother making these when her Alzheimer's got so severe all she could do was sit and sew scraps together by hand. She wants quilts the grandkids can keep but use since they already have much nicer ones made by the same grandmother when she was in her prime. (I had to put them on hold until the move is done so some may have heard me mention them before.) She did NOT want any corrections made even squaring up so we had to work together to accomplish her desires and yet end up with usable bed quilts. One I ended up setting with off kilt borders so it has a funky retro look and yet is finished square to actually fit a bed...smile... I have had 5 different customers come to me in the last two years alone with "after Alzheimer's tops". All of these have been referrals from a single lady and all have requested just as she did for the tops to not be corrected or "fixed prior to quilting". So it isn't just a single one time experience.

Another set of three that were just dropped off last week are all beautiful round the world variations from 2 inch scraps but are ALL made of polyester. The stitching is all by hand and perfect, not a single seam off or square not a perfect 1 1/2 after piecing. One is 118 inches square!!! The owner purchased them at auction and wants to give them to her boys and their wives as mementos again of someone they knew growing up. These tops would never be considered museum quality no matter how they were finished or left and she definitely wants them quilted and not tied. She recently had a stroke and is now unable to finish them herself. So again I discussed with her what she envisioned and how we could accomplish that but within a reasonable cost to her. Obviously she didn't want to spend over a thousand dollars on the extra large one to get it hand quilted. And she does not care for tied quilts.. So again we go back to machine quilting.

So while I agree that a historically significant work should be kept and preserved there are instances where older tops can be machine quilted with the right care and patience.

Sharon in NC

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Subject: Museum - Turkey Red From: KareQuiltaol.com Date: Tue, 21 

http://www.sdc.org.uk/museum/turkeyredarchive.htm

Here is another great website. Stumbled across this one via a post on the BQHL list about a Scottish quilting seminar that is planned for next May -- www.lochlomondquiltshow.com

Karen Alexander

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Subject: antique date cut off From: Patricia L Cummings

Sharon wrote:

Well I do machine quilt older tops per customer requests. These tops are usually era 1940-1970, made of all types of fabrics and would be impossible to hand quilt.

* * * * * * * *

Just for the record, I was thinking of 1880s and 1930s antique quilts when I made my remarks.

Pat

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Subject: Asian quiltingculture in Texas From: "Marcia Kaylakie"

HI All, this is a general query to those QHL people who may know of any  type of Asian quilting culture in Texas. Would you please contact me?  Thanks, Marcia Kaylakie Marcia Kaylakie, AQS Certified Appraiser Austin, TX  www.texasquiltappraiser.com

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Subject: Re: Old quilt tops and machine quilting From: "ElizaBeth L. 

Why go to all the time and effort to make a quilt, if you're not going to quilt it by hand. I just started quilting and yes, it takes me forever to do a quilt by hand, but the result is worth it. Yes, my stitches have a lot of room for improvement, but everyone was a starter at one time. I get great pleasure from doing it by hand. I look at the ones that my mothers and grandmother's did and I can't imagine them doing it by machine. I agree with Patricia and how to do it.

Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> wrote:Jan D. brought up a very important point when she said that she does not generally machine quilt old tops. I can't tell you how many times I have been asked for advice on this very subject. Generally, no one likes my answer. The end up doing what they had intended to do before asking me. I guess they just wanted me to wave my hand and give a blessing that it was okay to do this, and were extremely disappointed to hear the following answer:

Old quilt tops can be very fragile. While they may look "sturdy" to the naked eye, there is more going on, on a molecular level. Cotton was once a growing fiber. If the fiber is old, it is the process of breaking down, decomposing. There are some old fabrics I would not even hand quilt, let alone subject the ancient cloth to the rigors of machine quilting. Such weak fibers can often turn to dust (poof!) before your eyes, the minute you put a needle to it.

While machine quilting is a growing industry that is enjoyed by many and while it is very excellent in getting a new quilt quilted very rapidly, my personal preference is that it be used only for new quilts. I'll go out on a limb even further here and say that to me, it looks ridiculous to see some of the traditional patterns (antique quilts) overlaid with pantograph stitching. There, I've said it. You can hate me, if you must.

I think that we can best honor our tradition of quilting and the work of our grandmothers, aunts, and other forebears whose heirloom treasure we may have in hand, if we keep her work, as she left it. Enjoy it for what it is. Make a copy of it and make your own quilt to use and if you want to machine quilt it, that will be your preference.

These are just a few thoughts, and probably unwelcome, unsolicited advice. Not trying to start WWIII here or a huge discussion as to the value of machine quilting or not. I'm just saying that it is important to think about your decision very carefully because sometimes the result will be irreversible.

From one who cares about the treasures of time,

Pat Cummings

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Subject: Civil War quilts From: "Corinna Camacho" <c.camachocomcast.net>

Hi,

I have been reading the postings and have finally gotten the time to  write. Last year, I started doing research on Civil War quilts at the  request of my daughter's 5th grade teacher. I didn't know much about  the Civil War nor quilts. I am an English Professor at SJSU. However,  I found several quilts with extensive amounts of text written in pen.  Unfortunately, the pictures of these quilts are from a distance that  makes reading the text impossible. The one I am most interested in  reading appears in the book Hearts and Hands. It was engineered and  overseen by Cornelia Dow. The author only transcribed one playful  sentence. "While our fingers guide the needle, Our thoughts are intense  (tents)." There are also two other authors who wrote on quilts, one is  on an Evening Star cradle quilt and the other was done by Mary High  Prince.

My father is from Alabama and has been an avid Civil War historian his  entire life. I have been relying on him for information. He felt that  most of the quilts I would like to find would be found in people's attic  trunks. The one I mentioned in the book is the Collection of the  Simmons family. I actually dragged my family through the South this  last summer. We started in Atlanta and worked our way up to Gettysburg.  We loved it. The kids learned so much about the Civil War and the  cultural differences that exist in the U.S. I made several discoveries  and contacts. The trip made me even more committed to the idea of  creating a collection of quilt writings.

I am sending out this plea for anyone who knows of one of these quilts.  I have contacted a couple of publishers and have been encouraged to  collect these writings and put together an anthology. I would naturally  give full credit to the owners of the quilts. Any help would be greatly  appreciated. I just feel strongly that these women wanted to be heard  and chose the only medium available to them. I think it is worth the  effort to publish their words again but on a more traditional and widely  distributed medium.

Thank you, Corinna

 


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