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Quilters Find a way to care

Subject: Precious Water & Digital Camera From: "BOBBIE A AUG"

I had the privilege of appraising Precious Water for Hollis Chatelain  last August when she shipped her quilt to my home. I had the honor of  studying every inch of this textile and I can tell you that it was pure  artistry. And, there was quilting and thread enhancement everywhere!  All of her quilts come to her in dreams and she spends sometimes years  drawing them and executing her designs. It was painted in four hues of  yellow and stitched with over 200 spools of thread. I guess that counts  as sewing!

My digital is a Nikon Cool Pix. It is 3.2 MP and I have had it about 2  years or so. It was over $500 and is probably half that now. I am very  pleased with it in every application - including a 3 minute movie mode  that I use with my laptop and LCD projector for illustrating sewing  techniques, etc. I have a battery recharger with an adapter for my  cigarette lighter in my car, but I don't find that battery usage is a  problem. However, I always carry a spare. Shopping for features is  ongoing as products change rapidly to keep up with competition and now  cameras are so cheap that having more than one is not unreasonable,  depending on the application.

The quilts in Houston were wonderful - but so is every FINISHED quilt!

Bobbie

Bobbie A. Aug Author, lecturer, teacher, AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser

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Subject: camera information From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> 

Here's quick armchair browsing for camera selections http://tech.nytimes.com/top/news/technology/products/cameras/index.html

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Subject: Re: need dates of AQSG 2005 From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net>

Hi, Marcia - don your boots and cowboy hat for Golden October 7-9, 2005! And if you really want to plan ahead, mark down October 6-8, 2006, for Farmington, CT.

I was sorry to hear your trip to Italy resulted in a bum back; those airline seats are killers, especially if you sit for 8 hours. Houston was interesting but not particularly lucrative; the quilts, however, were spectacular, and the show floor and exhibit spaces just keep getting bigger! Someone said if you walked all of the aisles (which I did) you would have walked 5 miles!

Thanks for the offer of the page(s) from Modern Priscilla. I am still trying to buy an actual copy; can't believe they are so hard to find, and so pricey!

Xenia

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Subject: email address From: "Marcia Kaylakie" <marciarkearthlink.net> 

HI All, for those of you who might have had my old email address  marciarkev1.net , please note that I have turned off that service due  to server problems and am only using my current address. I will put up a  reminder on my website. Thanks, Marcia Marcia Kaylakie, AQS Certified Appraiser Austin, TX 20 www.texasquiltappraiser.com ------_NextPart_000_0021_01C4C7B9.A9ECC480--

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Subject: One more thing on the Sanitary Commission Quilts From: "Linda

I was so tired yesterday.... I reviewed my post and realized I got my wires cross about which group I was posting to. I made a remark about an "onion" who traveled far to be with us. Just to clarify, I am on an on line list of antique sewing machine collectors as well as this list dealing with quilt history. The term "onion" refers to a person on the Treadle On (used to be called a Treadleonian, then shortened to "onion") At any rate, that remark (though few of you are on both lists, I note) was totally off topic for this group and I apologize. At any rate, what I meant to comment on here (but was really not "up" to posting, I guess) was that our own Pat Cummings and her wonderful husband Jim traveled about an hour's ride from Concord NH to join out group in making these historic quilts for the soldier's families. It was great to meet her. Just wanted to add that if you are not familiar with Pat's writings or work, that she is as gracious as she is an excellent writer and quilter. Her sewing kit is this amazingly crazy quilted "wonder"! She is quite talented! Please do take note that Pat's article on this project will be appearing in the next issue of The Quilter magazine. Thanks, and sorry of being a bit "off" last night. Linda Heminway Plaistow NH

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Subject: One more thing on the Sanitary Commission Quilts From: Joan Kiplinger

Linda -- I enjoyed your slide presentation and thanx for sharing those moments. I recognized Pat Cummings but wish there had been a way to ID the others who gave their time to help with this project. Linda Heminway wrote:

> I was so tired yesterday.... I reviewed my post and realized I got my > wires cross about which group I was posting to. I made a remark about > an "onion" who traveled far to be with us. Just to clarify, I am on > an on line list of antique sewing machine collectors as well as this > list dealing with quilt history. The term "onion" refers to a person > on the Treadle On (used to be called a Treadleonian, then shortened to > "onion") At any rate, that remark (though few of you are on both > lists, I note) was totally off topic for this group and I apologize. > >

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Subject: RE: Update on Sanitary Commission Quilt project From: "pines"

Linda

Thank-you for hosting this, all the hard work you put into it. Wow, six quilts--that is a far cry from one or two, I am glad that we will make a positive impression on the grieving families.

pines 

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Subject: Hitting "reply" From: pkeirsteadcomcast.net 

I'm going to piggy-back on Lynn Gorges' request about not hitting reply. I agree with her--it's annoying to read the same original message several times--but it's OK to hit reply if you delete the original message at the bottom of the page.

Having said that, I want to add that I can put up with this mild annoyance for the privilege of reading what all you talented and well-informed quilters have to say.

I've noticed that some computer-savvy QHLers cut and paste relevant portions of the original message so they can respond point by point; I really like that!

Thanks for listening.

Peggy Keirstead in mild north Texas

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Subject: Re: Hitting "reply" From: "ElizaBeth L. Haubold" 

Peggy, where in mid-north Texas do you live, if I might ask? I live in Denton. ElizaBeth

Peggy Keirstead in mild north Texas

ElizaBeth eliza1057yahoo.com

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Subject: RE: FL quilts From: "Teddy Pruett" <aprayzerhotmail.com> 

Lynn Says: <<No one responded to how the Fla. quilt project will be done. Will it be treated as several states? How will Fla. quilts be determined?>>

Well, with sincere apologies to the Florida members of this list, we ain't got a clue. Does such a thing as a "Florida Quilt" exist? As an appraiser who works all over the state, my business consists of 90% Yankee quilts that have retired to the Sunshine (and hurricane) state. Because we will be encouraging guilds to document their members quilts, and because 90% of those members are from upnawth, my guess is that we will be documenting quilts from New England and surrounding areas, particularly PA, OH, Michigan and other points north, but very seldom west of the Mighty Mississippi. Please bear in mind that my response is right off the top of my little white-spikey haired head, and is in no way to be construed to be information of any value whatsoever.

Those of you who were kind enough to sign up for my AQSG study center are heads-up on exactly what a Florida quilt is. As for our committee, we are still planning and organizing and getting our act together. Teddy Pruett

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Subject: There will be peace in the valley...someday...QR From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> Date: Thu, 11 Nov 2004 13:11:20 -

Dear List Members:

How pleasant to find so many compliments about my husband and I on the list this morning. We certainly enjoyed the time we spent yesterday with Linda and a very dedicated group of quilters who are making Sanitary Commission repro. quilts. Some of these same ladies also get together on a regular basis to make quilts for the homeless through a program called "Ugly Quilts". If some of you don't know why it is called that, the idea is that the quilts be warm but not so attractive that they would have value, money-wise, to the point that they would incite violence, or be stolen to be turned into cash.

So far, New Hampshire has lost six soldiers to the War on Terror. One would have been too many. I heard Linda say that when she is making quilts for the homeless, or these quilts, she ponders how very lucky she is in her own life. We can all count our blessings, and it IS a blessing to do for others.

My article in The Quilter magazine, Jan. 2005 issue, first appeared about a week ago. Since then, Don Beld, the quilter and historian (and our friend) who first conceived of this nationwide effort, has been contacted over and over again by those wanting to help, or by those who have lost a family member and do not have a local guild willing to make a commemorative quilt. The calls he gets sometimes bring tears to his eyes. Our nation's dilemma and its ongoing entrenchment in lands far away, and the loss of our young people, is beyond sad.

I would just like to encourage any of you who can sew, to think about joining in this project. You don't have to make perfect quilts. These are machine stitched, and hand tied or even perhaps, machine quilted. The thought is what counts, more than anything. The blocks are easy to make. Even if you can make one block, that is a big help.

I am very inspired by Linda and Don and all of the ladies who have stepped forward to work on these quilts so far. Just as the Civil War women who made quilts for Union soldiers made a difference and then stepped into the annals of history, so too, are the quilters of today who are helping to shape the face of history by their generosity and kindness. Their actions will NOT go unnoticed, now or in the future.

Thanks again, Linda, for your very kind words. I am sure the Jim and I were very pleased to help and were delighted to finish the quilt destined to be given to the four year old child up north. Blessings to you as you continue your outreach efforts. Don, all I can say is, "you're the best".

Hugs,

Pat Cummings

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Subject: Political Quilts From: Judy Knorr <jknorroptonline.net> 

Pam, At the NJ State Quilt Show last June in Edison, NJ there was a special display on quilts with houses as a theme. One of those quilts was about President Bush and the White House. If I remember correctly its title was something like "The House My Daddy's Friends Built". I got such a big chuckle out of that quilt and I took a picture of it. I just checked my album, but I haven't printed those pictures yet. Thought I might be able to pick out the name of the maker. Maybe someone else on the list was at that show and has the name or picture of it. I just happened to think about my show program and I checked it. The exhibit was titled "Dwellings". I remember the quilt was made by a man and the only male name on the list of quiltmakers for that exhibit is Jim Griffin. The name given for the quilt in the program is "Political Dwellings". It's a small quilt but very clever. The exhibit said it was "an exhibit of Art Quilts from NJ Artists based on the word Dwellings, curated by Lois Griffin". The NJ Quilt Guild website is: www.njquilt.org Perhaps they could help you track it down. Judy Knorr

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Subject: Re: Political Quilts From: "Christine Thresh" <

Is this an old listing for political quilts?

http://www.brandywinemuseum.org/news_print/news009_print.html

Christine Thresh

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Subject: Re: Political quilts From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> 

Okay. I don't want anybody accusing me of introducing politics to the list. I'm answering Pam's querstion. I made a polictical quilt to commemorate the 2000 election. It's a redwork portrait of George W. inside an appliqed President's Wreath of Ely Walker (his g-g-grandfather founded the company) fabric with a frame of bunting-type red. white and blue fabric. Next to his left eye I appliqed a tiny butterfly to mark the bizarre circumstances in Florida. Challenged (by DH John) to make a 2004 quilt, all I had the heart to do was to applique a diagonal red stripe acoss his face. Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: political quilts From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> 

To apologize for my gaffe early this morning, when I sent a message to everyone that was meant for Marcia K., here is a little more info on political quilts. I think it may be necessary to make a distinction between political quilts and patriotic quilts; is the focus of this research just quilts featuring political candidates, or does it include those quilts with patriotic themes and colors that refer to events that may be of political origin?

Here are two good examples: Prosperity Is Just Around the Corner. made by Fannie B. Shaw, Van Alstyne, Texas, 1930-32. Cotton, pieced and appliqué with embroidery, 72” x 86”. Twentieth Century Quilts; and the National Recovery Act quilt, p. 100.

Both of these quilts commemorate events or situations arising from the politics of the 1930s; are they patriotic, political, or both?

Here are some titles (in no particular order) where political/patriotic quilts and textiles can be found:

The Bird, the Banner, and Uncle Sam All Flags Flying The Baltimore Album Quilt Tradition Glorious American Quilts (MAFA) The Hawaiian Quilt Twentieth Century Quilts 1900-1950 How to Compare & Value American Quilts The Fabric of Persuasion The Power of Cloth, Political Quilts 1845-1986 Antiques Journal July 1971, "Presidential Quilts" p.17 Celebration and Remembrance, Commemorative Textiles in America 1790-1990 Threads of History

...and don't forget that these themes also appeared in woven jacquard coverlets in this country from about 1830 into the centennial period.

Finally - 4 years ago I was dragged to an inaugural party for W, and decided to show my colors by making and wearing a vest of all patriotic/political fabrics. I did it crazy-quilt style, with embroidered bits reminding all of the "chad" controversies. I later gave it to a friend with a substantial collection of political items, and it recently appeared in an exhibit!

Xenia

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Subject: Re: Recommendations regarding QH speakers From: "Molly"

How about jonathan Holstein. Doesn't he live in nearby Cazenovia??? ----- Original Message ----- 

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Subject: RE: FL quilts From: "Doug and Sarah Hough"

Thanks for responding. I didn't realize I was supposed to report to this group. Will try to do better in the future.

Sarah

Your answer as to what a Florida quilt is was great. I don't have a clue, but will keep plugging.

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Subject: RE: FL quilts From: "Doug and Sarah Hough"

Guess I am the guilty party regarding the Florida project but didn't realize so many people were waiting for a reply.

I am Sarah Hough, so-called facilitator for the Florida project. I am still in the process of trying to get a project going. I have made a proposal to the group (it will be in the next newsletter which should come out shortly) that we have a trial run of a documentation project, hopefully in January, before we "go public". I still have lots of questions to be answered but will try to do better in keeping this group informed.

Some of my questions have to do with Seminole patchwork and quilts of the many minorities in Florida. In re-reading the book that was published after the first documentation project, these quilts were not covered - pun not intended.

Would appreciate any help you can offer

Thanks

Sarah Hough dougandsarah1comcast.net

 

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Subject: Re: Recommendations regarding QH speakers From: "

Hi Molly, The Genesee Country Museum Program Director actually suggested Jonathan Holstein as a possible speaker, but I cannot find out how to contact him. Does anyone have his e-mail address or contact information?

Beth ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Sanitary Commission and Quilting documentation From: 

Thanks for your kind words on this digest, Pat Cummings, about our work to help the homeless and also this current Sanitary Commission Quilt project. I, too, urge more of you to come forward and help with this project in your own states. Don Beld has informed me that there are still several states where no one has come forward to lead an effort to make quilts for the families of our departed soldiers. Don is amazing, by the way. He is organized, clear in his goals and a tremendous person to take this on! I must say that I kind of "gulped" when I took this on. I'm a pretty busy person, as we all are. But, I put my own projects aside, temporarily, to do this. I am unable to comprehend the feelings of loss that families who have lost a soldier in this horrible war might be feeling. I think having a quilt with so many signatures from all over our country will be a true comfort. We can't replace their loved ones, but we can show them we care and give them something special, something only a quilter can give. They will know that we, as citizens, appreciate their sacrifices and what they are going through. By the way, when I first volunteered to do this, there were only three soldiers from my state who died, now we are up to six. But, as we are now getting "caught up" on making these, should there be (and I certainly hope not) another soldier from NH that dies, it won't be such a huge undertaking to get one quilt at a time done. If you are fearful that it's just too much for you, you might want to take on a volunteer gathering role and try to inform people about this project in your state, I'd suggest posting notices at quilt shops and asking local guild presidents to inform their members. It's a grassroots effort and I know the quilting community CAN get these quilts done. Should you consider volunteering, there is no deadline as to when you "have" to get these quilts made. I have chosen not to inform the families that the quilts are being done for them until they are completed, then I feel no pressure. That's important to me, as I have a family and I can work at my own pace. As you saw from the photos, there were several volunteers who came forward. I didn't identify them, by name, as you all wouldn't probably know them. A few are local people who help me in my volunteer effort to make quilts for the homeless came forward. One woman, by the way, is not a quilter, she is just a caring woman and I put her to work pressing and cutting border strips! One person is an antique sewing machine collector and the remaining wonderful ladies came from my quilt guild, Hannah Dustin. None, other than Pat, are on this list. However, I'd be glad to list their names if any of you want to know. Now, I must ask all of you experts a few questions. If this project took place 100 years ago and you, as a quilt historian, found documentation of this project, what might you want to know as far as documentation? I am going to create a scrapbook (and I am not a scrapbooking person, but feel I should document this project for history's sake). There will be some obvious information included in this book such as the names of the soldiers, date of death and birth. The names of the families who recieved the quilts as well as a photo of each completed quilt and the names of those who participated in the project. But, what other information would you all want to see there? I was thinking of donating this scrapbook when this war is over (soon, I hope) and our people come home to the New England Quilt museum. I think it's an important enough project that documentation will be something that will be kept and treasured at some time in the future. Is the quilt muesum the best place for this to go, or would you all recomment another place? Linda Heminway Plaistow NH

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Subject: Re: Political Quilts From: Pat Kyser <patkyserhiwaay.net> 

Years ago I saw a wonderful political quilt made by someone in Georgia. It was called, "Jimmy Who?" It was the familiar peanut character in top hat with cocked legs and a cane, but with an unmistakable likeness of Jimmy Carter for its face. I first saw it a few months after Carter was elected President and thought it delightful. I am sure it was published, but I have no idea who made it or where it is now. Certainly it would be a wonderful addition to any political quilt exhibition. Pat in Alabama

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Subject: Re: Political quilts From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrowpatmedia.net> 

Cinda,

Please bring your Bush Redwork quilt to study group on Tuesday.

Please, please!

Judy, aka the Ringoes Kid judygrowpatmedia.net

----- Original Message ----- From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomc

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Subject: Re: Recommendations regarding QH speakers From: "Molly"

Hi Beth,

I understand that Jonathan will be a guest speaker at the Erie Canal Museum in March. Try contacting them..eriecanalmusuem.org Molly 

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Subject: Link to photos? From: "Nancy Roberts" <aquilteralltel.net> Date: Fri, 12 Nov 2004 11:13:06 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

The link as published in the 11/11 QHL Digest (http://www.ofoto.com/BrowsePhotos.jsp?showSlidetrue&Ucb1dqjnvj.alsfnut7&U y-c6g8ts&Ux0) shows an "Album Not Found" message. Is more info needed to find the photos? Thanks. Nancy Roberts

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Subject: chenille From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> it

Candace -- The Tajima website states that chenille or chenille cloth was first made in 1866 by machine and provides some background on the subject. You can pass on this site to your friend who was looking for information.

http://www.tajima-west.com/tajimaChenille.htm

--------------010901080204060505030404--

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Subject: slide show link From: "Nancy Roberts" <aquilteralltel.net> Date: Fri, 12 Nov 2004 11:25:18 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

Okay, I got the link for Home of the Brave Quilt Project to work after all. Apparently I was missing part of the address the first time. What a productive group! Thanks for sharing these photos. Nancy Roberts

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Subject: Re: Political Quilts From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Fri, 12 Nov 2004 11:40:33 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

The Mr. Peanut quilt "Jimmy Who" was part of Julie Powell's wonderful exhibit "The Fabric of Persuasion: Two Hundred Years of Political Quilts." It's on p. 35 of the catalogue which includes the following information: Jill Jayne-Read, a Georgia volunteer, traveled to New Hampshire as a member of Jimmy Carter;s Peanut Brigade to work in the 1976 primary. She started to make the quilt during the campaign and titled it "Jimmy Who" because that was the question most frequently asked of the primary campaign workers. A smiling peanut figure in the center is bordered with embroidered Carter patches made for the brigade volunteers working in NH. Jayne-Read collected enough patches from fellow volunteers to complete her border." Cinda on the Eastern Shore who will certainly bring her "Dubya" quilt to study group in NJ

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Subject: RE: qhl digest: November 11, 2004 From: "

Xenia wrote:

I think it may be necessary to make a distinction between political quilts and patriotic quilts; is the focus of this research just quilts featuring political candidates, or does it include those quilts with patriotic themes and colors that refer to events that may be of political origin?

Pam writes:

That is just one of the questions I am trying to answer for myself in my decision on how to focus this project:

Political as in:

Protest? Campaign oriented? Presidential commemoration? Quilts to campaign for one’s cause?

Others?

As always, many thanks to Xenia and others for your invaluable insight.

Pam in NH where the snow storm is my fault—I planted the last tulip bulbs yesterday, so today it snows!?!

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Subject: Small Wonder From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> 

The subject line refers to the Delaware slogan. Actually it's an improvement over the previous "Home of Tax Free Shopping." I guess if you are the second smallest state in the Union it's hard to find something to crow about, not being unique even in being really tiny (for you Texans who laughed at Connecticut, Delaware has three counties!). Right now a really good thing is happening in Dover, DE at the State Museums Visitor Center, an exhibit called "Stitches of Art and Comfort: Delaware Quilts, 1740-2002." About 60 quilts (also 5 quilted petticoats from 1780- to 1880) from the collections of Delaware's state museums are exhibited along with many sewing-related items. Anytime you get a chance to see so many quilts from a small area you know you're going to learn something. My generalizations are: women in 19th century DE made lots of quilts without borders (that I think is unusual) and they liked to set their quilts on point (a New Jersey influence, perhaps). A surprising number of the mid-19th century quilts were signed. I hate to complain, but all the quilts (except for one on a bed and a couple of doll quilts) are folded. However each label includes an overall picture of the quilt. Sadly there is no catalogue available, but I think that everybody who goes should ask them to do a digital image quickie like the DAR is doing for their current exhibit. The perfect should not be the enemy of the good (if you can't get a grant for a professional catalogue go to Kinkos). It's easy to get to Dover from Baltimore, Wilmington, Philadelphia areas. You could visit the John Dickinson Plantation at the same time. The address is 406 Federal Street; phone (302) 739-4266; hours 8:30 to 4:30 Mon.-Fri., 9-5 Sat., 1:30-4:30 Sun. Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: need NJ museum info From: "Marcia Kaylakie" <marciarkearthlink.net>

Hi All, \May I ask for your help in finding the address/telephone/web  address of the Trenton Historical Musuem or is it the NJ State  Historical Museum? You know, the one you all talked about with the  wonderful exhibit recently? Thanks, Marcia Marcia Kaylakie, AQS Certified Appraiser Austin, TX 20 www.texasquiltappraiser.com ------_NextPart_000_0007_01C4C8D2.41E74760--

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Subject: Access to Archives Question From: catzrockisland.com Date: Fri, 12 Nov 2004 15:20:25 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 13

Hi: I am a new member of this list and find all of the information so informative ! My passion for many years has been antique textiles - especially quilts. I am grateful to Bobbie Aug for suggesting this site as a valuable place for information ! I have tried to access the archive listings and my password does not work .. is there something special that one needs to do to get into the archives ? Or perhaps that is not open to list member ? Thanks you very much ! Marie Johansen

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Subject: Sanitary Quilt project -one for Michigan? From: "Carol Garnaat" <cgar88ameritech.net> Date: Fri, 12 Nov 2004 11:32:30 -0500 X-Message-Number: 14

Hello, Does anyone know if there is such a project going for the state of Michigan?

BTW, Linda did a great job of updating her group and I am so impressed with the final product! Carol in Mid-Mich

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Subject: Re: Sanitary Commission quilts From: "Marilyn Maddalena Withrow"

I'm working with Don Beld in California to make these reproduction quilts for the soldiers' families, as Linda is working with him in New Hampshire 2E20 Several local quilters have taken on the challenge to make a quilt, but a s the days go by, sadly more and more names are added to the list of quilts needed for families. If anyone would like to help by making a quilt or s ome blocks, please let me know and I'll add you to my Northern California lis t.20 Information on the project is on my website -- www.marilynquilts.com -- a nd I'm putting out the call for quilters to pitch in and do what you can to support not only our troops, but their families. Please contact me if yo u can help in any way. Linda, your photos were wonderful!! I hope to be a ble to put together a day or two of quilters getting together to make these quilts, but I'm realistic enough to know it's not going to happen until after the holidays. If we can just do what we can in the next few weeks, even if it's to make a block or cut some fabrics -- you know, between wrapping packages, baking, shopping, and of course finishing those quilty gifts -- then we'll go at it full force after the first of the year. I' m in Sacramento -- (home of Governor Arnold!) -- but everyone is welcome t o help with this national project. I hope to hear from you.  Marilyn Maddalena Withrow Professional Quilt Appraiser, Judge, Designer, Textile Historian and Speaker www.marilynquilts.com --------------Boundary-00_XTV3LVC0000000000

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Subject: Response to C. Thresh From: "Kathy Moore" <kathymooreneb.rr.com> Date: Sat, 13 Nov 2004 19:05:18 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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Since no one else has responded, I will jump into the breach on the post  given below: yes this is old information. I think it is in reference to  an exhibition curated by Julie Powell in the Fall of 2000 on political  quilts. The exhibition was at the Brandywine River Museum and catalogs  of this exhibition are still available. You should contact the  Brandywine River Museum in Chadds Ford, PA for a copy. You'll have to  Google the musuem, I don't have contact information.

I recommend it if you are interested in political themed textiles.

Kathy Moore Lincoln, NE

Subject: Re: Political Quilts From: "Christine Thresh" <christinewinnowing.com> Date: Thu, 11 Nov 2004 11:31:48 -0800 X-Message-Number: 13

Is this an old listing for political quilts?

http://www.brandywinemuseum.org/news_print/news009_print.html

Christine Thresh ------_NextPart_000_0010_01C4C9B3.B7544A20--

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Subject: Quilting Book Recommendation From: "Kathy Moore" <kathymooreneb.rr.com> Date: Sat, 13 Nov 2004 19:47:18 -0600 X-Message-Number: 3

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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A heads up to all you quilting book bibliophiles: Jonathan Holstein's  Abstract Design in American Quilts with a forward by Shelly Zegart is  now available at a bargain basement price of $6.99 plus shipping. The  University of Nebraska Press has a couple of pallets left and they plan  to destroy any copies left after February.

This will be your last chance to get this book at such an affordable  price. The toll free number for University of Nebraska Press is  1-800-755-1105.

Kathy Moore Lincoln, NE

 

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Subject: Re: Sanitary Commission quilts From: Jccullencrewaol.com Date: Sun, 14 Nov 2004 01:14:14 EST X-Message-Number: 1

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Dear Linda, Congratulations for getting something going with the Sanitary Quilts. I'm in NJ and hope to do the same in 2005. I, like most everyone else, can barely keep up with day to day activities, but in Jan/Feb etc. I'm sure there will be free time and cold, windy, snow/sleet/rainy days to keep me home. Had our first snow last night--kinda early actually. I'm hoping this is not an indication of what's to come. We have three young men in my area whose families are in need of the quilts...so very sad, but the young men all seemed to feel they were doing what was right and justified. Their patriotism made their families proud despite the outcome for themselves. I wish you success in finding others to help you. I'm going to put an article in the paper and at the churches to see if I can get help too. I've never assembled a quilt so will need help myself. Maybe you can get help this way too. I hope you let us know how things are going for you. Kind regards. Carol Grace

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Subject: Laura Bush needs better quilt information From: "Christine Thresh" <christinewinnowing.com> Date: Sun, 14 Nov 2004 07:57:22 -0800 X-Message-Number: 2

I just ran across a site that had some remarks by Laura Bush. Check paragraphs 6 and 7. She needs better information about quilts.

http://www.preserveamerica.gov/firstladyremarks-mobile.html

Christine Thresh

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Subject: re: Laura's speech From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> Date: Sun, 14 Nov 2004 11:45:32 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

I just ran across a site that had some remarks by Laura Bush. Check paragraphs 6 and 7. She needs better information about quilts.

http://www.preserveamerica.gov/firstladyremarks-mobile.html

Christine Thresh

* * * * * * * *

Dear Christine:

Thanks for the link to the summary of Laura Bush's remarks in her Mobile, Alabama speech recently. This is a dark day for quilt historians. Now, it seems, those involved with politics are going to pick on pieces of Americana, namely quilts, to win over minority audiences.

The Truth may be dull and boring, but feel good messages appease the constituency. I am extremely disappointed that any public figure who is as much admired and respected as this woman, would not inform herself before sharing information about a subject of which she is so dismally unaware.

I further realize that quilt historians have been brewing "a tempest in a teapot". Apparently, their studies and conclusions often go no further than amongst themselves, or to those students and teachers of History who truly care to seek the truth.

What Mrs. Bush imparted in her speech is not verifiable quilt history. Evidently, this news has not reached the White House...yet. But then again, the people who live there have been more concerned lately with continuing that status (of living at the White House).

Okay, so who is going to take this on?????

I really wish that Laura Bush would visit my website and that of others on this list who have placed information about the lack of evidence regarding a connection between slave made quilts and blocks and their purported use on the Underground Railroad.

Instead of helping to celebrate Black History, misinformation is, in my opinion, an extreme disservice to the Black Community who deserves to learn and know about their very rich cultural history, not be handed a bunch of hooey.

A high school student wrote to me last night. She is doing a paper and had read my writings. She could not tell, for sure, which way I felt about the situation, so she asked outright if I think that the UGRR/quilts issue is a myth or a hoax. Sadly, I had to tell her that I personally believe that it is what I refer to as the latest American myth. I went on to add that a lot of other information about the heroism and work of abolitionists and the courage of escaping slaves. There is so much to applaud about black history. I could cry when I think of the suffering of this race of people, and I could scream and rant about the false re-writing of their history.

Pat Cummings www.quiltersmuse.com

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Subject: re: Laura's speech From: Dana at Material Pleasures <danabalsamoyahoo.com> Date: Sun, 14 Nov 2004 09:02:33 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 4

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First Lady Laura Bush USA.first.ladywhitehouse.gov

First Lady Laura Bush:first.ladywhitehouse.net I don't feel I have the knowledge or credentials to fight this fight, but those of you who do, this is a start.

My best, Dana

Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> wrote: I just ran across a site that had some remarks by Laura Bush. Check paragraphs 6 and 7. She needs better information about quilts.

http://www.preserveamerica.gov/firstladyremarks-mobile.html

Christine Thresh

* * * * * * * *

Dear Christine:

Thanks for the link to the summary of Laura Bush's remarks in her Mobile, Alabama speech recently. This is a dark day for quilt historians. Now, it seems, those involved with politics are going to pick on pieces of Americana, namely quilts, to win over minority audiences.

The Truth may be dull and boring, but feel good messages appease the constituency. I am extremely disappointed that any public figure who is as much admired and respected as this woman, would not inform herself before sharing information about a subject of which she is so dismally unaware.

I further realize that quilt historians have been brewing "a tempest in a teapot". Apparently, their studies and conclusions often go no further than amongst themselves, or to those students and teachers of History who truly care to seek the truth.

What Mrs. Bush imparted in her speech is not verifiable quilt history. Evidently, this news has not reached the White House...yet. But then again, the people who live there have been more concerned lately with continuing that status (of living at the White House).

Okay, so who is going to take this on?????

I really wish that Laura Bush would visit my website and that of others on this list who have placed information about the lack of evidence regarding a connection between slave made quilts and blocks and their purported use on the Underground Railroad.

Instead of helping to celebrate Black History, misinformation is, in my opinion, an extreme disservice to the Black Community who deserves to learn and know about their very rich cultural history, not be handed a bunch of hooey.

A high school student wrote to me last night. She is doing a paper and had read my writings. She could not tell, for sure, which way I felt about the situation, so she asked outright if I think that the UGRR/quilts issue is a myth or a hoax. Sadly, I had to tell her that I personally believe that it is what I refer to as the latest American myth. I went on to add that a lot of other information about the heroism and work of abolitionists and the courage of escaping slaves. There is so much to applaud about black history. I could cry when I think of the suffering of this race of people, and I could scream and rant about the false re-writing of their history.

Pat Cummings www.quiltersmuse.com

Material Pleasures Affordable Vintage Linens, Lace, Textiles, Buttons & More! www.material-pleasures.com

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Subject: re: Laura's speech/question From: Jccullencrewaol.com Date: Sun, 14 Nov 2004 12:28:11 EST X-Message-Number: 5

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In a message dated 11/14/2004 12:03:50 PM Eastern Standard Time, danabalsamoyahoo.com writes: http://www.preserveamerica.gov/firstladyremarks-mobile.html Hi, Can you tell me how you got to read her words in the paragraphs mentioned? When I pull up this site, the type is so miniscule I can't read it even with my reading glasses. I'd like to see what she said before I comment. Thanks. Carol Grace

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Subject: re: Laura's speech/question From: "Christine Thresh" <christinewinnowing.com> Date: Sun, 14 Nov 2004 09:36:45 -0800 X-Message-Number: 6

Here are paragraphs 6 and 7: "The exhibit Stitches in Time here at the museum highlights the symbolism behind historic quilt patterns. Early slaves made quilts to keep warm-but they also used scraps of fabric to weave a story. A beautiful example is the Drunkard's Path Wall Hanging made of cloth from Africa. "The block-type design was used by African American quilters to communicate routes of escape northward. The jerky pattern may look like the wanderings of a tipsy man - but the message to slaves was to avoid traveling in a straight line to evade capture. Quilts were made with tied string and the knots in the strings indicated the number of miles to freedom - while the star pattern represents the North Star."

----- Original Message ----- From: <Jccullencrewaol.com> Subject: [qhl] re: Laura's speech/question

> In a message dated 11/14/2004 12:03:50 PM Eastern Standard Time, > danabalsamoyahoo.com writes: > http://www.preserveamerica.gov/firstladyremarks-mobile.html > Hi, > Can you tell me how you got to read her words in the paragraphs > mentioned? When I pull up this site, the type is so miniscule I can't read it even > with my reading glasses. I'd like to see what she said before I comment. > Thanks. > Carol Grace

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Subject: art or studio quilts From: <dsrakestarband.net> Date: Sun, 14 Nov 2004 13:41:19 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 7

On November 8 Newbie Richardson asked for some discussion about art or studio quilts. I apologize for not responding sooner; I've been away from my computer for a week.

If you are new to studio quilts, I recommend Penny McMorris' book "The Art Quilt" as a great place to start. Also try Michael James, "Art and Inspirations." Two other q

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Subject: art or studio quilts From: <dsrakestarband.net> Date: Sun, 14 Nov 2004 13:53:24 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 8

On November 8 Newbie Richardson asked for some discussion about art or studio quilts. I've been away from my computer for a week, so I hope this isn't too late to be helpful.

Two excellent books are Michael James, "Art and Inspirations," and Penny McMorris, "The Art Quilt." For more on painted quilts, try Faith Ringgold, "Dancing at the Louvre." Nancy Crow and Yvonne Porcella are two more quilt artists; their books are listed on Amazon. You could also look for the books published every other year that catalog the Quilt National exhibit at the Dairy Barn. It is one of the premier venues for art quilts.

As with any other type of quilt, the more you look, the more you appreciate. We are so lucky to be living in the golden age of quilting. There is a quilt out there for everyone--tradional, avant garde, pieced, appliqued, made by hand or machine, subtle or wild.

Debby Rake

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Subject: Studio Quilt Study Group From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrowpatmedia.net> Date: Sun, 14 Nov 2004 18:46:38 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

Studio Quilt Study Group will be meeting here in Ringoes New Jersey in a couple of days, on Tuesday, November 16th. We meet from 10 AM to about 3PM with a break for lunch.

Hoping (in vain it seems) to have a speaker from Baum textiles, our focus still will be on quilts with fabulous fabric collections.

In addition, we realize that our own quilts, the ones we make, will be the ones that other quilt study groups will be looking at in years to come. Many of those in our own group who are quilters (and I realize that not all of us are) should be recognized for their body of work now, in their own lifetime, before the quilts are scattered . Starting with this meeting one of our regulars will be bringing a representative sampling of her (his) own quilt history to share with the rest of us. Sue Reich will be sharing her special Christmas bed quilts with us this month.

I hope you can come. Get in touch with me for directions and more information.

Judy, aka the Ringoes Kid judygrowpatmedia.net

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Subject: Re: Houston Quilt Controversy and a Hello to all! From: Elpaninaroaol.com Date: Sun, 14 Nov 2004 19:21:46 EST X-Message-Number: 10

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Good evening all,

My name is Tom Reddick and I am a new member to this list. I have long been interested in quilting thanks to my mother (Mary Reddick) and our longtime family history with quilting.

Just now piecing my first project, and Preview Night a couple of weeks ago was my first visit to Quilt Festival and WOW what a time! Had a blast.

Never made it over to the exhibits, but I have seen pictures of the winning quilt. It is stunning and I wish I could have had time to see it in person.

I agree with others who say this was much ado about nothing. Between my mother, my grandmother and some other local quilters I have heard no argument about this piece winning much deserved recognition. There may be some angry buzz in some Houston circles, but I have not caught wind of it. My grandmother also pointed out that in her lifetime she witnessed similar short term uproar in quilting competitions over machine quilting and even rotary cutting!

In any event, I expect I will do more reading than posting here for now being a newbie. I am glad to have joined and look forward to reading more. It is fun to collect and make quilts, but I am also very interested in a lot of the historical discussions this group offers. It will be nice to not only enjoy seeing quilts, but get a better understanding of where they came from.

Take care,

Tom.

 

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Subject: Re: Houston Quilt Controversy and a Hello to all! From: "Janet" <right2me2003yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 00:47:30 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

I, also, am hoping that some of the wonderful people on this board got to view this quilt in person and will describe it in detail for us. I am very interested if reading the discussion on this quilt, although I think it is beautiful. Janet

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Subject: QHL: archival boxes From: "Peggy O'Connor" <mnocbrinet.com> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 15:28:09 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

I've read how you should replace acid-free tissue paper periodically, but what about the archival storage boxes? Can they be used "forever" without damaging quilts or other items stored in them? Peggy in sunny NC

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Subject: RE: QHL: archival boxes From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 15:50:45 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Peggy, I think they can be used forever! We've had some here at the Heritage Center in use for almost 20 years, still a-okay. They're inert, and free of wood lignins. Candace Perry

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Subject: archival boxes From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 15:37:17 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Peggy -- I asked this question awhile back on the TexCons list. Yes, boxes can be used; you can freshen by changing acid-tissue paper. Conservationists have two schools of thought about archival packaging -- some believe the acid buildup from a textile permeates the box; others believe that in time box can transfer its buildup into fabric. Middle of the roaders which seem to be the majority prefer using same box but changing tissue maybe once a year. Again, much depends on the rarity and value of the textile as to storage container and its lifecycle.

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Subject: Re: QHL: archival boxes From: "Marcia Kaylakie"

Dear Peggy, The archival products company that our guild uses for boxes says that their boxes will last 100 years. Marcia Kaylakie, Austin, TX ----- Original Message ----- 

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Subject: Re: QHL: archival boxes From: Elpaninaroaol.com Date: Mon, 15 Nov

Great topic and good timing for me!

I am moving to Austin in about 2 weeks and I plan to leave most of my older quilts here in Houston for a few months until I get fully settled. I have pillowcases for each of them and they will go into a temperature controlled private storage facility with non-aerosol pest control programs in force.

Good idea to set them in boxes as well? Where can I find these archival boxes?

Thanks for any help,

Tom.

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Subject: archival boxes From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 22:07:44 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

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Tom -- archival supplies can be found on www.gaylord.com and www.hollingercorp.com

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Subject: boxes From: Palamporeaol.com Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2004 08:09:27 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

For fair advertising---you can also find them at Light Impressions. Just do a search on the Internet. Instead of acid free paper you can line the boxes with 100% cotton sheeting that has been washed in Orvus or Ivory. I do both. I really prefer the sheets for they are easier to control when wrapping a quilt. However I just don't have that many sheets. This also works well in trunks. Lynn Lancaster Gorges Historic Textiles Studio

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Subject: Re: boxes From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2004 08:34:59 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

I agree with Lynn that sheeting is easier to work with than tissue, and old sheets can be torn into necessary-sized pieces for padding folds etc. A good source for cotton sheets is an old-fashioned auction, the kind where the auctioneer lumps the bedding, embroidery, towels, quilts, bath mats and aprons in a heap on the beds, and sells the stuff willy-nilly by the box or armload. If the previous owners are old enough, the sheets will be all cotton - check the labels.

Xenia

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Subject: Re: boxes From: "Laura Syler" <texas_quilt.coairmail.net> 

I'll ditto both Xenia and Lynn on the cotton sheeting, and add one more thought on acid free tissue. Several years ago I worked with the textile curator at Dallas' Old City Park run by the Dallas Historical Society. I helped him correctly identify the "common names" of the quilts in the collection while they were "replacing the acid free tissue". In the past they had to replace the tissue every year as "it is only regular tissue with a buffering compound applied and that breaks down all too quickly". They were using a "new" acid free fiber product that looked much like the protective "fabric" found in panty liners! Cost was only $80 a yard!!! I'll go for the sheets every time!!! But, if you can't find sheets, wait until JoAnn's or Hancock's has their muslin on sale....run through the washing machine rinse cycle several times and off you go!

Laura Hobby Syler Richardson, Texas -

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Subject: Re: boxes From: Elpaninaroaol.com 

Thanks to all for the suggestions! I appreciate it (and I expect some of my old quilts will too!)

Take care,

Tom.

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Subject: Re boxes & sheets From: "Charlotte Bull" <charloumo-net.com> Date: Wed, 17 Nov 2004 08:00:13 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1

I have found many sheets and pillow cases for sale very cheap in a local flea market...no fleas in them! I had stored each quilt in a pillowcase for years before even learning about proper care with tissue and fancy boxes. They are stored in a big walk in closet. I had fastened an ID card on each pillow case so I could find them quickly when I changed quilts on racks and beds every month. At times I've sacrificed vintage white or muslin yardages for this good cause too. But most of my collection consists of quilts with no major $ value. I usually fall in love with well used quilts with a "Story" to tell or with unique block designs or settings. I often get teased because I'm a Humane Home for old quilts, dogs, cats & birds, not to mention books & fabrics! The quilts live on second floor. The dogs & cats live on first floor! The wild birds live outside. The books & fabrics live in my quilt studio. I float between the various life styles, keeping everyone happy, including me.

To be honest, I cannot afford the really specialized boxes. But if I were to build a Quilt Haven I'd have a big room, just for those boxes full of quilts, tops & blocks; and it would be well organized, like a Library! With a File with information on each item! Well, I can dream! cb

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Subject: re: Storing Quilts From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> Date: Wed, 17 Nov 2004 09:41:37 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

CB wrote:

To be honest, I cannot afford the really specialized boxes. But if I were to build a Quilt Haven I'd have a big room, just for those boxes full of quilts, tops & blocks; and it would be well organized, like a Library! With a File with information on each item! Well, I can dream! cb

* * * * *

Dear Charlotte:

I think that you've just described the International Quilt Study Center in Lincoln, Nebraska. Wish I lived closer!!!

Pat

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Subject: please, no pillow cases From: "Newbie Richardson"

Dear list, Although I can already hear the boos and hisses - please do NOT use old pillow cases to store your quilts. They are fine for very short term transportaion, but not for long term storage. Bedding such as sheets becomes impregnated with body oils and sloughed off skin cells. Over the years, these oils become permanent in the fibers. No amount of washing will rid the fabric of them. We all have the experience of opening an old linen closet and having the odor assail our nostrils - that is "old bodies". Old cotton sheets - like our parents and grandparents had before the new fitted sheets became common, are probably OK as they were not used as frequently. However, pillow cases are full of oils - by definition they have had faces, necks ,and hair rub against them for years of use. If you wait and hit the white sales in January and buy close outs of mismatched pillow cases, then that would be fine as long as you wash out the finishes used in the fiber production. The objection is not the pillow case - but where it has been prior to being put to use as a storage medium. I am a great advocate for common sense, cost effective textile storage, as many of you know. You can use aluminum foil to line cardboard boxes or old suitcases, as a barrier against acids. You can make "snakes" of stuffed cotton tubing to pad the folds or even just fat strips of quilt batting. I use 100% cotton stockinet purchased from medical supply firms. This is the same stuff the doctors put over your arm before they build a cast around a break. It comes in many widths. Two inch wide is very useful. Wash it first, as it too has sizing. Go in with a friend - or your guild and buy it by the box, not the yard. I think I last paid .50 cents a yard! Or if you live an area with textile mills, use the tubesocks sold by the pound, cut off the toes, and wash first. But please do not use pillow cases. Sorry if this makes more work for some folk. Newbie Richardson

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Subject: Hollis' quilt described From: <chrisajetlink.net> Date: Wed, 17 Nov 2004 10:04:45 -0800 X-Message-Number: 4

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Since no one else is describing Hollis' quilt, I will try, but no  description can possibly do it justice, so this is simply better than  nothing.

I took a class with her this summer to "learn " her techniques and she  brought this quilt among others. I was very close to it. She does not  use paint. She uses fabric dyes and makes them up from dye powder  differently than if she were going to whole cloth dye with them. She  starts with a white or natural piece of muslin that she has prepared  for dying. This quilt is a whole cloth of this muslin (if it is seamed I  didn't think to notice, so it may be.) She did not piece or appliquE9  any of the design. First she uses natural hair brushes to apply the dye  onto the fabric, drawing the outline first and then filling in as shadow  or solid. She is a wonderful painter and knows how to use the brush  well. It's all done freehand. When this is complete, she rinses and  washes it like any dyed material. Next she goes to her sewing machine  after layering it with batting and backing. Without the threads from  quilting it wouldn't look complete at all. The best example of this is  the man's plaid shirt. Most of the lines forming the plaid are sewn with  colored threads, not dyed and then sewn over. this stood out the most in  my mind. A great deal of the detail is thread, not dye. yellow threads  and black brown threads made up the most of this quilt. She uses tons of  thread and it takes a long time for her to make quilts like this from  start to finish she told us.20

Kim Wulfert www.antiquequiltdating.com

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Subject: Keeping the quilts From: "sue reich" <suereichcharter.net> 

Our Connecticut Documentation Project saw 3000+ quilts. The best kept  quilts in private collection had been stored for years in king-sized  pillows cases and well-laundered feedsacks. One family brought in over  30 quilts and 15 woven coverlets that had been stored that way for  nearly one hundred years. They are from the Buck collection and can be  viewed in the Quilts and Quiltmakers. The owners labeled the outsides  of the sacks and cases for ease of identification. 20 One important thing that I noticed about quilts stored this way was the  reduction of fold lines in the quilts. The quilts are in more of a  rolled condition when stored in a pillowcase or feedsack. They can also  breathe yet they are protect from dust. 20 This method of storage has become my favorite recommendation to quilt  owners and the one I have adopted myself. Archival products are  expensive and take up more room. Anyone can watch a "White Sale", buy  those king size or European size cases, laundered the heck out of them  to get rid of the sizing. They make quilt storage as economical as  possible. sue reich ------_NextPart_000_0006_01C4CCA8.7FC908F0--

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Subject: Re: Recommendations regarding QH speakers From: Hazelmaccaol.com Date: Wed, 17 Nov 2004 13:38:55 EST X-Message-Number: 6

Jonathan Holstein's email is fourscorealltel.net. At least that was it the last time l wrote him.

Hazel Carter

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Subject: Re: Recommendations regarding QH speakers From: Carolyn K Ducey

Jonathan Holstein is visiting here at the International Quilt Study Center this week. I asked if I could send out his new email and he's given me the okay. He'd be happy to discuss the possibility of being a speaker at your event. Here it the new email. jonfourscore.com

Carolyn Ducey Curator International Quilt Study Center HE 234, University of Nebraska Lincoln, NE 68583-0838 402/472-6301

"Beth Davis" <bethdan533eznet To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> .net> cc: Subject: [qhl] Re: Recommendations regarding QH speakers 11/12/2004 04:41 AM Please respond to "Quilt History List"

Hi Molly, The Genesee Country Museum Program Director actually suggested Jonathan Holstein as a possible speaker, but I cannot find out how to contact him. Does anyone have his e-mail address or contact information?

Beth

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Subject: RE: please, no pillow cases From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney"

Good evening, QHL'ers - Thanks, Newbie, for another great summary. Let me add another reason NOT to use pillow cases, whether old or new: most quilts are way too big to be crammed into something as small as most pillowcases (even those that are king size). So all sorts of folds/creases and compression of the quilt result. If you have a quilt that already has brittle/physically damaged parts, squishing it into such a small volume will cause additional damage. If you have a small/tiny quilt with low volume (no puffy batts), then a new well-rinsed (should I explain the whole process of rinsing again?) pillow case for a short time should be OK. Regards, Margaret (Meg) Geiss-Mooney Textile/Costume Conservator Professional Associate, AIC mgmooneymoonware.net

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Subject: RE: archival boxes - another source From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney"

Hi again, QHLers - Another source of fantastic archival boxes is the company, Conservation Resources International, www.conservationresources.com. They make the Microchamber products which scavenge all sorts of damaging air pollution and off-gassing (like smoke, mothballs). Request a copy of their catalogue - it has one of the most comprehensive explanations about paper chemistry I've seen. They make boxes that are appropriate for those silk and wool textiles: unbuffered on the inside and buffered on the outside (the boxes are called Microchamber/ Silversafe).

>>archival supplies can be found on www.gaylord.com and www.hollingercorp.com>>

Elpaninaroaol.com wrote:

>Good idea to set them in boxes as well? Where can I find these archival >boxes?

Regards, Margaret (Meg) Geiss-Mooney Textile/Costume Conservator Professional Associate, AIC mgmooneymoonware.net


 


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