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Quilters Find a way to care

Subject: Re: Amish Feathered Star in eBay From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrowpatmedia.net> 

Isn't that feathered star quilt the same quilt that is on the cover quilt in a book called "Feathered Star Quilts" by Marsha McClosky, published in the 1980's?

Hers are in red on white, this one is blue on white.

Judy, aka the Ringoes Kid judygrowpatmedia.net

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Subject: Re: Amish Feathered Star in eBay From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrowpatmedia.net> Date: Sun, 30 Jan 2005 00:53:19 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Whoops, Judy Kelius. I didn't read your post , before I posted my reply. Great minds think alike!

Judy, aka the Ringoes Kid judygrowpatmedia.net

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Subject: Re: Amazing wool quikt From: Annette Gero <A.Gerounsw.edu.au> 

a live eBay auction # 6506326978 Subject: Amazing wool quilt From: "Busy Thimble" <bsythmblctel.net> Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2005 09:20:39 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

Thanks so much,,I went to the web site but how do I find the sale prices..I could only still find the estimates

Thanks for your help

Annette In Australia

The Paul Family quilt sold at auction in Maine for $85,000 plus 20%. See photos here www.juliaauctions.com Also was a live eBay auction # 6506326978

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: January 29, 2005 From: DDBSTUFFaol.com 

In a message dated 1/30/2005 12:08:47 AM Eastern Standard Time, qhllyris.quiltropolis.com writes: vitaleptd.net

No, you won't find any email from me unless you go back several months.

I wrote you several times about a couple of quilts and got no response. I finally gave up and now I don't bother to even check your quilts.

Perhaps you were out of town but I was very interested in bidding and got frustrated and gave up.

Others have told me they don't get responses from you as well.

No big thing...

Darwin

-------------------------------1107090598--

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Subject: Re: Amazing wool quilt From: "Lynne Z. Bassett" 

> The Paul Family quilt sold at auction in Maine for $85,000 plus 20%. See > photos here www.juliaauctions.com > > Cyndi in Maine

Now the question is, who bought it? I do so hope that it went to an institution where I can go visit it!

Best, Lynne

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Subject: Re: Amazing wool quilt From: "Karen Evans" 

That would be lovely - I hope it's not in a private collection. Something like that deserves to be accessible to the public.

And in other news, I just finished my grant proposal for the AQSG and sent it off....*nervous grin*

Karen Evans

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Subject: RE: qhl digest: January 28, 2005 From: "Teddy Pruett"

Thought you might be interested to know how many times people bring antique quilts for me to appraise because they want to donate them to MAQS. Most people are stunned to learn the collection is for new quilts, and more specifically prize winners from the AQS shows. I usually suggest they contact museums in the area of the quilts origin. I dont think any of them have ever actually donated the quilts, as I explain to them the need for an IRS donation appraisal, but they never actually have me write one. Only once. Teddy Pruett

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Subject: RE: qhl digest: January 28, 2005 From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> 

Also, with the advice of their appraiser as to the 'worthiness' of the quilt, and with good provenance to go with it, those who want to donate antique quilts might consider the International Quilt Study Center in Lincoln, NE. It may be the country's largest repository for quilts, both antique and contemporary art quilts, as well as specialized collections (the Sara Miller Amish Crib Quilt collection and the Robert Cargo collection of quilts from the same area as Gee's Bend, for example). Go to: http://www.quiltstudy.org

And if you haven't already explored it, IQSC has a searchable database of antique quilts in the collection.

Xenia

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Subject: RE: UGRR again From: munseyjuno.com 

Follow the link below to see the feature article in today's (Sunday, Jan. 30, 2005) Cape Cod Times. It was in the local news (Cape and Islands) section, with a headline "Secret Stitches".

http://www.capecodonline.com/cctimes/secretstitches30.htm

Sandra on Cape Cod

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Subject: RE: qhl digest: January 28, 2005 From: "J. G. Row" 

All those people wanting to donate whatever tangible item to their local museum or historical society should be counseled to accompany it with a monetary donation to help care for it in storage or whatever.

Judy, aka the Ringoes Kid judygrowpatmedia.net

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Subject: The idea of "permanent loan' From: Patricia L Cummings 

I just love the idea of books or quilts being on "permanent loan". As someone said, the institution would be required to contact you, should they decide to de-acquisition.

Pat Cummings

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Subject: Something out of the ordinary... From: "Karen Evans" 

I know we don't normally post our own work here, and I apologize in = advance if I'm out of line...but pictures of my 17th century style silk = quilt are now on line, and I thought the list might want some idea of = what I do since medieval and Renaissance quilting is so far out of the = mainstream.

Note: I'm listed under my re-enactment name, Sarah Davies, as the site = is primarily re-eanctor oriented. But it's very definitely me. =20

http://www.artisans-showcase.org/east/items/i_h_000065/index.html

Hope people like it!

Karen Evans Easthampton, MA ------=_NextPart_000_0005_01C506EB.7E510F90--

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Subject: Re: Something out of the ordinary... 

Dear Karen, Thank you so much for your post. I spent a wonderful few hours looking at all your items and those in the master index by other individuals too. What wonderful work.

Thank you again, Julia Zglilniec

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Subject: Re: Something out of the ordinary... From:

I have no idea if you are out of line with regards to qhl policy, but I must say I found your work stunningly beautiful and I appreciated seeing it! Gorgeous work.

Tom.

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Subject: Re: Something out of the ordinary... 

http://www.artisans-showcase.org/east/items/i_h_000065/index.html

Hi Karen, If you're looking for accolades, you've got them. Wow, that is a magnificent piece of art. How big is the quilt, and how long did it take you to do the top? What kind of thread did you use, and how did you get the pattern on the top? However it was done, the results are fabulous. Are you keeping it for your own use? Certainly it'll go in a juried show or two, right? It was a pleasure looking at the photos. You must be so proud. Carol Grace

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Subject: raw edge applique question From: "Karen Erlandson" 

Hi all, This is a "new quilt" question, but I think this is the group to pose it to - my answer concerns the future health of the quilt: I am doing a project that I have determined will be best served by raw edge appliqué. I do not use fusibles, basting spray, etc. Considering that this quilt will receive normal wear and some washing - do we have any idea how the raw edge appliqué can be expected to hold up?

Karen in Texas

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Subject: Re: raw edge applique question From: Dana Balsamo 

Hi Karen, I made a quilt for my daughter with some raw edge applique...I machine appliqued with a buttonhole stitch...the quilt has only been washed twice, but has held up. If I had to do it again, I probably would have done a satin stitch with my machine instead...better coverage of the edges. Best of luck with it! Hugs, Dana

Karen Erlandson <quiltercooke.net> wrote: Hi all, This is a "new quilt" question, but I think this is the group to pose it to - my answer concerns the future health of the quilt: I am doing a project that I have determined will be best served by raw edge appliqué. I do not use fusibles, basting spray, etc. Considering that this quilt will receive normal wear and some washing - do we have any idea how the raw edge appliqué can be expected to hold up?

Karen in Texas

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Subject: Re: Something out of the ordinary... From: "Karen Evans" 

I am waiting for the slides to go back, and would love some advice as to which show to enter; I've only entered local shows so far.

The quilt itself is about 44 x 44, took three months, and uses silk 30/2 thread dyed to match the top. I first drew the pattern on white paper with black felt tip marker and then traced it onto the silk with pencil.

In the 17th century the design would have been marked with either dilute ink or something like soapstone. I didn't trust my hands to be steady enough so I used lead pencil, which has the advantage of being chemically inert and washing out after the design was stitched.

As for what I'm doing with it (besides using it as a teaching tool in my medieval and Renaissance quilting classes), first it's going in Hands Across the Valley, then in some juried show (any advice on which one would be greatly appreciated), then in the Big E. Eventually I'm hoping to use it in a book I'm writing on medieval and Renaissance quilting.

*whew* Glad you like it! I keep it on my wall to avoid the bulimic felines I laughingly call my pets....

Karen Evans

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Subject: Something out of the ordinary... From: Joan Kiplinger 

Karen -- it is a stunning quilt and thank you for sharing it. You have every right to be proud of it. All good luck in any shows it is entered.

Karen Evans wrote:

>I am waiting for the slides to go back, and would love some advice as to >which show to enter; I've only entered local shows so far. > > > > >

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Subject: Iowa-Ill Quilt Study Group From: "Debby Rake" 

Hi--I'm sorry to bother everybody but my Email crashed and I had to get a new address. Does anyone know how to get in touch with the Iowa Illinois Quilt Study Group? I think they are having a meeting soon. Thanks so much. Deb Rake

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Subject: Re: raw edge applique question From: "Karen Musgrave" <

Karen,

I have several raw edge applique quilts that have been washed many, many times and are holding up very well.

Karen in Illinois

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Subject: feedsack book From: "Rosie Werner" 

Darlene Zimmerman has done a new 20 page booklet for Connecting Threads = called FEEDSACK FACTS & FUN. It has some info on sacks, companies and = advertising for their use. Not a big enough booklet to show many = samples. Also has a couple projects to do. Merikay Waldvogel has a = chapter on feedsacks in her SOFT COVERS FOR HARD TIMES book. Hope this = helps.=20 Rosie Werner ------=_NextPart_000_0040_01C50706.C0674A00--

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Subject: Re: Karen/Renaissance Quilt/where to show 

Hi Karen, Sorry I can't be of more help, but I think the gals on this list will be able to help you out. Thanks for the info. I can't believe how quickly you got this done. Take care. Carol Grace

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Subject: re: Karen Evan's quilt From: Patricia L Cummings 

http://www.artisans-showcase.org/east/items/i_h_000065/index.html

Dear Karen:

I'm not sure which I enjoyed doing more: seeing the actual quilt or reading about all of its symbolism and background. If the quilt remains near your written description of it in years to come, there will be no mistakes about why you made the quilt, what your choices were, and how they changed over time (such as the dye accident), and how you decided to engage in the actual process of hand quilting the crib quilt (choices of design, use of a frame, choice of backing, and the decision to use a running stitch).

Nice work! So this weekend, we have learned that you have applied for a study grant to go to Europe, you hope to present a paper for AQSG, you have finished this stunning quilt, you will be entering some quilt shows, you are a Renaissance re-enactor who dyes her own fabric, you have studied books on the Renaissance, and you are writing a book, as well as teaching classes in Renaissance techniques. I'd say that you've been a busy person!

Congratulations on all of your success so far! We will be waiting to hear when the book is published! Please reserve an autographed copy for me.

Pat Cummings www.quiltersmuse.com

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Subject: re: Karen Evan's quilt From: "Karen Evans" <

*blush* I'll do that...I have all the notes together and just need to sit down and write the blasted thing. But it'll get done. I've been waiting since 1990 for someone to write the book on medieval quilting, and guess what? Looks like it's me....:)

Karen (still blushing* ----- 

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Subject: Re: Iowa-Ill Quilt Study Group From: Marilyn Woodin 

Hi Deb---I imagine you will get a reply from Sue Wildermuth and Cathy Litwinow but here's mine---we meet April the 2nd at the Kalona Historical Village at I think, 9--it may be 9:30 and it is still the same $20.00 with lunch included. We will be studying indigo's and signature quilts. Glad you asked on qhl---I'm sure that will be noticed there.

We have a marvelous quilt coming in to show also. These computers! take care and we will look for you marilyn woodin

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Subject: RE: UGRR again From: "Lynne Z. Bassett" 

> Follow the link below to see the feature article in today's (Sunday, Jan. > 30, 2005) Cape Cod Times. It was in the local news (Cape and Islands) > section, with a headline "Secret Stitches". > > http://www.capecodonline.com/cctimes/secretstitches30.htm > > Sandra on Cape Cod

An article in yesterday's Springfield (Mass.) Republican was all about the winner of the Springfield, Mass. middle school history contest, who did her project on the quilt codes of the Underground Railroad. There was absolutely no questioning of the code's historical truth. ARGH!

Lynne

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Subject: RE: UGRR again From: "Karen Evans" <charter.net> Date: Mon, 31 Jan 2005 08:10:09 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

The Republican is a piece of trash, so this doesn't surprise me *at all*....*sigh*.....

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Subject: RE: UGRR again From: "Lynne Z. Bassett" 

> The Republican is a piece of trash, so this doesn't surprise me *at > all*....*sigh*..... > > Karen Evans

It's not the newspaper's fault--they were just reporting on the event. What I'm worried about is the lack of critical thinking, and lack of historical research in any sort of depth at all, that is rewarded by a "First Place" award for this project.

Lynne

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Subject: RE: UGRR again From: "Karen Evans" 

The first place award makes it even worse....

Karen

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Subject: feeling a bit edgy, replying to Karen in TX From: "Caron Carlson" 

Hi all, This is a "new quilt" question, but I think this is the group to pose it to - my answer concerns the future health of the quilt: I am doing a project that I have determined will be best served by raw edge appliqué. I do not use fusibles, basting spray, etc. Considering that this quilt will receive normal wear and some washing - do we have any idea how the raw edge appliqué can be expected to hold up?

Karen in Texas

Hi Karen, I find the historical banter fascinating, but I am a "NEW" quilter. The PC term for "raw edge" applique is now "soft edge" LOL The best way without fusibles is to machine or hand stitch near the edge and then incorporate quiting that will tame the soft edges over time. Use a fair share of spray sizing. But once it frays a bit around the edge, that should be all the worse for wear, provided you have done enough quilting and overstitching. My preference for masses of "quick" applique is the invisible machine method that Harriet Hargraves made popular.

Finally glad to contribute! Caron Carlson http://community.webshots.com/user/ccarlson518 www.windows-essentials.comd

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Subject: RE: UGRR again From: Gail Ingram <

Exactly. Were it possible to abolish Social Studies Projects, we would eliminate probably one-half of the school-based UGRR disinformation. Sadly, in most (not all, mind you!) cases, the projects are parent-done, so the damage is double.

From my viewpoint, much has been done in last couple of years to point out flaw in this pretty story. Persistence will pay off.

Gail Ingram

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Subject: Raw Edge vs. Soft Edge applique From: 

I believe Caron refers to "soft edge" applique where the motif is intended to fray a bit. But does Karen intend "raw edge" applique, as in blanket-stitched, button-hole, or even zig-zag-stitched raw edges? Karen could you clarify? Barbara Burnham

Caron Carlson <caronarr.com> wrote:

The PC term for "raw edge" applique is now "soft edge" ... once it frays a bit around the edge...

Caron Carlson

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Subject: Quilt donations From: Anita Loscalzo <aloscalzyahoo.com> 

The New England Quilt Museum accepts donations of antique quilts also. We request that a potential donor send a photograph or photographs for us to see first with any documentation/information that they have [preferably by regular mail to my official address].

Anita

===== Anita B. Loscalzo, Curator New England Quilt Museum 18 Shattuck Street Lowell, MA 01852 -------- email: CuratorNEQuiltMuseum.org telephone: 978-452-4207 Ext. 11

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Subject: QNM, IQA surveys From: "Marcia Kaylakie" 

HI All, I have need for the latest surveys put out about quilters which = was sponsored by either QNM or IQA. You know, the one about how many = quilters there are, what they spend per year, etc. Can anyone point me = to that info? Thanks, Marcia Marcia Kaylakie, AQS Certified Appraiser Austin, TX =20 www.texasquiltappraiser.com ------=_NextPart_000_0003_01C50779.D7840D40--

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Subject: Eastern Shore Quilt Study Group From: "Lucinda Cawley"

At last! We're going to be able to look at old quilts on the far side of the bridge! The first meeting of the ESQSG will be February 23, from 1 to 4 p.m. at the St. Michaels Library, 106 Fremont St., St. Michaels, MD. You are all invited. Email me for directions and more information. Cinda on the Eastern Shore hoping to come up with a snappier name for the group (it's hard to compete with FVF and The Dating Club)

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Subject: Re: Quilt donations From: Judy Schwender 

A free-lance writer named Andi Reynolds contacted me about the topic of donating quilts. Hopefully her article will appearing QNM soon. One reply I sent to her was:

"It is the owner’s responsibility to research possible museums. This is easily done on the web. Narrow the selection down to 2 or 3 institutions based on their collections policies. You should obtain contact names- ideally the curator of collections- and address, phone number, and email address. Initially I would write to one of your choices, directing the letter to the curator of collections. Inquire if the quilt is something that they would be interested in. Include a photograph and information about the quilt such as maker’s name, birth and death dates, where the quilt was made, and date the quilt was made. Include your name, address, phone number, and email address if you have one. Allow at least a week to ten days for a response. After the museum has responded, you can decide whether to go further with the contact, or want to try another museum. If you decide to try another institution, it is a courtesy to notify the first contact that you are seeking another home for your quilt."

When I am asked for suggestions on where to donate antique quilts, I first suggest the local, county, or state historical society. I suggest the donor do a google search for these, and have found that many donors want me to do this for them. Another good place to start a web search for historical societies is http://www.daddezio.com/society/hill/.

Next I suggest they consider local historic homes and buildings that may have need of period textiles.

Then I include a list of museums that have antique quilt collections. In Kentucky, this includes the The Kentucky Museum Quilt Collection that is part of Western Kentucky University. If you are asked these sorts of questions often, it helps to have a list of such places in your own state since most folks want their family treasures to stay at least in the state.

And never forget, the owner must have clear title to the quilt.

I will also say that the term "permanent loan" is a BIG NO-NO in the museum world.

Judy Schwender

Curator of Collections / Registrar

MAQS

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Subject: Re: Raw Edge vs. Soft Edge applique From: "Karen Erlandson" 

I was considering both options, but I think soft edge appliqué has the quality I am looking for. So, my question needs to be modified to: What is the long term life expectancy of soft edge appliqué when exposed to "normal" conditions (the quilt is gently used and must be washed at some point!) Thanks, Karen

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Subject: Re: Raw Edge vs. Soft Edge applique From: 

> What is the long term life expectancy of soft edge appliqué when exposed to > "normal" conditions (the quilt is gently used and must be washed at some > point!)

> I have used this technique quite a bit. It holds up rather well, assuming your applique stitch is sufficient. I like a narrow zig-zag stitch that is not nearly as dense as a satin stitch. I've seen some soft-edge applications using a straight stitch, but I have my doubts that would hold up through washings and wear.

Dana Bard, Moose Island Quilting

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Subject: Re: The idea of "permanent loan" From: "

Hi, QHLers,

I just wanted to share that many museums are trying to avoid permanent loans because there are all sorts of legal and liability issues that have caused all sorts of headaches for museums. At least in the museum training world, this is something that professionals are told to avoid if possible. It is encouraged that every loan have a definite end date, usually within 5 years of the beginning date. Too many small historical societies in the past have taken "permanent loans" with few parameters on their disposition and have had to deal with what to do in the case of fire or other damage to objects while in their care, as well as loans that have been with an organization for so long that the heirs for the object have forgotten about it or are unknown to the institution, or the object itself has been lost. Plus, the institution has the burden of caring for the object, and storing it, without the benefit of ownership.

In our institution, if a donor wants to give us an object, but retain ownership, we have to politely decline. Our museum does not want to have the headache of tracking down owners and heirs, nor the responsibilty for caring for and protecting an object that doesn't really belong to us. We take loans, but they are for a set period of time. At the end of the loan, we may ask potential donors if they would like to give us ownership of their object. Our resources are spread thin enough (as I am sure many small museums could attest) that to take on the responsibility for caring for and protecting an object could become an unnecessary burden. I am speaking from a historical museum perspective, and I am sure there are differences in the art world.

Thank you for taking the time to read this. It really is a serious problem, especially for smaller museums with limited staff and monies. Some states have helped them out by creating laws that will allow museums to take ownership of loans that have been with institutions for a certain number of years set by the law, but have not been reclaimed. Illinois has a similar law that has been on the books since 1998, and I know there are some other states with similar recourse.

Best regards, Jennifer

Jennifer Van Haaften Education Coordinator Elmhurst Historical Museum Elmhurst, IL ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: The idea of "permanent loan" From: 

Very well said, Jennifer. Judy Schwender Curator of Collections / Registrar MAQS

Jennifer <jasvanhaaftenhotmail.com> wrote: Hi, QHLers,

I just wanted to share that many museums are trying to avoid permanent loans because there are all sorts of legal and liability issues that have caused all sorts of headaches for museums. At least in the museum training world, this is something that professionals are told to avoid if possible. It is encouraged that every loan have a definite end date, usually within 5 years of the beginning date. Too many small historical societies in the past have taken "permanent loans" with few parameters on their disposition and have had to deal with what to do in the case of fire or other damage to objects while in their care, as well as loans that have been with an organization for so long that the heirs for the object have forgotten about it or are unknown to the institution, or the object itself has been lost. Plus, the institution has the burden of caring for the object, and storing it, without the benefit of ownership.

In our institution, if a donor wants to give us an object, but retain ownership, we have to politely decline. Our museum does not want to have the headache of tracking down owners and heirs, nor the responsibilty for caring for and protecting an object that doesn't really belong to us. We take loans, but they are for a set period of time. At the end of the loan, we may ask potential donors if they would like to give us ownership of their object. Our resources are spread thin enough (as I am sure many small museums could attest) that to take on the responsibility for caring for and protecting an object could become an unnecessary burden. I am speaking from a historical museum perspective, and I am sure there are differences in the art world.

Thank you for taking the time to read this. It really is a serious problem, especially for smaller museums with limited staff and monies. Some states have helped them out by creating laws that will allow museums to take ownership of loans that have been with institutions for a certain number of years set by the law, but have not been reclaimed. Illinois has a similar law that has been on the books since 1998, and I know there are some other states with similar recourse.

Best regards, Jennifer

Jennifer Van Haaften Education Coordinator Elmhurst Historical Museum Elmhurst, IL --- You are currently subscribed to qhl as: sister3603yahoo.com. 

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Subject: Re: We interrupt your daily program From: "The Motl's" <motljefnet.com> Date: Mon, 31 Jan 2005 16:12:33 -0600 X-Message-Number: 16

Anna Lou Cook's "Identification and Value Guide, Textile Bags, the feeding and clothing of America" is the best one out. 1990 and OOP but available on ebay much of the time. ISBN 0-89689-080-5 Chris Motl 

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Subject: Re: We interrupt your daily program From: Babette Moorleghen 

You can also purchase this book at Amazon.com with a starting price of $2.10 if you wan to buy one used. I just recently purchased the book for my own library. There are 2 new ones for sale also with slightly higher prices. Babette in Illinois

The Motl's <motljefnet.com> wrote:Anna Lou Cook's "Identification and Value Guide, Textile Bags, the feeding and clothing of America" is the best one out. 1990 and OOP but available on ebay much of the time. ISBN 0-89689-080-5 Chris Motl ----- Original Message ----- From: "gb-best" To: "Quilt History List" Sent: Saturday, January 29, 2005 7:27 PM Subject: [qhl] Re: We interrupt your daily program

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Subject: New (old) article on website: "Mr. Beecher Sold Slaves in Plymouth Pulpit" 

This is a link to an enjoyable yet lengthy article which originally appeared in Ladies Home Journal in 1896.

http://www.quiltersmuse.com/beecher_1896_article.htm

Enjoy!

Pat Cummings

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Subject: Re: Raw Edge vs. Soft Edge applique From: Babette Moorleghen 

Just my .02 worth here! :) I have done a lot of "raw-edge" applique and use either a satin stitch or a button hole stitch with great success. Mind you, these are mostly wallhangings or table toppers not large pieces. I do have a signature quilt, dated 1938, in my collection which is a sampler. There is one block where this method was used and it's fraying a bit. It appears the maker of that particular block first attempted to do a satin stitch by hand, got tired of doing that method and then resorted to just a regular stitch. I am occasionally tempted to re-do it but follow Xenia's advice when it comes to washing antique quilts.... I take a nap! There are a couple of other blocks in this same quilt which are appliques and done rather nicely with the edges turned under. Amazing how many blocks I continue to find when I view this quilt! Hugs, Babette in Illinois

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Subject: quilt design From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> 

Does anyone know approximately when the kimono design first appeared on quilts -- this would be a repeat design of a kimono image?

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Subject: raw edge applique From: "J. G. Row" 

I've looked closely at a number of early chintz applique (Broderie Perse) quilts and noted that many of them are done with what we now call raw edge applique.

I especially remember seeing one at Sumpter Priddy's shop, displayed on an appropriate period bed, and spending a long time with it while DH was looking at everything else. It was done with a very tiny buttonhole stitch, by hand of course, and seem to have stood up well. I think condition all depends on how small and tight the stitches are, and the laundering history.

Judy, aka the Ringoes Kid judygrowpatmedia.net

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Subject: Re: quilt design From: Dana Balsamo

Hi Joan, I don't see it in Brackman's Pieced Quilt Patterns...might this be 'newer'? I know there are several patterns available now. Fabric companies have come out with beautiful Japanese Inspired Fabrics, and with them books, and patterns. Here is mine, made of Japanese Sateens. My patterns date 1998 and 1999...not what I think you are looking for.

http://share.shutterfly.com/osi.jsp?i=EeANGLNoxbsmTCwg

Hugs, Dana Who is on a kick sharing her quilts today!

Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> wrote: Does anyone know approximately when the kimono design first appeared on quilts -- this would be a repeat design of a kimono image?

--- You are currently subscribed to qhl as: danabalsamoyahoo.com. To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1476849Alyris.quiltropolis.com

Material Pleasures Affordable Vintage Linens, Lace, Textiles, Buttons & More! www.material-pleasures.com

--0-534123572-1107217170=:44877--

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Subject: quilt design From: Joan Kiplinger

Dana -- that's what I'm trying to determine. A few others have given 1990s dates, too, so it would appear kimonos in varying design are a very modern innovation so far.

 

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Subject: double wedding ring From: "Debby Rake" <dsrakehotmail.com> 

Hi everybody-- I am looking for information on kits for double wedding ring quilts, circa 1920--1940, that were made with solid color fabrics only, no prints. If you have catalogs, magazine advertisements, or any other reference, I would love to hear from you. Thanks! Deb Rake

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Subject: Re: raw edge applique From: "Karen Erlandson" 

Judy, I too have seen some chintz appliqué with "raw edges", most of what I have seen have never been washed . One of the new styles shows no buttonhole or blanket or zig-zag, but simply a straight line of stitching (small stitches) about 1/4 inch away from the raw edges of the appliqué design, so it will become frayed. there are several other raw edge methods out now - the flannel fringe quilts, denim, etc. This has led me to wonder how these will weather the years, given educated, but consistent use.

I appreciate the input from everyone. I am thinking about doing a straight line of quilting, then going back with a small zig zag stitch. I think it will still fringe sufficiently to give texture.

Thanks - Karen

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Subject: Alexander Henry by the bolt From: Elpaninaroaol.com 

Good evening all,

Not sure if this is appropriate use for the forum- please let me know if it is not.

Today I found an AWESOME western Alexander Henry fabric- took all they had left. It is from 2004. I would really like a whole bolt of this for future use. It is perfect for backing as well as in a quilt design.

Can anyone suggest a good resource for Henry fabrics by the bolt?

Here is a link to a photo I took if that helps,

http://members.aol.com/elpaninaro/ahenry.jpg

Thank you,

Tom.

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Subject: Re: Alexander Henry by the bolt From: Feedsackfanaticcs.com 

Tom,

These shops all have your fabric, and I think hancocks-paducah.com would be your best bet to get a whole bolt:

hancocks-paducah.com thebestkeptsecret.com honeyforkfabrics.com strawberrypatches.com

Paula in GA

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Subject: Re: Alexander Henry by the bolt From: Elpaninaroaol.com 

Awesome! Thank you both for the links. Found just what I needed.

Take care,

Tom.

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Subject: Kimono patterns From: louise-b <vlbequetmcmsys.com> 

I would say that either the late 80s or early 90s was when I first saw them. One of the quilters in our guild who was half-Japanese was making them at that time. Will check with her this week on the dates. Think they were showing up in the Japanese quilt magazine that our guild received at thtat time.

Louise Bequette -- in mid-Missouri

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Subject: donation article From: "Andi Reynolds" 

Thanks for mentioning my article, Judy. You and several others on the = list were great help - the talents and willingness to share among this = group are wonderful. Thanks, Kris, for making it possible. QNM is = reviewing the piece now (they have a committee process just like museums = do - I love that); even if they decided today to publish it, "soon" may = be a year or longer, as they work quite far in advance. If they decline = it, I'll send it around until someone in the quilt world picks it up. In = fact, my plan is to broaden the scope of the article to appeal to as = wide a readership as possible, always keeping quilts in the copy. As = articles are living things and a writer's research is never done, any = additional thoughts, perspectives, ruminations are welcome.

Andi in Keota, Iowa

From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> Date: January 31, 2005 10:26:14 AM CST

A free-lance writer named Andi Reynolds contacted me about the topic of = donating quilts. Hopefully her article will appearing QNM soon. One = reply I sent to her was:

"It is the owner's responsibility to research possible museums. This is = easily done on the web. Narrow the selection down to 2 or 3 institutions = based on their collections policies. You should obtain contact names- = ideally the curator of collections- and address, phone number, and email = address. Initially I would write to one of your choices, directing the = letter to the curator of collections. Inquire if the quilt is something = that they would be interested in. Include a photograph and information = about the quilt such as maker's name, birth and death dates, where the = quilt was made, and date the quilt was made. Include your name, address, = phone number, and email address if you have one. Allow at least a week = to ten days for a response. After the museum has responded, you can = decide whether to go further with the contact, or want to try another = museum. If you decide to try another institution, it is a courtesy to = notify the first contact that you are seeking another home for your quilt."

When I am asked for suggestions on where to donate antique quilts, I = first suggest the local, county, or state historical society. I suggest = the donor do a google search for these, and have found that many donors = want me to do this for them. Another good place to start a web search = for historical societies is http://www.daddezio.com/society/hill/.

Next I suggest they consider local historic homes and buildings that may = have need of period textiles.

Then I include a list of museums that have antique quilt collections. In = Kentucky, this includes the The Kentucky Museum Quilt Collection that is = part of Western Kentucky University. If you are asked these sorts of = questions often, it helps to have a list of such places in your own = state since most folks want their family treasures to stay at least in = the state.

And never forget, the owner must have clear title to the quilt.

I will also say that the term "permanent loan" is a BIG NO-NO in the = museum world.

Judy Schwender

Curator of Collections / Registrar

MAQS=20

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Subject: UQRR topic, yet again From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Tue, 1 Feb 2005 07:00:56 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Not a week goes by where this same topic does not come up. I just had a thought. There are many of you who are equipped, due to your research and knowledge, to really do something about this problem. It comes up time and time again. What about someone actually writing a book called "The REAL clues in calico" and talk about the "folklore" aspects of this? This book might talk about the plight of slaves, recognizing their bravery in escaping as well. This book might also remind people that some of the patterns supposedly used to direct slaves to certain places of safe haven where not even invented to well after the time period they are supposed to have been in use. This book might clearly talk about how actual slaves wouldn't have access to fine fabrics, vs. scraps, etc. Also, what about offering (if you possess knowledge and information for "show and tell") to go into schools and museums and do a "talk" on this subject. If this talk were done in a non-argumentative fashion, presenting facts and knowledge, this would be remembered and the myths might be finally recognized as myths? Seems to me that the only thing that will put a stop (and it will probably never truly stop, now) to this growing misconception is some really knowledgable people coming forth with the actual truth and research, etc. I know that many of you have tried, but who, among this group, has the most knowledge and is equiped to write a book? If a good book was available, it would invite this person to do things like teach, lecture and even be on Simply Quilts and that kind of thing. The word needs to get out in a "good" way, if that makes sense. It seems like many people here are talking about what happens after an incident occurs, when it's too late to do something to stop this misconception. A proactive approach might be to really work towards re-educating. When I hear of a child making a project out of this and getting first prize, I recognize that she and her school and even the newspaper involved think this is true. They are probably very pleased at this being something historical and showing a wonderful civil rights kind of theme, particularly in these days when freedom in our world is such an issue, due to the Iraq situation, etc. What school and teaching staff would not be happy when child comes forth with this "wonderful" project and they feel it is truthful. It is up to those who possess the most knowledge to get the knowledge out, but not after the fact and in a negative way, but in a positive and educated fashion. At least the article in Cape Cod Times called Secret Stitches used phrases to indicate that there is no proof and this was a "belief". I did not see an link about the article on the girl's project, but would love to read it.

Linda Heminway Plaistow NH

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Subject: bleached muslin From: Mary Anne Randall <sewmuch63yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 1 Feb 2005 05:35:00 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 5

Would anyone venture a guess as to when bleached muslin came into common usage? I recently purchased a Double Irish Chain quilt top made with a solid red and natural, unbleached muslin. I wondered why the quiltmaker didn't use bleached muslin but then had to wonder if it predates the common usage of bleached muslin. But when was that?

Mary Anne

__________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Take Yahoo! Mail with you! Get it on your mobile phone. http://mobile.yahoo.com/maildemo

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Subject: bleached muslin From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Tue, 01 Feb 2005 09:20:28 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

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MaryAnne -- bleacheries date back to the early 1800s in the US but from what I've read in textbooks, technology for non-yellowing whites first started around the mid to latter 1930s but took several more decades to develop the suitable whitefast fabric. I've heard over many years persons saying they prefer quality unbleached to bleached [other than bed linens] because yellowed white is a horrible color and too much trouble to try to maintain whiteness This in part may be answer to your question..

Mary Anne Randall wrote:

>Would anyone venture a guess as to when bleached >muslin came into common usage? I recently purchased a >Double Irish Chain quilt top made with a solid red and >natural, unbleached muslin. I wondered why the >quiltmaker didn't use bleached muslin but then had to >wonder if it predates the common usage of bleached >muslin. But when was that? > > > > > >

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Subject: Kimono patterns From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Tue, 01 Feb 2005 09:30:50 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

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I appreciate this information Louise and thank you in advance for taking the time to find out more about dates.

louise-b wrote:

> I would say that either the late 80s or early 90s was when I first saw >them. One of the quilters in our guild who was half-Japanese was making >them at that time. Will check with her this week on the dates. Think >they were showing up in the Japanese quilt magazine that our guild >received at thtat time. > > > > >

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Subject: re: ugrr From: Laura Robins-Morris <lrobinsfhcrc.org> Date: Tue, 01 Feb 2005 08:05:08 -0800 X-Message-Number: 8

Even if you weren't a quilt historian, wouldn't you think the "story" a bit implausible? "Follow the north star"," gather your tools", "follow a zig-zag path"..... How's that going to help someone travel hundreds of miles through unknown territory to an unknown destination? Marking a safe house with a quilt, I guess you could buy that one. But the rest? Surely other pragmatics would be sceptical of the idea and want more specifics? How can educators devour the story so completely? Where are the cynics and the common sense??! Laura in Seattle

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Subject: re: ugrr From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Tue, 01 Feb 2005 11:22:42 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

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Laura -- as most on this list know, I know so very little about quilts. But when I read HIPV, I would have stopped at the dust jacket blurb about Ozella telling the author to come back in three years to learn the rest of the story. If it hadn't been for all the investigation and knowledge of QHL people and their comments on the list, much of the conjecture in the book would have bypassed me, knowing nothing at all about quilt designs. But just using common sense, as you say, is enough to throw up smoke signals as one stumbles through this badly written book. And the "come back in three years" will always bring a chuckle; I've seen SciFi movies with better fantasy plots.. :-D

Also thank you for your comments re kimono dates.

Laura Robins-Morris wrote:

> Even if you weren't a quilt historian, wouldn't you think the "story" > a bit implausible? "Follow the north star"," gather your tools", > "follow a zig-zag path"..... How's that going to help someone travel > hundreds of miles through unknown territory to an unknown > destination? Marking a safe house with a quilt, I guess you could > buy that one. But the rest? > Surely other pragmatics would be sceptical of the idea and want more > specifics? How can educators devour the story so completely? Where > are the cynics and the common sense??! > > >

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Subject: Re: UQRR topic, yet again From: "jocelynmdelphiforums.com" <jocelynmdelphiforums.com> Date: Tue, 01 Feb 2005 17:22:43 +0000 X-Message-Number: 10

On February 1, 2005, Linda Heminway wrote: > Seems to me that the only thing that will put a stop (and it will probabl= y=20 > never truly stop, now) to this growing misconception is some really=20 > knowledgable people coming forth with the actual truth and research, etc.

Linda, Alas, we all know about the cherry tree Washington chopped down. Yet Pastor= Weems made that one up out of whole cloth. It, like HIPV, remains popular = because it's an emotionally appealing story and there are a lot of naive an= d lazy people out there, who would rather believe a lie that makes them fee= l good (or which comes with prepackaged class activities) than to stop and = think for themselves about the huge gaps of illogic in the story, or who be= lieve that if something is published in a book, it is definitely true. Thos= e who believe one source as gospel aren't likely to want to read articles d= isproving that source. It's just sad that there are so many teachers who wi= ll teach one point of view without reading the opposing sides.

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Subject: Wool Quilt from Maine From: Dana Balsamo 

Was it this list that someone was inquiring about the Wool Quilt is Maine?

Here's a link, it went to an unnamed museum:

http://www.antiquesandthearts.com/

y best, Dana

Material Pleasures Affordable Vintage Linens, Lace, Textiles, Buttons & More! www.material-pleasures.com

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Subject: L. Sinema's quilts From: Xenia Cord 

I have just learned that Laurine Sinema's daughters are selling her collection of antique quilts and tops by appointment. They have placed a notice in a Phoenix-area "penny saver" type newspaper, and given two phone numbers.

I don't feel comfortable putting the phone numbers out to the list, but if anyone who is interested in buying contacts me privately, I will give them the numbers that are in the ad.

Xenia

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Subject: Virginia Snow From: Edwaquiltaol.com Date: 

Does anyone know if the Virginia Snow quilting designs are still under copyright.

Holice

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Subject: Another Heritage Center Event From: "Suzanne Cawley" 

Hi All!

I understand that lots of us from the Quilt History List have signed up for the one-day seminar on Arts of the Pennsylvania Germans. We should all have a grand time! Staff at the Heritage Center have asked me to post the following additional program that may interest those who live close enough to attend:

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Lancaster Quilt and Textile Museum, 717-299-6440 April 16, 2:00p.m. - 4:00p.m. Rachel Pellman lecture and tour of Lancaster Quilt and Textile Museum; "Amish Women and their Quilts" Cost: $15.00 per person ($13.00 Heritage Center members) The lecture, "Amish Women and their Quilts", gives a brief historical basis for these treasures and places them within the social fabric of Amish women's lives. The presentation provides factual information on antique Amish quilts along with colorful stories and experiences to make the quilts come alive. Please call to reserve your space. We expect this lecture to fill to capacity.

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Sounds like a wonderful program that would make for a nice "day trip".

Suzanne Cawley In wild, wonderful Keyser, WV

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Subject: permanent loan From: "Newbie Richardson"

Dear list, I have experienced the down side of "permanent" loans. First, the story of a family who left a large and significant collection of historic clothing with the state historical society. It sat for 30 years in the boxes it had been packed in. The list of items ( over 300) had been compiled by the great grand aunt of the family and was - to say the least- inaccurate, so no one knew exactly what was in the boxes. (Treasures, it turns out - as well as drek!) I do not know the whole story and I am sure that museum personel was as much at fault as the family, but be that as it may, the collection languished until just last month when I was called in to appraise the donation and the items saw the light of day. (Appearantly the existance of a qualified appraiser was part of the impetus to get the family to sign the deed of gift - that and the persistence of the curator). I can only speculate as to what the home packed boxes had contributed to the overall condition of the pieces over the span of 30 years..... The museum had been unwilling to invest any resources into a collection that was not theirs - yet. I think that there had been some unreasonable demands made by the family originally... Anyway, my point is that loans are not given the same kind of care as accessioned objects, (unless they have term limits and an agreement by both parties) their existance is not known to scholars for study, and the institution is asked to provide "free" storage, curatorial time, and conservation resources. The only good thing about this situation was that the items were away from the family manse when it burned down 25 years ago. (And I got to be like a kid in a candy store when I unpacked those boxes! - There were two WONDERFUL, EARLY Broderie Perse coverlets!) Second, I was asked to appraise a collection of Thomas Jefferson's clothing "loaned" to the Smithsonian in 1921. Mom never signed the deed of gift. She died in 1998. The family inherited the items - and had to pay inheritance taxes on them. When you consider that a suit of clothes belonging to George Washington (with questionable providence) sold at auction for $350,000...you can understand how upset the family was! As the clothes had been on view for 50 years in the old "Hall of Presidents" with no climate control, UV ray sheilding, etc. you can imagine the condition. In fact, I was able to discount the value based on condition. On my advice, the family later gave the collection to an institution that will see that they are conserved - (which they can be, sturdy stuff, linen). The bottom line is:I believe that the object comes first. In both cases, the objects suffered because they did not "belong" to the collection. Permanent loans are like orphans at a family reunion! Newbie Richardson

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Subject: Re: Virginia Snow From: "Susan Wildemuth"

Good Evening Holice,

Collingbourne Mills - Elgin, Illinois was the home of Viriginia Snow Studios and there were still some living Collingbourne children as of 2000-2001 which was my last contact with them. I can forward you an e-mail address of one of the children, who might be able to tell you about the copyright information.

Also I believe the "Grandma Dexter" pattern portion of Collingbourne Mills have been reproduced in a modern booklet by a group called the Dover Needlework Series.

I would be glad search through my Dexter Thread Company/Collingbourne Mill/Virginia Snow/Grandma Dexter/Boag Company/Lee Wards files to give you the Collingbourne family member e-mail address and e-mail it to you privately. Let me know.

Sue in Illinois


 



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