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Quilters Find a way to care

Subject: Re: sunbonnet sue recording From: Midnitelaptopaol.com 

there was a weekly/maybe daily radio show...that used the sunbonnet sue song for a theme song...it went like this "sunbonnet sue, sunbonnet sue sunshine and roses run second to you..." can't remember the rest

does it ring a bell with any other dinosaur out there? jeanL

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Subject: Identifying a quilt block -- Help! From: "Candace Perry"

I think it's common but I can't remember the name -- it's 6 triangles set in one large triangle (at least that's how I look at it...it's actually a large triangle made up of little triangles). Thanks for answering my ignorant cry for help, Candace Perry Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center

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Subject: Re: Identifying a quilt block -- Help! From: "Karen Evans" <charter.net> Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2005 14:07:33 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

Um. Sounds like it could be variation on Sugarloaf? *slinks away that her ignorance of block patterns has been exposed at last*

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Subject: Question From: "Karen Evans" <charter.net> 

I am applying for an AQSG grant to help with the research on my medieval = quilt book (I need to travel to see some of the old quilts in Europe and = quite honestly can't afford it on my own). If anyone on the list has = any experience with the process, I'd love some advice. =20

Please reply privately to charter.net. Thanks in advance for = all your help.

Karen Evans Easthampton, MA ------=_

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Subject: Re: Identifying a quilt block -- Help! From: Judy Kelius <

Hi Candace . . . do you means "Birds in the Air"? But that has nine triangles. I'm not sure how a triangle would be divided into six smaller triangles. Seems like there would be 4 or 9 - I can't picture what you are describing.

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Subject: Triangle block composed of triangles ???? From: Patricia L Cummings 

Dear Candace:

Does it look like the "Tents of Armageddon Quilt" shown here:

http://www.quiltersmuse.com/quilt_blocks_inspired_by_the_bib.htm 

Pat

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Subject: Re: Identifying a quilt block -- Help! From: Xenia Cord 

Brackman shows several triangle possibilities, the most likely being 3 dark and 6 light equilateral triangles set together to form one larger triangle. There are also blocks showing 2 sizes of triangles, 1 large and 3 small dark, 9 small light forming a larger triangle. These all have names like Sugar Loaf, Pyramid, Triangular Triangles, Triangular Trees (#s 201, 201.7, 202)

Brackman's Encyclopedia of Pieced Quilt Patterns, with over 4000 patterns, is a wonderful resource for pattern identification because of the way it is formulated and organized, and it also is a good imagination stimulator if one is trying to find a pattern to make up into a quilt. (1993; ISBN 0-98145-815-8; order from AQS)

Xenia

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Subject: Re: Identifying a quilt block -- Help! From: "Candace Perry"

I will try to clarify...bear with me! The large triangle is made up of 16 little triangles -- 7-5-3-1. The larger number of triangles looks like the background fabric to me...the smaller number (the six that I mentioned) looks like the pattern (I'm looking at this from a non-quilter's perspective, so please don't guffaw). The quilt is made of strips of these triangles alternating with non-pieced triangles. The quilt in question is quite busy, lots of prints and colors. If I had a photo I'd post it and you'd say yeah, that's what the heck she's talking about! (PS...Judy, it's not birds in the air...I eliminated that one) Candace Perry

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Subject: Re: Identifying a quilt block -- Help! From: "Candace Perry"

Oh, I lied, it may indeed be Birds in the Air...the thing that's confusing me is that there is no obvious block. Then again, it's quite apparent that I do not have a clue as to what I'm talking about...may I blame the foot+ of snow for freezing my brain??? Candace

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Subject: Re: Identifying a quilt block -- Help! From: "Laurette Carroll"

Hello, Sounds like "Sugar Loaf" to me. Here's a beautiful one that has many triangles, perhaps more than most.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.

If the URL breaks up do a search on ebay for auction number 3777471143.

Laurette Carroll Southern California

Look to the Future With Hope

> I will try to clarify...bear with me! The large triangle is made up of 16 > little triangles -- 7-5-3-1. The larger number of triangles looks like the > background fabric to me...the smaller number (the six that I mentioned) > looks like the pattern (I'm looking at this from a non-quilter's > perspective, so please don't guffaw). The quilt is made of strips of these > triangles alternating with non-pieced triangles.

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Subject: Re: Identifying a quilt block -- Help! From: Barb Garrett

Candace -

Could it be a version of this quilt -- I think I've seen Sugar Loaf quilts with fewer rows -- http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=2221&item=3777471143&rd=1

Barb

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Subject: RE: Triangle block composed of triangles ???? From: "Candace Perry"

Pat, good call, it looks more like this block but the triangles are wider. 7-5-3-1 for the set of the little triangles in the big triangle (Barb G, I need your mathematical brain!!!) Candace

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Subject: Re: Identifying a quilt block -- Help! From: "Candace Perry"

Yup, on our quilt the triangles are wider than these, and our border is different. But definitely similar!

-----Original Message----- From: Barb Garrett [mailto:bgarrett421comcast.net] Sent: Monday, January 24, 2005 3:15 PM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] Re: Identifying a quilt block -- Help!

Candace -

Could it be a version of this quilt -- I think I've seen Sugar Loaf quilts with fewer rows -- http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=2221&item=3777471143& rd=1   

Barb

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Subject: Extreme Home Makeover From: KareQuiltaol.com 

Recent post on another list: <<Extreme Home Makeover has recently featured=20 the home of a California family.=A0 Because the mom is a quilter, the show=20 contacted Alex Anderson to aid them in developing a "Quilter's Dream Room!"= =A0 To do=20 this, apparently Alex involved Bernina, P&B Textiles and Eddie's Quilting Be= e (a=20 Bay area store).=A0 Stay tuned; and check your local listing!>>

Karen Alexander

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Subject: Re: repair of needlework tools From: Babette Moorleghen 

Alan, my husband has repaired a couple of these tape measures for me. Look in the center and you will see a small hole. There should be a little screw there. You will have to use one of those small screwdrivers like you would use for eyeglasses or if it's a Phillips type a really small screwdriver. There is a spring inside so when you take it apart be careful not to lose it. It just might take more than your 2 hands to put it back together. When you have it apart you can put the little metal tabs on the end with a little glue. Hope this helps you out. Would love to see a picture of the one with the cat face. Sounds really cute! Babette

"Alan R. Kelchner" <alanalankelchner.com> wrote: Can anyone suggest someone who can either repair or instruct me in how to repair a couple of sewing tape measures? The one's a plain Bakelite and the other is this neat , vaguely Victorian metal with a cat's face impressed in it, and green sparkly eyes. They both suffer from the same problem - the metal tabs on the end of the tapes came off, and the tapes are now inside. I have the tabs still. Any thoughts?

It's a bit disappointing, since Mom bought them for me for Christmas.

Alan

-- Alan R. Kelchner Textile Artist http://www.alankelchner.com

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Subject: Triangles within a Triangle? From: "paandma" <

-You might check out an old pattern called "flat iron" one author that mentions it is Maggie Malone in her 5,500 Quilt Block Designs----

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Subject: RE: Navajo Nation fabrics From: "Jennifer Van Haaften"

If they wanted an alliteration for their title, it would have been just as easy to say "Native Nations" and be more correct in titling its fabric line.

Just a thought, Jennifer Van Haaften Lombard, IL

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Subject: New England Quilt Museum current exhibit From: Anita Loscalzo

January 20th – April 2nd 2005: “THRILLED TO PIECES: The Awesome Intricacy of Multi-Pieced Quilts." Showcasing quilts comprised of 1,000 to 25,000 pieces. Curated by New York City antiques dealer and quilt author Laura Fisher, the exhibition features extraordinarily remarkable part of quilting heritage when quilters cut, accumulated, and united thousands of fabric pieces into larger intricate designs. Opening reception and lecture by Laura Fisher, January 29, 2005 at 1:00 PM. Free with admission to the gallery. Admission is $5; $4 for seniors & students. Members free. Handicap accessible. Hours: Tues-Sat 10-4. Closed Sundays.

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: February 01, 2005 - Virginia Snow Copyright From: Anne Copeland 

For the final word on copyrights, go to http://www.copyright.gov. They clearly define the lengths and terms of all copyrights. Peace and blessings, Annie

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Subject: Re: kimono patterns From: Laura Robins-Morris 

Joan, I found one pattern copyrighted 1991. Let me know if you need more info on it. Laura

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Subject: UGRR - again From: "sue reich" <suereichcharter.net> 

This subject is going to be resurrected in our lives every year in  conjunction with February, Black History month.  If any of you happen to be in Connecticut on Sunday, February 6, you can  join me at the Bethel Library for a lecture by a Civil War re-enactor,  who will discuss "the significance and history of story quilts, used as  a method of communication by slaves seeking freedom". The article goes  on to say that examples of these story quilts will be on display! I am  going with an open mind, a willingness to remain silent, and the intent  to question without embarrassing the speaker. Any takers? sue reich ------

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Subject: Mother of injured soldier requests quilt donation in TX From: 

I hope that this post is okay to place here. It is directly related to quilt history in the making.

This morning, I received a letter from a woman in Texas whose military son has returned home. He was the victim of a car bomb incident in Iraq. She told me that her husband had seen a segment on CBS and that some quilts that are being given to soldiers were shown there. She would like very much for her son to be given a quilt, as she is proud of him and would like his efforts to be acknowledged.

Does anyone know of a group in TX who is making quilts for veterans? If so, please let me know privately and I will pass the information along.

Thanks.

Pat Cummings

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Subject: Re: UGRR - again From: Barbara Burnham

Sue, Sadly, I cannot attend. However, I wish to be a fly on the wall! Please, do let us know what you see and learn. Barbara Burnham Ellicott City, Md

sue reich <suereichcharter.net> wrote: This subject is going to be resurrected in our lives every year in conjunction with February, Black History month. If any of you happen to be in Connecticut on Sunday, February 6, you can join me at the Bethel Library for a lecture by a Civil War re-enactor, who will discuss "the significance and history of story quilts, used as a method of communication by slaves seeking freedom". The article goes on to say that examples of these story quilts will be on display! I am going with an open mind, a willingness to remain silent, and the intent to question without embarrassing the speaker. Any takers? sue reich

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Subject: Update on the Cape Cod story From: Patricia L Cummings

Friends:

As some of you may know, this is Black History Month. Many newspapers are celebrating this month by publishing information about the "hottest" topic to hit the combined world of Black Studies and Quilt History in a long time. The American public consists mostly of individuals who have NOT read the book that has generated so much controversy (since 1999), nor are they conversant in the matters of quilt history.

Instead, the public has relied on hearsay through which they have learned the details of the "secret quilt code", as originally shared by Ozella McDaniel Williams. Although I, and other critical thinkers, have analyzed the details and found them to be short on truth, our words exist in an echo chamber that extends little beyond our own dear group of quilt historians.

One of the most disturbing elements is that, now, educated adults, even University curriculum specialists, are preparing materials to teach about the code in the schools. Already, two school districts (in DE and NJ) and probably many more, are including information in their K-12 classrooms. Discussion of the secret quilt code has become so much a part of the vernacular, to question it at all is to be thought of as a complete nutcase.

On January 30, 2005, Sandra Munsey reported that her local paper, the Cape Cod Times, ran a story. The headline reads, "Secret Stitches: Cape women replicate quilts used by abolitionists to help slaves". I, for one, do not know of one documented case of an abolitionist making a quilt to help slaves escape. Do you?

As the information spread within my small group of serious quilt historians who are involved in emailing discussions, for the sake of support and "sightings" of new dispersions of the code, some of us decided to write letters to the editor.

I will tell you, this has been a hard, last three days. Apparently, the editor has decided to publish the letters sent by Leigh Fellner and Kate Clifford Larson, author of a biography on Harriet Tubman, and had said that he was going to publish a letter which I had mailed to the writer of the article. Since the letter I wrote was not intended for publication, I have asked them not to run it. Due to the fact that any further correspondence was going to be limited to no more than 200 words, I spent a good part of yesterday, editing the other letters I had on hand from two people, Karen Evans and Joan Kiplinger, and could only reasonably cut the text from 1038 to 328 words to keep the gist of meanings and information intact. I eliminated any statement of my own altogether, figuring that I have other potential venues to place further comments.

If you have not read the CCT article, there is a permanent link to it at the bottom of my Quilt Historians United web page at my website. I called the editor this morning, but again, he was "not available". We had had an amicable discussion on Monday and I was happy when he invited me to compile quilt historian comments for presentation in a special page entitled, "My View". In this case, it would be "Our View". Initially, I had worked very hard at writing a concise message (and that is very difficult with this topic). However, if anything I wrote is included, it will be no more than a paragraph.

Joan Kiplinger has suggested that perhaps a larger organization, such as the new UGRR Museum in Cincinnati, would take a role in helping to alert the public, and clear the air about this subject. That is a possibility and would be a good choice, if they are willing to take a stand. Of course, the clouding factor may be that a major million dollar contributor might object to the museum taking a stand. Money talks, which should come as no great revelation to anyone.

I personally feel that our children are being brainwashed in the schools, and that this topic has been embraced by otherwise reasonable people (University educated teachers, etc.) solely because they want to believe.......... To you and I, this seems strange because we know that history is not a matter of faith or belief, rather it is a record of what actually happened.

So, I am reading all of your posts about new UGRR/quilt code meetings and presentations, discussions, and newspaper articles, etc. etc. with growing weariness. I feel impotent in that my words, repeated over and over, in many venues, and in numerous ways, have had so little effect on the mainstream public who, for whatever convoluted reasons, need and want to believe in this tall tale. If you feel differently, I am sorry to offend you. From my perspective, this is an insidious infestation that is polluting the truth of American History and is an insult to anyone who cares about correct information being passed to our children and their children.

I hear from many of you privately. For a myriad of reasons, you can't speak out in your workplace or otherwise for fear of hateful rebuttal, or retribution for possessing a divergent point of view. Please know that Quilt Historians United is a dedicated, grassroots group and we are actively pursuing every lead we can to counteract this unsubstantiated story, passed off as legitimate history. Our Black sisters and brothers deserve more. Let's start with respect for their true history and ALL that they endured. Not as pretty a picture as quilt blocks, to be sure. It's not as convenient to tell children the truth about man's brutality to man, or bravery in the face of adversity (think Martin Luther King).

Together, we CAN make a difference. Unfortunately, at times it feels like we are alone, but that it not so. United we stand, divided we fall.

Wishing you peace in your day.

Pat Cummings www.quiltersmuse.com

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Subject: UGRR quilts From: Judy Schwender 

I was interviewed by Robin Roenker for Kentucky Living Magazine concerning Dr. Clarice Boswell's presentations about the secret quilt code. Since I have never seen one of her presentations, I spoke in general terms about the secret quilt code issue, that we quilt historians want more persuasive evidence for support, and the role of myth. The article and sidebar are in the February issue of Kentucky Living Magazine, can be found online at http://www.kentuckyliving.com/article.asp?articleid1343&issueid233. Included are links to articles by Pat Cummings, Leigh Fellner, and Kim Wulfert's interview with Giles Wright. If anyone looks at the bibliography that accompanies Pat's article they will find Passages to Freedom: The Underground Railroad in History and Memory listed. I dream that all the educators would begin with that! Judy Schwender

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Subject: U.S. SANITARY COMMISSION REPLICA QUILTS--HOTBQP From:

Hi everyone. I have posted at www.vintagepictures.eboard.com two photo of the Riverside County and San Bernardino County Home of the Brave Memorial quilts that my guild made to present to our County Boards of Supervisors at our quilt show on May 7, 2005. Sadly they contain the names of 32 local military that have fallen in Iraq and Afghanistan.

As some of you are aware, we began our drive to make replicas of the Lincoln Shrine's real U.S. Sanitary Commission quilt to present to local families of the fallen last July. Since then we have made over 55 quilts and have delivered 26 out of 32 to our local families and I will be send 3 more next week.

This project is now in 32 states, with varying results--I would estimate that between 200-300 of 4 by 7 foot quilts have been made. This, of course, is only one of many projects that honor the wounded and KIA military from those two conflicts. They are history in the making. Best, Don

--0-1101796657-1107367230:20420--

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Subject: Re: quilts for injured soldiers From: "J. G. Row" 

I'm just finishing a quilt for the project that Kathy Moore mentioned on 1/12 -- giving quilts to injured soldiers as they are taken off the transport planes.

I am writing to say that I can't remember ever having felt so good about making a quilt, and that includes the ones made for sons to celebrate weddings.

I am including the information below. Mine should be ready to ship in a week. I didn't look at the size guidelines and mine is somewhere in-between the two sizes given at 55 x 65 -- I don't think that some size variation should pose a problem -- do you?

I will be taking all that iniformation to my quilt guild meeting on the 13th and hope to get more quilters involved.

Judy, aka the Ringoes Kid judygrowpatmedia.net

They are making cotton quilts in twin (55" x 72") or lap (45" x 60") sizes. The quilts go directly to the soldiers and are distributed at Walter Reed Hospital as the soldiers arrive. They've sent 65 quilts so far!

The article states that Mrs. Hagel told the Verdigre quilters that "the more severely injured military personnel are given a quilt as they are taken from the transport plane at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland. They are brought in on stretchers, some with their arms wrapped around the quilt, others with it folded beneath their head. For most of the soldiers, it is the first time they've been on U.S. soil for many months, and it is often quite emotional for them...the quilts are a warm and meaningful welcome home..."

I couldn't agree more. If you want to participate here's the address to send your quilts:

Sandhills P.A.C. Attention Mrs. Hagel 1310 G. Street N.W. Suite 600 Washington, D.C. 20005

Okay, girls, let's roll!

Kathy Moore Lincoln, NE

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Subject: RE: permanent loan From: "Jennifer Van Haaften" 

Thanks, Newbie, for a great couple of stories "from the trenches."

I was just looking over some old American Association for State and Local History (AASLH) Technical leaflets, and they had one in the late 1970s addressing the issue of permanent loans, which directed museums how to find owners and/or heirs, and get them to sign a deed of gift in the end, in order to stop all headaches. It was interesting...

Jennifer V.

Jennifer Van Haaften Education Coordinator Elmhurst Historical Museum Elmhurst, IL

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Subject: Center for Research in Black Culture From: "Jan Drechsler" 

The following is a portion of a CNN article today.

http://www.cnn.com/2005/TECH/internet/02/02/black.migration.ap/index.html 

Web site traces African-American migration

NEW YORK (AP) -- At the start of Black History Month, the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture announced the creation of an education project focusing on black migration over the past 400 years.

The project, which includes a new Web site, will give the public access to articles, photographs, maps and historic documents -- including a letter from President Lincoln in which he writes about sending blacks to Haiti.

blah, blah, blah...

For example, someone interested in Virginia can click on a map and follow the journey of runaway slaves from a plantation to the cities, said Dr. Sylviane Diouf, the project's manager.

"This is an invitation to every person of African descent in the United States to revisit their families' migration histories," Diouf said.

I did not explore the site itself, and I do not have the spirit to delve into the site, to see if research is included re quilts, etc. It is offered as a point of interest, only.

Jan

-- Jan Drechsler NEW E-MAIL ADDRESS: quiltdocadelphia.net

Quilt Restoration; Quilting teacher

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Subject: Re: Center for Research in Black Culture From: Xenia Cord

Jan alerted us to

http://www.cnn.com/2005/TECH/internet/02/02/black.migration.ap/index.html

If you go to the bottom of that page and click "In Motion," it will take you to the full website about African American Migrations in the US.

You'll be happy to know that when I searched "In Motion," the section on Migrations (escaping to the north), putting in 'quilt codes' in the search box, I got:

<You searched for "quilt codes" quilt codes does not appear in any sections of this site.>

Grateful for small favors! Xenia

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Subject: Re: Mother of injured soldier requests quilt donation in TX From:

> Does anyone know of a group in TX who is making quilts for veterans? > If so, please let me know privately and I will pass the information > along. > > > A quilt donor has been found. Thanks to all who have responded.

Pat Cummings

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Subject: Re: Center for Research in Black Culture From: Judy Schwender

We should all contact the host group and THANK THEM for this!

Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> wrote:Jan alerted us to

http://www.cnn.com/2005/TECH/internet/02/02/black.migration.ap/index.html 

If you go to the bottom of that page and click "In Motion," it will take you to the full website about African American Migrations in the US.

You'll be happy to know that when I searched "In Motion," the section on Migrations (escaping to the north), putting in 'quilt codes' in the search box, I got:

quilt codes does not appear in any sections of this site.>

Grateful for small favors! Xenia

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Subject: Re: Center for Research in Black Culture From: Babette Moorleghen

Dear Jan and all. Well, I took the plunge and went to the CNN site and did a little exploring. Nowhere did I find mention of codes in quilts. I also checked out bibliographies, sources, etc. and found no mention there. It's a pretty interesting site. I especially enjoyed the National Geographic site where you could "be" a runaway slave and find your way to freedom. Interesting note: a mention of "following the North Star" was in this presentation but only in reference to a newspaper which was published at that time. There was also an article written by a man whose great-grandparents had been slaves and had traveled to freedom in Canada. Since we had the discussion some time ago about the National Parks Service, their printing the poster of quilt blocks for the UGGR, I also checked out their site. No mention there either. All in all it was a nice journey into our history. Hugs, Babette in Illinois

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Subject: Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture From: Judy

I went to the website for the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture that is the focus of the CNN article. Very nice website! I've been hanging out there for over an hour, and found many things that encouraged me and a few that discouraged me.

One that discouraged me: among the publications of the Center is Jubilee: The Emergence of African-American Culture. It is written by Howard Dodson (Director of The New York Public Library's Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture--one of the most prominent institutions of black scholarship in the world) et al. You can see the book at: http://www.nypl.org/publications/jubilee.cfm and this is part of the description: "From slave ship manifests, manumission papers, and some of the earliest photographs of slaves to carved items that echo African sculpture and freedom quilts with African motifs, the book is richly illustrated in an interactive way that brings to life this crucial transition from slavery to freedom." Having never seen the book, I will reserve judgement.

Cool thing: The center has "Textile holdings [that] include quilts, uniforms, African women's fashion, strip weaving, tie-dyed and commemorative cloth and appliques." Cool thing: Image: The Brothers Assistesd in the Quilting, you can see this at: http://149.123.1.8/schomburg/images_aa19/aa19c_info.cfm?cogt8457

Cool thing: Image of a Shango quilt http://www.inmotionaame.org/gallery/detail.cfm?id298144&typeimage

Good things that I found encouraging:

The student activities are not easy, light-weight stuff. The student is supposed to research and think. to aid in that, the site is chock-full of resources for former slave narratives: "Tell students that in addition to the narratives provided on this site, they can find full narratives online, in most cases at the North American Slave Narratives website maintained by the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill Libraries at http://docsouth.unc.edu/neh/nehmain.html. Published versions may be available, as well (see Related Works)." Lots of interviews with former slaves are right on the site: http://www.inmotionaame.org/texts/?migration2&topic99&typetext Read some of these, they are quite compelling.

The lesson plans I saw concentrated on research and looked good. The one exception can be found at http://www.inmotionaame.org/education/lesson.cfm?migration2&id2_007LP and this is what the caption reads: "Sewing/Fashion Production/Home Economics: The possible role of quilts as "maps" on the Underground Railroad has recently come to light, but is still a matter of debate by scholars. Working with the sewing teacher, ask students to find historic quilt designs that some have suggested were used by the Underground Railroad, and then to select one and recreate it in fabric, with an explanation of the element it was meant to represent. Students may combine the individual squares and display them in a location in the school, with collaboration from the administration and contributions of batting, backing, and border material."

So there may be some progress being made here. I suggest you surf the site for a while. There is a an incredible amount of content, and it looks to be well-researched. These folks could well prove to be a major ally in clarifying the UGRR quilt controversy. I am looking on the bright side: the home page isn't a banner of quilts, and that is a good thing! Judy Schwender

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Subject: Count the white sheep too. From: Gail Ingram

I second the motion of Pat Cummings, who suggests list members might note the Black culture site for not perpetuating the UGRR story. Positive feedback can alert entities to the questionable scholarship available if they have not encountered it yet and thus preclude passing the results of that scholarship along. It can also do what we should do all the time: acknowledge and applaud good work.

Might not be the parting of the Red Sea, but it does seem to me we are seeing more such positive work this year than we saw last year.

Gail

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Subject: $97.000 WOOL QUILT, c. 1812 From: DDBSTUFFaol.com 

I just read an article in the Newtown Bee about a c. 1812 wool quilt that sold this past month at James Julia's Auction for $97,000. I have posted the article and pictures on the Eboards under the "quilt" tab.

Nice to know some quilts are still selling for good money.

I wonder what it would e brought on Ebay? $200-$400??

Darwin

-------------------------------1107349493--

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Subject: Re: Count the white sheep too. From: Patricia L Cummings

Gail Ingram wrote:

>I second the motion of Pat Cummings, who suggests list members might note >the Black culture site for not perpetuating the UGRR story. Positive >feedback can alert entities to the questionable scholarship available if >they have not encountered it yet and thus preclude passing the results of >that scholarship along. It can also do what we should do all the time: >acknowledge and applaud good work. > >Might not be the parting of the Red Sea, but it does seem to me we are >seeing more such positive work this year than we saw last year. > >Gail > >Dearest Gail: > > You could second my motion if I had said it in the first place. Can't remember who did say it, but can I "third" the motion now? I'll applaud a scholarly study of anything, anytime! I should note this site somewhere on my website, too. Great idea. Thanks.

Pat

> > >

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Subject: Query: African Influence/quilting (Long-would you guess?) From:

Re Judy's citation: "From slave ship manifests, manumission papers, and some of the earliest photographs of slaves to carved items that echo African sculpture and freedom quilts with African motifs, the book is richly illustrated in an interactive way that brings to life this crucial transition from slavery to freedom."

Not having read the book, Judy Schwender reserved judgment on validity of the implied conclusions. I certainly reserve judgment.

Yet, recent comments raise these questions in my mind:

1) Why would we doubt that sculpture and textiles of Africa influenced the early crafts and art of African-Americans? Isn't it reasonable to assume the objects and patterns of their homes and homelands shaped these peoples' aesthetics, just as the objects and patterns of the Germanic settlers shaped their aesthetics? Such influences are unconscious, unavoidable.

2) Wouldn't it be reasonable also to guess that in the case of people who were taken from their homelands against their wills and enslaved, there would be a determined, conscious effort to preserve elements of their native culture in a new and hostile environment? Don't all people do this? Isn't that the drive from which early signature and memory album quilts arose?

3) Wouldn't it also be reasonable to imagine that in some way, perhaps some highly diluted way, the aesthetic and objects preserved by this first generation would be handed down to the next and then the next generations?

A quiet questioning and tacit dismissal of these possibilities or the real merit of quilts such as those in the old Gee's Bend collection occurs today among Anglo-European-American quilters. I cannot count the number of times I've heard the remark, "Well, anyone could produce quilts like that. But if WE produced them, everybody would laugh at us, dismiss us."

I've always thought, "Well, I could not create a quilt that could pass for a Gee's Bend or any other highly traditional African-American quilt I've seen around me." I can spot them, but my own sensibility differs too greatly for me to create such a quilt, one that would have the genuine feel of those. And given my circumstances and cultural background, some of the crudeness of technique noted in these pieces would be fraudulent for me.

One of the more amusing discussions of this topic of which I was a part took place in a TEX-MEX restaurant. There we were, in our Eddie Bauer greens and blues, sitting in a room filled with Southwestern colors and objects, holding Margaritas, and dismissing the authenticity or artistic merit of the Gee's Bend quilts.

I recognize the restaurant's choices were somewhat contrived for thematic purposes, but not entirely, for it was owned and run by a Mexican-American family who were its cooks and waiters and receptionists. They were not dressed up "in costume," but their choices in color and form in their personal clothing looked nothing like the choices of the people at my table. The irony of our conversation taking place in that setting seemed to strike no one but me.

I visited Gee's Bend before it was "GEE'S BEND," way back in the early sixties, before its quilters had begun to quilt for eastern markets. A college friend who knew I loved quilts invited me, and her mother took us to see the quilting. Only within the last year or so did I even learn the same place I had visited was Gee's Bend, for it had been called by the name of the family who had owned the plantation. It was isolated, reached by a ferry that made me nervous. I've never forgotten the distinctiveness of the quilts I saw that day. They were being made for church members in need, quilted for members of the church group. And they constituted something in my limited knowledge I could understand only through analogy with abstract art or woven African textiles. Aside from a brilliant, mostly orange Dresden Plate and an eye-popping semi-Log Cabin made in colors that would light up a cave, I do not recall any made in conventional patterns. That was also the first time I had seen quilts tied. These were not the quilts Alice Walker's Mama would refused to yield to her superficial daughter, a girl alienated from her past and trying to establish a false heritage. Those were made in traditional American patterns. But in their choice and arrangement of pattern, I bet the quilts Walker had in mind shared some common ground with those I saw in that little church building.

I can understand the view of many quilters reared in or influenced by different cultural traditions, that many of the GB quilts and many of the Southern country quilts in general are "ugly." But beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Both of these have immense value for what they can tell us about their makers and the world in which their makers lived.

Maybe we could encourage all the UGRR folks to shift their focus to consider such questions about real African-American quilts. Now that would give teachers plenty of "critical thinking skill" exercises to meet their states' curriculum requirements!

Is there an updated bibliography of authoritative scholarly research into African cultural influences in 19th- and 20th-century quiltmaking? Are there present in the collections of MESDA or other museums have quilts that are in line with the GB pieces? that predict them?

An inquiring mind that slept under a few "ugly" quilts of great beauty, Gail

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Subject: Regarding Gail's question From: "Kathy Moore" 

Gail Ingram asks, "Is there an updated bibliography of authoritative  scholarly research intoAfrican cultural influences in 19th- and  20th-century quiltmaking?"

I am attempting to assemble a bibliography on resourses relating  African-American influences especially as they relate to quilting. I  would appreciate suggestions from all of you for additions to such a  list. Titles of books and articles that you know of or would like to see  would be most welcome.

I can't wait to see what you all suggest!

Kathy Moore Lincoln, NE

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Subject: UGRR comment From: Lori Hudlow <lahudlowyahoo.com> Date:

Just a thought. How do we know that just once a quilt chain was made to help a slave make their way to freedom? Then just a most stories go they get embellished along the way and now we have this wonderful folklore story to be shared. Whether it is a true account who's to say....none of us where there.

Snowing in Keedysville, MD Lori

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Subject: RE: UGRR comment From: "Candace Perry"

All we can do is draw on the material evidence, Lori...and also, there's safety in numbers. If one story survived with this precious information, why didn't ten stories survive...or 100... Folklore is like folk art, IMO; it's the stories of a community. One tale does not folklore make -- once again, just my opinion. Now I'm worried, also; I write all of these labels for exhibits but you're correct, how do I know this, I wasn't there. Somehow historians and researchers have to draw on the evidence to piece together a glimspe of what might have been. One of my very favorite quotes is "the past is a foreign country," which is terribly true. It has a language and customs we must learn to understand it, and thereby, somehow interpret it for this and future generations. Candace Perry where it is not snowing in Pennsburg PA, and am now concerned it's snowing in MD (LOATHING the snow!!!)

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Subject: Re: UGRR comment From: Jackie Joy <joysbeesyahoo.com> Date:

Oh, goodness gracious me!

Jackie in Reno

Lori Hudlow <lahudlowyahoo.com> wrote: Just a thought. How do we know that just once a quilt chain was made to help a slave make their way to freedom? Then just a most stories go they get embellished along the way and now we have this wonderful folklore story to be shared. Whether it is a true account who's to say....none of us where there.

Snowing in Keedysville, MD Lori

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Subject: Re: U.S. SANITARY COMMISSION REPLICA QUILTS in NEW JERSEY

Hi, Has anyone started on this great endeavor in NJ? I have the directions which Don kindly sent me, but I'm not really a quilter, but more of a crazy quilter. I know I can make the blocks (well, I haven't tried, but I think I can), but need more guidance in assembling the entire quilt. Anyone know if this project has started in NJ? I'm in NW Jersey but can travel some when the weather gets better. TIA. I know four families locally that have lost their sons so there is work to be done. I'd also like to make one for a Coast Guardsman who was also lost in Iraq to an explosion. There's not much you can say to the families, but I think the quilt itself speaks volumes. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks. Carol Grace

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Subject: ugrr....yet again From: Lori Hudlow <lahudlowyahoo.com> Date:

As to my last comment....I really could care less about the story. I love quilt history and whether is a piece of it it sure makes for interesting conversation. I have been into collecting antiques for over 20 years and just as soon as someone says never or that couldn't be something comes up to change their opinion. Just like I have been told by many historians that ladies during the civil war period always parted their hair in the middle......I have seen pictures of side parts and lets be real if you didn't look good with your hair parted in the middle would you? Well, that was a little off the subject sorry.

Still snowing in Keedysville, MD Lori

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Subject: Room in Paducah? From: jeanlester <jeanlesterntown.net> Date:

I seem to have missed out on getting a room, this year, in Paducah. If there is anyone with an extra, would you consider me as a recipient?

Jean

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Subject: Re: ugrr....yet again From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date

Those historians can't be very scholarly. One only has to read publications published during CW to see the various hair styles. And it was antebellum ladies who were more prone to middle parts than in the 1860s. One sees only the fashion plates and makes determinations that is how everyone lived or looked. Yes, history is a living subject but I agree with Candace's observations about folklore or folkmyth and understand their origins.

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Subject: The Queen's Quilt Book From: Loretta Woodard

For those who remember the Summer 2003 Blanket Statements article, THE QUEEN'S QUILT, the book is now available online through the 'Iolani Palace shop for $7.95 at http://www.iolanipalace.org/shop/books.html. It's just the right size and price for gift-giving. <G> No personal gain accruing.

I trust it will be ok to suggest that If other museum gift shops would be interested in stocking the book, please contact Darryl Chung, Iolani Palace gift shop manager (see http://www.iolanipalace.org/contact/index.html). I know the Palace is interested in getting the book out there but it's not being carried by the regular trade book vendors at this point.

Mahalo. ----- Laurie Woodard Hawaiian Quilt Research Project 558 Palawiki St. Kailua, HI 96734

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Subject: P.S. From: Gail Ingram <gingramtcainternet.com> 

Reading my earlier posting (African-American influences), I note a couple of places in which a critical word was omitted that makes a difference in meaning.

First:

>A quiet questioning and tacit dismissal of these possibilities or the real >merit of quilts such as those in the old Gee's Bend collection occurs today >among Anglo-European-American quilters. I cannot count the number of times >I've heard the remark, "Well, anyone could produce quilts like that. But if >WE produced them, everybody would laugh at us, dismiss us."

The word "many" should qualify "Anglo-European-American quilters."

Actually, I personally---please note the qualifier there!---think a lot of the discussion is divided between those who are swept up in a wave of political correctness and see buttons on the Emperor's new coat that might not be there and those who have a hard time seeing the Emperor at all. It seems to me (Note "seems" and "me") the subject of African-American quilts has been politicized more than is healthy for discovery and affords a subject that can help us understand many other quilt traditions within our nation's general tradition.

Second:

> These were not the quilts Alice Walker's Mama would >refuse to yield to her superficial daughter, a girl alienated from her past >and trying to establish a false heritage.

I relied on everyone's having read "Everyday Use" by Alice Walker. The "Mama" referred to above is a character in the story, not Walker's own mother.

Gail

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Subject: raw edge applique From: "Newbie Richardson"

About 20 years ago, I did a set of vestments for my church ( High Episcopal). It was the "All Seasons" set, which means that these are the vestments and altar hangings used on non feast days, the green set. The altar hanging was of a gorgeous silk and cotton brocade with lots of floral motifs in urns. It gets hot up "on stage" at the altar, so I was asked to try and design vestments that would "breath". I did them out of cotton moire with the motifs from the brocade cut out and appliqued on the front and back of the chasuble . That is the tabard style garment worn by the officiating priest over the cassock.( It looked swell, if I do say so myself) I treated the cut edges with Fray Chek , allowed it to dry and button hole stitched with embroidery floss - 2 strands. I had checked all my needlework encyclopaedia and, in the 19th century, seamstresses used gum arabic to seal buttonholes before stitching - so that is why I used the Fray Chek. After at least one dry cleaning a year for the past 20, the chasuble is still in great shape with no fraying. As I did make a mistake on the set (which was easily corrected) born out of my ignorance as to use. (I hinged the burse on the wrong side). I decided that I needed to learn more about vestments, so I joined the altar guild. When the new members were querried as to why we joined, I answered: "post graduate training". I doubt that Father Malm had ever heard that response before! Many of the chintz used for the Broderie Perse in the early 19th c. were VERY tightly woven, so that they did not fray like we are used to seeing today. I also suspect that many of them were treated with gum arabic, just like the button holes. 18th c dresses made of silk taffetas ( lutesong) were frequently trimmed with ruffles and ruching with "pinked" edges. This was achieved by a tool (which may have been heated in some cases) that cut the edges in a scallopped pattern. The silk was so tightly woven that those edges still have not frayed in over 250 years. Newbie Richardson

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Subject: Re: gees bend From: Midnitelaptopaol.com

have to go watch the pbs special on the gees bend quilters and quilts... can't wait ...i saw those quilts and they are wonderous.. jeanL

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Subject: Re: gees bend From: Dana Balsamo 

Hi Jean, It was a very nice special, I saw it tonight, too. I wish I could be so freeing in my quilts. I saw them with a group of ladies from my guild when they were at the Whitney Museum. My best, Dana

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Subject: Gee's Bend Quilts From: "Mary Voss" 

For those of you in the West Michigan area the program "The Quilts of Gee's Bend" will be presented this Sunday, February 6 at 3 p.m. on the local PBS station WGVU.

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Subject: Historical inspirations From: "Barbara Vlack"

First of all, thank you, Newbie for your explanation about your ecclesiastical work. It came at a PERFECT time for me, as I am working on a purple scapular for my best girlfriend, who also was my former pastor. It's purple, for Lent, and she wants lots of fancy do's in it to change the focus from Lent being a downer (mourning and repentance) to being an uplift (renewal). I've got less than a week to finish this up.

And thank you, Laurie, for the URL for the Iolani Palace information. I found the site to offer great shopping!

I attended the Hero, Hawk, and Open Hand exhibit at the Chicago Art Institute last week and found it to be totally inspiring. It was an exhibit that focuses on the history of native Americans in the Midwest to southeast. I mean "In the beginning" kind of history. There were some stone artifacts in the exhibit that were dated hundreds of years B.C. (I was surprised they did not use the more "politically correct" "B.C.E.", but I digress). I had never thought of native Americans in B.C. terms.

What most impressed me were many of the pottery pieces that had decorations that look so very much like our current machine quilting designs! And many of the images looked like they had an Egyptian influence, though I doubt that could happen directly. What is the anthropological term for two cultures developing similar designs though they are geographically distantly removed from each other and therefore had no contact with each other? "Simultaneous something-or-other" I'm struggling to remember the term.

The exhibit is now closed, but there is a wonderful catalog that contains the history of archeological digs of Indian mounds that uncovered the many artifacts. Each piece is beautifully photographed and explained. I bought the book for design inspirations, because I know I'll use them! You can see some of what the exhibit was about at http://www.artic.edu/aic/exhibitions/herohawk/overview.html The museum bookstore has the catalog book, "Hero, Hawk, and Open Hand."

Barb Vlack cptvdeosbcglobal.net

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Subject: African American Bibliography From: Beth Donaldson

Kathy, Here is a book title to include in your bibliography: African American Quiltmaking in Michigan, edited by Marsha L. MacDowell, Michigan State University Press in collaboration with the Michigan State University Museum, East Lansing, Michigan, 1997.

>I am attempting to assemble a bibliography on resourses relating  >African-American influences especially as they relate to quilting. I  >would appreciate suggestions from all of you for additions to such a  >list. Titles of books and articles that you know of or would like to see  >would be most welcome. > >I can't wait to see what you all suggest! > >Kathy Moore >Lincoln, NE

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Subject: big bucks for wool quilt From: "Newbie Richardson"

That wonderful wool quilt that sold for such a large sum crossed the line from "quilt" to "folk art" - with the added feature of solid American provenance. Thus it had a whole new market - the same market as those wonderful 18th and early 19th century school girl embroideries and samplers with solid American provenance. The market that purchases these, besides wealthy collectors of the decorative arts, are investors who are looking to diversify out of the stock market but do not trust the art market. They do trust and understand Americana, such as presidential memorabilia or icons of pop culture. Thus the high price paid. One can argue that this is a good thing in that, by default, it elevates the value of all textiles, and that when someone pays that much for an object - whether for themselves or on behalf of an institution - then the object will be well cared for. In this case, the object is very graphic with wonderful visual appeal. If there was a corporate benefactor involved, or an MBA turned museum director then that would have influenced the decision to purchase the object. There has been a sea change in museum management in the last 5 years. The older "gentleman scholar" who by charm and erudition, could pursuade the wealthy old lady to underwrite a museum acqisition, has been replaced by MBA's whose buddies are the CFO's of companies. They want to be associated with objects that have visual appeal, & PR potential. This has impacted the acquisiton - and value - of historically important but not "sexy" acquisitions. It is the times we live in. Newbie Richardson

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Subject: Searching for Civil War Literature From: Ark Quilts

Hello! I am searching for a particular piece of literature about a woman walking in a garden -- she is thinking about the civil war, the roses in the garden, the pattern of leaves shadowed on the fabric of her gown, the stones on the garden path.............etc. I cannot remember if it is a poem or a selection from prose. It was popular in the 1970's in college classes...any guesses out there as to what this is? I only vaguely remember the details of the selection used in forensic speaking competitions, but would like to locate it and read it again. Don't know if the author is a woman or man or if they were a mid-eighteenth century person or lived & wrote after the war. The selection reflects on death, war, love, being left behind, etc. It really bugs me that I cannot remember the title. I have checked under "pattern of roses" "garden" and everything else I can think of. Thanks-Connie Ark

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Subject: Re: Searching for Civil War Literature From: "Karen Evans"

I believe you're thinking of "Patterns" by Amy Lowell.

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Subject: Re: Searching for Civil War Literature From: Ark Quilts

Karen--I think you are correct. I located a copy & will read it carefully. Thanks-Connie

Karen Evans <charter.net> wrote:I believe you're thinking of "Patterns" by Amy Lowell.

Karen Evans -

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Subject: Book question From: "Karen Erlandson" <quiltercooke.net> 

Does anyone know of a book about "Broderie Perse" or chintz appliqué quilts?

Karen in Texas

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Subject: Re: Book question From: Barbara Burnha

There are many. Here are my favorites: For history, lots of great color pictures, samples from museums, etc.: "Chintz Quilts: Unfading Glory" by Lacy Folmar Bullard and Betty Jo Shiell, 1983 For how-to, design, methods, quilting, trapunto, etc.: "Broderie Perse, The Elegant Quilt" by Barbara W. Barber, 1997 Barbara Burnham Ellicott City, MD

Karen Erlandson <quiltercooke.net> wrote: Does anyone know of a book about "Broderie Perse" or chintz appliqué quilts?

Karen in Texas

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Subject: Re: Book question From: "Doug and Sarah Hough"

I have a book "Chintz Quilts: Unfading Glory" by Lacy Folmar Bullard and Betty Jo Shiell, Serendipity Publishers, Tallahassee, c1983

Sarah in Panama City, Fl where it is sunny and in the 60s today!

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Subject: Traveling exhibition for children From: "Karen Musgrave"

I am writing to help the Troy Museum and Historic Village. Their question came to me via The Alliance for American Quilts (www.centerforthequilt.org). They are looking for a traveling quilt exhibition for children. If you know of any or could share with me information on children's programs and quilting, I would be most appreciative.

Thanks for your help, Karen Musgrave

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Subject: Capital Region Quilt Study Group From: Kris Driessen

The Capitol Region Quilt Study Group of Albany NY will hold its bi-monthly meeting at the Guilderland Public Library tomorrow from 10:00AM to 3:00PM. The theme is red or heart quilts. All are invited to attend with or without quilts to examine and share. The Guilderland Public Library is located at 2228 Western Avenue Guilderland, NY 12084 (518) 456-2400

I will be bringing the quilt y'all so generously made for me. I think that qualifies as a heart quilt:-))

Kris

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Subject: Copake Auction From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net>

Good Evening All -

This auction was listed in one of the "free newspapers" in my area, and I just went to the website -- 20 pages of pictures of textiles to view -- many many quilts. The auction looks like it would be great to attend -- just as a spectator or as a bidder. Hope you enjoy the picture show. Click on "click here for full preview" to begin the viewing.

http://www.copakeauction.com/

Barb in southeastern PA

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Subject: Re: Copake Auction From: Dana Balsamo

I was able to get my husband to make a weekend out of it. We are taking the girls to the Berkshires (about 30 min from Copake)...I get to go to the auction on Saturday and have Sunday and Monday with the family in the mountains.

Anyone else planning on going. These guys put on a great textile auction every February and are truly the nicest people to deal with.

My best, Dana

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Subject: another perspective on black history month From: Joan Kiplinger 

This rather straddles staying on topic but I know many of you are scholars or interested in black history month and related. Perhaps some of you saw this AP story or heard it on the news; for those who didn't, I thought this became an interesting development which was long overdue. I can remember many blacks I worked with stating the same views back in the 1970s, more so when affirmative action was mandatory.

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Subject: TV Show mentions quilts in NH used to point the way to freedom 

The very end of this file: http://www.quiltersmuse.com/quilt_historians_united_presents.htm will provide information and a link to a transcript of a television interview with authors of a recent book: /Black Portsmouth/.

Unless my memory is failing me completely, I do think that I remember one of the authors as saying that she started writing the book in 1999. Of course, that is the same year that HIPV was published.

There is a mention of quilts in the online transcript, if you are patient and read down far enough. This seems to be a re-broadcast of an earlier show in 2002, yet amazon.com states that the book was pubished in 2004, so I'm not sure about that discrepancy.

Pat C.

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Subject: Software for Nancy Page Applique Patterns? From: "

Hi- Is anyone aware of a computer software which catalogues the old  "Nancy Page" newpaper patterns, and can be used as a basis for patterns  for new projects? I have seen some photocopies of some of the pattern  sets on ebay, but I would prefer comprehensive source, if there is such  a thing. Thanks very much. I really enjoyed the link to the Copake auctions, and several of the  other links especially in the last few weeks when the weather has been  so gloomy. Learning from the list is a good antidote to cabin fever! Jo, in Newnan ----

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Subject: Re: Copake Auction From: ARabara15aol.com 

I attended last year as well as Sue Reich. There is a LOT more this year than last year. A great selection of not only quilts but many many more textiles. I find many of the prices and estimates reasonable.I will be attending this year as well. Hope to see some of you.

Donald Brokate Trenton NJ

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Subject: CRQSG pictures From: Kris Driessen 

The pictures are up, but I don't have the minutes yet. Remember, they are thumbnails, click on them to see them close up.

I would be interested in everyones opinion of the quilt in the upper right hand corner - and the one I am stading in front of:-))

The URL is http://www.quiltstudy.com . Click on CRQSG (Capital Region Quilt Study Group)

Kris

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Subject: Re: CRQSG pictures From: Xenia Cord 

Kris, the red and white quilt with the crosses was a fundraising effort for the American Red Cross during WW I. In the December 1917 issue of Modern Priscilla, the project was described in detail, down to how to solicit important people and where to feature their names, and what sorts of support could be donated by raising specific amounts of money. The campaign was pitched at individuals and small groups, giving everyone a chance to support the war effort.

And would you contact me privately about another quilt matter?

Thanks!

Xenia

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Subject: Re: CRQSG pictures From: "Karen Evans" 

Do you mean the Baltimore-style applique one with all the pseudo-Victorian panels? It looks more like a nostalgia piece, quite recent....

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Subject: Re: Software for Nancy Page Applique Patterns? 

Hi ..... Please answer this on line, as I am also interested : 0 ) thanks! Judy 

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Subject: Re: CRQSG pictures From: Midnitelaptopaol.com 

is the quilt you're standing in front of....the chimney sweep quilt we all contributed blocks to...

there you go two sentences ending in a preposition....my 5th grade teacher would be sooooo proud...LOL

jeanL

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Subject: Quiltmakers of Gee's Bend tv show From: Barb Garrett

I'm so excited -- while searching to see if there will be any tv for me to watch tonight while my DH watches football -- I found that the Gee's Bend show will be on at 7 pm -- yay!!!!!

For Philadelphia/Wilmington, DE, area members -- Quiltmakers of Gee's Bend will be on PBS channel 12 at 7 pm Sunday night, Feb 6 -- according to my tv guide.

Barb in southeastern PA where Fly Eagles Fly mania has taken over

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Subject: RE: HIPV From: "Teddy Pruett" <aprayzerhotmail.com>

This is a brazen thing to say, but those of you who know me well can just consider the brazen source. But, every time I see the initials HIPV, my mind instantly jumps to a similar set of initials that represent yet another disease that spreaads rapidly and wont go away. Teddy Pruett

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Subject: HIPV From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> 

Oh Teddy, there is a saying that great minds run in the same gutter. :-D When I first saw the acronynm I couldn't figure why THAT subject would be a topic for this list; I was relatively new to list at the time. It must have been several weeks or so before I caught on, at first thinking that the disease was in action much earlier than thought if the slaves had it, and the finally came the dawn when someone gave full name of book.Talk about feeling 1" tall. :-[

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Subject: Re: Teddy's statement From: Patricia L Cummings

Teddy Pruett wrote:

> This is a brazen thing to say, but those of you who know me well can > just consider the brazen source. But, every time I see the initials > HIPV, my mind instantly jumps to a similar set of initials that > represent yet another disease that spreads rapidly and won't go away. > Teddy Pruett

* * * * * * **

> Teddy,

> I love you, you "brazen" thing.

Pat C. :-)

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Subject: Quilt donations to museums From: 

Per the discussion about quilts and museums...

First of all, I wanted to let everyone know that the Great Lakes Quilt Center/Michigan State University Museum continues to build its holdings of quilts and quilt-related ephemera with the guidance of a collection development policy. The Museum also seeks innovative ways to make those collections available for research, exhibition, and education through exhibitions (including virtual ones), publications, festival programs, special events, and major efforts like The Quilt Index (where a sample of our collections can be searched) and Boxes Under the Bed (where you can see samples of the ephemera collections).

For more information, about the collections, go to: http://museum.msu.edu/glqc/collections.html

For learn about The Quilt Index, go to: http://www.quiltindex.org

To learn more about Boxes, go to: http://www.centerforthequilt.org/boxes/boxes.html

To view the MSUM quilt collection development policy, go to: http://museum.msu.edu/glqc/collections_developuse.html

For more information about the Great Lakes Quilt Center, go to http://museum.msu.edu/glqc/index.html

Secondly, I want to emphatically support Judy's suggestion of considering donating funds along with a quilt. When a museum acquires a quilt, it is just the beginning of the museum's long-term commitment to provide care for the quilt and, for many institutions, a commitment to make it accessible (through web-based avenues, exhibitions, on-site study, etc). All this costs and, as museum standards for care and accessibility rise, so do the expenses involved in meeting those standards. Thus a donated item -- while a gift in and of itself -- also becomes a financial responsibility and is one of the reasons that museums carefully deliberate on each possible acquisition. While we in museums realize that not everyone who donates an item or a collection has the capacity to also donate funds, we certainly appreciate those who can and do.

Marsha MacDowell, Ph.D. Curator and Professor Great Lakes Quilt Center Michigan State University Museum

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Subject: HIPV - revisited. Our efforts may be hopeless!

I went to the Bethel, CT public library today for the presentation of  Freedom Quilts by a Civil War Enactor. She was in costume and began her  lecture speaking about her outfit, behind her was a quilt with patterns  from HIPV and the story of Ozella Williams. She did state that the book  was based on recollections of Ozella who is now deceased and that it is  legend but she added to every legend is a kernel of truth. She also  stated up front that quilts were not hung out on the fence posts to lead  the way. Using the poem associated with the quilt blocks, she told the  story of the UGRR. The audience of 3/4 quilters was charmed as you  might expect. And then the questions came! Mine was the second  question. I started out with a compliment on her Civil War and  Underground research and then I asked her if she also researched the  quilt patterns or if she studied quilt history. She stated that she had  not researched the patterns at all and she was not a quiltmaker or a  quilt historian. She had based her entire tale on what was written in  HIPV and never validated it. I asked her how she could justify  presenting a story using patterns that were mostly (about 2/3rds) never  used in quilts until after the Civil war ended and some from the  twentieth century when talking about a time period from 1830-1860 (her  dates for the Underground). With that question, there was a collective  hiss from the audience directed at me.  She continued that even though these patterns might post date the UGRR,  their use to demonstrate the unspoken strengths of character of the  slaves was the message she was there to impart. Also, she and her  husband have discovered designs similar to these in eighteenth century  African textiles. I pointed out to her that some of the designs are  timeless and can also be found mosaic floors across Europe and in Asia.  Never the less, she strongly feels that African slaves brought these  designs with them and may have been the first to incorporate them into  their private quiltmaking, pre-Civil War to be seen by their families  and other slaves. I ask her to tell me historically, where even one of  these quilts might be found to validate this. Her husband agreed that  there has never been a quilt found. When I suggested that this is a wonderful story that is not based on  fact but fiction; she thought that the connection with quilts was not  its purpose. The story was told in this way to enlightened people about  the strength of the Negro spirit. She dismissed me then with "This is  not the time or place to debate this."  I presented her with copies of all of the web offerings from our list  and that of Giles Wright.  She told me that she presents extensively in the South and there is not  an event that passes without someone from the African community speaking  to her about their memories of similar stories involving quilts. So,  she feels totally justified in continuing her performance. Her husband told me that "This week, quilt historians are planning to  debunk the Myth." (Quilt historians out there, is it any of you?) Was it worth it? There were at least four people who asked me for the  web sites to enlighten them further. If only one person asked, then I  think it was worth it.  Also, this story, if presented well is so powerful and appealing that  people do not want to hear that it might be fiction. They do not care  that they are being lead astray. That's where we stand in Connecticut.  sue reich ------_

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Subject: Re: HIPV - revisited. Our efforts may be hopeless! From: "Karen Evans" <charter.net> Date: Sun, 6 Feb 2005 18:24:54 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

*wince* Sorry to hear you were hissed. At least people came up to you afterwards and asked for more information.

Karen Evans 

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Subject: Re: HIPV - revisited. Our efforts may be hopeless! 

Oh, Sue, what a brave girl you are! The hiss would have done me in.

"With that question, there was a collective hiss from the audience directed at me."

Christine Thresh http://www.winnowing.com

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Subject: HIPV - one more thing From: "sue reich" <suereichcharter.net>

One question I didn't ask but needs to be addressed; are royalties being  paid for all of these presentations. The right to present this  information should be requested first by the presenters. And royalties  should be charged. I doubt that Dr. Tobin or Ozella William's family  are receiving their fair share. sue reich ------_NextPart_000_000C_01C50C7A.4D8B5ED0--

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Subject: Confrontation at Meeting by Sue Reich 

Dear Sue Reich:

Thanks so much for sharing the story of your encounter of the worst kind. You, my dear, are the one who had the most courage, in this instance. Anyone can stand up in front of an audience, spinning a wild tale for entertainment's sake and (money?), but it takes a certain amount of conviction to stand up for what you know to be true. If many of us could have been there, we would have stood tall with you.

Hopeless? Hardly. It may seem like you are one voice crying in the wilderness but you are not. While it may seem that the American public would all like to be sold this story, woven out of whole cloth and imagination, not everyone wants to accept it as THE Gospel truth, and have not done so. What is the old saying, "You can fool some of the people, some of the time...."?.

What strikes me most are some of her statements. How does telling an unsubstantiated tale about the history of a people, make members of that group feel better? I just don't get it, and I probably never will.

Congratulations! Nice to know that I am not the only one who disputes the code. Then again, I already knew that there's a bunch of us!

Patricia L. Cummings, one Yankee who prefers fact to fiction www.quiltersmuse.com

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Subject: Re: CRQSG pictures From: 

> is the quilt you're standing in front of....the chimney sweep quilt we all > contributed blocks to... > > there you go two sentences ending in a preposition....my 5th grade teacher > would be sooooo proud...LOL > > jeanL > > Jean,

One of my favorite preposition stories comes from a feisty colleague who was reprimanded in a message sent through hapless child. The mother was a friend of mine but among the most "knowing" and "certain" individuals I've known. She had proofed a paper her son had written and on which the teacher had not marked a sentence that ended with a preposition.

The boy reported, "My mother says a sentence cannot end with a proposition."

My colleague snapped, "Tell your mother she doesn't know what she's talking about."

Gail

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Subject: Ozella, Ohgawd From: Gail Ingram 

I once received an email from a woman who has done much to establish the study of quilts as a respectable field of scholarship and source of knowledge.

She said merely, "Oh gawd!"

My mother, born in 1908 into a family of highly intelligent and accomplished women, carefully enunciated each syllable when she praised some brave and daring action of a woman.

"I glory in her spunk!" she would say enthusiastically.

Sue, I pass along these pithy remarks to you on the occasion of your having stood and spoken truth to a hostile audience:

"Oh gawd! I glory in your spunk!"

Gail

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Subject: citation From: "Donna Skvarla" <bearspawcox.net>

Hi All,

I enjoy reading everyone's comments and now I have a question! Do any  of you have a citation for an article that appeared in Life magazine  sometime in the 30s that was about the Kansas quilters, Rose Kretsinger,  Charlotte Whitehill, etc.? If anyone knows the date of this particular  issue of Life, could you let me know what it is? Thanks so much!

Donna Skvarla



 



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