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Quilters Find a way to care

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Subject: Prepositions and confrontations From: Sally Ward 

Talk of prepositions sent me looking for a quote that my Mother told me came from Winston Churchill; she always claimed he said in a speech: 'Up with which the British public will not put'. Couldn't find it, but I did find this from the same man which seemed appropriate for Sue and her hissing audience:

"You have enemies? Good. That means you've stood up for something, sometime in your life."

Sally W

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Subject: Re: Prepositions and confrontations From: "Karen Evans" 

I always heard it this way:

Someone commented that placing prepositions at the end of a sentence was incorrect. Churchill promptly agreed, adding, "That is language up with which I will not put." I wonder which version is correct, or if it's apocryphal?

Karen Evans -

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Subject: RE: Ozella, Ohgawd From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> 

Darn tootin' Ms. Gail. Sue, this is one of those instances where my least favorite word in current venacular would have been highly appropriate: WHATEVER. You know, hip jutting out, hand on hip, and the hand in the perpetrator's face. What makes it worse is when the race card gets played, and it looks like that was the direction where this particular situation was headed. I'm sorry you had to endure the slings and arrows, but you did the right thing. Once more, unto the breach! Candace Perry

 

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Subject: Letters published From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> Date: Mon, 07 Feb 2005 09:18:33 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

The Cape Cod Times, Feb. 7, 2005, has the following comments from some of us:

http://www.capecodonline.com/cctimes/edits/letts.htm

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Subject: UGRR - Report from Cape Cod From: munseyjuno.com Date: Mon, 7 Feb 

Today's (2/7/05) edition of the Cape Cod Times has published five letters in response to their Jan. 30 article "Secret Stitches". The paper captioned the letters as follows:

"Phony slave stories used for marketing" - Leigh Fellner's letter; "Quilt code theory has no historical basis" - Kate Clifford Larson's letter; "Quilt code research is available online" - Joan Kiplinger's letter; "Reality much richer than quilt code myth" - Karen Evans' letter; "Teachers help spread new American myth" - Pat Cummings' letter.

The link for those of you with an inclination to read them is www.capecodonline.com/cctimes/edits/letts.htm . Or, for today at least, you may go to www.capecodonline.com, click on, Today's Print Edition, Editorials, Today's Letters.

Sandra on Cape Cod, where the snow piles are shrinking, but there is still enough to SKI CAPE COD!

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Subject: For Sue Reich: Lend-Lease Plan From: Gail Ingram 

Sue,

The next time you attend such a gathering as you attended this weekend, where you might be hissed, please ask Ms. Kaylakie if you might borrow one of her rattlesnake quilts---one of those with the head (shiver!!!) appliqued--and unfurl it as if on cue.

Tell them it was a quilt used to warn Scots-Irish of snake-infested mountains and swamps as they took the overland foot road south and west.

Or tell them nothing. Let the quilt do the talking.

Always thinking in Louisiana, gi

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Subject: Re: For Sue Reich: Lend-Lease Plan From: Kris Driessen 

Gail, you are wicked.

Marcia, can I borrow a rattlesnake quilt?

Kris

--- Gail Ingram <gingramtcainternet.com> wrote:

> > Sue, > > The next time you attend such a gathering as you attended this > weekend, > where you might be hissed, please ask Ms. Kaylakie if you might > borrow one > of her rattlesnake quilts---one of those with the head (shiver!!!) > appliqued--and unfurl it as if on cue. > > Tell them it was a quilt used to warn Scots-Irish of snake-infested > mountains and swamps as they took the overland foot road south and > west.

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Subject: quilt hsitory of the future From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> 

Thought you all might enjoy this. Judy

US cotton exports expected to rise in USDA report Mon Feb 7, 2005 10:06 AM ET NEW YORK, Feb 7 (Reuters) - U.S. cotton exports should increase when a government crop report is released this week, but further changes in other key figures are unlikely, industry analysts said Monday. The U.S. Department of Agriculture will release its monthly supply/demand report on Wednesday at 8:30 a.m. EST (1330 GMT). Sharon Johnson, cotton expert for Frank Schneider and Co. Inc. in Atlanta, said that at this time of the year, "these reports carry less weight as the crop size is known and any changes to demand are made incrementally over a period of several months." Mike Stevens of Swiss Financial Services in Mandeville, Louisiana, said the only key change he expects in the USDA report would be an increase in the estimate for U.S. 2004/05 (August/July) cotton exports. Last month, USDA forecast U.S. cotton exports at 12.7 million (480-lb) bales. Stevens believes the figure "is going to be too low" and he would raise exports by 200,000 bales to 12.9 million. Stevens' view was shared by John Flanagan of brokers Flanagan Trading Corp. in North Carolina, who said in a report that an increase in exports should trim U.S. cotton ending stocks by 300,000 bales to 7.4 million. Johnson's estimate of U.S. cotton exports, on the other hand, stood slightly higher at 13 million bales. "China still has 2 million to 3 million bales to buy from the U.S. and our mix of quality and price is allowing sales to be made that would not otherwise occur," she said, adding a pick-up in shipments "should occur into this spring/summer as domestic supplies are depleted by foreign users." Stevens said the figures from other countries contained in the USDA data could also see some "additional tweaking." Production in China was estimated by USDA last month at 29.5 million bales. Most analysts expect this to eventually be cut to 26 million to 28 million bales. China is the world's largest producer and consumer of cotton.

© Reuters 2005. All Rights Reserved.

-

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Subject: RE: qhl digest: February 06-HIPV all is not lost From: "Jennifer Van Haaften" <

Well, I have a tale to tell regarding HIPV. Warning, this is long...

Being the educator at our museum, I am in charge (among other things) of scheduling and presenting programs to an adult audience every 3rd Thursday of the month (since it is in the afternoon, it is mostly a senior audience). I asked a gentleman to perform his "first person" piece on the Underground Railroad. This was sight unseen, I was crossing my fingers that it was a quality, well backed piece of documentation. As he was setting up before the program, he strung up a painted canvas backdrop, upon which, predominately featured, were several quilt patterns. I cringed when I saw it. His description of the program did not mention quilts and I was hoping and praying that it was just an artistic rendition for the sake of a backdrop. I decided to let the program go as it was and let him do the job he was hired to do.

He was presenting it from a conductor's point of view. His early part of his presentation seemed well documented, covering the story of a conductor in Southern Illinois who was sued for having stolen a neighbor's "property." (In Illinois, apparently, slave owners did live within the borders, especially in the southern part of the state, as long as they didn't talk about slavery, but discussed it as property). It seemed pretty well documented, he cited the court references to the trial. He continued talking about conductors and how slaves moved up from the Missouri area and southern Illiniois. He also did a bang up job of pointing out that slaves were helped by free blacks along the way, with two or three stories demonstrating and naming, specifically, black people helping with the escape.

But then, just as I dreaded, he started to talk about the quilts. I waited for him to finish his entire presentation, wondering how I would bring it up, because here were 40 people that had just heard this myth and I didn't want them to walk away with the wrong information. Luckily, an audience member asked about the quilt patterns, and the peformer actually admitted he didn't know a whole lot on the subject, his wife actually did the research and he presented the programs. At that point I raised my hand and asked if I could add to the conversation. He was very gracious and cheerful and asked me to go ahead. I asked him if HIPV had been his source for the information and he said yes. I explained that quilt history was a hobby of mine, and that I had heard from other, much more knowledgeable, quilt historians that HIPV had many inconsitencies in it and it was a poorly written book as a supposed historical tome. I explained that some of the patterns mentioned did not come into existence until even the 20th century, and suggested that people read more about it before believing that story to the fullest. Afterwards, the lady with the original question came up to me and asked me more about what I knew. I steered her towards one of your websites (I think quiltermuse) and also mentioned Giles Wright's discussion, and Barbara Brackman's Encyclopedia of Pieced Patterns. I also talked to the performer and he was not upset that I had mentioned it and seemed interested in looking into it further. I don't know if he'll change his performance, but he was willing to listen to my information and seemed interested in updating his information as needed.

So, I am quite embarrassed to have booked a "historical" performance with questionable information, but glad that he was willing to listen and re-examine what he was saying, and let me speak publicly about it. I don't have the time to go around and preview every single show I've booked, and, from the description, there was no indication that he was actually going to talk about quilts. But it seemed it was kept in check and ended well and on a good note. <sheepish grin>

Obviously, this HIPV quilt story is really something people latch onto. As someone already mentioned on this list, we need a book that looks at the UGRR and quilts in a more objective way, with more diverse source material, so that when someone looks something up at their library, not only does HIPV pop up in their search, but this new and wonderfully well researched and objective book does too. Because HIPV is out there and is not going away, and people love quilts and want something tangible of the UGRR. Quilts are so easy to latch onto, we all know what they are and know they can connect us to the past.

Boy, I wish I wasn't employed full time and my kids were older. I would love to go out researching, going to every place that had a slave associated quilt, studying up on the UGRR, looking for all sorts of information. Are there any research grants out there that would allow me to quit my job? ;)

On a side note, my husband, a museum director, has been trying to get into the National Park Service's Network to Freedom. His historical society owns the Sheldon Peck Homestead, the last home of Sheldon Peck, a very popular folk artist in the art world. In this area, he was rumored to have been a conductor. His son wrote a memoir in the early 20th century, stating that he remembered sitting on a black man's knee when he was very small. The National Park Service requires two "eyewitness" accounts, two contemporaries that actually state someone or someplace was part of the underground railroad. My husband and his volunteers have done tons of research. They have Mr. Peck connected to the abolitionist movement, no problem. He was even a main speaker at some of their gatherings. His travels back and forth from St. Louis back to the Chicago area has some suspicious undertiones. But the historical society can't find a second contemporary of his that has outright stated he was conducting slaves. There's ton's of circumstantial evidence, that might have gotten him convicted, but only the one witness. So the museum remains off the Network to Freedom list, without this smoking gun. The representative he's been working with at the National Park Service is very impressed with his research and is sorry they can't put him on the list. But the rules are, they have to have 2 (two) contemporary sources. (which is odd, considering they made that poster with the quilts. They'll take that late 20th century rendition about the quilts at face value, but won't put a site in with huge amounts of circumstantial evidence and one eyewitness on their Network to Freedom?) My husband's having such a blast with the research. I am a bit envious. Oh, and no quilts mentioned anywhere here....:-)

As several others have mentioned, keep up with your brave statements. Several people will hear and understand you (even if it is not the presenters). It seemes like a hard road to slog, but it will be done. Remember, Betsy Ross has floated for over 100 years. I don't know if the schools have backed down from that, but I do know they have backed down from George and the cherry tree. Just keep with the questions and comments. It just shows that Americans are fine with myths about our past, because these myths tell good moral stories for us and make us feel all warm and fuzzy (quilts do that quite literally, too, don't they?). The funny thing is, there are real historical incidents that are just as inspiring.

Hmmm... maybe I should quit my day job and write historical books for children... HA!

Jennifer Van Haaften Education Coordinator Elmhurst Historical Museum Elmhurst, IL

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Subject: PBS new series From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> 

There is a new program -- Slavery and the the Making of America -- on PBS this Wednesday at 9 [Northeast Ohio] though scheduling may differ in other areas. Program is defined as a series but promo makes it sound more like a one-time show than a serialization. If this has been posted before, I didn't catch it, so apologies for duplication.

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Subject: Re: Letters published From: Babette Moorleghen

As a good friend would say... "YOU GO, GIRL(S)!!" I read with great interest the UGRR discussion and now the response you all have made. Thank you so much for broadening my own information regarding this subject! Hugs, Babette in Illinois

Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> wrote:The Cape Cod Times, Feb. 7, 2005, has the following comments from some of us:

http://www.capecodonline.com/cctimes/edits/letts.htm

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Subject: Re: PBS new series From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> 

i searched the PBS website (www.pbs.org) and this is a four-part series, and each part is a one-hour segment. Two episodes will be aired back-to-back on the two nights of the initial airing. The program's website is really good: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/slavery/ The site's resources page can be found at: on-line resources http://www.pbs.org/wnet/slavery/resources/online.html In the books for kids section HIPV is not listed: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/slavery/resources/kids.html And, it is VERY heartening to see the WPA slave narratives available here: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/slavery/resources/wpa.html

Anything that has children going to primary sources is to be applauded. This series appears to present the "truth" that we all want to supercede HIPV as a beacon in the telling of the history of slaves in the United States. Judy

Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> wrote: There is a new program -- Slavery and the the Making of America -- on PBS this Wednesday at 9 [Northeast Ohio] though scheduling may differ in other areas. Program is defined as a series but promo makes it sound more like a one-time show than a serialization. If this has been posted before, I didn't catch it, so apologies for duplication.

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Subject: Re: Prepositions and confrontations From: "Lucinda Cawley"

The way I heard the story was that Churchill was pointing out the foolishness of rigidly adhering to grammatical rules that interfere with graceful language and said (as an example) "That is a situation up with which I will not put." In the same vein, would any of us say "Your mother doesn't know that about which she is talking"? Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: Re: Prepositions and confrontations From: "Julia D. Zgliniec"

Who said: " A foolish consistancy is the hobgoblin of a small mind" ?

Julia Zgliniec

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Subject: : Prepositions and confrontations From: Joan Kiplinger 

I'll go out on limb and go back to my days in the early 1950s at Kent State which had a very stiff English department. The staff's view on the preposition was that in many instances it was perfectly acceptable to end a sentence with one; in fact, they felt modern language required new expressions of speech and usages to continue to serve changing lifestyles. This was great news to us J-students who lived by the AP bible and on some occasions, Strunk. More remarkable, teachers often pointed to our examples of ending sentences in of and with as a perfect and corrrect way to blend written and oral speech. Churchill had it right. :-D

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Subject: Re: Prepositions and confrontations From: "Sharon in NC" <patchworksecrets2earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2005 13:11:25 -0500 X-Message-Number: 16

I believe that is Emerson Sharon in NC

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Subject: National Geographic story - Feb. 2005 More re: The Secret Quilt Code

http://news2.nationalgeographic.com/news/2004/02/0205_040205_slavequilts.html

In this article by Sarah Ives, Dobard, Giles, and Bonnie Browning are quoted.

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Subject: Candace's Whatever! and Copyright Infringement From: "sue reich"

-Actually, that is just the way it did end. When I gave the speaker's husband, my 1" packet of data, we became engaged in conversation. He went round about the designs such as Churndash/Hole in the Barn Door, something he called Bow Tie - I call Yankee Puzzle, Double Wedding Ring and Drunkard's Path showing up in old African textiles. He stated that plantation slaves were probably the very first to make quilts from these patterns. He suggested that the reason Double Wedding Ring and Drunkard's Path are not recognized as pre-Civil War is because they exited in the slave community for personal use to explain the code. At that very point, I just gave up and left. I didn't say WHATEVER but that is exactly the way I felt. Heaven help us all, if this becomes part of the story without a quilt or two to prove it! Can you imagine trying disprove that! -I did not come away from yesterday feeling at all heroic! Trodden upon is a better descriptive. Thank you all for your spirited words of encouragement. Each February, these types of programs are offered all over Connecticut. We do have identified UGRR sites. About ten years ago, I participated in making a square for a four panel quilt that hangs in our State Library. My square represents a UGRR site in Bloomfield, CT. To my knowledge, these are historically, documented sites. -One point that we are all missing here is the issue of copyright infringement! It is quite obvious that if these performances were not profitable, they would not happen. The next time, I might be inclined to question the speaker about obtaining the copyright for their gig and who they pay royalties to. Yesterday's performance was right out of the HIPV book. The speaker stated at the onset "This is Ozella's story." Copyright infringement is theft! Period, bottom line! To Gail, the snake idea is very interesting! Marcia K., just imagine the tales you could weave and the money you could make if you took your snake quilts on the road. So many of us have wonderful collections of quilts that we research up the whazoo (not the best choice of words) before we dare speak about them in public. These presenters just lift their show off the pages of HIPV. Doesn't that bother anybody! sue reich >

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Subject: Three messages in one From: Patricia L Cummings

The date on the article I just cited is 2004, so this is actually "old news".

On another note, I have been thinking all day about the idea that even quilters can read the book, Hidden in Plain View, and not really understand the implications of it because one has to use applied knowledge to understand where the "break down" of information occurs and why, timelines for quilt blocks being just one of the items under consideration.

Not surprising, some quilters whom I personally know, have read the book and said that it is "pretty good". Of course, these same people are not scholars, or bent in that direction at all. Many quilters just want to learn enough about quilting to make a pretty quilt for themselves or for a gift. Any learning of the history of quilting is peripheral.

To further change the subject (three for the price of one?), I want to thank Kris for her time and effort in providing photos of the NY study group meeting. Kris is one of the nicest people I've met in the quilt world and she is always so generous and ready to help anyone, in any way. I am sure that I am joined by others in saying that we appreciate all of her work, on this list and elsewhere, and that we are relieved that the two quilts that we helped make for her are finished and in her hands.

Best,

Pat Cummings www.quiltersmuse.com

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Subject: Hmong piece From: Carolyn K Ducey <cduceyunlnotes.unl.edu> Date:

Does anyone on the list know of a museum/organization that is interested in adding Hmong quilts to their collection?

Carolyn Ducey Curator International Quilt Study Center HE 234, University of Nebraska Lincoln, NE 68583-0838 402/472-6301

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Subject: for history buffs From: Joan Kiplinger 

Perhaps this booklet -- Slavery in New York -- written in 1900 may be of interest to quilt historians especially in that state.

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Subject: speaking of slaves... From: "Lynne Z. Bassett" <lzbassettcomcast.net> Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2005 16:26:05 -0500 X-Message-Number: 22

Dear All,

I just found this wonderful passage from a book I am reading, a reminiscence of a New England teacher working in Georgia in the early 1840s. Thought you all would enjoy it:

Emily Burke. Pleasure and Pain, Reminiscences of Georgia in the 1840's. Savannah, GA: The Beehive Press, 1978. First published in 1850.

p. 89 "While I was on this plantation, the overseer's wife made a quilting at which she invited the field slaves, both men and women. It may seem strange to my readers to hear of men being invited to a quilting, but I can say to them that among the Southern field hands, the women can hoe as well as the men and the men can sew as well as the women, and they engage in all departments of labor according to the necessity of the case without regard to sex. This quilting party was held in the night, the first part of which was devoted to work on the quilt, the latter part to festivity and dancing. Caroline, the overseer's wife, was one of my best friends on this plantation, and from her I had learned the minutiae of the preparations for this scene. And, when her guests had all assembled and were seated around the quilt, she sent for me to go and see them at work. It was most assuredly an amusing sight. [p. 90] The men and women were seated promiscuously around the frame, very quietly yet as expeditiously plying the needle to all sorts of lines, both crooked and straight, as if their lives depended upon having the quilt out before midnight. But oh! what quilting! It was, however, executed very much as one would suppose it would be by hands much more accustomed to wield the spade and shovel than the cambric needle. They quilted with darning needles and traced their designs in charcoal, and I can assure you those athletic fingers drew no microscopic lines, but every one of them exhibited width and distinctness worthy of a heavy hand! The entertainment Caroline served up for her company, with the permission from her master to provide just what she pleased, was well calculated to tempt the appetite of the most fastidious epicure. Pastry of various kinds and frosted cake that would rival any thing of the kind coming from the confectioner's oven, tea and coffee that a Frenchman might consider it a luxury to sip and fowls and ham and other meat most deliciously prepared, all together contributed to make up a feast that any ambitious landlady might be proud of."

(I won't even question whether it was a "coded" quilt....)

Best,

Lynne

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Subject: snake quilt From: <kerrybrackozemail.com.au> 

is that really true about the snake quilt! is that the quilt that was for sale on ebay...also has anybody looked at the sms messages teenagers text these days. its a whole nother language that is creeping in. <g> kerry in sydneyx

This message was sent through MyMail http://www.mymail.com.au

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Subject: Re: Prepositions and confrontations From: 

> Ralph Waldo Emerson said, "A foolish consistancy is the hobgoblin of little minds."

Its my motto sometimes. Only I leave outthe "foolish"<g>

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Subject: Auction From: "Doug and Sarah Hough" <

There is an auction Saturday in Mexico Beach, FL (Panhandle). Listed  "beautiful quilts all documented by Fl. Museum of History (1 backed  w/"Capital & Labor in Accord").

If interested, please let me know and I will forward the complete flyer.  Unfortunately, I won't be able to go to the auction Saturday.

Sarah in the beautiful Panhandle of Florida where it set a record of 72 today!

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Subject: RE: Life citation, etc. From: louise-b <vlbequetmcmsys.com> 

Go to the library and check the Reader's Guide to Periodical Literature from 1936 on and you should be able to find it. Use several keywords besides the names tho - Kansas quilters, etc. You might also look at the book on Kansas quilts that is out now; the citation is probably in there.

I just finished reading The Quilt That Walked to Colorado and enjoyed all the information about the quilts. I had mentioned earlier that I had seen a quilt machine stitched/quilted in 1849 with a Howe SM bought to Colorado in an early issue of McCall's Vintage quilts but had not been able to find it again. In the meantime I had been contacted by Jeanne Wright and said it might be hers. The date was 1859 but the Howe SM was mentioned so this must have been the one I remembered.

Also, at the MOKA meeting last Saturday Missouri is going to do a presentation on kit quilts so we will be working on that. And to the people who wrote me about kit quilts, we will get pictures to you sometime soon. Is there a cutoff date for kit quilts, BTW? Copeland and Dunivent's article was located in the 94 American Quilter also. Ms Copeland, would you contact me please?

Louise Bequette

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Subject: Re: Candace's Whatever! and Copyright Infringement From: 

> Marcia K., just imagine the > tales you could weave and the money you could make if you took your snake > quilts on the road. So many of us have wonderful collections of quilts > that we research up the whazoo (not the best choice of words) before we dare > speak about them in public. These presenters just lift their show off the > pages of HIPV. Doesn't that bother anybody! sue reich

Yes, Sue, it bothers me, mainly because it confuses the general public about the genuine scholarship existing and being done in quilt history and the relevance of this work to cultural and economic history and the preservation of America's antiquities.

That is one reason I support all efforts to enlarge the membership of AQSG and wish it had a really full-service web site. The more attention we call to the real scholarship and the more we inform the guilds of the presence of the real McCoy and the speakers who know it, the more we will serve history and dignify the discipline. The proliferation of quilt study groups, modeled on AQSG seminar has same effect.

Folks in the know on QHL and in AQSG need to offer to speak on "THE UGRR QUILTS: MYTH AND HISTORY." Send out info to program chairpersons right now.

But the folks who hissed you are not, I imagine, the ones who are most critical. Get the word out publicly---newspapers, magazines, big guilds, publications of all sorts---and repeatedly, and anyone who does research in the future will have "the other side." As for now, just keep keeping on.

It takes a long time to establish truth. I think members of this list have done a great deal toward that end this past year.

Gail

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Subject: Re: snake quilt From: Gail Ingram <gingramtcainternet.com>

> > is that really true about the snake quilt! is that the quilt that was for > sale on ebay...also has anybody looked at the sms messages teenagers text > these days. its a whole nother language that is creeping in. <g> kerry in > sydneyx > > This message was sent through MyMail http://www.mymail.com.au > No, it is not the quilt with the black snakes on it. Ms. Kaylakie has quilts in the traditional Rattlesnake pattern that go just a step further than tradition---mean little brown pit viper heads with beady serpent eyes appliqued.

My guess is that these are textiles that would stop a hiss.

Re teen language, jardon: every generation invents its own. Its purpose is to define one as part of the teen group and keep out others. What's in today is out tomorrow.

Gail

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Subject: Copake Auction--bark cloth From: "Edith L. Taylor" <

Can someone answer this question for me? I looked at the Copake Auction web site, and boy, do I wish I could be there!

They have several lots of fabric that they describe as 1940s or 1950s "bark cloth." It obviously isn't what I thought of as bark cloth, i.e., the material made in the Pacific islands for clothing. So what do they mean by this use of the term?

Thanks,

Edie Taylor

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Subject: Re: Letters published From: "quiltstuff" 

Patricia, that is an excellent link. I am going to let my Australian group know as well. you have no idea how much it has captured the imagination of other countries and has spread as a truth.

To be quite frank, I think some quilters enjoy it. It makes them feel that quilting has even more special meaning. I think that many quilters feel that a lot of people think quilting is just 'frivolous" and this story makes quilting seem a little more 'serious'

Anyway, it will be good to let them read some letters that read so easily. Suzy

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Subject: Slaves at a quilting From: "J. G. Row" 

Lynne,

I loved reading that passage. Thank you for taking the time to transcribe it for us.

It brings up questions that I have long had, and that nowhere have been addressed by those supporting HIPV .

It is implicit from the passage that this quilt top was not made by the slaves, but by the mistress. She had the fabric for the top, the backing and also owned the needles and thread. She wielded the scissors.

The quilting was done by the slaves, and from their expertize it seems this wasn't the first quilting that they had been "invited" to. (to which they had been "invited").; )

If, as we have been told, field hands worked from sun-up to sundown, where did the women (and now, it seems the men as well) have the time to make such large and time consuming projects for themselves as quilts when they also had to see to their own food and clothing? By what light did they work?

Where did they get the fabric? The needles? The thread? Were their masters and mistresses complicit in providing them the materials for these supposed code quilts.

In a slave economy if bedding was needed, free time was limited and fabric was in short supply, one would think that a pattern with as few seams as possible would be chosen, not one as labor intensive as the log cabin pattern.

Where did the black center fabrics come from? There really was no good black dye for cotton until years after the Civil War.

With perhaps only one or two new garments a year, where did the extra fabric come from?

Judy, aka the Ringoes Kid judygrowpatmedia.net

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Subject: Re: Copake Auction--bark cloth From: Joan Kiplinger 

Edith -- commerical barkcloth is not the tapa you are thinking of [note that preposition ending]. It is a creped cretonne in a variety of blistered designs or striations. I noticed those Copake descriptions also and none looked like barkcloth as they were smooth but it might have been the just the photo. For more on barkcloth, see below. Joan www.fabrics.net/joan1202.asp Osnaburg the Great Part 2: Cretonne, Chintz, Barkcloth

labels

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Subject: Re: Copake Auction--bark cloth From: ARabara15aol.com Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2005 08:08:05 EST X-Message-Number: 1

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Some of those barkcloth pieces are mine so I can vouch that they are indeed barkcloth. It's hard to see the texture in the photos.

Donald Brokate Trenton, NJ

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Subject: Copake Auction--bark cloth From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Tue, 08 Feb 2005 08:36:45 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

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Don -- thanx for clarifying. I thought that might be the case.

ARabara15aol.com wrote:

>Some of those barkcloth pieces are mine so I can vouch that they are indeed >barkcloth. It's hard to see the texture in the photos. > >Donald Brokate >Trenton, NJ > > >

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Subject: RE: Hmong piece From: "Dana Bard" <mooseislandearthlink.net> Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2005 09:16:58 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

I'm not certain, but the San Jose Quilt Museum might be a likely candidate for a Hmong collection. There is a large population of Hmong in California, especially in the Bay Area.

Dana Bard Moose Island Quilting www.mooseislandquilting.com

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Subject: Letters link From: Laura Robins-Morris <lrobinsfhcrc.org> Date: Tue, 08 Feb 2005 07:00:16 -0800 X-Message-Number: 4

Excellent letters, ladies!

If you got the QHL message late and couldn't find the letters, here's the link. (they were moved to archives). http://www.capecodonline.com/archives/7days/mon/letts.htm

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Subject: Hmong piece From: "Rosie Werner" <rwernerrconnect.com> Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2005 09:05:28 -0600 X-Message-Number: 5

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The cities of Minneapolis, St. Paul MN have very high populations of = Hmong immigrants. Perhaps one of the MN museums would be interested.=20 Rosie ------=_NextPart_000_008A_01C50DBD.5576B470--

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Subject: Re: Letters link From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> Date: Tue, 08 Feb 2005 10:15:17 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

Laura Robins-Morris wrote:

> Excellent letters, ladies! > > If you got the QHL message late and couldn't find the letters, here's > the link. (they were moved to archives). > http://www.capecodonline.com/archives/7days/mon/letts.htm > > > > Thanks, Laura. There is also a link to same, highlighted in lavender, > on the front page of my website, for easy access. I am very proud of > everyone who responded to the Cape Cod Times article by writing a letter.

Sandra Munsey also wrote a letter that was probably the first one to arrive at the paper. I hope that the paper will see fit to print her fine letter as she is not only an active quilt researcher and historian, but also lives in that area. I wasn't even sure that our letters would be published, or in what format, until I saw them in print yesterday morning.

Pat Cummings www.quiltersmuse.com .

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Subject: Coverlet Retreat announcement From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net> Date: Tue, 08 Feb 2005 13:52:54 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

I just received this in the mail and thought there might be someone interested in attending who isn't on the same list as I seem to be on. The flyer says --

From Floatwork to Figured: Woven Bed Coverings of the 19th Century 2005 Coverlet Retreat

Join us for a 2-day intensive study of 19th century coverlets designed for museum professionals, weavers, antique dealers, historians and textile addicts...

Trough detailed examinations of float weave, geometric double cloth, figured double cloth, twill block and other coverlets, Susan Rabbit Goody will teach us how to identify, document and preserve these historic textiles.

Who were the weavers? Where were the yarns spun and dyed? Why are they historically important? How can we better understand what the textile can tell us?

Susan Rabbit Goody is a textile historian, author and owner of Thistle Hill Weavers, a custom mill producing historic textiles for museums, private homes and for the film industry. She is a museum consultant and frequent teacher at The Farmer's Museum in Cooperstown and elsewhere.

Participants are welcome to bring woven textiles for us to examine, especially coverlets and blankets.

Workshop will be held at the historic Sherwood Inn in Greene, N.Y. Sat and Sun April 9 and 10 Registration fee of $125. includes 2 continental breakfasts and 2 lunches. To register contact Pat Merritt at findingfancyweaversstny.rr.com or call 607-656-9795

I have no connection to this retreat, just wanted to share the information. Barb in muddy southeastern PA

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Subject: RE: Life citation, etc. From: "Larry Wohlge" <larrywgreenhills.net>

Louise, are you from the Moberly area? I knew of a lady with this name whenI lived there some time ago. Sherrie Wohlgemuth 

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Subject: pook and pook auction catalog From: "Candace Perry" 

Got this notice today; the quilts are so-so I think but someone may be interested -- lots 301 to 328 . Candace Perry

Hello,

We have recently updated our website ( www.pookandpook.com ) to include the February 19th Variety Auction. From our home page click on "Upcoming Auctions" and take a moment to browse or search the catalogue! The auction details are also below…

Sale Time: February 19, 2005 - Beginning at 10:00 a.m. Preview: Thursday, February 17th - 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Friday, February 18th - 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and Saturday, February 19th - 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.

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Subject: Re: pook and pook auction catalog From: Barb Garrett

Thanks, Candace, for directing us to more wonderful quilt viewing opportunities. While there I decided to check out Bunch Auctions and while they don't have alot of quilts at their next auction, I thought this quilt was worthy of viewing.

It's lot 300 on this link http://www.williambunchauctions.com/content/nvCat_0086.htm

If that link didn't work, follow these steps to get there -- Go to http://www.williambunchauctions.com/ Click on Multi Estate Catalog Auction Mon Feb 14 and Tues feb 15 Click on Click Here to View Tuesday Catalog Click on Quilts and Textiles

The floral basket trapunto quilt is lot 300. Be sure to click on the pictures as it's cool how they enlarge. There are also some crazies shown. Barb in muddy southeastern PA

-- Internal Virus Database is out-of-date. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.300 / Virus Database: 265.7.2 - Release Date: 1/21/2005

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Subject: Re: pook and pook auction catalog From: "Candace Perry"

Wow, is that for real? That quilt defines the idea "nature abhors a vacuum" -- or at least that quilter did! Candace Perr

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Subject: RE: Life citation, etc. From: "Donna Skvarla" <bearspawcox.net> Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2005 11:11:28 -0600 X-Message-Number: 13

Thanks for the suggestions, Louise!

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Subject: letters to the Cape Cod Times From: "Kathy Moore"

I read the letters to the editor. Kudos to you all who wrote. Good job. = And kudos to the editors for publishing them.

Thanks ladies.

Kathy Moore Lincoln, NE ------=

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Subject: Quilt labels From: "quiltstuff" <quiltstuffoptusnet.com.au> Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2005 13:33:38 +1000 X-Message-Number: 15

A friend asked me a question about labels on quilts and was wondering if anyone had any more information . I was only able to tell her that they weren't often labelled, rarely signed. So I told her I would ask the history list. She wrote >. ask if you know anything of the history of quilt labels. Have they always been used on quilts or, if not, when did women start to use them and what sort of information did they put on them. e.g. Did they sign their quilts Mary Austin or Mrs. Charles Austin, etc. I can't seem to find any info about them and it is bugging me.>>

So were sperate labels a very modern phenomenon?

Suzy Atkins Australia

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Subject: Re: Quilt labels From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Wed, 09 Feb 2005 07:03:33 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1

As a longtime dealer in antique quilts, I think I can say that separate labeling is a fairly new phenomenon. For several years (recently), Mountain Mist batting included a label, and one could also obtain the specially woven labels from the company, especially when they appeared at quilt shows. There are also a number of entrepreneurs who sell pre-printed labels and who teach classes in label design.

In the past, especially in the 19th century, when modesty in all things was a byword, women did not sign their work in obvious ways. It is exciting to find names or initials in tiny script, worked into the quilting, or in the case of pre-1850 quilts to find cross stitched initials in red or blue, usually on the front (but sometimes on a back corner, like a linen inventory mark). BTW, a good way to search for hidden names is to turn the work over onto the back, and look for irregularities in the quilting design.

Quilts made for others often have dedications embroidered or quilted into the work, usually in a corner. And of course signature, fundraising, and other friendship quilts, because the names are important to the purpose, are a sort of labeling. If you will be near Paducah, KY, between April 15 and June 10, I hope you will stop by MAQS and see my exhibit, "Pens and Needles: 19th and 20th Century Signature Quilts" (end commercial message <g>)

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Subject: Question for the experienced out there... From: "Karen Evans" 

Which quilt magazines accept articles on quilt history? Please reply = privately. Thanks!

Karen Evans ------=_

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Subject: New Quilt Show From: Lori Hudlow <lahudlowyahoo.com> 

Recently while watching Simply Quilts on HGTV there have been advertising for a quilt show on Lifetime TV. Has anyone seen it or know what time of day it is on? They said it would be starting the end of January.

Sunny and Warm in Keedysville, MD, Lori

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Subject: Re: New Quilt Show From: Judy Kelius <quiltsptd.net> 

It's the American Quilter, produced by the American Quilters Society - it is on Lifetime Real Women channel, Saturday and Sunday mornings (repeat same episode). The first two weeks are completed. There is also info on the AQS web site - http://www.americanquilter.com/television/. I saw the second episode (missed the first!) and thought it was well done. --=====================_8572828==.ALT--

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Subject: Cotton in PA German Life From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2005 15:45:49 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

Greetings All: Just wanted to pause for this commercial break: The Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage will present the exhibit "Cotton in PA German Life" opening March 20 and running through September 12. The exhibit and associated programs are sponsored by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services. A catalog containing color images of most of the pieces in the exhibit will be available on or around March 20 for a low price yet to be determined (less than $10 + postage, I'm sure). An online exhibition will also be available -- link to be posted later. On June 25 a symposium on the use of cotton in PA German areas and in general 19th century life will be held; details forthcoming on that one, also. I hope that when some of you visit the Lancaster quilt show you'll come and see us...we're about 1 1/2 hours from Lancaster, about 30 minutes south of Allentown and an hour northwest of Philadelphia. An easy ride, with good restaurants and tea rooms hereabouts. We can provide info on local accomodations and other marvelous places to go when in the area -- specifically, the Mennonite Heritage Center in Harleysville, or the Goschenhoppen Historians in Green Lane (open Sundays starting in April), our good buddies. Please feel free to email me or call with any questions. And now, back to our regularly scheduled program, Candace Perry Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center www.schwenkfelder.com Pennsburg, PA

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Subject: Re: Hmong piece From: Sandra Millett <smillettsbcglobal.net> Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2005

Dear Carolyn: Also try the H mong community in Fresno, California. They have the largest H mong population in the State. I wrote a book about the H mong and have researched them extensively.

If I can help, please let me know.

Sandra Millett smillettsbcglobal.net First Peoples: The H mong of Southeast Asia, Lerner Publications and Times, Ltd. Singapore

Carolyn K Ducey <cduceyunlnotes.unl.edu> wrote:

Does anyone on the list know of a museum/organization that is interested in adding Hmong quilts to their collection?

Carolyn Ducey Curator International Quilt Study Center HE 234, University of Nebraska Lincoln, NE 68583-0838 402/472-6301

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Subject: Re: New Quilt Show From: "Laura Syler" <texas_quilt.coairmail.net> Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2005 19:22:05 -0600 X-Message-Number: 7

A few months ago, Pat Campbell was taped for the first show, to air on Lifetime For Women.....a new network....Not just Lifetime.....we don't have it here on our cable network, and when I asked about it, the customer service person said she had never heard of it.

Laura Syler ----- 

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Subject: Pat Campbell From: Crm793aol.com Date: 

Referring to Laura's message mentioning Pat Campbell, I don't recall if this has been on QHL or not. On January 1 Pat had a ruptured aneurysm and is still in the hospital. If you are interested there is information about it with a daily update on her website. Keep her in your prayers.

Carolyn

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Subject: Author seeks info on documenting quilts From: MegMaxCaol.com Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2005

Dear fellow QHL list members: For the book on modern quilting I'm writing, I am including a sidebar on the best advice for how to both label and document quilts. I think quiltmakers today are aware that this is important, and don't want their masterpiece quilts to be hanging somewhere decades from now marked "Maker: Anonymous." However, they don't always know what they should include. Could anybody share advice on this that I could quote in my book? I'm curious about what you, as historians, wish you knew about the quilts that remain mysterious. You can either address this question on the list, or contact me directly off-list. Thanks so much! Meg Cox Writing & Quilting in Princeton, NJ

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Subject: Re: Quilt labels From: "quiltstuff" <quiltstuffoptusnet.com.au> Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2005 14:30:38 +1000 X-Message-Number: 10

Xenia wrote>> . If you will be near > Paducah, KY, between April 15 and June 10, I hope you will stop by MAQS > and see my exhibit, "Pens and Needles: 19th and 20th Century Signature > Quilts" (end commercial message <g>)

Would absolutely love to come.. but it is a tad far from Brisbane, Australia. VBG Thank you so much for the information about labels though.

Suzy

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Subject: book title From: PatKoerneraol.com Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2005 23:53:46 EST X-Message-Number: 11

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The book mentioned in an earlier posting as The Qult That Walked to Colorado is actually titled The Quilt That Walked to Golden, written by Sandra Dallas for Rocky Mountian Quilt Museum. The book includes the story of a quilt that was donated to the museum that the family had dubbed the Quilt That Walked to Golden because it contained scraps from garments that were worn on the journey west from Ohio by the Burgess family. Sandra Dallas, (author of Persian Pickle Club, Alice's Tulips, and Chili Queen) has done extensive research (aided by Nanette Simonds) and interviews to give a comprehensive look at the pioneers as well as todays contemporary quilters in Colorado and the Rocky Mountain Region. Although I am very prejudiced, it is a wonderful book, beautifully written and photographed and I hope you will enjoy it. Pat Moore

 


 



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