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Quilters Find a way to care

Subject: Re: A question about historian Ruth Finley From: "Lynne Z. Bassett"1

> It's also about twenty years old, no? In which case it misses out on a > lot > of research that's been published since then, including much of Barbara > Brackman's work on pattern dating.

It was first published in 1974, so it's over 30 years old.

> I also seem to recall that the Orlofskys, even in the reprint, continued > to > date the Saltontall quilt at 1704 even though it's much likelier to date > from the early 1800s. Am I correct on this, or have I misremembered?

Yes, they date the quilt to the papers used for the templates (an early Harvard catalogue), even though the silks are considerably later. (However, a new analysis of the Saltonstall quilt has concluded that it was probably begun in the mid-18th century and finished in the last quarter of the century. We'll be writing about it in the Mass. Quilts book. The problem with the earlier analysis was that it was done by an English textile authority using photographs, not by examining the quilt in the flesh.) Another quilt that the Orlofskys point out as being from the early 1700s actually has a Greek Revival house depicted on it--a style that didn't come into fashion until about the 1820s. They assert that the patchwork quilt was likely developed in the early colonial period out of the necessity for frugality--and we all know now that was certainly not the case. And they make blanket statements about quilting practices that were definitely not true of New England, at least. Okay, I'll stop now.

Lynne

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Subject: Re: A question about historian Ruth Finley From: "Karen Evans"

When it comes to American quilting, I'm much more likely to go with Kiracofe.

I wasn't aware of the new Saltonstall date - do you have a publication date for the Mass quilts book? Sounds fascinating!

Karen Evans 

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Subject: Book search From: "Liz Lois" <loislanetds.net> 

Hi all, One of my friends is currently in school and trying to locate a book for = a paper she is doing. I am not sure that it isn't a magazine article = and not from a book? Any help on locating this would be appreciated. Here is her query The obsession continues...I am still plotting a research paper for one = of my classes about Depression era quilts and quilters. When looking through MORE fabric for grandmother's flower garden last = night, I found Xerox copies from a book called Triumphs in Hard Times. = Sound familiar to anyone? I can't for the life of me remember who gave = me the copies. The copies I have are the instructions for making GFG = hexagons, etc. Sound familiar to anyone? Liz in sunny Wisconsin where it's unseasonably warm..40+ degrees!!

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Subject: Re: Book search From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> 

My guess is that this book is "Soft Covers for Hard Times" by Merikay Waldvogel (1990) (ISBN 1-55853-062-2)

Xenia

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Subject: Hmong Story Cloth From: "Judy Anne" <anne_jworldnet.att.net> 

I'm planning to write an article shortly on Hmong needlework and quilting. I have a lovely example of their reverse appliqué but need an example of Hmong story cloth. I'm frustrated with myself for not buying one at the Fresno fair last fall when we were visiting there but now it's too late. If anyone has a picture that they could give me permission to publish on my site please let me know. It will be a small picture and doesn't have to be anything fancy. I'm at a loss as to where to find one.

Also if anyone knows of a book about Hmong needlework I'd be very interested. I've found quite a bit of information on the Internet but would like to have book references as well.

It will be published in my multicultural quilters section on American's Quilting History .http://www.womenfolk.com/historyofquilts/

Judy Anne

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Subject: Antique quilt on Ebay From: ady <adamroninetvision.net.il>

You wrote:

"Susan,

I am in complete agreement with the discussion related to accuracy in fabric representations. That's a problem I have regularly with Egyptian motif fabrics that include hieroglyphs, particularly. 9 times out of 10 the "glyphs" are either just squiggles that have no resemblance to the actual thing or they are stylized "glyphs" that sort of represent the real ones but not quite. Once in a while I'll find accurate hieroglyphs, but they're usually untranslatable as they've been selected at random. If there's a legit representation that is actually taken from a real document it's rare. Considering how many "real" inscriptions exist, there's really not excuse for not using the real thing.

 

There are two types of Egyptian appliqu=E9 quilts, each serving a different purpose. The kind made for the tourist trade does indeed include various representations of ancient Egyptian art, done in varying degrees of accuracy. These were made, if memory serves, from the beginning of the 20th century onwards (possibly earlier), and reached a peak of popularity in the Twenties, following the discovery of Tutankhamen's tomb. I've seen some (even new ones) that were beautifully made, with exact replicas of the hieroglyphs in the original text (most scenes depicted are taken from scenes painted on walls of famous ancient Egyptian tombs).

 

The other kind (and the Ebay quilt is of that variety) are authentic prayer and mourning wall hangings, made in the Islamic tradition and used for mourning tents. When a person dies, the family erects a mourning tent where visitors can sit and express their condolences. These fabric "walls" of the tents are decorated with appliqu=E9d plant = and geometric motifs (as in Islamic art representations of human figures =96 "idols" - are forbidden) and calligraphic quotes from the Koran. The calligraphy is what makes the script so beautiful, and so difficult to read if you're not well versed in Arabic. My Arabic is far too rusty to decipher the inscription on the Ebay quilt, but it is something about praising Allah every day (I'll ask an Arabist friend if she can translate for me). Sadly, this magnificent tradition is dying out as nowadays cheap pre-printed panels are used instead of the expensive, hand appliqu=E9d masterpieces.

Just my two cents' worth

Ady in Israel

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Subject: Laura Fisher From: Senoperaaol.com Date: Sat, 12 Feb 2005 13:36:31 EST 

I stopped in Laura Fisher's shop in New York a couple of days ago - only to find that she has suffered a devastating flood. Many of you know of her wonderful inventory of antique quilts -and so many of them now are just ruined. Including her Amish beauties -

She's clearly still in business - but there's much to do to get it all "dried out".

Sue North

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Subject: Re: freedom quilt From: "jocelynmdelphiforums.com"

>>>We were told that if a man reached the age of 30 and was not married, h= e received a "bachelor's quilt". There's a quilt to prove it, so this one = is not a myth.

Rosie,  Sorry, but the quilt proves that a quilt was made for a particular man who = was 30 years old; it doesn't prove that it was made BECAUSE he was 30, or t= hat it was customary to make quilts for 30 year old bachelors.

Census records might be able to give you a clue as to whether this man was = actually a bachelor. This might be as much of a myth as the one about Amish quiltmakers putting = in a mistake deliberately.

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Subject: Re: freedom quilt From: "Sharon in NC" <patchworksecrets2earthlink.net> 

OK I may be missing something but what proves it was that mans quilt? I have noticed some of the church signature quilts with ages of people on them before. Mostly the elder members and younger members I admit. But why does just having an age signify that the quilts was made for the particular person? Sharon in NC

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Subject: Lancaster Quilt and Textile Museum Volunteers needed From:

For those members living in the eastern Pennsylvania and Maryland areas who might be interested as an individual or quilting group in working with the Lancaster Quilt and Textile Museum, here is an opportunity to join us in our demonstration program.

Trish Herr

Quilt and Textile Museum Volunteers Needed

Heritage Center of Lancaster County is seeking volunteer quilting and needleworking demonstrators (and entire guilds) to demonstrate at the Lancaster Quilt and Textile Museum (QTM). Demonstrators may work on their own project, whatever that may be. You can take anything quilt or needlework related, handwork or machine. It would be a great spot for one of the mini groups to meet. Many demonstrators find the demonstration days to be good opportunities to socialize and network.

In addition to the free publicity for your guild, some of the benefits of volunteering include invitations to Heritage Center special volunteer events, free parking downtown during the volunteer shift, 10% discount in the museum stores and after 82 hours of volunteering, QTM demonstrators receive a coupon for a denim shirt at the QTM store.

Currently the Heritage Center is scheduling regular (mixed-guild) demonstration days on the 1st and 2nd Saturdays of the month. In addition the Heritage Center is scheduling days to feature guilds throughout the year. This is a great opportunity to highlight the activities of your Guild. If you are interested in being a volunteer demonstrator or have any questions please contact Helene Tingle at 717-299-6440 or htinglelancasterheritage.com.

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Subject: Re: Hmong Story Cloth From: "Laurie Magee & Tom Blajeski"I have a Hmong employee and she gave me a lovely one for Christmas. If you are interested perhaps you could borrow it? copntact me personally if you are interested. Laurie in Wisconsin.

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Subject: Re: A question about historian Ruth Finley From: "Lynne Z. Bassett"

> I wasn't aware of the new Saltonstall date - do you have a publication > date > for the Mass quilts book? Sounds fascinating! >

We're working on it! Don't hold your breath, though--it's probably going to be a few years yet. Anybody want to help fund this worthy project---pretty pleeze?!

Best, Lynne

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Subject: RE: Antique Quilt on E-bay From: "Ilene Brown" 

Hi, I thought maybe I was dropped from this list as I have not received emails for several weeks. So I please ask if someone could send me the Ebay number for this quilt so I can see it. Thank you. Ilene of Raleigh NC 

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Subject: Copake - next weekend From: "sue reich" <suereichcharter.net>

If any of you are coming to the Copake Auction, bring your lunch; there = are only hot dogs available. More important, bring your cameras. I did = not know this last year but photos are allowed. sue reich ------=_NextPart_000_000C_01C511EB.C8051450--

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Subject: Re: Copake - next weekend From:

Sue, I'll be there on Sat. Hope to see you and others.The auction is very full. We will have a lot to see... and bid on.

Regards, Donald Brokate

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Subject: Re: Hmong Story Cloth From: Sandra Millett 

Dear Judy Anne:

I've written a book about the H mong and have quite a bit of their stitchery and clothing from Vietnam. Be aware the what you are familiar with is pan dau from Laos, where the H mong in the US originate. The H mong tribes in Vietnam create different looking pan dau. If you want more information, you can contact me directly.

Sandra Millett First Peoples: The H mong of Southeast Asia

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Subject: Is all hope lost for this quilt? From: danabalsamoyahoo.com

Hello all, I did a silly thing...I bid on a quilt without seeing it in person. I have had such great luck until now, though. The pictures of the quilt (at a distance) showed no damage. There are no stains, no tears. I bid, I won, it came in the mail. I love the pattern, the colors, the fabrics. But all those little red hexagons are breaking down. Each has at least one small hole in it. It's 19th century, I haven't dated it more specifically yet. Question is...do I leave it, or do I fix it? That would be a lot of red fabric to replace. I do love the quilt, I have a 'thing' for hexagons, I just purchased a mosaic quilt with hexagons in the center, like an English Medallion Style quilt. So what do I do? Pics are below. Thanks, Dana http://image.inkfrog.com/pix/danabalsamo/honeycomb1.JPG http://image.inkfrog.com/pix/danabalsamo/honeycomb2.JPG ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Is all hope lost for this quilt? From: "Sharon in NC"

Dana I would probably do one of two things. Leave it alone and appreciate it for its visual appeal... OR reweave each hole. Set your self a goal to do X amount a week and before long you will have all of the repairs done. I doubt I would even consider replacing all of them.

Sharon in NC

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Subject: Re: Is all hope lost for this quilt? From: "Sharon in NC"

I just looked at it again and had another thought. You could cut small pieces to fit under the holes and reverse appliqué to cover them also.

Sharon in NC

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Subject: Re: Is all hope lost for this quilt? From: Judy Kelius <quiltsptd.net>

It's a beauty! Personally, I think replacing all those hexagons would drive me crazy and I'd learn to love it as it is. After all, that deterioration is almost inevitable with these mid 19th century reds. Going by your closeups and those luscious Prussian blues, I would guess this is 1850s-1860s. Can you tell if it was done with English paper piecing? (The seams will be whipped rather than sewn with a running stitch.)

If you bought it on eBay, you might also try to negotiate a partial refund with the seller . . . I've done that a number of times when an item had problems not described but I didn't really want to return it.

At 11:17 AM 2/14/2005, you wrote: >Hello all, >I did a silly thing...I bid on a quilt without seeing it in person. I >have had such great luck until now, though. >The pictures of the quilt (at a distance) showed no damage. There are no >stains, no tears. I bid, I won, it came in the mail. I love the pattern, >the colors, the fabrics. But all those little red hexagons are breaking >down. Each has at least one small hole in it. It's 19th century, I >haven't dated it more specifically yet. >Question is...do I leave it, or do I fix it? That would be a lot of red >fabric to replace. I do love the quilt, I have a 'thing' for hexagons, I >just purchased a mosaic quilt with hexagons in the center, like an English >Medallion Style quilt. So what do I do? >Pics are below. >Thanks, >Dana >http://image.inkfrog.com/pix/danabalsamo/honeycomb1.JPG >http://image.inkfrog.com/pix/danabalsamo/honeycomb2.JPG 

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Subject: Re: Is all hope lost for this quilt? From: Dana Balsamo

Thanks Sharon and Judy,

I purchased it via phone bid from an auction in NY (not Copake). The auction staff were very nice, helpful, and professional. I should have asked questions, that's all. I didn't spend a lot on it, less that $200. So I consider it a lesson learned.

It is whip stitched. It's heavy, the backing is a white cotton, twill type weaving. Binding is in very good condition, too. What struck me was how graphic it was. I love it. I never saw a 'garden path' in anything else but green before, the red really took me.

I think I am going to leave it for now...there are a few other hexes I might fix. One a brown, the other a red.

The quilting is wonderful, in the ditch. The amount of time put into this quilt is staggering. Ever make a hex quilt? I am making a GFG in 1930s Repros. I started it when I was pregnant with my youngest daughter. She's 4 and half now and I still don't even have the top finished!

Thanks and hugs, Dana

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Subject: Re: Is all hope lost for this quilt? From: Barbara Burnham

Dana,

If you feel you were misled, negotiate with the seller, or look into other options, such as returning the quilt. Repairs, unless done by an expert with vintage fabric, may only decrease the value of the quilt, will be expensive and time-consuming, and that's only IF enough appropriate fabric could be found. If it were my quilt, I would not attempt repairs. Enjoy it as it is--if you cannot, and if the sight of it makes you very unhappy, re-sell the quilt, cut your losses and move on, lesson learned.

I too, have an old quilt that arrived in worse condition than the seller revealed. They begged ignorance of textiles and would have accepted a return. However, I kept the quilt, because I enjoy having it anyway. However, another quilt (different seller) that was grossly misrepresented by "enhanced" photos, was promptly returned for refund.

Do let us know what you decide?

Barbara Burnham Ellicott City, MD

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Subject: Re: Is all hope lost for this quilt? From: "Sharon in NC"

Dana I agree with Judy it is a beauty. I have a take along hex project I have had for a year or so. It is only 1/4 hexs in a GMFG pattern. I may get it finished this year since I want it for my baby doll bed I had as a kid..lol..

Sharon in NC

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Subject: Re: Is all hope lost for this quilt? From: ARabara15aol.com 

Dana, I have a black and red hexagon quilt that has the same problem. The black is wool and the red is silk. Needless to say there is a lot of red missing from the quilt exposing the paper piecing behind it. If you have the energy you can applique over the damaged pieces leaving the original fabric in tact underneath-an enormous undertaking. I would not attempt to mend the squares that are breaking down. The fabric is probably to weak to support the work and you will shread it even more. I enjoy my quilt the way it is. Shreaded silk and all, I catch my breath whenever I open it up.The damage adds to it's History.

Donald Brokate Trenton NJ

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Subject: Re: Is all hope lost for this quilt? From: SadieRosecfu.net 

Dana, The quilt is gorgeous... I am not an expert on this, but my thought would be to baste a light netting over it. I know there are 'conservation' type materials for this purpose. I have seen this at a local museum, where they used this netting to cover disintegrating fabric on a Civil War flag that was made by the local women and went to battle with a company from our town. The netting is so shear, you can't even tell it is there from a short distance (they colored it red somehow so the 'white' netting wouldn't show up against the red stripes). I remember past QHL posts from our experts that some of the netting is too harsh against cottons, so I would want to make sure I got the 'safest' netting available. I hope we hear recommendations from QHL'ers experienced with this. I would view this as a 'conservation' project rather than try to repair/ restore it. The next thought might be to replicate it, or at least get it photographed professionally before it disintegrates further. Register it with the state quilt documentation project, also, if that is possible. There's my 2¢ worth... Karan

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: February 11, 2005 From: Susan Riley

Greetings to the List-somehow I got off the list for a few days, so do not know if this showed up in the last 2 days. If duplicated, my apologies-just skip over..... Greetings from Beantown in Flurries (again!) One of the most successful ways to capture children's attention in a museum setting was accomplished at the Eric Carle museum. As they enter, children are given a list of items to seek in the current display and a small golf pencil (if they use their own pens or pencils, guides ask them to put them away). The children have to explore the exhibitions and find these objects. I went with a group of librarians and we stood back and observed: not 1 child was disruptive since they had a focus and were too busy trying to check off their list of items! You could do objects, shapes, colors etc. A link is below: http://www.picturebookart.org/ When my kids were little, they enjoyed foam shapes to create quilt designs at the N.E. Quilt Museum; they had an entire corner for children to create so the moms could view their shows 'in peace' (well sort of....) Susan Riley Quilt History List digest <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> wrote:

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Subject: sources of repro fabrics online From: "Newbie Richardson"

Dear list, I would like to know which web sites those of you who shop for reproduction fabrics like the best. I get a great many requests from re-enactors, and people who make historic dolls clothes, for recommendations and sources. As not everyone lives near to a good, independently owned quilt shop ( which what I always start off recommending) I want to put together a list to hand out. I already have wonderful, first hand experience with Hickory Hill Quilts, Reproduction Fabrics, and Vintage and Vogue.Please let me know who else I should include. Thanks Newbie Richardson

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Subject: damaged red From: Palamporeaol.com Date: Tue, 15 Feb 2005 00:24:19 EST

Dana, the material used to stabilize textiles that is sheer is Tetex. It is 100% polyester and extremely expensive---$75 or more a yard. I use it on areas of textiles that are damaged rather extensively. I think that all of the red in your quilt covered in red Tetex would not enhance the appearance. It looks great in the large photo. Why don't you display it so that it will be viewed from a distance? Then you will love it! I have lots of quilts that are in that condition. I am a textile conservator, but I rarely see the need to "fix" them. If it is damage all over rather than just a spot or 2 I think it is best to live with it. Love it as you love the lines on your grandmother's face and hands. See the "falling out" of the red as a lesson in fabric dyeing. Just my 2 cents worth...... Lynn Lancaster Gorges, New Bern, NC

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Subject: Kid activities in museums From: "Newbie Richardson" 

One of the best children's activities I have seen was at the Maryland Historical Society when they did an exhibit of the star and kaleidescope quilts from the 1830's. They had felt boards with lots of pre cut felt shapes. The kids had to "copy" some of the quilt designs, and also make up their own. They also did a variation on the treasure hunt. Another exhibit I was involved with had a "dress-up" area with bits of costume that pertained to the topic at hand.,as well as a "book nook" with pertinent children's books. Having things for the kids to do is vital to the success of an exhibit - or the continued funding of a site. Time and again research has shown an increase in visitation if there are kid friendly activities. ALHFAM (Association of Living History, Farm, and Agricultural Museums) devoted a lot of time to this topic at a recent symposium. Newbie Richardson

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Subject: Reproduction fabrics From: Sylvia Adair <piecethepastwi.rr.com> 

I really love the ones you listed already (especially Hickory Hill and Reproduction Fabrics). I can also recommend The Fabric Shack (www.fabricshack.com). They are a full service, regular fabric shop, but any reproduction fabrics they have are very reasonably priced. Their service is also great. Years ago, when they started up their bricks and mortar store, I lived near them and visited at least once a month. They are a family operation, and really care about their customers. No affiliation, just a happy customer. Sylvia Adair, Germantown, Wisconsin

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Subject: Re: Reproduction fabrics From: Dana Balsamo <

Colonial Crafts has lots of reproductions. www.colonialcrafts.com, a little pricey, but they have sales and a birthday club.

Hugs, Dana

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Subject: Re: Kid activities in museums From: Barbara Burnham

When MHS exhibited their fabulous Baltimore Album quilt collection, they provided small tables and chairs where children could play with pre-cut felt shapes (flowers, birds, hearts, etc.) to arrange into quilt blocks. Leaving the exhibit, they provided copies of some Baltimore style blocks kids could take home to color or paint, simple line drawings like from a coloring book. I like the idea of a treasure hunt; a list of unique things (or motifs) to search for within the exhibit, or pictures (drawings) to match. There were demonstrations set up where anyone could watch, ask questions, or even try their own hand with applique, quilting, embroidery, writing on fabric, etc. Barbara Burnham Ellicott City, MD

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: February 11, 2005 From: "Jennifer Van Haaften"

When we held a quilt exhibit about three years ago, we did a scavenger hunt type activity. Actually, I got it from my mom, who had attended another quilt show elsewhere and it was a worksheet with lots of pictures and shapes on it, so that kids could circle or check off the shapes they find. We also had a place where kids could pick up cardboard tubes and use them to "spy" for the shapes and objects on the kits. Kept little hands busy. Our local quilting guild also made sample squares of quilts with all the layers, which we placed out in a prominent place with a "Please touch" sign and explanations of the layers, the piecing or applique and some quilting example on the square. We too put out the shapes, though ours were wooden, but all basic pieced quilting shapes for the kids to make designs.

For special activities, we had kids piece together quilting squares in paper, which seemed to work well. We also had fabrics and put together potholders with simple running stitch sewing and quilting.

Hope this helps, Jennifer V. Education Coordinator Elmhurst Historical Museum

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Subject: Re: Reproduction fabrics From: MargaretFaheyaol.com Date: 

In a message dated 2/15/2005 11:11:42 AM Eastern Standard Time, danabalsamoyahoo.com writes: www.colonialcrafts.com, I can't seem to get this site to come up. Would you check the address, please. Thanks.

Margaret

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Subject: Re: Reproduction fabrics From: "Sharon in NC" <patchworksecrets2earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 15 Feb 2005 15:09:56 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

It opened for me straight from your email margaret. Maybe the site was too busy to open when you tried it the first time..

http://www.colonialcrafts.com Sharon in NC

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Subject: Re: Reproduction fabrics From: Dana Balsamo <danabalsamoyahoo.com> 

Hi Margaret, Is the comma coming up at the end?

http://www.colonialcrafts.com

Customer service is excellent and they promptly reply to questions, too. No affiliation, just a happy customer.

My best, Dana

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Subject: Re: Reproduction fabrics From: "temblen" <temblendodo.com.au> 

I love this place. The prices are very good (many around $5 yard) and the service is great. Has some wonderful reproductions.

http://www.zandsfabrics.com/home.asp

Regards, Tracy

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Subject: Re: damaged red From: Dana Balsamo <danabalsamoyahoo.com> 

Hi Lynn, Thank you, for the time being, I am going to do just that. Leave it and love it. I have it draped on a quilt rack in my bedroom now...let's see if hubby notices the difference...I had a pink and green 1880s quilt on there before. The pink and green one was a top that is to DIE for, I found an appropriate reproduction fabric for the backing and am hand quilting now. I plan to label it appropriately when I am finished. Too many projects... My best, Dana

Palamporeaol.com wrote: Dana, the material used to stabilize textiles that is sheer is Tetex. It is 100% polyester and extremely expensive---$75 or more a yard. I use it on areas of textiles that are damaged rather extensively. I think that all of the red in your quilt covered in red Tetex would not enhance the appearance. It looks great in the large photo. Why don't you display it so that it will be viewed from a distance? Then you will love it! I have lots of quilts that are in that condition. I am a textile conservator, but I rarely see the need to "fix" them. If it is damage all over rather than just a spot or 2 I think it is best to live with it. Love it as you love the lines on your grandmother's face and hands. See the "falling out" of the red as a lesson in fabric dyeing. Just my 2 cents worth...... Lynn Lancaster Gorges, New Bern, NC

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Subject: Re: Reproduction fabrics From: RAGLADYaol.com Date: Total agreement with Tracy..... Zooks - Z and S fabrics..... is a wonderful company. Excellent prices and superb customer consideration and service.. Carol is a real sweetheart...... nayy, except for being a very happy repeat customer.

Gloria ragladyaol.com > I love this place. The prices are very good (many around $5 yard) and the > service is great. Has some wonderful reproductions. > > http://www.zandsfabrics.com/home.asp > > Regards, > Tracy

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Subject: Fabric sources From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net>

Thanks to all who sent their top choices for reproduction fabric sources. When I get back form my trip, I will put together the list and post for all to see. I get to go play "mom" at a championship swim meet in Cedar Rapids, IA. Lord, is it ever hard to leave town for 4 days! Newbie

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Subject: New York City From: "Pilar Donoso" <quiltpdmi.cl> 

A good friend of mine is leavingfor New York City in a couple days. Any = quilting museum, galleries or stores that you can recomend?

I apreciated your help

Pilar Santiago, Chile ------=_NextPart_000_000F_01C513FE.AF3A6D70--

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Subject: Re: Reproduction fabrics From: Judy Kelius <quiltsptd.net> 

I totally second that! I live less than a half hour from Zooks and about five minutes from their sister store, Sauder's, so I get to shop there whenever I want! You might also check out the following web page which lists other fabric shops in this area: http://www.quiltart.com/lancaster.html. One of my personal favorites is the Hayloft in Morgantown.

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Subject: Re: Is all hope lost for this quilt? From: "Laura Syler"

Dana, The quilt is indeed a beauty. From a restoration point of view, if you were a client bringing it to me, I'd say enjoy it for what it is.But if it really bugs you... Do not go the netting route, unless you use silk crepaline. Any of the tuille or netting, especially polyester, is much too abrasive to put on anything unless it is going in a glass display case, never to be moved. I have a Mariners Compass top that has the same problem. I use it in my fabric dating classes to talk about the mordents and certain dies that gave the quilts a death sentence from the day the fabrics were printed. We call it my Swiss Cheese top! Laura Hobby Syler

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Subject: Oh no! HIPV strikes again! From: "Pepper Cory" 

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=3D2221&item=3D7301= 104121&rd=3D1

Check it out friends. Pepper

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Subject: Re: Oh no! HIPV strikes again! From: Kris Driessen

Oh, that description is just so silly, I can't even get upset by it. Would an attorney really write such gibberish without researching it first?

Kris

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Subject: Marie Webster website From: Karen Alexander

 Here's a heads-up on the fact that the web name mariewebster.net ---via which one used to be able to access the Webster granddaughter's website about quilt designer and author Marie Webster --- has been taken over by a porn net marketer (=B3How=B2 is tech stuff I don't understand.) The other address -- Mariewebster.com -- has also been contracted to some other business. If you want to reach the "real" <g> Marie Webster website, you now have to go to www.practicalpatchwork.com. In 1921 Marie joined forces with two friends (Ida Hess and Evangeline Beshore) to found the Practical Patchwork Company -- and it is a name the granddaughter (Rosalind Webster Perry) uses to publish her books abut Marie and Marie=B9s patterns. Hence the new website's name -- www.practicalpatchwork.com.  The Quilters Hall of Fame (located in the Marie Webster home in Marion, Indiana) has its own website (www.quiltershalloffame.org) totally separate from the Marie Webster/Practical Patchwork website -- but, of course, with very close personal ties because Rosalind Webster Perry is Vice President o= f The Quilters Hall of Fame. (But there is a link to www.practicalpatchwork.com on the QHF website). If you have a website and have a link to mariewebster.com or .net (heaven forbid), you will want to change it to www.practicalpatchwork.com. Hopefully, you will also have a link to QHF too!  Karen Alexander Press Secretary The Quilters Hall of Fame

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Subject: Re: Oh no! HIPV strikes again! From: "jhorsey" <jhorseymail.newnanutilities.org> Date: Wed, 16 Feb 2005 14:32:40 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

Dear Kris, having worked for lawyers for more than 20 years, my answer to your question is a resounding "you bet!". I do find ebay a pretty unusual forum for such a discourse, but then it's always been a home for the weird and wonderful <LOL>. Jo Horsey

> Would an attorney really write such gibberish without researching it > first? > > Kris >

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Subject: Re: Marie Webster website From: "Susan Wildemuth" <ksandbcwgeneseo.net> Date: Wed, 16 Feb 2005 16:42:36 -0600 X-Message-Number: 8

Karen,

Who was Esther O'Neill? Was she a designer for Marie Webster? I have five of her pattern price sheets - Morning Glory Quilt, Poppy Quilt in Applique, Dresden Quilt With Birds, Monogram Quilt, and Blue Quilt Applique in my quilt paper collection.

Thanks-- Sue in Illinois

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Subject: Re: Marie Webster website From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Wed, 16 Feb 2005 18:20:43 -0600 X-Message-Number: 9

Sue, Esther O'Neill was a pattern designer in her own right who lived in Indianapolis; she was somewhat older than Marie Webster, but was marketing successful kit quilts around the same time as Webster's practical Patchwork. It sounds as though you have all of her offerings except her most popular, called Dolly Varden. It was a floral applique with blue ribbons with flowing tails. Do you have a date on your O'Neill ephemera? After her death her niece apparently continued the business for several years.

I own 4 examples of the Dolly Varden quilt, all from Indiana and Ohio, suggesting that her marketing sphere was midwestern rather than national like Webster.

Xenia Cord

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Subject: Esther O'Neill From: "Susan Wildemuth" <ksandbcwgeneseo.net> Date: Wed, 16 Feb 2005 18:05:11 -0600 X-Message-Number: 10

Xenia,

They came in an Indiana lot with a 1929 - QUILTS THEIR STORY AND HOW TO MAKE THEM - Marie Webster (inside cover signed Isabel Smith), two Quilts and Spreads Pamphlets - Marie Webster, Nasturtium Wreath Quilt pattern price sheet - Marie Webster,

and then the 5 Esther O' Neill Pattern Price Sheets -- here's what the O'Neill Price Sheets have on them:

Dresden Quilt with Birds - Quilt - $8.00 Mail 15 cents Poppy Quilt in Appliqué - Quilt - $8.00 Mail 15 cents Monogram Quilt - Quilt $6.00 Mail 15 cents Blue Quilt in Appliqué - With Blue border $9.00 Without blue border $8.00 Mail 15 cents Morning Glory Quilt - Quilt $8.00 Mail 15 cents

None of the O'Neill paper items are dated, but maybe the price on the patterns would be a clue to their approximate age.

Thanks for helping me out on this one. The O'Neill sheets look very similar to Marie Webster's pattern price sheets. I asked the individual I purchased them from for their background history and they stated they were an auction acquisition - no history.

Sue in Illinois


 



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