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Quilters Find a way to care

Subject: Re: Indigo flaking From: Charles Woodford 

Perhaps someone can tell me----I washed, by hand of course, an 1880's piece (crib quilt) with a solid blue backing. First the water turned brown, and then blue. Then little fine particles of blue floated around in the water. Well, they actually sank. The blue did not run into the other fabric and did not really fade. So does this mean that this fabric was indigo dyed by hand? or does it mean nothing except that it was very chancy to wash the thing?.

Thanks, Barbara Woodford and PLEASE someone look at my website: historic-american.com.

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Subject: Cigar Flannels / Felts From: "Louise" 

Hello, I just got 50 or so Cigar Flannels. I want to make a quilt with them for my son who is enamoured with flags. Are these washable? I have seen some quilts made from these but was wondering about the colorfastness of the flannels before I make the quilt. Suggestions are welcome. Thanks, Louise ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: PA State Museum Quilt exhibit info From: 

From: Beatrice Hulsberg <Bhulsberg@Verizon.Net> Subject: Pennsylvania Quilt Exhibit Date: April 27, 2005

The exhibit “Quilts and More” will be opening May 15, 2005 at the State Museum of Pennsylvania. Historic quilts (including an outstanding appliqué signature quilt) from the museum’s collection along with contemporary quilts will be featured. The “More” refers to a wonderful grouping of native Birdseye Maple bedroom furniture, several painted Pennsylvania German blanket chests, a painted cradle, a quilting frame and various antique needlework tools. The exhibit closes August 21, 2005.

The State Museum of Pennsylvania is a general history museum with exhibits on industrial history, military history, community and domestic life along with archeological, paleontology and natural science displays. It is located in Harrisburg, the capital city of Pennsylvania. Metered on-street parking (requires quarters), along with parking garages, is available in the city. The museum is open from 9 am until 5 pm Tuesday through Saturday and from noon until 5 pm on Sundays. The museum does not have an admission charge.

An earlier quilt exhibit “Historic becomes New” and other quilts from the collection are on virtual exhibit at the museum’s website: www.statemuseumpa.org <http://www.statemuseumpa.org/>

Available in the museum’s gift shop are two books relating to the collection. “Saved for the People of PA” details a number of the collection’s quilts. A pattern book for the Wickersham Album Signature quilt is based on the signature quilt on exhibit. This was a joint project between the museum and quilt designer Patty Harants.

Beatrice Hulsberg, Curator, Community & Domestic Life, The State Museum of Pennsylvania

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Subject: Re: Indigo flaking From: <@charter.net> 

I've never seen such a thing, and I've been dyeing with indigo for over ten years. Then again, something that's heavily *over* dyed with indigo and not properly rinsed may flake...but surely something *that* dark a blue would have crocked rather dramatically when the quilt was made.

Was the backing noticeably lighter after the wash? And was it shiny before?

Karen Evans 

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Subject: Re: Cigar Flannels / Felts From: Vivien Sayre 

Louise, I have appraised and documented many of these quilts and, unfortunately, those that were washed, ran. I would suggest you do a color test before you try washing them. Who knows, you may have flannels that don't run. Testing will tell you. Vivien in MA

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Subject: Re: Cigar Flannels / Felts From: "Julia D. Zgliniec"

Dear Louise and All, I second Vivien's remarks and in addition to the dye running, the nap wears off very quickly. Tobacco premium "throws" and pillows that have been used are in very poor condition. The ones that have not been used or exposed to light remain sound.

A display piece might be fine - but if you are intending your son to use the proposed quilt, you might reconsider.

Regards, Julia Zgliniec in CA

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Subject: Re: Cigar Flannels / Felts From: 

I wouldn't dare wash them; they were cheap little advertising premiums to begin with, and weren't meant for hard use. Maybe a wall hanging would work, but I sure wouldn't make a bed quilt with them.

Karen Evans 

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Subject: Re: Cigar Flannels / Felts From: Sally Ward

> A display piece might be fine - but if you are intending your son to use > the proposed quilt, you might reconsider.

How about scanning and printing onto fabric for a working quilt?

Sally W

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Subject: Re: Cigar Flannels / Felts From: Xenia Cord

Cigar flannels or felts are not washable. The color will bleed away and they will eventually turn white.

Xenia (finally back on line after 3 weeks in cyberhell)

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Subject: Re: Tobacco flannels From: "Laurette Carroll"

Louise, Unfortunately some of the colors run when the tobacco flannels are washed, and they also seem to fade a great deal, losing much of their beauty. This is probably due to the synthetic dyes used at the time.

I wouldn't make something that will eventually need washing. I have seen them framed and under glass, and that can be an attractive way to enjoy them.

Also you might start a collector type album for him using archival supplies, and he can thumb through the album to see the flags, and perhaps add to it himself.

Laurette Carroll Southern California

Look to the Future With Hope

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Subject: Re: Cigar Flannels / Felts From: Sally Ward

> Xenia (finally back on line after 3 weeks in cyberhell)

Well Haloooo!!! How's You?

S

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Subject: muslin storage From: Joan Kiplinger <

Suzanne -- another piece of information I came across in my notes from a dyer's discussion list --. For starch testing, if you apply a drop of tincture of iodine to water-moistened fabric and it turns blue-black, there is starch present. Also if fabric is to be sold as white fabric/article, that starch is removed before it is bleached. So this is possibly an answer to why some use recommend bleached muslin as another choice. Generally speaking, desizing is not a do-at-home thing -- it's very difficult to remove all addiatives completely, even using Synthropol. Some sort of enzyme is needed along with agitation. I'm sure museums are aware of Testfabrics in West Pittston PA which provide desized goods [the ones I mentioned yesterday] to archival users but individuals may not be aware of this firm. For those who may be interested, you can contact them at testfabrics@aol.com or 570 603-0432. They may have a website by now.

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Subject: Re: Using Muslin for Storage From: "Laurette Carroll"

Suzanne Cawley writes..... > We can all have our opinions on this....but I would like to hear from > curators and other specialists in the field who can make a recommendation > and back it up with scientific studies or something similar.

I too would be interested in hearing from any professionals about this. And what exactly are the pitfalls of using, well washed readily available muslin, that may still have some of the sizing present???

Laurette Carroll Southern California

Look to the Future With Hope

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Subject: Re: Using Muslin for Storage From: Carolyn K Ducey

Suzanne, I'd suggest ordering muslin from a company called Test Fabrics, Inc. We order an unbleached muslin that has no sizing, and can be used without having to wash first. ( I emailed the company to be certain!) The product that we use for sleeves on our quilts is #400U. It is not expensive - I believe under $4.00 per yard, and schools and universities get an additional discount.

testfabric@aol.com 570-603-0432

Carolyn Ducey Curator International Quilt Study Center HE 234, University of Nebraska Lincoln, NE 68583-0838 402/472-6301

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"Suzanne Cawley" <wvquilter@adelph To: "Quilt History List"

Hi All!

I spent a wonderful day today looking at over 20 early quilts in a museum collection in Moorefield (Hardy County), West Virginia. It is amazing to me that beautifully crafted quilts, using the best available fabrics, were created in this rural community in the early 1800's. Two special quilts were made by the same person and dated (in the quilting) 1807 and 1808 respectively. (Cinda....you missed a great experience!)

As sometimes happens, the quilts are in dire need of proper storage and the local guild is attempting to address this on a limited budget. Before they can raise funds for textile boxes, they planned to wrap the quilts in laundered muslin while using acidfree paper to cushion the folds.

There was a debate over the type of muslin one should use.....bleached vs. unbleached. Some say bleached to avoid acid migration from the cotton plant particles that often remain in unbleached muslin. Others say that chemicals in bleached muslin remain after washing and are more harmful.

We can all have our opinions on this....but I would like to hear from curators and other specialists in the field who can make a recommendation and back it up with scientific studies or something similar. Thanks in advance for any info and source links you can provide.

Suzanne Cawley In wild, wonderful Keyser, West Virginia

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Subject: experts needed on coverlet/weavings From: "Marcia Kaylakie"

Hi All, I have been contacted by someone about needing to preserve/conserve some = coverlet weavings that she inherited. Will those among us who do this = please contact me off list? Thanks, Marcia Marcia Kaylakie, AQS Certified Appraiser Austin, TX 

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Subject: quilt top question From: Judy Schwender 

A visitor to MAQS found a quilt made of twenty-five (17 inch) blocks of traditional Baltomore album patterns. The patterns are stamped on thin muslin blocks with color directions and the following notation: Barker Products Co. 23 Church Street Cooperstown, N.Y.

The blocks are not appliqued. Each muslin pattern backs a velveteen square and the pattern has been hooked with yarn. Does anyone have any idea about Barker Products? I googled the name and couldn't find anything useful. Judy Schwender

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Subject: Indigo flaking From: Charles Woodford <haq@galenalink.net> 

Karen,

Thanks for your comment. No, the backing was not noticeably lighter after washing. Before, it did have a very slight sheen and it still has that. Curious, no?

Barbara

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Subject: picture of an antique burgandy on slate background quilt From: "Velia Lauerman" 

About a month ago we discussed an antique quilt maybe for sale somewhere. Where did I find the picture? I drafted the appliqué design and ready to make an orphan but have misplaced the name given to the crescent like piece. Found the pattern in QN but misplaced the book. Maybe issue 75? NO ! I hate when that happens. You remember ! Don't you? Velia

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Subject: Re: Indigo flaking From: "Karen Evans" 

Extremely. Did the quilt have a slightly fermented smell before, almost musky? Indigo comes from fermented plant leaves and has a distinctive odor.

Very curious. Thanks for the mystery!

Karen -

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Subject: Kansas City antique quilts From: "Carolyn Burrough"

Anyone who will be visiting Kansas City this spring might like to check out the area Out Of The Attic quilt show that is currently running at 8 area museums. It runs through June 30 and features 100+ antique quilts. The flyer I received says that a complete list of the quilts on display can be seen at www.PickleDish.com. Carolyn Burrough

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Subject: Advice, please From: Xenia Cord 

I have permission from a correspondent in Tasmania to share a problem. She is interested in your advice on this matter.

<I am about to donate a quilt to an organization that will sometime in the future - could be 5 yrs could be 50 - become a museum with all the climate controls etc that go with it.

However at the present this quilt and others also to be donated at the same time, will be on display in an old cottage. Brick built in 1840s without modern [insulation or moisture barrier]. The structure is being renovated/restored/kept upright and in time [insulation/moisture barrier] will be added, but not yet.

As its an old building light is not a problem for the quilts, however I am a bit concerned about the effects of the rising damp.

Most of the quilts will be hung on the inner walls which are OK, but mine will be hung on the outer wall. The quilts concerned were all made as a Tasmanian Bicentennial project inspired by the Rajah Quilt - so they are in themselves historical, which is why the preservation issue concerns me.

What's your experience with quilts in dampish buildings ?

I have been thinking that I should tell them to rest the quilts in the warmer office building every month or so - a rotation scheme could easily be worked out if necessary.

Or would a plastic sheet behind the quilt to protect it from the outer wall be a good idea ?>

I will happily forward your comments/suggestions to this woman.

Xenia

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Subject: RE: "home dyed"? From: "Velia Lauerman"

Is it home dyed? HICKORY LEAF APPLIQUE, Ebay 7310325562&rd=1 sold for 1,025. What a bargain!

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Subject: RE: "home dyed"? & white gloves From:

That red and blue hickory leaf quilt is for sale again (unless the seller had twin quilts). It is now at $201 (reserve not met). I wonder if it will go anywhere near $1,000 this time.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=7318254291&rd=1

This time she is not saying that it is fruit or nut dye but the "blueberry COLOR hand dyed".

~~~~~~~~~~~ Thanks again for the suggestions on finding white gloves, especially the person who suggested trying a drugstore. I live in the boonies so I didn't have access to specialty stores but we do have a drugstore and I found a pair there. Thanks.

Sandra Starley quiltappraiser in training Moab, Utah

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Subject: Re: Advice, please From: "quiltstuff"

Xenia wrote>>> I have permission from a correspondent in Tasmania to share a problem. > She is interested in your advice on this matter. The quilts concerned were all made as a Tasmanian Bicentennial project inspired by the Rajah Quilt - so they are in themselves historical, which is why the preservation issue concerns me.

This may sound a little trite but I wonder if she would be better contacting the Australian museums that have textile conservators that have had a lot of experience with our climate... and humidity. One of the best is the one that holds the Rajah quilt in Canberra.

Suzy Atkins Brisbane 07 3378 0499 My Quilting Photos. http://community.webshots.com/user/quiltstuff

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Subject: Re: Advice, please From: Xenia Cord 

Thanks to everyone who responded with information on quilt display in a building with stone walls and no climate control. Your comments were similar to mine, and echoed the concerns/solutions proposed by the quiltmaker herself in Tasmania. I have forwarded your responses to her.

Xenia

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Subject: Victorian Characters on redwork block- help! 

This is driving me crazy . . . I once knew the name of this cartoon character but can't find it now - they look somewhat like turtles, very simple lines. I have a redwork block with a family of these characters.  Anyone know their name?

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Subject: Re: quilt top question From: 

Judy- What a great find! I have looked through two good rug hooking history = books, Kopp's and Tennant's to look for the Barker Products Co., a = similar rug or pattern to what you describe and found nothing. It wasn't = uncommon for rug makers to use quilt patterns however.

Wouldn't the velveteen's age would shed some light, as velvet from the = Victorian era is different than velveteen. (calling Joan Kiplinger here) = Rug hookers generally used various linens or burlaps, not cotton muslin, = cotton monk's cloth is quite different, so this sound like a creative = rug hooker using a quilt pattern.

However, the intrigue remains as to where did these patterns of = Baltimore Album Quilts come from? Assuming they were home sewn to the = velveteen, as a back to save the hooking from unraveling, the stamped = design could be quite older. What is it stamped with? Can you estimate = an era by the font used?

You might check the NYS Historical Association which is in Cooperstown.=20

Please keep us posted as to what you discover.

Kim Wulfert www.antiquequiltdating.com

A visitor to MAQS found a quilt made of twenty-five (17 inch) blocks of = traditional Baltomore album patterns. The patterns are stamped on thin muslin blocks with color directions and = the following notation: Barker Products Co. 23 Church Street Cooperstown, N.Y. =20 The blocks are not appliqued. Each muslin pattern backs a velveteen = square and the pattern has been hooked with yarn. Does anyone have any idea about Barker Products? I googled the name and = couldn't find anything useful. Judy Schwender

---

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Subject: qhl digest: April30, 2005 From: stephanie drake

I am trying to find reference material that would talk about plisse fabric and when it came into use. Is it a heat set texture or in the weave. How does it differ from seersucker? I have seen it in some scrap/string quilts that I thought dated from the 1930's or 40's. Can QHL help me?

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Subject: quilt top question From: Joan Kiplinger 

Kim -- generally, velveteen is a cotton version of silk or rayon velvet, and slightly heavier whether Victorian, medevial or modern.

Judy -- You might want to check with the New York State Dept. of Commerce to find out about Barker Products. I've been successful tracking down several firms using by contacting a state's business division.

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Subject: plisse From: Joan Kiplinger 

Stephanie -- plisse is a chemically blistered cotton crepe as opposed to seersucker whose texture is created during weaving. The fabric has been around since the 1880s; I am not sure when chemical puckering or blistering was intnroduced prior to that.This process was patterned after a French woven tucking or puckered fabric called plisse meaning pleated or plaited. During the early 1900s Serpentine Crepe and other kimono crepes were popular loungewear plisses. Most persons know plisse as a fabric with cute kiddy or floral designs from the 20s-60s.

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: April 29, 2005 From: Charles Woodford

Karen,

No odor, and I have a very good sniffer.

Barbara

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: April 23, 2005 From: 

> A more social way to piece rather than on the machine. A lot of ladies are > also incorporating paper piecing with their medallion quilts... which is > having a big resurgence as well. > > Suzy Atkins > Brisbane >

I have a very early medallion quilt with hexagons made of wonderful chintzes. Anyone who wants to tell me the age is welcome to do so. I am guessing 1st quarter, but others know their fabrics better than I do. I will get some pictures taken and get them posted on the e-board. I also have an early quilt top where the medallion is hexagons. I had some pictures of these from a discussion last year, but somehow the pictures got corrupted, so I have to take them again. I believe that one quilt is English, and the other American although I can't be sure.

Kay Triplett

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Subject: Re: Victorian Characters on redwork block- help! From:

Looks like Teddy Bear's Picnic to me.

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Subject: Baltimore Album Quilt on black? From: Julie Silber

Hi All, Julie Silber here. Has anyone seen an authentic Baltimore Album Quilt with a black ground? I am trying to get more information on one I am assessing in the collection of a small historical museum here in California. It is silks and velvets appliqued onto a black silk background. I'm estimating its date as circa 1860. I'd appreciate any information. Thanks, Julie

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Subject: Dena Katzenberg BAQ book From: Julie Silber

Hi again, I can not locate my copy of Dena Katzenberg's book, Baltimore Album Quilts. Any chance someone has one for sale? Thanks, Julie Silber

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Subject: Eveline Foland From: "Louise" 

Hello, I am doing a bit of research on Eveline Foland. I have been trying to locate a copy of the 1984 Uncoverings, but it is out of print. Louise O. Townsend wrote a paper on the KC Star quilt patterns in that issue. If anyone has this and wants to let me know what it says about Eveline, I would appreciate it. I did find out that she illustrated at least one small children's book in 1928 called Little Ninny-Nonny, that was published by P.F. Volland Company of Chicago. Does anyone know if she ilustrated any others? Thanks and best regards, Louise ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Victorian redwork characters From: "Nancy Roberts"

Might they be Thornton Burgess characters? There were embroidery patterns for his Quoddy Quiltie published in newspapers and he wrote stories for children about animals like Peter Rabbit, Reddy Fox, and Joe Otter. I don't know what the turtles are called, but they look like those types of designs. Here is a website with his stories listed. I was unable to find Quoddy Quiltie in a web search. Let us know what you learn, please? Nancy Roberts

http://www.2020site.org/child_calendar/


 



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