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Quilters Find a way to care

Subject: Applique quilts at Vermont show From: "J. G. Row"

A few years ago I learned that someone named Judy Roche was running a quilt study group once a month at an almost local quilt shop. I signed up and began 2 years (or was it 3) of applique and Turkey Red bliss. For each meeting we would be given reading or research assignments and would be invited to bring in examples from our own collections to illustrate the time period, or color, or style under study. Sometimes our assignments were to report back on aspects other than quilting so that we could more easily relate the quilts under study to their times.

But what made the classes so extra special were the quilts that Judy brought as illustration each time -- quilts from her own collection. Once a month she'd lug as many as 10 or more quilts to the shop. It didn't matter what period of the 19th century we were studying -- Judy had examples in depth to share with us.

Now you have an opportunity to see over 40 of the spectacular quilts from Judy's collection at the Vermont Quilt Festival. http://www.vqf.org/exhibits.html If you can possibly get to Vermont you should go. But if travelling to Vermont is impossible for you, you will have 2 more opportunities to view the collection.

Judy has told me that in the 3 coldest winter months selections from her collection will be warming up the Brandywine River Museum in Chadds Ford Pa.!!! http://www.brandywinemuseum.org/index.html They will be there for the months of January, February, and March. (Another field trip for SQSG, for sure.)

After Pennsylvania the quilts will travel to another venue farther west -- much farther west. But since there are no firm dates yet, I won't announce the location . You folks on the west coast should start saving your pennies.

Do you remember how everyone said that we had to see the quilts at the Shelburne when they had their show, because who knew when they could be seen again? You need to see this collection, whether in Vermont or Pennsylvania, or ????. Make the time. Take the trip. What joy these quilts will bring you!

Judy in Ringoes, NJ judygrowpatmedia.net

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Subject: Eagle Quilts From: "Jan Drechsler" <

Around the dates September 4th-5th, 2004, there was a QHL discussion on Eagle quilts with some of our experts such as Lucinda, Xenia, Julia Zgliniec, Pat Cummings and probably others. Search the qhl archive for eagles, eagles and more, and eagles beak. I saved their comments, but don't feel comfortable sending their comments out to qhl again. I also remember a longer discussion than the few I saved, so an archive search may prove fruitful for anyone interested. -- Jan Drechsler NEW E-MAIL ADDRESS: quiltdocadelphia.net

Quilt Restoration; Quilting teacher

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Subject: Uncoverings Issues From: 

Hello to all, I am trying to complete my collection of Uncoverings. I need the issues from 1984 through 1989 and the 1996 issues. If you have extra copies of these or are downsizing your books, please contact me off list at _JLHfwaol.com_ (mailto:JLHfwaol.com) . Thanks, Janet Henderson

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Subject: Eagle Quilts From: "Teddy Pruett" 

The very specific quilts with the four eagles diagonally set on the quilt must have been quite popular. I have had three of them come across my appraisal table in the past few years. A lot of people from Pennsylvania retire here to Florida. I probably know more about Pennsylvania quilts - (and NY and NH and Vt and MA) than I do about southern quilts. Quilts from the north show up on appraisal days in a 10 to 1 ratio over southern quilts. Don't you think that's interesting?? Teddy Pruett in steamy, humid, icky north Florida

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Subject: Eboard for pictures is full From:

I tried to post the pictures of my quilt from Provence which is perhaps from the 1700 - completely corded and backstitched. The best picture is held up to the light where the cording blocks the light, but the light passes through the fabric. There is no batting/wadding, and the cording appears perhaps handspun. Tried to post the first picture and got this message.

Could not save note - This attachment is too large. The total size of all attachments on your eBoard is limited to 20 MB.

If anyone would like me to email pictures, and you think you can help me date the quilt, just let me know.

Kay Triplett

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Subject: Re: Eboard for pictures is full From: "Karen Evans"

My, that's interesting...and it's old, all right. I'm fascinating by the way it looks against the light, and the places where the stuffing has come out. It's certainly been used over the years.

Have you checked the pictures in Kathryn Berenson's book on Provencal quilts? What I can that isn't against the light isn't as densely stuffed/corded as the ones in her book, but I don't have it in front of me right now. But the pattern certainly doesn't look like any 19th century whitework quilt I've seen - maybe late 18th century?

*Definitely* check it against the Berenson book, and see if anyone else on the list can help. It's a great piece - did the seller know anything about it that might help?

I hope this does some good - thanks for showing it to me.

Karen

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Subject: CORRECTION: THACKERAY, NOT TROLLOP From: Gail Ingram

Dear List Members,

Mercy Maude! While going through emails in effort to clear up some space on my server, I reread my own response to a query re home economics classes of days gone by.

First, I realized what a valuable function VINTAGE FABRICS list serves. I bet we all feel better for having the opportunity to unburden ourselves of old grievances. Alas, I know I felt better.

At the time, that is.

Reading it again, I noted that the English teacher alluded to an incident in Trollope's "Vanity Fair."

That would be Wm. Makepeace Thackeray's "Vanity Fair." The incident, of course, occurred when the charity student, feisty little Miss Becky turned and heaved out the window of a departing coach the big fat copy of Samuel Johnson's Dictionary the mistress of the young ladies' school had reluctantly bestowed on her at graduation for her achievements.

I have so little information to contribute to this list that I suppose I can at least be grateful to have given some pleasure to those who knew the difference in Thackeray and Trollope (Thackeray wrote big fat books in one volume; Trollope wrote series of moderate-sized books that had to be read in sequence and so might be seen to have written one really big fat book). It has been my experience that few more universal pleasures exist than to witness an English teacher make a grammatical or syntactical error. I can only hope that having the same soul mix up writers offered at least a degree of that pleasure.

And Joan, that little boat and sea metaphor: I like it!

Gail

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Subject: eboard From: Joan Kiplinger 

I am posting this per discussion with Kris. The eboard does have its ceiling. As part owner of eboard with Kris, I every so often delete old photos which have been posted by the Vintage Fabric list to free up space. If those on this list who have photos more than 3 months old on the eboard would remove them, this will solve the current problem. Also for future postings, it would be helpful to remember this 3-month limitation to assure continued free space.

To delete is very simple: - www.vintagepictures.eboard.com - at top of right screen select post/ edit mode - enter vintage for password - same screen will appear with edit/delete in each box - select your box; click delete; that's it. - or repeat same process and click edit if you wish to change or add to a previous posting

To post photos to eboard: - www.vintagepictures.eboard.com - see Welcome/Directions box - contact Kris or myself if you have any problems

--------------000505050807040106050408--

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Subject: Social Fabric From: 

For all the people who have asked about the availability of Social Fabric, there is a copy available on eBay.

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Subject: Uncoverings issues From: JLHfwaol.com 

Dear Friends, As I posted earlier, I am trying to complete my collection of Uncoverings. Does anyone have an online bookstore that specializes in out of print or older quilt and/or needlework books? Please reply to me off list at _JLHfwaol.com_ (mailto:JLHfwaol.com) . Thanks, Janet

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Subject: Re: Uncoverings issues From: Xenia Cord

Anyone seeking back issues of Uncoverings should turn first to AQSG itself. Many of the issues have been reprinted, although some years remain out of print. Email Executive Director Judy Brott Buss, AQSG2unl.edu.

Xenia

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Subject: Able to post Provence quilt pictures - 1700s? From: Kaytriplet

I was able to post the pictures tonight of the quilt from Provence. Several people (including me) deleted some of their older postings. I am interested in the age of the quilt, and wondering how old it could possibly be. Thanks everyone!

Kay Triplett

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Subject: And for those who love needlework besides quilts.... From: "Karen Evans"

Historic Deerfield is having another symposium in the "In Search of = Origins" series, this time on samplers. Here's the list of speakers:

http://www.historic-deerfield.org/documents/LECTURELIST.pdf

Karen Evans ------=_

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Subject: "Colored Friends" From: Julie Silber

Hi, Julie Silber here. Does anyone know of a group known as "Colored Friends"? I have a signature/fundraiser quilt, circa 1930, with their embroidered name. I am particularly interested in what may be a church related group in Atlanta. I think it may go back to the Civil War, but any information on such a group anywhere at any time would be appreciated. Thanks.

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Subject: Name that Quilt!!! From:

Hi everyone. I'm new to the list and am trying to identify what the heck the pattern is on an antique quilt top a friend purchase in Houston. One blocks are 11" squares of muslin with a strange red and green applique that looks like a football, olive, nut perhaps. Does anyone want to give it a shot? Thanks for any help, Cindy Young, Newark, CA

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Subject: Re: Name that Quilt!!! From: Judy Kelius 

At 12:51 AM 6/14/2005, you wrote: >Hi everyone. I'm new to the list and am trying to identify what the heck >the pattern is on an antique quilt top a friend purchase in Houston. One >blocks are 11" squares of muslin with a strange red and green applique >that looks like a football, olive, nut perhaps. Does anyone want to give >it a shot? Thanks for any help, Cindy Young, Newark, CA

Hi Cindy - welcome! It is hard to know what you are describing without seeing it. Could you post a photo to the eBoard? (Joan Kiplinger just gave the instructions which I am copying here for your convenience: To post photos to eboard: - www.vintagepictures.eboard.com - see Welcome/Directions box - contact Kris or myself if you have any problems)

That said, many applique designs were created by the quiltmakers so it is not always possible to give them a common name or sometimes even identify what they were supposed to represent, if anything <GR>!

- Judy

--=====================_1094703==.ALT--

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Subject: Re: San Antonio From: 

Cinda, I lived in San Antonio 8 years: Go to the River Walk, the Alamo, there are 4 other old missions you can see, the sunken gardens, el marcado, Eat BBQ at Rudy's, if you can get out there. Mexican food at Mi Tiera. Have Fun! Polly Mello

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Subject: textile article From: Crm793aol.com 

I found a really nice article entitled "Chemistry, Star of Fashion!" about the age of the colorists in early 19th century Alsace. It's in a newsmagazine called Chemical Heritage, summer 2005, and is written by Joyce Storey, a professor of textile design at Philadelphia University. Samples of the fabrics and topics about the technique, French taste, the chemical style of printing and support for the industry are included.

This magazine is delivered to our house (husband is retired chemical engineer) and I would not have read it except for the fabric samples on the cover. I don't know where you can get the magazine, maybe in your local library?

Carolyn Miller

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Subject: Re: textile article From: Gail Ingram

> This magazine is delivered to our house (husband is retired chemical > engineer) and I would not have read it except for the fabric samples on the > cover. I > don't know where you can get the magazine, maybe in your local library? > > Carolyn Miller

Oh, Carolyn, don't try to make us believe you aren't over there reading chemical books right and left. <g>

Gail

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Subject: Re: textile article From: "Julia D. Zgliniec"

Dear Carolyn and QHL, Thank you for the notice about this magazine. I googled Chemical Heritage and came up with the web page and instructions for ordering this issue. http://www.chemheritage.org/pubs/pub-nav2-current.html

Regards, Julia Zgliniec

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: June 15, 2005 From:

> Dear Carolyn and QHL, > Thank you for the notice about this magazine. I googled Chemical > Heritage and came up with the web page and instructions for ordering > this issue. > http://www.chemheritage.org/pubs/pub-nav2-current.html > > Regards, > Julia Zgliniec

Thanks Carolyn and Julia. I do read Chemical Engineering magazines when I have time, but didn't know about this one! I just subscribed on their web site. You never know what you will learn at QHL!

Kay Triplett

--part1_19d.35ed148d.2fe2b886_boundary--

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Subject: Hunt Treasures for QHF From: Karen Alexander

Dear QHL Members,  Last year many of you were very generous in donating items for the Quilters Hall of Fame Grand Opening Auction and, due to the generosity of quilters like you, we raised $10,000 for the on-going expenses of QHF: i.e. keeping the Marie Webster House full of rotating exhibits; maintaining the offices and archives of The Quilters Hall of Fame; plus tackling the production costs of our first book. Our call went out two months ago for this year's auction but the response has not been nearly as great as last year, so I am here again to ask if you could go on a treasure hunt in your sewing rooms again to find some items you might once again donate. We are seeking finished quilts of any size, tops of any size, handmade dolls; pieces of fabric from your quilt stashes that we can bundle together; books by our Honorees; quilted or patchwork vests; and whatever else could tickle a quilter's purse to entice her to whip out her check book. You all know exactly what I am talking about, I=B9m sure! So please, dig deep in those closest and sewing rooms and see if you can find a few items to part with and send them to QHF care of Jean Chambers, 406 Gardner Court, Marion, IN 46952-1916. This year's Celebration dates at which Bets Ramsey of Nashville= , TN, will be inducted are July 14-17, with the auction Friday night, July 16= . Check out our website at www.quiltershalloffame.org to see all the exhibits hanging during Celebration. Thank you for all your support of QHF!!  Karen Alexander Press Secretary The Quilters Hall of Fame

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Subject: Name that Quilt! From: c

Hi evryone, I've posted a photo on the eBoard of the quilt I asked about earlier. It is listed as Antique Quilt Top and is has red and green oval shapes about 8" in length appliqued on 11" muslin squares. Thanks for all of the responses I've received so far. Any information about the top is greatly appreciated. Also any suggestions for quilting the top or if it should be left alone, Thanks so much. Cindy Young, Newark CA

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Subject: New book about textile production From: Audrey Cameron

Hi All,

Here is a note about an new book published in Britain. I have not seen it & I am reporting it as it was listed in a magazine British Archaeology July/ August 2005:

The Textile Industry of South West England by Marilyn Palmer & Peter Neaverson ISBN 0752431331 price in English pounds 17.99

The book unites the production of textiles (primarily wool, linen, & silk) with chapters on fabrics, fashion, the fulling mill, the role of the clothiers, workshops & mills, the houses of the workforce, & the current state of the textile industry remains today.

Audrey Cameron in a sunny but still cool Lincolnshire

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Subject: Re: Name that Quilt! From: Judy Kelius 

At 01:54 PM 6/16/2005, you wrote: >Hi evryone, I've posted a photo on the eBoard of the quilt I asked about >earlier. It is listed as Antique Quilt Top and is has red and green oval >shapes about 8" in length appliqued on 11" muslin squares. Thanks for all >of the responses I've received so far. Any information about the top is >greatly appreciated. Also any suggestions for quilting the top or if it >should be left alone, Thanks so much. Cindy Young, Newark CA

Thanks Cindy! That's a fascinating pattern . . . has an "Op-Art" look to it! It was probably the maker's own design - it doesn't look like anything I recognize. There's a lot of disagreement about whether or not to quilt old tops, but personally I think if it is done with designs and materials appropriate to the period (i.e., all cotton), it will probably lengthen the life of the piece. Plus applique quilts are usually strong enough to hold up under the stress of quilting, not always the case with pieced quilts where a lot of printed fabrics were used, especially those weak browns.

 

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Subject: Wowzey wow wow... From: "Candace Perry"

I come into work this morning and my boss had picked up a donation from some of our elderly supporters...well, and what a donation it is! I was, I daresay, hyperventilating (those of you who know me know my enthusiastic nature...) A quilt top, Mosaic/Grandmother's Flower Garden/whatever name you attach to this...could be 1840s but more probably 1850s, wonderful cotton prints (a Prussian blue TO DIE FOR)...mouth-watering, if that is possible. AND...a quilt, a Lone Star with appliqued roses between the points. Same date as the top. Excellent condition. I am beside myself. We often have great late 19th century quilts walk in the door, but rarely something like this -- esp. as a donation. The only small issue with the quilt is that I believe the quilting is later, possibly 20th century. Both pieces come from cnetral Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, around the Worcester Township vicinity. The same donor apparently has a strippy quilt she has not yet given to us, but I will visit her and be appropriately enthusiastic, and it may come our way. Candace Perry Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center Pennsburg, PA www.schwenkfelder.com

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Subject: RE: Hunt treasures for QHL From: "Teddy Pruett"

Karen wrote:

I am >here again to ask if you could go on a treasure hunt in your sewing rooms >again to find some items you might once again donate.>>

Karen, Your note was timely - never, ever hesitate to ask for donations! My studio is brimming - to the point of overruning with junk. I was recently looking at all the wonderful things I thought I had to own or rescue from some dirty little thrift shop. Mary Sorensen does a lecture and shows a quilt or two of mine - and tells people that "My friend Teddy shops in places I would only go with rubber gloves and tongs." Well, that may be a little exaggerted - but I will admit that I keep hand sanitizer in my car, and find the nearest fast food restaurant and go in and wash up to my elbows!!

Now, that being said, aran't yall just dying to own my stuff??? I'll try to find time to pack up some collectables and other goodies. Karen, what is the deadline for getting them there? Teddy Pruett

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Subject: quilt history question From: "Kathy Moore"

All you who are knowledgeable about Pennsylvania history, please dig = deep and help me with this question.

In her book, Stars and Stripes: Patriotic Motifs in American Folk Art, = Deborah Harding makes a comment on page 113 about the Pennsylvania state = motto once having been the word "Dollie". She doesn't cite a source for = the information!

Have any of you ever heard/read this? I need a printed source for this = information. I've done a Google search but the number of mentions was = overwhelming.

Knowing the resourcefulness and penchant you all have for fact finding = I'm hoping you can help me.

I'm looking forward to your answers!!!

Thanks in advance, Kathy Moore Lincoln, NE

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Subject: Re: quilt history question From: "Nancy Gibbs" 

I never heard of that before. The current motto, "Virtue, Liberty and = Independence," was adopted in 1778, so it seems a bit unlikely that = anything else could ever have been a state motto. Possibly a saying of = some sort during the colonial period?? It doesn't make much sense = though. Nancy G. in PA 

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Subject: Re: quilt history question From:

"Dollie"????

Sorry, that doesn't even vaguely possible. I'm agree with Izannah - the Pennsylvania motto and heraldic device were adopted so early that it's difficult to see anything else preceding them.

Karen Evans

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Subject: RE: "Colored Friends" From: 

Have you checked with the local DRA chapter? I would be very interested if you found any information about your quilt also. What does it look like? cindy young, newark ca,

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Subject: Teddy's Treasures heading for QHF! (long) From: Karen Alexander

Teddy, believe me, I would LOVE to see some of your so-called =B3junk= =B2 head for Marion, Indiana! That you want to send some of it to QHF just set= s my checkbook to vibrating already! It would be very helpful if you could have it in Marion at Jean Chamber=B9s home by July 11, but we do manage to find room for things that people arrive with at the last minute in their suitcases, too. Just to repeat myself: dig deep into those closets and sewing rooms, ladies (and gentlemen =AD Holice also has been generous to us!)= , and see if you too can find a few items to part with. (UFOs and unfinished projects are welcome too!) Send them to QHF care of Jean Chambers, 406 Gardner Court, Marion, IN 46952-1916. I hope the MWQSG (Mid-West Quilt Stud= y Group) will once again be out in full force with their checkbooks unsheathed!! Ya=B9all were so GREAT last year at the auction! Weren=B9t there some incredible deals there! This year the MWQSG will hold their meeting in Marion AND be hanging a spectacular exhibit =B3Botanical Beauties=B2 for us consisting of 26 quilts ranging from 1850-1950. To reiterate: This year's Celebration dates at which Bets Ramsey of Nashville, TN, will be inducted are July 14-17, with the auction Friday night, July 16. Some of our events: Merikay is doing her workshop on Kit Quilts (almost sold out) plus a retrospective lecture; Pat Nickols is doing her wonderful workshop on fabric dating; Laurel Horton is doing a FUN workshop that will allow you to take a little bit of fabric history with yo= u to incorporate it in your next quilt, plus a lecture; etc etc. You can download a registration form from our website. We try to balance our seminars with quilt history and =B3how to=B9s=B2 an= d find ourselves somewhere between a MUCH smaller version of a =B3how to=B2 event like Paducah and an AQSG seminar history-oriented seminar. We welcome any input from QHL members, both requests for specific programs to be considere= d as well as exhibits you might like QHF to consider. (By the way, if any other quilt study group out there would like to put an exhibit together for a future QHF Celebration, please feel free to contact me and see what we ca= n work out.)

Karen Alexander

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Subject: "Colored Friends" From: Julie Silber <

Hi Cindy, Thanks for your response and for your interest. "DRA"? What is that? Did you mean "DAR"?

The quilt is a friendship/signature/fundraiser, circa 1930 or 49. It's out of Atlanta, I was told. Lots of individual names, all embroidered. Some with the amount of their donation -- from 10 cents to 50 cents. A few blocks are from church related groups -- "WMU" - " BYUP" - etc. The block in question say "Compliments of Colored Friends."

I am wondering who the "Colored Friends" might be, and if it is some kind of organization. I don't know if the quilt is made by African Americans, or if, perhaps, the quilt is made predominantly by White folks and this block is indeed made their "Colored Friends." I have read some Civil War materails by both African Americans and Whites which use the phrase "colored friends."

I will get some photos of my (way-post-Civil-War) quilt and post them in a few days. Julie Silber

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Subject: RE: "Colored Friends" From: 

Have you checked with the local DRA chapter? I would be very interested if you found any information about your quilt also. What does it look like? cindy young, newark ca,

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: June 18, 2005 From: Loretta Woodard

Kathy--I think maybe you are misreading Deborah's photo caption. I think she is saying that, although we don't know who Dollie was, the motto, "Virtue, Liberty, and Independence" was the original state motto. For those who don't have a copy of this wonderful book, I quote:

"VIRTUE LIBERTY AND INDEPENDENCE" . . . "Dollie" is inscribed in ink in the lower left corner and was once stitched in the upper left corner, but there is no provenance as to who Dollie was or where she lived. However, this phrase was the original state motto for Pennsylvania."

The missing bits between are descriptive details of the pattern and layout for this eagle medallion quilt. The appliqued motto forms an arch above the eagle and "JULY FOURTH/1776" appears below.

> In her book, Stars and Stripes: Patriotic Motifs in American Folk Art, > Deborah Harding makes a comment on page 113 about the Pennsylvania > state > motto once having been the word "Dollie". She doesn't cite a source for > the information! ----- Laurie Woodard Project Director Hawaiian Quilt Research Project PO Box 491 Kailua, HI 96734

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Subject: Re: "Colored Friends" From: Gloria Hanrahan 

Any chance it could be an off shoot of a Quaker group? Did they have any type of African American following post Civil War?

Gloria

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Subject: Fw: "Colored Friends" From: "sue reich" <

Julie and all, I have newsclippings from Ohio about societies of colored quiltmakers. They were called exactly that. The clippings are from the 1930s. I have a houseful of adult children and grandchild visiting but I'll try to dig them out later and post. sue reich

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Thanks Polly. I'm looking forward to entertaining myself while John works (not too hard, I trust). Cinda

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Subject: joke From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2005 11:22:07 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

The one-day, outdoor antique shows that are summer staples in northeastern PA are few and far between on the Eastern Shore (probably because it just too hot). Thanks to Nancy Hahn I discovered one in Delaware, held the Saturday before Father's Day, that always has some fun stuff. Arriving at 9 a.m. when the show opened, I got some goodies yesterday. One of the dealers told me that the real treasures changed hands among the dealers as they were setting up. He asked me "What do three antique dealers do on a desert island?" Answer "Make a living." Cinda happy on the Eastern Shore where it is actually cool enough to turn off the AC and open the windows

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Subject: a mea culpa! From: "Kathy Moore" 

I've received some good information from you all and now realize that I = was misreading Ms. Harding's copy.

In its center, the quilt has the words Virtue, Liberty, and Independence = appliqued in large red calico letters arching over a large red calico = eagle. You can see it on page 113 of her book, Stars and Stripes.

About the quilt Deborah Harding wrote, "'Dollie' is inscribed in ink in = the lower left corner and was once stitched in the upper left corner, = but there is no provenance as to who Dollie was or where she lived. = However, this phrase was the original state motto for Pennsylvania."

I misread and misconstrued what she was alluding to.

My sincere apologies to Deborah Harding and you all. Thank you all for = your forbearance and assistance.

Mea culpa, Kathy Moore

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Subject: QNM From: "Velia Lauerman" <velialivehotmail.com> 

Looking for the info on the QNM out of print and back issues we discussed during the "What to do about old books etc". Someone was donating and needed to get them to some beginning quilter. Need the year 1992 for a series of blocks. Thanks, Velia Lauerman,313-605-2171 108 North St.,Hudson,Mi. 49247-9705,

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Subject: QHL: Signature Quilt Database From: "Susan Wildemuth"

If Nancy Hornback is on the list would she e-mail me privately.

Also if anyone knows the status of the Signature Quilt Database, would you e-mail me privately.

Thanks Sue in Illinois

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Subject: BAQ from Shenandoah Valley From: Karen Alexander

From the auction website:

a 16 blocks featuring chintz, fondu, printed and plain fabrics, techniques include multi-layer and cut-appliqu=E9, along with inked embellishments. Classic Baltimore blocks include Eagle with American flag, shield and liberty cap; open-work basket with lyre and bird; compote featuring watermelon and other fruit; cornucopia wreath with urn and bird holding "Th= e Fountain of Health" banner; heart wreath with butterflies and birds; etc. Inked names include "M J Justin, Balt. Nov. 18, 1845", Mrs. M. A. Bayne, Mary A. Pettecord, Louisa C. Pettecord, plus numerous others. Second quarte= r 19th century. 82" x 84". Excellent as-found condition, minor fabric losses at inkings along with some light staining and discoloration, shows virtuall= y no wear. Estimate: $15,000 - $20,000.

http://www.greenvalleyauctions.com/Auctions/Upcoming/2005JuneLot95.html

No affiliation etc. Just thought you all might like to see this one.

Karen Alexander

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Subject: BAQ from Shenandoah Valley From: RBCochranaol.com 

Karen-- Thanks for posting. It's a beauty. Is it unusual that the quilting goes through the applique? --Rachel

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Subject: Re: Fw: "Colored Friends" From: "JESSICA VAUGHN"

Sue, Being an AA quiltmaker, I would be greatly interested in this info = when you dig it out......

Jessica M. Vaughn Aurora, CO

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: June 20, 2005 From: "Jean Carlton"

Karen wrote: > From the auction website: > > Classic Baltimore > a 16 blocks featuring chintz, fondu, printed and plain fabrics,etc..

Thanks Karen, for alerting us to that one - a delight to see. Will be eager to see what it brings.

Jean Carlton -- (alive and well with some time, at last, to spare......and a back log of posts since December 04 to catch up on....decided to just jump back in now - I may never get to the old ones but I hate to miss anything so can't bear to delete that folder yet!)

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Subject: Re: QNM From: "JESSICA VAUGHN" <vaughn8047msn.com> 

Velia, let me understand your question? Are you looking for back issues = of QNM? Or is there an article that you are looking for "what to do = about old books"? Clarify for me, please. I maybe can help.

Jessica M. Vaughn Aurora, CO vaughn8047msn.com<mailto:vaughn8047msn.com>

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Subject: Quilts at auction in Southern Indiana From: "Cindy Claycamp"

Hi Everyone, Just a quick note to let you all know about a wonderful quilt auction this weekend. I helped catalog 67 quilts from the 1840's thru the 1930's. Several wonderful red-green appliques,a very well done log cabin,lots of 30's pieces. Many have notes on them about the makers,the place purchased,and the prices the collector paid. Two have labels from the Indiana Quilt registry. It was like quilt heaven going through them all by myself...I tried not to droll. They can be seen at www.auctionsandrealestate.com Enjoy!

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Subject: Shelburne Museum From: "Ronda McAllen" 

I am trying to get in touch with someone at the Shelburne Museum who would be able to help with information on a quilt in their collection. I have called and left messages for the textile curator and several other people for the last three months and no one will respond. If anyone knows the secret password would you let me in on it?

Ronda McAllen

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Subject: The Silber-Demeter exhibit Mavericks opens Thursday From: Karen

New England Quilt Museum 18 Shattuck Street Lowell, Massachusetts 01852

Exhibitions and collection Anita Loscalzo, Curator CuratorNEQuiltMuseum.org <mailto:CuratorNEQuiltMuseum.org> 978-452-4207 Ext.11

Museum hours are 10 AM - 4 PM Tuesday - Saturday; and May through December only, Sundays 12 - 4 PM. Admission is $5 for adults, $4 for students/senior citizens; Museum members are admitted free. Handicapped parking is available.

http://www.nequiltmuseum.org/

Thanks

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Subject: a reminder From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net> 

Hi Just a reminder that the Minnesota book of quilts documented in our = state is out (and getting rave reviews so far! :) It's a beautiful = hardback book loaded with great photos, state history and personal = stories. Order it here: http://www.mnquilt.org/

Jean Carlton ------=_

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Subject: From The Alliance for American Quilts From: "Karen Musgrave"

CONTACT:

Karen Musgrave, Marketing and Communications Director

The Alliance for American Quilts

(502) 897-3819 (telephone and fax)

quiltallianceaol.com

http://www.centerforthequilt.org

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

"Quilts 2006" Wall Calendar

Louisville, Kentucky, June 21, 2005- The Alliance for American Quilts has joined with Pomegranate Communications, Inc. to produce a one-of-a-kind calendar. "Quilts 2006" is a high quality wall calendar (opens to 12" x 26") that showcases full-color reproductions of twelve quilts representing the traditional, the antique and the contemporary. In addition, you may read interviews by the contemporary quiltmakers featured in the "Quilts 2006" calendar, as well as hundreds of other interviews of quiltmakers, at Quilters' S.O.S. - Save Our Stories (www.centerforthequilt.org), the Alliance's extensive oral history project.

The calendar retails for $13.99. However, The Alliance is offering its members a special on the calendar. This special discount offer allows members to purchase calendars for $6.99 each (limit 2 at this price) plus shipping and handling (plus 6% sales tax for KY residents). Please allow 15 business days for delivery. For information concerning membership or purchasing the calendar, visit www.centerforthequilt.org.

Pomegranate works in association with the world's great museums, galleries and art resources to achieve the highest possible quality in reproduction and presentation. The Alliance is excited to announce that, based on projected sales of the 2006 calendar, Pomegranate has already asked The Alliance to participate with them to produce a 2007 calendar!

The Center for the Quilt Online shares incredible, FREE resources with everyone who cares about quilts. At The Center for the Quilt Online, you can find:

. Quilt Query-Experts from our incredible board,-including Marsha MacDowell, Penny McMorris, Yvonne Porcella, Julie Silber, Merikay Waldvogel, Janice Wass, and

Shelly Zegart-will answer your questions about quilts, including care, display, history, restoration, and evaluation.

. Quilters' S.O.S. - Save Our Stories-The Alliance's extensive oral history project, with hundreds of in-depth interviews with quiltmakers across the U.S.

. Quilt Treasures-Documentary web portraits of key figures in the great 20th century Quilt Revival-including Virginia Avery, Cuesta Benberry, Jinny Beyer, Jean Ray Laury, Bonnie Leman, and Yvonne Porcella.

. The Quilt Index-A growing digital reference library, with searchable information and

photographs of thousands of historic and contemporary quilts

. Boxes Under the Bed T-A national project to ensure the preservation of historic

quilt related materials, such as patterns, letters, and clippings from publications

. Special Features-Film clips from "The Quilts of Gee's Bend," "Hearts and Hands," and "Quilts in Women's Lives."

. H-Quilt-The lively internet discussion forum.

The Alliance for American Quilts, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization, implements its projects in partnership with institutions and organizations nationally, including three regional centers- the Center for American Material Culture Studies at the University of Delaware, the Great Lakes Quilt Center at the Michigan State University Museum, and the Center for American History at the University of Texas. Other Alliance partners include the Library of Congress American Folklife Center, and MATRIX, the Center for Humane Arts, Letters and Social Sciences Online.

For more information contact:

Karen Musgrave, Marketing and Communications Director

The Alliance for American Quilts

(502) 897-3819 (telephone and fax)

quiltallianceaol.com

http://www.centerforthequilt.org

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Subject: Sharon Newman From: Gail Ingram <gingramtcainternet.com>

I did not know Sharon Newman personally, although I have a number of friends who attribute their best quiltmaking skills to her instruction. And for some reason, she appears to have touched both their minds and their hearts.

I myself had only a brief correspondence with her, regarding the Deep South Quilt Study Group and a question I had asked onlist. At that time, I was touched deeply by what appeared to have been an uncanny coincidence of misfortune under which she was laboring. That conversation has haunted me ever since, for I knew so many who had learned so much from her and it seemed sad that she could not be made more unaware of their gratitude.

Would anyone like to join me in making a donation to the AQSG scholarship fund in Sharon's name? Individually, our donations might be small, but collectively, they would help promote the study of quiltmaking.

If anyone is interested, please contact me off-list.

Gail Ingram

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Subject: Sharon Newman From: OzarkQuiltmakeraol.com Date

Hi:

I'm not sure if my original post to this list went through so I thought a better send in again. It read as follows:

Hi Everyone:

Sharon Newman passed away last Friday after a brief hospitalization for a reoccurrence of cancer. Sharon was from Lubbock, Texas and owned a quilt shop there for 20 years. She was an author, teacher and AQS Appraiser. I had taken quilt history and appraisal classes from Sharon and learned so much from her. Her ability to identify quilt patterns and date fabrics always amazed me. I don't have an address to send condolences to her children but if I do learn that information, I will post it to the list.

Kathy Kansier Teacher, Judge & AQS Appraiser Ozark, Missouri

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Subject: FW: [vintagefabrics] Sharon Newman From: Gail Ingram

Several have asked about my post re Sharon Newman. This post appeared on Vintage Fabrics List:

Hi Everyone:=20 =20 Sharon Newman passed away last Friday after a brief hospitalization for a reoccurrence of cancer. Sharon was from Lubbock, Texas and owned a quilt shop there for 20 years. She was an author, teacher and AQS Appraiser. I had taken quilt history and appraisal classes from Sharon and learned so much from her. Her ability to identify quilt patterns and date fabrics always amazed me. I don't have an address to send condolences to her children but if I do learn that information, I will post it to the list. =20 Kathy Kansier Teacher, Judge & AQS Appraiser Ozark, Missouri www.kathykansier.com <http://www.kathykansier.com/> --------------------------------

Anyone who wishes to join me in making a donation to AQSG scholarship fund in memory of Sharon, please notify me of your intentions so I can know when everyone has donated who wishes to donate.

Please make checks to AQSG and memo =B3scholarship fund.=B2 That way, you get tax credit, AQSG gets gift, and there is no danger of my absconding with th= e donations.

I will collect checks, write letter to AQSG, find who in family should be notified and include that in AQSG.

I apologize for not including the above post. I paid no attention to fact i= t was posted to Vintage Fabric, not Qhilt History list.

Gail Ingram

--B_3202447895_247626--

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Subject: FVF Picnic (long) From: "Lucinda Cawley" 

It was a picnic even if we were inside and the food was yummy. It amazes me how much wonderful stuff this group comes up with. Wednesday seemed like "chintz day" with many early quilts to drool over. Nancy Hahn, our source for all things British, was home again with copies of "Through the Needle's Eye." (Nancy, of course, was greeted by the age-old question "What is Sally Ward really like?") 

We saw a couple of pieces that would fit nicely into the York Castle Museum collection. On pp. 12-13 is a bedcover that looks very much like a large piece of linen (no seams) with a crochet edge (maybe a Victorian tablecloth?) decorated with early chintz appliqués of Arabs, exotic birds, monkeys, lions with an oval medallion in the center. There were a number of quilts that elicited comments that many of the fabrics were not quite what we expected (for instance, a top of 6-point Stars c. 1830), could they be English? Yes, I think they well could be. 

Nancy showed us a linen framed center quilt (1810) which we know was made in England, no batt (I guess I should say wadding) but quilted. There was a most unusual quilt, c. 1880, made to look like the old-fashioned photo albums (the kind with the tabs at each corner). In the center of each block fabric was fussy cut to look like a photo image of a woman. It was a good day for baby quilts: a nautical theme from the 1940s in red, white and blue with little animals in sailor suits (very cute), a Snow White crib cover and pillowcase, a feedsack with animal shapes quilted in, a very early (1810?), very English looking baby quilt from VA, tiny Ocean Waves c. 1860 and a fabulous, like-new double sided 1840s Four Patch and Random Patch. 

A lovely Nine Patch variation from the 1830s had a brown and pink chintz border of roses and carnations. My 1840 crazy pieced diamonds set in zigzag strips with it's great earlier chintz border got an enthusiastic reception (I had made an emergency "tell me what to do call" to Hazel Carter before buying it). The prize for elegance goes to an 1840s Orange Peel made of a single lovely blue and pink floral chintz and white. Also from the 1840s was a Long Island Strippy of large squares on point (love to see big chunks of early fabrics). 

We saw two c. 1900 Mennonite dresses: one grey and one black. An incredible Lone Star from southeastern PA in brown, orange, green and double pink (c. 1870) came out of Barb Garrett's fabled attic. We saw an Amish sheet and pillowcase set beautifully embroidered "Annie King" from Intercourse, Lancaster, Co. and five (count them 5) Amish scissors holders. Suzanne Cawley immediately produced hers and scolded me for not bringing my scissors holder. She was somewhat mollified when I confessed that I had just bought a second one last weekend. 

Suzanne, Barb and I share a weakness for the bizarre. There was an Amish Irish Chain (peacock blue and bright pink) with great quilting, a lovely fine wool crepe probably 1930s. Also unmistakably PA was an 1850s Whig Rose with an appliquéd vine border: turkey red, double pink, poison green on a double blue background--all the bells and whistles. 

The 20th century was represented by a Grandmother's Flower Garden with lots of Disney fabric--busy, busy, busy with no paths between the flowers, a white quilt with a lovely inner border of green and yellow appliquéd morning glories, a red, white and blue version of Ruby McKim's colonial history embroidered blocks. 

I started with the off-beat Photo Album quilt and I'll end (although there was a lot more we looked at) with the Parcheesi Board quilt. It was predominantly red with green bars and squares very like the game board (maybe 1890)-curious. Cinda on the Eastern Shore getting ready to go to Texas tomorrow


 



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